This is a floating closed javascript menu.
Menu


Interstate Shield

Interstate 5

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

Rte 5From the international boundary near Tijuana to the Oregon state line via National City, San Diego, Los Angeles, the westerly side of the San Joaquin Valley, Sacramento, and Yreka; also passing near Santa Ana, Glendale, Woodland, and Red Bluff.

Suffixed Routings Suffixed Routings

Originally, there was also an I-5W. This routing dates back to the original definition of I-5 in 1947. At that time, I-5 was defined to run along the present-day Route 99 routing from N of Los Angeles to Sacramento. I-5W was proposed to run along a routing that corresponds to present-day Route 132, I-580, I-80, and I-505 (although it was only signed E of I-80 to near Piedmont). US 50 was multiplexed on the I-580 section. The route was resigned to the present-day route numbers in 1964 as part of the regularization of state and legislative route numbers. Note that the CalTrans history shows that I-505 and I-580 were approved as interstate in 1947 but proposed as I-5W (as well as some other numbers), and renumbered in 1964. One issue of California Highways and Public Works has a picture showing an I-5W shield on a segment of present-day I-580.

Note that it appears the original 1947 Interstate route submission had I-5W running to Modesto along LRN 110, now the portion of I-580 from the I-580/I-205 split to near Vernalis, and then along Route 132 to Modesto. By the 1958 submission and approval, this routing has been truncated to "Near Tracy". This appears still to be the portion of I-580 near Vernalis, although some maps appear to show it going straight to Tracy (potentially I-205's routing). But as I-205 was submitted separately at that time, and nothing was constructed, it appears the desire was the I-580 routing.

A proposal unearthed by Richard Moeur from the AASHTO files indicates that, at least in 1957 and 1958, there was at least a proposal for an I-5E. These proposal had I-5 running along the traditional alignment (Route 99 in 1957; "Westerly Alignment" in 1958) until either Modesto (1957) or Tracy (1958). The route then split, with I-5W going off as described above, and I-5E continuing along present Route 99 (1957)/I-5 (1958) into Sacramento. Evidently, AASHTO liked the routings, but didn't like I-5E, because that was never signed.

Over on AAroads, Scott Parker provided significant history of the suffixed routing in a number of posts (combined below):
(Scott Parker (Sparker) at AAroads, 7/12/2016, 8/9/2016, 8/10/2016, 8/24/2016; Joe Rouse at AAroads, 8/12/2016)

The original I-5E/I-5W split was, designation-wise, more of a political decision than one made at the planning level. The 48,300 mile Interstate plan was one of the earlier more extensive plans to be proffered; the immediate postwar years under the Truman administration saw the Interstate concept opened up for input and comment from various states; the composite of what was proposed by 1952 was similar in scope to that "48.3" plan, but with about 900 less total miles; but one consistent similarity was two routes planned between L.A. and Northern California, one along US 101 and the other following US 99. When the plans were retrenched to (more or less) the original MacDonald plan of '44, featuring a little under 40K miles, by the incoming Eisenhower administration in 1953, the US 101-based route was again eliminated from consideration. Prior to 1958 there was a connector from US 99 in Modesto to Oakland via Route 132, a new-terrain route extending Route 132 northwest from its terminus at Route 33 to Altamont Pass, and thence west along US 50 to the east end of the Bay Bridge. The original number proposed for that route was I–72, but complaints began rolling in from Bay Area political figures that such a designation didn't place the region on the Interstate north-south grid. Thus, when the first "final" sets of numbers were established in 1958, the I-5E/I-5W concept was put into place -- which would, of course, require a substantial multiplex from Emeryville to Vacaville (about 48 miles) with I-80.

In 1963 the Division of Highways issued the "one road/one number" credo that instigated the vast 1964 renumbering effort, and the shift away from I-5E/I-5W began. The multiplex with I-80 would have stretched approximately 48 miles, from the present I-80/I-580/I-880 interchange in Emeryville north and northeast across the Carquinez Bridges to Vacaville, where I-5W would have turned north along LRN 90, which, despite its longstanding use as a connector to north US 99W, had never received signage; the basic alignment is today's I-505. Not wanting to cosign I-5W and I-80 for that distance, the Division, after exploring several numbering permutations, settled on I-580 for the Oakland-Tracy segment and I-505 for Vacaville-Dunnigan. Except for short sections of freeway at the junctions of Route 128 and Route 16, I-505 remained largely a 2-lane road for several years after its designation. Expansion to a full freeway began in the mid-70's; it was completed circa 1980. Prior to completion the road was signed as "Temporary I-505"; this signage extended to BGS's on I-80 and I-5.

Along today's I-580, I-5W shields were indeed deployed from the Emeryville interchange east along the MacArthur Freeway, at the time co-signed with US 50. That initial section of I-5W only extended for a few miles east to Grand Ave. in eastern Oakland; it was the only stretch to receive signage as 5W. I-580 signage was applied to that segment in early 1964 and further east as the freeway was completed. Aside from that original stretch of the MacArthur Freeway between the first "Distribution Structure" and Grand Ave., there were no other I-5W shields posted in the field. Despite being technically multiplexed along I-80 for 48 miles north from Oakland, no I-5W reassurance shields were ever posted along that route; the only mention of 5W was on the approach BGS's from I-80 -- and those lasted about as long as the shield shown in the pictures. There is one legacy, however, from the I-5W signage: if you have ever looked at the post miles on I-580, you might notice that they actually decrease as you head eastbound, rather than increase (the exit numbers increase, as expected). The I-80 interchange with the northern independent section of I-5W wasn't constructed until 1965, a year after the number change to I-505 occurred.

At that point (1960) the routing of (then) I-5E was still TBD; the Division of Highways was trying to juggle the desire of Sacramento interests who didn't want the freeway coming through the downtown district (which was then planned for renovation [read gentrification!]), so I-5E was tentatively routed through West Sacramento, which had little political clout to oppose the routing. But because of the location of the Yolo Bypass flood-control facility to the west, which north of Broderick was separated from the Sacramento River itself only by the levee on which Route 16 and the Sacramento Northern railroad tracks were located, a West Sacramento routing would have meant three separate high-level crossings of the navigable Sacramento River -- a very expensive proposition. In addition, the Division was trying to find a route between Sacramento and Stockton that was feasible to construct -- a problem because that area was mostly marshland immediately east of the Sacramento Delta. The route preliminarily adjudged the most feasible followed the Western Pacific RR tracks, which were in turn closely followed by Franklin Blvd. (County Sign Route J8). That is the road that Rand McNally utilized as the place to plop down the I-5E shield west of Lodi. Eventually the constructed I-5 alignment did closely follow County Sign Route J8 north of Stockton, but veered slightly west north of Route 12 before turning north again; this was to avoid the taking of valuable grape-growing tracts in the area (mostly table grapes then; now Lodi has evolved into a recognized wine-grape growing district), a politically charged phenomenon then as it would be today.

By 1964, I-5E (none of which had been constructed at the time) gave way to mainline I-5 via Sacramento. Additionally, by this time anti-freeway grumblings were beginning to be heard from San Francisco and other Bay locations; the concept of the Bay Area being located on a major north-south Interstate axis was no longer of any importance.

The first section of I-5 to be completed in the Sacramento area was the E-W segment west of El Centro Ave. (Route 99); 2 lanes of the eventual 4 (2 + 2) were constructed between El Centro and Garden Highway (at the Sacramento River) and opened to traffic in early 1967. These became the eventual I-5 northbound lanes; the southbound side was grubbed by that time; grading & paving came later. The initial berms for the Sacramento River bridge were under construction at that time as well. As the Sacramento airport was also under construction immediately to the north, this initial 2-lane segment served as a construction access road to the airport site. It saw little traffic until I-5 was completed both north and south of the segment.

Temporary I-5 signage existed, at one point, along Route 99. This signage is discussed on the Route 99 page. Over on AAroads, Scott Parker (Sparker) provided the following summary of Temporary I-5 signage:
(Ref: Scott Parker (Sparker) on AAroads, 10/16/2016)

Temporary I-5 was signed, from 1972 to about 1976, from the present Charter Way (Route 4 WB) interchange in Stockton, east along Route 4 to Route 26 (old US 50), on Route 26 east to Route 99, then north on Route 99 north to I-80 (now Business Route 80/US 50) at the Oak Park interchange in Sacramento. From there it was signed west on I-80 to Route 113, then north on Route 113 to Route 16, which at that time remained on its original E-W route through downtown Woodland. It turned west on Route 16 to the old US 99W alignment northward to the present I-5 alignment (this currently is the eastern end of the western segment of Route 16), where it veered northwest along old US 99W, which was gradually being supplanted by I-5. The reason why Temporary I-5 was not routed from Sacramento to Woodland along Route 16, the most direct route and the one closest to the nascent I-5 alignment was the same as that of the original US 99W: Route 16 traversed the Yolo Bypass flood-control facility at ground level and was inundated during heavy rains, when the weirs along the Sacramento River were opened to avoid overflow in Sacramento. I-80, and US 40/US 99W before it, crossed the Bypass on a bridge structure, so it remained open even when the bypass was flooded. After 1976, when the I-5 bridge over the Bypass opened, completing that route north of Sacramento, the temporary section was truncated back to the (then) I-5/I-80 interchange in Sacramento, using Route 99 via Lodi until I-5 was opened between Stockton and Sacramento in 1981.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, the routing was defined by Chapter 385 as "Route 5 is from the international boundary near Tijuana to the Oregon state line via National City, San Diego, Los Angeles, a point on Route 99 south of Bakersfield, the westerly side of the San Joaquín Valley, and via Yreka; also passing near Santa Ana, Norwalk, Elysian Park in Los Angeles, Glendale, Woodland, and Red Bluff. That portion between Route 99 south of Bakersfield and Route 113 near Woodland may include all or portions of any existing state highway route or routes." The routing was simplified in 1984 (Chapter 409) to the present "Route 5 is from the international boundary near Tijuana to the Oregon state line via National City, San Diego, Los Angeles, the westerly side of the San Joaquín Valley, Sacramento, and Yreka; also passing near Santa Ana, Glendale, Woodland, and Red Bluff."

San Diego County

In San Diego, the "Montgomery" Freeway portion of I-5 was built for US 101 and existed before I-5, as part of US 101. When the San Clemente section of I-5 was finished, it was connected to the rest of the "San Diego" Freeway, which was connected to the "Montgomery". The Montgomery was then updated to be to Interstate standard. When the San Clemente section was finished, US 101 was multiplexed to San Diego. At the time, the section of I-5 from I-8 to Mission Bay Dr. was not finished, so the rest of US 101 from the northern end of the Montgomery to Mission Bay was part of US 101. When I-5 was finished there, US 101 was decommissioned south of the East Los Angeles Split (the present-day US 101/I-5 junction).

In Oceanside, US 101 (I-5) previously ran along Hill Street.

Orange County

In San Clemente, there are records of battles when the route was built through the town. With apparently little local protest, the freeway was cut through the heart of San Clemente. The route resulted in deep cuts through local hills and the destruction of a large reservoir. The huge demand for a better road between Santa Ana and San Diego outweighed concerns expressed by local environmentalists, and even the brass at Camp Pendleton agreed. Between 1958 and 1960, bulldozers scraped the pathway. As they were about to rip out several stately palm trees, local nursery owner Bob Carrick, Sr. convinced the crew to allow him to dig up the trees for transplanting in town. Those trees are still there to see in the median strip of Esplanade. Today the I-5 corridor basically cuts San Clemente in two. Most local leaders agree the road should have been located east of town.
(Source: San Clemente Journal, 11/15/2019)

Interstate Shield According to a book on the history of Buena Park, there was a debate regarding the routing of Route 5 through Buena Park. Apparently there were three proposed routes each of which were established as temporary highways while the freeway was being planned, and there was even a AAA map published that showed all three routes. Apparently one route was the site of the original El Camino Real Highway, which thru Orange County went up roughly what is now Route 57, and then went west on La Habra Blvd. Knotts Berry Farm, which was then the Amusement Park as this was pre-Disneyland, wanted the route that went up Beach Blvd, Route 39. Buena Park, itself, did not want to be divided by a freeway and was opting for the Manchester route which is the current route.
[Thanks to David Whiteman for this information.]

One map shows that, by 1953, the freeway portion of US 101 (now I-5) south of 1965 Route 245 had been constructed.

Los Angeles County

The history of the East LA Interchange, where US 101, I-10, I-5, and Route 60 come together, is discussed with US 101.

In the historic downtown Los Angeles community of Boyle Heights, full of Craftsman bungalows and Victorian homes, city planners saw fit to run a stretch of I-5 right through Hollenbeck Park in 1960 (despite a petition against it bearing an estimated 15,000 signatures and the dissent of then Councilman Edward Roybal). Hollenbeck originally includes a lovely lagoon ringed by trees. That lagoon now has a freeway running through it.
(Source: LA Times, 8/10/2015)

Scott Parker (Sparker) provided more history of the construction of the Golden State Freeway (the portion of I-5 N of the East LA interchange):
(Source: Scott Parker (Sparker) at AAroads, 8/23/2016)

The first section of the Golden State Freeway (eventual I-5) to be constructed and opened was between Riverside Drive near the L.A. Zoo in Griffith Park and Alameda Ave. in Burbank; that was opened in early 1957. By the end of that year it had been extended south to between Glendale Blvd. and Los Feliz Blvd, using temporary ramps to empty out onto Riverside Drive. Included in that segment was the Colorado Blvd. extension (part of LRN 161/Route 134). By mid-1958 US 99/US 6 had been rerouted onto the freeway using the Colorado extension (an arrangement that lasted for about 3 years). Northbound, US 99/US 6 remained on San Fernando Road (the original alignment) to the Colorado extension, then used that extension to the freeway mainline. It went north on the freeway to Alameda, where it turned west with Route 134 to Victory Blvd. At Victory Blvd. the temporary routing turned north, using that street to the "Five Point" intersection of Victory Blvd., Burbank Blvd., and Victory Place. While Victory Blvd. turned due west at that intersection, the US 99/US 6 temporary routing continued north on Victory Place, which merged with the original San Fernando Road alignment east of Lockheed (now Hollywood/Burbank) airport. This rerouting was necessary because northward construction on the Golden State Freeway used the alignment of Front Street, the former route, in central Burbank; the street was demolished in late 1957 to make room for the freeway, which was opened to traffic as far north as Burbank Blvd. in the spring of 1959.

The segment along Riverside Drive, which included the Route 2/Glendale Freeway interchange, was opened to traffic in the spring of 1961; southbound, it emptied all US 99/US 6 traffic onto the southbound Pasadena Freeway over the present ramp system bordering Elysian Park. The first Golden State Freeway section to actually receive I-5 signage, between Broadway on the north and Boyle St. on the south (near Hollenbeck Lake, just north of Wilshire Blvd., and including the San Bernardino Freeway interchange), had opened in early 1960, with the I-5 ramps to the southbound Santa Ana Freeway (US 101) opening a year later. The final section, between Broadway and just north of the Pasadena Freeway (including the interchange with that freeway, then US 66, and the L.A. river bridge) opened in late 1962.

North of Burbank, the segment between Burbank Blvd. and Lankershim Blvd. in Sun Valley opened in the spring of 1961, extending north to Van Nuys Blvd. in early 1963 (this section included the inital ramps to the planned Hollywood Freeway -- originally intended to be part of US 6, but, after the '64 renumbering, becoming Route 170). The final I-5 segment between Van Nuys Blvd. and the existing Golden State Freeway alignment north of Sylmar was opened to traffic in the fall of 1963, essentially finishing the freeway from its inception at the E.L.A. interchange to the point where it departed the San Fernando Valley.

On I-5 south at Route 118 there's a section of a bridge just before Paxton where it looks like the exit for Paxton originally went before Route 118 was built. It's an extra lane on the right with the original round rails but a little bump of concrete has been put down to kind of block off that lane.

Newhall Pass and the Grapevine

US Highway Shield The truck route for the current I-5 near Newhall Pass is from 1954 (when the route was still US 99). At the point where the truck routes cross Sierra Highway, there is an old tunnel similar to the one on the truck routes today. Its about half-filled with dirt and is open on one side. You can even see where the lights used to be. It was an undercrossing for an onramp that no longer exists connecting southbound Sierra Highway with southbound I-5 or US 99.

New Newhall RoutingMore specifically, the history of the "truck route" in this area is as follows: The original "road" was the railroad, which still goes through the tunnel built in 1875. The surface roads were pretty primitive in those days, with a mere dirt path going through Beale's Cut less than a mile north. That road was improved in stages, and became San Fernando Road, running continuously from LA all the way up into Newhall. The road NW to Castaic Junction was extended in 1915 along the Ridge Route, connecting LA to the Central Valley. When the roads got numbered in the 1930s, the road NW became US 99 (and the Ridge Route was bypassed by a new divided highway), and the road NE got the US 6 designation, but was renamed the Sierra Highway, which is why there is now a disjoint section of San Fernando Road up in Newhall. This was also Route 7. At this time, all the traffic was going through the old Newhall Tunnel. This tunnel was constructed in 1910, and was only 17' 5" wide, and accommodated two lanes of traffic. In 1928-1929, to alleviate traffic in this tunnel, the state constructed a bypass route along Weldon Canyon. This diverted the traffic going N to Sacramento and the San Joaquin Valley. However, the tunnel remained a bottleneck. In the late 1930s, a project called the Mint Canyon Short Cut was started. This process involved creating a divided road, and completely eliminating the tunnel by excavating and opening the top. The purpose of the Mint Canyon Short Cut was to carry the US 6/Route 7 traffic. This project also involved some rerouting of the end of Foothill Blvd. At some point, US 99 in the Sylmar area was rebuilt again as a divided highway next to "The Old Road", and its interchange with Sierra Highway was rebuilt as a three-level structure, with a short tunnel to carry southbound US 6. You can still find a bit of that tunnel on the ground, but it is mostly filled in with dirt. US 99 became I-5 officially in 1964, and US 6 became Route 14. Through the 60s, the Sierra Highway was gradually replaced by a freeway following a different alignment; the freeway construction started in the Antelope Valley and worked its way south. This project was finally completed in 1971 when the old I-5 (US 99) was redefined as truck lanes, the side of the hill was carved away, and new auto lanes were built, including the connection to the new Route 14 freeway. This involved eliminating most of the connectivity to Sierra Highway. This interchange still shows signs of the plans to continue Route 14 S. Half way through this construction, the Sylmar earthquake hit, and knocked a lot of the flyover ramps down, delaying the completion of the project. Similar damage happened in 1994.

Note: Tom Fearer has done detailed research into all the varients of the Ridge Route / Grapevine routings, and has extensive maps and such on his blog: Legend of the Ridge Route; a history of crossing the mountains between the Los Angeles Basin and San Joaquin Valley from wagon trails to Interstates.

In the Santa Clarita area, I-5 was built in segments: Castaic to Castaic Junction - 1967. Castaic Junction to Saugus Junction - 1964, Saugus Junction to Calgrove Blvd - 1968. Calgrove Blvd to the top of Weldon Summit - 1967.
(Ref: Michael Ballard on AARoads, 9/18/2016)

Often, folks ask about the famous "French Switch", where the two sides of I-5 swap which side of the road they are on. This occurs to give southbound - downhill - traffic a gentler descent so as to reduce the incidence of trucks losing their brakes. The uphill lanes are curvier and much steeper, as they follow the previous route of US 99/Golden State Highway. Uphill traffic stays on the valley floor until it reaches the base of the mountains, then takes a path through the canyons as it travels to the top of the first major set of hills. Downhill traffic takes a nearly straight constant-grade path that doesn't come down to the valley floor until nearly a mile south of the point where northbound leaves the valley floor.

Some pictures of the former bridges in Piru Gorge can be seen here. A nice article on the history of the Ridge Route may be found on the KCET Website. There's also a Ridge Route Preservation Organization website.

In 2013, it was reported that volunteers had been attempting to maintain the original Ridge Route roadway, and were running into resistance from the US Forest Service, which technically owns the two-lane road that was created by horse-drawn scrapers in 1914 across ridge tops dotting the Sierra Pelona mountain range north of Castaic. The Forest Service closed the 20-foot-wide road to the public in 2005 after heavy rains washed out parts of it. Federal officials later spent millions of dollars to repair the damage and repave 1½ miles of the road. It is now passable, although some areas remain unpaved because of pipeline relocation projects conducted by petroleum and gas companies whose lines run parallel to the road. The Forest Service also will not allow members of the nonprofit Ridge Route Preservation Organization to use mechanized equipment to clean out culverts and remove rocks that occasionally tumble onto the roadway, and have balked at designating the road a National Forest Scenic Byway. The organization, as of 2013, was sitll using shovels and wheelbarrows to clean out drains. The volunteers also use sledgehammers to break up steamer-trunk-sized boulders that sometimes fall onto the road where it slices through a steep ridge at a place called Swede's Cut. The Forest Service has indicated the roadway might reopen to the public later in 2013 after the utility companies undertake a $10-million slope-shoring project that will protect both their pipelines and the pavement at Osito Canyon, near the road's halfway point.
(Source: Los Angeles Times, 1/13/2013)

In 2016, there was another update on the volunteers maintaining the original Ridge Route, and why it may never be reopened again. Opened in 1915, and credited by historians with uniting the economies of Northern and Southern California, the notoriously slow and dangerous roadway had been superseded in 1933 by Route 99, itself to be replaced in 1970 by I-5. Harrison Scott first met the roadway in 1955, but did not return to the route until exploring it again in 1991, this time on a road trip with his son. After Route 99 bypassed it, the Ridge Route began losing its businesses. The cafes and gas stations were gradually shuttered, many of them in the 1940s and '50s. Sandberg's was destroyed in a 1961 fire. The once-grand but fading Hotel Lebec was torn down three years later. The Gorman Hotel was demolished in 1972. Working with government officials, Scott succeeded in 1997 in getting the highway listed on the National Register of Historic Places. He wrote a book about the road, formed the nonprofit Ridge Route Preservation Organization to raise funds to maintain it, and organized volunteer work crews to ensure it was safe for driving, biking and hiking. He hoped to have the route named a National Scenic Byway, like the Blue Ridge Parkway in the Appalachians, or the Natchez Trace Parkway, which runs through Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee. That would have qualified the Ridge Route for federal money, Scott said, for signage, guardrails, vista pullouts and other improvements. But Scott gradually found his proposal snarled in red tape. In 2005, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors elected to vacate the Ridge Route, giving up their control of the mountain motorway and ceding stewardship to the U.S. Forest Service, over whose land the road had always traveled. Massive rainstorms in 2005 forced the Ridge Route's closure. The Forest Service, without sufficient funds to repair storm damage to the road, erected huge metal gateways, and shut off access to all but the utilities and energy companies whose gas pipes or power lines still follow the Ridge Route. Worse, the transfer of control of the roadway also relinquished easements onto it. Suddenly, access to the northern and southern ends of the Ridge Route, already gated, was in the hands of homeowners. Today, the stalemate continues. The Forest Service confirmed that it had given up the easements in question, and that the public Ridge Route is now landlocked by private citizens. The southern gate to the roadway is a 12.5-acre parcel owned by retired graphic artist Greg Olson, who said he has lived on the property for 26 years. Olson said he had several conversations with Forest Service officials and Scott's Ridge Route Preservation Organization about granting right of passage, and was prepared to give it to them free of charge. But those conversations ended in 2008 and never resumed. Olson, who has plans to develop the property, is no longer willing to reopen the road to full-time traffic. Today, Scott, as founder of the Ridge Route nonprofit, is one of only a few private citizens with keys to the gates that block the historic roadway.
(Source: LA Times, 5/2/2016)

Kern County and the Westerly Routing

Scott Parker on AARoads explained by I-5 uses a right exit at the southern junction with Route 99:
(Source: Sparker on AARoads, "Re: Interstate 5", 6/22/2019)

That was one of the earlier 6+ lane sections of US 99, dating from about 1962; as the I-5/Westside alignment had been adopted several years earlier and the interchange location had been finalized, it was decided that it was not worth the effort to tear up the existing alignment just to place the I-5 divergence on the left side of the NB carriageway. In addition, it was calculated that it would be safer to diverge I-5's truck traffic from the right side rather than require them to merge to the left -- particularly as they were (and are) on a relatively steep downgrade at the interchange's location. So along with the 6-lane upgrading of former US 99, the initial berm to carry the I-5 diverging ramp was simultaneously constructed. Southbound, that steep gradient eventually caused problems with slow trucks SB from Route 99 interfering with a "clean" merge from I-5; the present separation of truck lanes from auto lanes was subsequently implemented (this also helped with Route 99 trucks accessing the Grapevine scales).

Many ask why the Westerly routing in the San Joaquin Valley was constructed. One poster on MTR noted that in 1965 or thereabouts, in response to a legislative request, the then California Division of Highways prepared a report on the effect of the Interstate system on California highway development. One important point noted in this report was that although both I-5 and Route 99 were planned for eventual development as freeways, I-5 had received artificially higher priority over Route 99 because it was funded as an Interstate and so attracted federal completion deadlines. This in turn meant that more resources were being devoted to I-5 even though it was projected to be far less busy than Route 99. This might imply that the Division had had the decision to build I-5 on an independent alignment wished on it—possibly by the Legislature, the Highway Commission, or even the B.P.R.—and would rather have chased the traffic on Route 99, possibly by building it as an Interstate, while leaving the facility now known as I-5 to be developed as a western relief route at some point in the relatively distant future.

Scott Parker (Sparker) at AARoads provided a nice explanation for the delay in completion of I-5 between Stockton and Sacramento on 7/17/2016:

The reason for the delay in the completion of [this segment] was largely due to the fact that the ground along the alignment was highly unstable, the routing essentially lying along the eastern fringe of the Sacramento River delta. Grading that sunk hours after being completed was more common than not along this section; there was a lot of fill involved, often with rocks and rip-rap trucked in from other projects. One section, between Route 12 and San Joaquin County Sign Route E13 (the western non-state extension of Route 104 west from the Galt area) was particularly problematic; they built twin bridges over the Mokelumne River (at that point practically a bayou rather than a river) — but every time they tried to build the embankment approaches (there were levees on both sides of the river), it would sag almost immediately because the water-saturated ground upon which they were building wouldn't support the additional weight. Eventually, they had to resort to pumping as much water out as they could, replacing it with a fill composition more resistant to saturation. Pretty much every technique used along that route was trial-and-error; neither Caltrans nor their various contractors had encountered anything like it previously. The preliminary grubbing for that route segment had started about 1967; it was 14 more years until it finally opened.

Scott Parker (Sparker) later noted:
(Source: Scott Parker (Sparker) on AAroads, 4/15/2018)

The terrain of the Delta region through which I-5 travels has the consistency of a sponge -- one of the things that delayed the completion of this segment for nearly 10 years. Lane additions -- especially from Route 12 to the Consumnes River floodplain at the south end of Elk Grove -- require dry earth and other underpinning material be brought in to handle the combined weight of pavement + traffic. Caltrans uses that segment of I-5 as a training ground for their fledgling bridge engineers as a "worst case scenario", since the Mokelumne River section of the Delta tended to swallow up berm materials in the late '70's when construction was under way; they just had to bring in more and more riprap, coarse gravel, and other materials to occupy space but, at the same time, not sink under its own weight. Finally a combination of a brute-force approach and partial relocation of some of the bayous that accommodated the river's flow made it possible to drop a series of short bridges in place connected by berms as short as possible, leading to the final 1981 bridging of the I-5 gap.

Sacramento

In Sacramento, before the route was completed in the late 1960s, it appears that I-5 split off of Route 99, and ran W along Broadway, and then continued W co-signed with the West Sacramento Freeway, then signed as I-80/I-5 (now Business Route 80, unsigned Route 50). Given that, it was likely then route N temporarily along Route 113 back to the present route of I-5. Additionally, while the West Side Freeway portion was being completed around 1975, I-5 had a temporary routing that entered the Sacramento area via Route 99 (South Sacramento Freeway), then followed Route 99 westbound on the WX Freeway past the Oak Park Interchange (co-signed with I-80), before merging with the constructed portion of the West Side (but still co-routed with Route 99).

In January 2005, the CTC considered a resolution to vacate the public’s right to use roadway connectors in the City of Sacramento, along Interstate 5 (I-5) between N Street and Capitol Mall and between Capitol Mall and L Street. The connectors were constructed around 1964 as part of the I-5 freeway project. At the time, Capitol Mall (formerly LRN 6, which was signposted as US 40) was the principal route for traffic traveling between Sacramento and San Francisco resulting in high volumes of inter-regional and local traffic using the same corridor. Upon completion of the freeway system in Sacramento, inter-regional traffic on Capitol Mall was almost completely eliminated. Traffic operation studies have concluded that these connectors are no longer necessary. The connectors are currently maintained by the City of Sacramento and reimbursed by Caltrans. Terminating the public’s right to use the connectors creates excess land that can be combined with other excess parcels and sold.

The exit for Route 99 North is also labeled "To CA 70". This was placed after the original Route 70/Route 99 co-designation was removed between here and the current junction. The overhead sign at the exit had a Route 70 shield on it until around the year 2000. The Route 99/Route 70 co-designation signage that remained as of 2003 were (1) on eastbound Elkhorn Blvd at the onramp to NB Route 99; (2) on Capitol Avenue at 5th Street; and (3) on I Street and 4th Street at the Amtrak station.

Shasta Environs / Far Northern California

I-5 almost bypassed Redding entirely. Early plans would have had the freeway skirt the town near what is now Redding Municipal Airport. News reports from 1962 say that as many as four routes originally were considered, but residents, city leaders and business owners chose the one nearest to Redding. Cypress Avenue and Hilltop Drive soon became the main pit stops for travelers, leaving many businesses on former Route 99 in south Redding, downtown and the Miracle Mile to wither away.

In the Lake Shasta area, I-5 replaced the former Route 99 routing, which was submerged when the lake was filled. Relics of this routing reappears when the lake water level drops, as noted in this story: "A bridge from Highway 99, the precursor to Interstate 5, was being used last week as a makeshift low-water boat ramp at Antlers Resort & Marina near Lakeshore Drive in Lakehead."

In 1953, it was proposed that I-5 bypass Yreka. However, California Senator Randall Collier made the route go through Yrkea. The original plan was to have I-5 run on the east side of those hills near Shasta Lake, straight across that gently rolling plain instead of taking a big bend to the west. However, although the interstate was a federal project, the California Highway Commission had the final say in where the freeway would go, and in the early 1960s, State Sen. Randolph Collier was chair of the CHC. In 1947, Collier wrotethe Collier-Burns Act, which created the funding for the California highway network. Collier grew up in Yreka, and began his political career as Yreka's police judge, a position he held for 13 years until 1938, when he was elected California senator. For 37 years he was the representative for six Northern California counties. In 1963, when the government proposed to bypass Yreka by routing I-5 directly from Grenada to Hornbrook, Collier went to work. By the end of the year, the planned length of the freeway had increased nearly two miles, with the route swerving to the west and passing through Collier's hometown of Yreka before turning back east, adding an additional $7 million to the $28 million project. Until his death in 1983, Collier's opponents whispered under their breath, calling his freeway diversion "Collier Curve," "Politician Hill" and the "Randolph Collier Monument."
(Source: Mail Tribune, July 2009)

Research by J. Ledbetter noted that I-5 was completed from the Oregon state line to the Hilt interchange sometime in 1966. This coincides with the opening of I-5 in Oregon, from the S. Ashland Interchange (Exit 11) to the California state line, as a full freeway on June 21, 1966. (The northbound lanes were opened to two-way traffic six months earlier, on December 21, 1965, while the southbound lanes were still under construction) In particular, the November-December 1965 of CHPW notes "In Siskiyou County, conversions of a short section of I-5 in and north of Dunsmuir and a 1.5-mile section south of the Oregon line to full freeway standards are nearing completion, and the budget will finance the construction of 3.3 freeway miles on this route, approximately 11 miles north of Yreka."

Miscellaneous

The following freeway-to-freeway connections were never constructed:

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 Route 5

Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, Route 5 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 13 (now Route 17) near Glenwood to Jct. Route 1 at San Francisco (along Skyline Blvd) . This route was LRN 55. This was renumbered on July 1, 1964 as Route 35, although parts of the original Route 5 alignment follow the current alignment of Route 280. Before Route 280 was constructed, Route 5 began at the intersection of Route 9 (LRN 42) and Skyline, proceeded up to the junction of Route 92 (LRN 105), and then went over Crystal Springs Reservoir, and then turned north following the existing portion of Route 280 from the Route 92/I-280 interchange north to until where Skyline Blvd exits to the left.

Interstate 5 Routing Before 1964

US Highway Shield Prior to 1964, the present day I-5 previously was numbered as US 99 and US 99W, and US 101.

The segment of I-5 (that is, former US 101) between the Mexican Border and Santa Ana (Route 72) was defined as part of the state highway system as LRN 2. It was originally signed as US 101. The segment between San Diego and Santa Ana was added in the first bond issue in 1909/1910.

LRN 2 (US 101) was extended to the Mexico border in 1931. Prior to 1931, the existing state highway only went as far S as National City; the remaining 10 miles to the border was traversed by county highways. The extension used portions of the county roads with an ultimate connection to the Mexican line that depended on the selected site for the US Customs House. It was anticipated that the extension would carry a large volume of local traffic but when the proportion of such traffic that can be analyzed (as of is of a transient nature) is added to the traffic originating at distant points, it was determined that the routing served principally a class of traffic that was of State rather than local nature.

The LRN 2 / original US 101 routing between Santa Ana and Los Angeles is present-day Route 72, which was part of the 1909 LRN 2. From San Juan Capestrano, the LRN 2 routing of US 101 ran N through El Toro and Irvine to Santa Ana. It ran along 1st Street, Main Street (Santa Ana), Santa Ana Blvd, Los Angeles Blvd (renamed after 1970 to Anaheim Blvd), and Spadra (renamed in 1967 to Harbor Blvd). It ran N on Spadra/Harbor to Whittier Blvd, and W along Whittier Blvd into Los Angeles County to Mission Road. It ran N along Mission Road to Sunset Blvd. This portion of the routing has been bypassed by I-5.

LRN 161 and LRN 174 were planned limited-access reroutings. The current segment between Main Street in Santa Ana to Firestone Boulevard (former Route 42) near Norwalk was defined as part of the state highway system in 1933 was LRN 174, and was signed as US 101.

The segment from LRN 172 (3rd Street, eventual Route 60) at the intersection of Downey Road to Firestone Blvd near Norwalk (LRN 174; former Route 42) was LRN 166, defined in 1933. The routing was moved in 1941 from Telegraph Road between Los Nietos Road and I-5. LRN 166 also included the segment of 1964-1965 Route 245 along Downey Road between Route 60 (LRN 172). This was also part of US 101.

The segment between Downey Road (eventual Route 60, LRN 172) and downtown Los Angeles was the remainder of the original 1909/1910 LRN 2. The segment between downtown Los Angeles (the current start of US 101) and Route 14/Tunnel Station was defined in 1909 as part of LRN 4. It was signed as US 99. Portions of this were later bypassed by LRN 161, leaving the only the portion between downtown and Route 110, and the portion N of Colorado Street in Glendale, as what was LRN 4. LRN 161 (between Route 110 and Colorado Street (originally Route 134)) was defined in 1947. The Burbank section was completed in 1959; the San Bernardino Split in 1947, and the San Fernando section in 1963. This segment was signed as US 99 until 1961.

An August 1941 report issued by the Regional Planning Commission of Los Angeles County entitled "A Report on the Feasibility of a Freeway Along the Channel of the Los Angeles River" proposed a four-lane roadway on each levee from Anaheim Street in Long Beach north to Sepulveda Boulevard in the San Fernando Valley; excepting between Soto Street and Dayton Street in downtown Los Angeles, where, due to a lack of right-of-way along the river, the alignment matches the future alignment of the US 101 portion of the Santa Ana Freeway. There is no mention in the report of a master plan of freeways like that issued in 1947, although the maps showed connections to the already-completed Arroyo Seco Parkway and the proposed Ramona and Rio Hondo Parkways.
(Thanks to Daniel Thomas for hunting down this information)

The segment between Route 14 (pre-1964 Route 7, US 6) and Route 126 was added to LRN 4 in 1935 (Chapter 274).

The segment between Wheeler Ridge and Woodland (the "westerly realignment") was defined in 1957 (Chapter 26), and was LRN 238. Before the westerly realignment, the route (as US 99) continued along US 99 (LRN 4) through Bakersfield to Sacramento. It then ran, as US 99W (cosigned with US 40), from Sacramento along LRN 6 (the present day routing approximates I-80) to just W of Davis, where it turned N, running cosigned as Alt US 40/US 99W (LRN 7; present-day Route 113) to Woodland. Currently, portions of this routing include LRN 138 (defined in 1955, Chapter 1912) from Route 33 near Oilfields to Route 33 and LRN 5 from I-205 east of Tracy to Route 4 in Stockton (defined in 1909/1910).

The segment from Woodland to Red Bluff was defined in 1909 was part of LRN 7. It was signed as US 99W to the junction with US 99E (now Route 99).

The segment from Red Bluff to the Oregon State Line was defined in 1909 as part of LRN 3. It was signed as US 99. See NAMING for more details on this history of this segment (see Stone Turnpike Memorial Freeway). Portions of this LRN have since been renumbered (as bypasses have been constructed) as Route 263, Route 265, and Route 273. See the Route 99 page for more information on US 99.

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959 by Chapter 1062.

Westside Freeway Route Adoptions in WoodlandIn November 1959, California Division of Highways published route adoptions for the Westside Freeway (I-5). This also included adopted routes for California 16 & Alt US 40 Alt & US 99W (post-1964 Route 113 and Route 16) in Woodland, Yolo County.
(Source: Joel Windmiller, California's Historic Highways on FB, 5/31/2020)

U.S. Rte 99E/99W (Int 5) Route Adoptions near Red BluffIn April 1960, the Sacramento Bee published information on route adoptions in the Red Bluff area. Note that on this map, North is to the LEFT. The Sacramento Bee wrote regarding this:
(Source: Joel Windmiller, California's Historic Highways on FB, 5/31/2020)

Aide Outlines US99E Freeway Tehama Routing. The state highway commission is considering adoption of a route for construction of 30 miles of freeway at an estimated cost of $12,765,000 on US 99E [future I-5] in Tehama County. State Highway Engineer'J C Womack yesterday recommended a route for the freeway from the Butte County line to 32 miles south of Red Bluff .

Taken Under Study. His recommendation was taken under advisement by the commission that opened a two day meeting in the Public Works Building. Womack said that of alternates studied his recommended route would save the state $1,228,000. He said it also would cause a minimum of interference with existing development and would involve the least acreage of cultivated land. His route would follow the existing highway to south of Deer Creek run, roughly parallel with and half mile east of the present highway to just north of Los Molinos, then turn northwesterly across the Sacramento River. It would cross the Southern Pacific Company tracks north of Proberta and join the adopted route of the US 99W Freeway (Route 99) south of Red Bluff The existing highway runs east of the Sacramento River to Red Bluff. The commission asked Womack to ascertain whether Tehama County Board of Supervisors wishes the commission to hold a public hearing on the routing before further action is taken.

Status Status

San Diego County

San Yisidro Port of Entry

In November, 2014, the first phase of the modernization of the San Ysidro POE was inaugurated, consisting of expanding to 25 northbound lanes with 46 tandem booths – and the construction of a new Customs and Border Protection (CBP) administrative building – in order to reduce border wait times to 15-40 minutes. This goal was achieved during the first three months of operation after the expansion, however, wait times are once again on the rise. The remaining phases are expected to be concluded by 2018. The overall modernization project consists of three phases: phase one was the primary and secondary inspection facilities, the administration building, and the San Ysidro bridge; phase two will be the construction of a new northbound pedestrian crossing; and phase 3 will connect I-5 directly to the El Chaparral southbound facilities, as well as invert the old southbound lanes and add them to the 25 existing northbound lanes to reach a total of 33 lanes.

According to a General Services Administration (GSA) study, more than 50,000 vehicles cross through San Ysidro each day, and that number is expected to grow by up to 87% by 2030. Because more than 18 million vehicles and 8 million pedestrians cross through this POE each year, reducing border wait times has become a priority for both Californias. The San Ysidro Chamber of Commerce has stated that these border wait times cost San Diego County $7 million a year in losses.

San Ysidro will also receive a Pedestrian West Facility and a Virginia Avenue Transit Center in Summer 2016. Located adjacent to the Las Americas Outlet Mall, the GSA already unveiled designs for the Pedestrian West Facility back in May 2014. At the time, community members said it looked like a “road stop bathroom.” The GSA presented the same design at The Front, this time without public comment. The Pedestrian West facility will have ten northbound and two reversible pedestrian inspection booths.

The status of the project as of January 2016 was (more information at the project webpage):
(Source: Andy3175 @AAroads, 1/30/2016)

In July 2017, it was reported that the border crossing was going to have its own equivalent of Carmaggedon: For 57 hours in September 2017, all cars will be barred from entering Tijuana through San Ysidro. Lasting from Sept. 23 at 3 a.m. until noon on Sept. 25, the closure is part of a plan by the U.S. General Services Administration to realign a portion of I-5. The operation launches the third and final phase of the $741 million expansion of the San Ysidro Port of Entry. The partial closure of I-5 at San Ysidro will cause all vehicle traffic crossing into Mexico during that period to be rerouted to Otay Mesa, where Mexico has only five inspection lanes. the partial closure of I-5 at San Ysidro will cause all vehicle traffic crossing into Mexico during that period to be rerouted to Otay Mesa, where Mexico has only five inspection lanes. The massive project, which entails re-building the southernmost stretch of I-5 as it leads into Tijuana’s El Chaparral Port of Entry, is scheduled for completion in June 2019. The aim is to double the number of southbound lanes that feed into El Chaparral from five to ten. It will also involve adding eight more northbound inspection lanes at the San Ysidro Port of Entry, bringing the total to 33. In addition, plans call for southbound vehicle inspection booths to be operated by U.S. Customs and Border Protection inspectors, and a secondary inspection area. The 57-hour closure of the southbound vehicle lanes is necessary for the safe removal of a large steel and canvas canopy that currently covers a portion of the southbound car lanes, according to GSA. During that time, workers will also remove concrete crash barriers, and install infrastructure and temporary paving and striping. Following the closure, southbound lanes will be reduced from five to three for a two-month period. After that the plan calls for adding a fourth lane before Thanksgiving, and softening the current sharp 110° turn toward El Chaparral to 90°. GSA expects that as a result of the gentler curve, the flow of traffic will not change significantly from what it is today, despite the reduction in lanes.
(Source: San Diego U-T, 7/17/2017)

In May 2019, it was reported that the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) will realign southbound I-5 to a newly constructed roadway on May 14, 2019 as part of Phase 3 of the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry (LPOE) Modernization and Expansion project. This stage of the project opens the four westernmost lanes of the newly constructed I-5 southbound freeway just south of the Camino De La Plaza Bridge. Four additional southbound lanes opened in June 2019.
(Source: GSA Press Release, 4/30/2019; GSAPress Release 5/29/2019)

Immigration Warning Sign

[I-5 Sign]Near San Clemente (≊ 005 SD R67.368), there was once a freeway crossing sign (5-feet × 7-feet) warning of people attempting to run across this freeway. This is because there is a border crossing checkpoint on NB I-5 in this area, and people wishing to avoid the INS often attempt (stupidly) to run across the freeway. There were similar signs on I-5 near the San Yisdro Border Crossing (~ 005 SD R0.305), as well as on I-805 at the I-5/I-805 split. The unusual signs were deployed during an era when San Diego County had by far the most freeway pedestrian deaths in the nation. In the 1980s, dozens of illegal aliens were killed or injured each year as they tried to cross the treacherous freeways near the U.S.-Mexico border. Recent efforts have reduced the death rate. There are a variety of factors: beefed-up law enforcement, a doubling of patrols at the border and increased public awareness. The problem reached its height in 1989, when 24 illegal aliens were killed on the freeways near the border. From 1985 to 1987, 128 died and 105 were injured. In 1992, Caltrans erected a special warning sign, and built 10- to 12-foot high median fences in the area. Since that time, the number of injuries and deaths has dropped. Part of this is due to Operation Gatekeeper, a joint operation that fortified walls between San Diego and Tijuana that moved the cross-border traffic to the east. There were none in 1997, the year the California Highway Patrol stopped keeping track. There were no pedestrian fatalities between 1998 and 2002, and there is currently talk that the sign has outlived its usefulness and should be taken down. The sign itself was designed by John Hood, a longtime CalTrans graphic artist in 1990. There were several versions of the sign, some stuffed in the envelopes of residential electric bills, other posted at rest stops. In some, the characters had eyes and other features; officials felt those would be too detailed for motorists to discern at high speed. In another, the mother juggled a baby and a sweater, but that too was deemed overly complicated for the freeway. The artist is quoted in an article on the sign in the Los Angeles Times (4/4/2008) as saying, "People are going fast. It had to be simple." In the end, the artist thought about family, noting "When you think about a little girl, you are more sensitive to something horrific.". Additionally, the choice of a family permitted the artist to give the girl pigtails -- a visual tool that made it easy to demonstrate the idea of motion, of running. A photograph of the sign is hanging at the National Museum of American History, part of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington.

In July 2017, it was reported that originally there were ten signs warning of immigrants running across the freeway once dotted the shoulders of I-5 Freeway, just north of the Mexican border. They became iconic markers of the perils of the immigrant journey north. But they began to disappear — victims of crashes, storms, vandalism and the fame conferred on them by popular culture. Today, one sign remains. And when it’s gone, it won’t be replaced — the result of California’s diminished role as a crossing point for immigrants striving to make it to America. In 1986, the San Diego sector recorded its highest number of border crossing apprehensions in a year: 628,000, according to Department of Homeland Security statistics. The area — geographically the smallest for Border Patrol — was once the busiest sector for illegal immigration in the U.S., accounting for more than 40% of nationwide apprehensions in the early ’90s. In fiscal year 2016, Border Patrol agents apprehended 31,891 people in the San Diego sector suspected of crossing the U.S.-Mexico border illegally. And so the famous border crossing sign, Caltrans officials say, has become largely obsolete. Currently, the last of the “running immigrants” signs stands on two wooden posts in a concrete median of northbound I-5, just before a “Welcome to California” sign.
(Source: LA Times, 7/7/2017)

In February 2018, it was reported that the last iconic road sign cautioning drivers near the San Diego border to watch for migrants running across the freeway has quietly disappeared. The transportation department stopped replacing the signs years ago because it constructed fences along medians to deter people from running across highways. The last sign, which stood on the side of I-5 near the San Ysidro border crossing (~ 005 SD R0.305), vanished in September.
(Source: LA Times, 2/10/2018)

Immigration Sign CartoonsInJune 2018, it became clear that the immigration sign had entered popular culture, when Trump's policy of Family Separation hit the news. You can see Rogers, 2018; or Sherffius; or Ebert. There are more older examples: Danzinger, 2014; Bennett, 2013; Luckovich, 2010.

In San Diego County, HOV lanes exist between the Mexico and US ports of entry (just a bit S of 005 SD R0.305). These require four or more passengers, and operate 24 hours a day on weekdays. Note that, at least in terms of postmiles. 005 SD 0.0 does not exist, the statewide odometer starts at 0.0 at R0.305.

In San Diego, there are plans to realign the freeway at Virginia Avenue (≊ 005 SD R0.644) approaching the San Ysidro Port of Entry [CTC April 2002 Agenda Item 2.1c.(1) TCRP Project #88]. According to Don Hagstrom in October 2002, plans to re-align the southbound I-5 lanes towards the old Virginia Avenue crossing, allowing a conversion of the current southbound lanes into northbound lanes, to alleviate some of the waits and congestion there. This would mean that I-5 southbound into Mexico would veer sharply to the right to meet the new crossing. It is likely that a suitable connection to the Calle Internacional (a 4-lane divided highway in Tijuana that parallels the border fence) will be constructed, since this important highway is the main gateway to the MEX-1D toll freeway to Rosarito and Ensenada.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

In March 2012, the CTC approved funding for: (2) In San Diego at Bay Marina Drive and I-5 (≊ 005 SD R10.054). $910,000 to widen Bay Marina Drive and add right turn lane onto Southbound I-5. (TCIF Project 69). [Note: Bay Marina Drive = Miles of Cars Drive = 24th St, National City]

In National City, there are plans to construct an auxiliary lane from 24th St. (≊ 005 SD R10.058) to Harbor Drive (≊ 005 SD R10.692).

In March 2012, the CTC approved funding for: (1) In San Diego at Civic Center Drive (≊ 005 SD R10.772) and the Wilson Avenue/I-5 northbound onramp (≊ 005 SD R10.465): $1,150,000 to add signalization; add northbound lane on Wilson Avenue; widen northbound I-5 onramp; lengthen left-turn pocket from westbound Civic Center to Southbound I-5; add left-turn pockets for eastbound/westbound Civic Center. (TCIF Project 72).

In June 2013, the CTC authorized $5,052,000 on I-5 in the city of San Diego, from 0.1 miles south of Route 8 (≊ 005 SD R19.944) to 0.3 miles north of Tacolote Creek Bridge (≊ 005 SD R020.88); also on Route 8 from Route 5 (≊ 008 SD R0.099; note that mileage W of I-5 is L mileage) to 0.3 mile east of Morena Boulevard (SD ≊ 008 SD R0.38). Outcome/Output: Construct auxiliary lanes and widen connector to improve traffic operations.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

In San Diego, there are plans to add an auxiliary lane at the Mission Bay Overcrossing to Route 52 (PM R24.1/R25.8). [CTC February 2002 Agenda Item 5.2b(1) Project 4].

Sea World Sucks ModificationIn December 2014, Steve O, the star of the television series Jackass was cited for illegally modifying a sign near Sea World (near Baker St, ≊ 005 SD R22.975). The Los Angeles-based entertainer, whose full name is Stephen Gilchrist Glover, posted a YouTube video in August showing him climbing up the freeway sign to attach the word "sucks'' after the words "Sea World." The stunt was meant as a show of support for critics of SeaWorld who assert that the park mistreats its orcas. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals -- which has long been critical of SeaWorld -- has agreed to pay any fine assessed against the entertainer. The citation can be settled by paying a $239 fine before Dec. 22. Steve-O also has the option of a trial before a traffic court commission. The stunt damaged the sign and posed a distraction for drivers that could have caused an accident, the city attorney's office said.
(Source: LA Times, 12/2/2014)

Gillman Drive Traffic Improvements (11-SD-005 R25.9/R26.8)

In December 2018, it was reported that the CTC allocated $7.3 million allocation for a project to improve traffic flow on I-5 at the Route 52 northbound connector by decreasing delay. The project will add an auxillary lane from Route 52 to Gillman Drive (~ SD R26.028 to SD R26.837).
(Source: Times of San Diego, 12/7/2018)

In December 2018, the CTC approved the following allocation (see above): $7,324,000. San Diego 11-SD-5 R25.9/R26.8. Route 5 In the city of San Diego, from Route 52 to Gilman Drive. Outcome/Output: Construct auxiliary lane. This project will improve operational functionality of Route 5 at the Route 52 northbound connector by decreasing delay. (Time Extension FY 17-18 CONST and CON ENG expires on January 31, 2019.) PPNO 11-1137.
(Source: December 2018 CTC Minutes, Item 2.5b(1) Item 9)

Gillman Drive Bridge (SD R26.81)

SANDAG, in partnership with UC San Diego and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) are constructing a new overcrossing over I-5 at Gilman Drive, just north of the La Jolla Village Drive Interchange. The overcrossing and related roadway improvements will connect Gilman Drive to the west and Medical Center Drive to the east. The project will provide a vital link between the west and east campuses of UCSD and add a second on-campus crossing over I-5. The overcrossing will be a three-span, pre-stressed concrete arch structure.

Construction started in November 2016, and is anticipated to complete in Spring 2019. The approximate total cost of construction is $20.6 million. The Gilman Drive Bridge project is being funded through a combination of local and private funding sources, including approximately $15.3 million from TransNet, the regional half-cent sales tax for transportation administered by SANDAG.

In November 2018, there were a series of full overnight closures of northbound lanes of I-5 for the removal of the Gilman Drive falsework, the temporary structures used to support the Gilman Drive Bridge until final construction is completed.

In November 2018, it was reported that tThe Gilman Drive Bridge was unveiled as crews continue to put finishing touches on the route across the busy I-5 corridor. The bridge provides a new connection between La Jolla and UC San Diego west of I-5 and Medical Center Drive on the east side of the highway. The bridge was built through a partnership between the San Diego Association of Governments, Caltrans, and the University of California, San Diego. “It’s a very unique arch bridge,” John Haggerty, Director of Rail at SANDAG said. “The university wanted a signature bridge for their campus connection.” Haggerty said the graceful bridge is an enhancement to the area and will serve as the second on-campus crossing over I-5. It will open to pedestrian and vehicle traffic in January. Construction on the bridge began two years ago and has required the closure of I-5 in recent weeks. Next steps in the Mid-Coast Trolley Expansion will be two other bridges to serve the trolley over I-5. Those will soon begin construction at Voigt and Nobel drives. When construction began, the approximate cost was estimated at $20.6 million. An estimated $15.3 million was expected to come from TransNet, the regional half-cent sales tax for transportation administered by SANDAG.
(Source: 7 San Diego, 11/7/2018)

North Coast Corridor Widening - North San Diego to Camp Pendleton (SD R28.444 to SD R54.398)

I-5 Widening Near Camp PendletonIn November 2010, there was additional information on the project that would widen I-5 between the I-5/I-805 interchange and the Camp Pendleton boundary. There are a number of different options for expansion (shown in the figure to the right, from the S-D Union Tribune). There is lots of opposition. At least four cities along the corridor have paid for their own impact studies and will be conveying their conclusions to Caltrans. Del Mar’s City Council urged Caltrans to look at alternatives to move people and goods, rather than just cars and trucks. SANDAG sought to contain any construction to the existing right of way and to protect the six lagoons and ocean views traversed by the highway. Community groups have hired attorneys to fight the plan every step of the way. Groups like the Audubon Society and Sierra Club have weighed in against the expansion. Allan Kosup, Caltrans director for the I-5 corridor, says it will take until the middle of 2011 to sort through and address all the comments and then pick a preferred option. Construction could begin in 2013.

SANDAG later indicated that their preferred approach is a phased-in development of the 12-lane highway that retains the inner-freeway but would require far less taking of private land and homes along the corridor. Their letter to the CTC stated that the board of directors supported the 8+4 option for the highway and encouraged Caltrans to minimize right-of-way impacts to adjacent properties to the corridor. It backed a gradual introduction of the HOV/HOT lanes, starting with two in the center (one in each direction) and expanding only if necessary. They also suggested that the design minimize and mitigate visual, noise and air quality impacts as well as effects on the corridor’s coastal lagoons.

In July 2011, it was reported that had decided to go with the 4-lane widening option. The decision to build only four express lanes (open to buses, carpools and drivers willing to pay a fee) reduces the project cost to $3.5 billion. It also cuts in half the number of homes and businesses slated for seizure and removal to make way for the project. Caltrans must still obtain a development permit from the California Coastal Commission before the agency can widen the freeway. Caltrans estimates the first phase of construction—a northbound and southbound express lane from Encinitas to Oceanside—could start as early as 2013.

In September 2012 additional details were provided. The new information about the project is contained in a draft supplemental Environmental Impact Report, which was officially released for public comment on Aug. 31, 2012. The public has until Oct. 15 to review and comment on the document. Additional documents to be released in the coming months include a final EIR and a “public works plan.” The project involves the addition of four carpool lanes — for a total of 12 lanes — between La Jolla and Oceanside, as well as rail improvements such as double-tracking, enhancements to North County lagoons, bicycle paths along the entire 27 miles of the project, and pedestrian walkways. In preparing the supplemental EIR, Caltrans commissioned hydraulic and other studies to determine how best to protect and enhance the health of the lagoons. The study found that longer bridges over three lagoons — San Elijo, Batiquitos and Buena Vista — are needed to provide better water flow in and out of the lagoons. Bridges across Penasquitos, San Dieguito and Agua Hedionda were found to be adequate. Caltrans has also acquired 100 acres of land along the lagoons, which will be preserved as open space to compensate for environmental impacts of the I-5 project. Planners have also added bicycle lanes along the entire project corridor; some will be within the freeway right-of-way, while others will be on local streets. Construction on the road improvements and environmental mitigation could begin in 2014, pending approval by the California Coastal Commission and other agencies. The road portion of the project will cost $3.5 billion, while the total project, including rail improvements, is pegged at $6.5 billion. The estimated completion date for the entire project is 2035.
(Source: Rancho Santa Fe Review, 9/26/2012)

In October 2012, more information on the EIR was obtained. There are five alternatives being considered:

In March 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Diego County that will construct roadway improvements on I-5 for 27 miles from Oceanside to San Diego. Phase 1 (PPNOs 0615A, 0615B, and 0615C) will extend the existing High Occupancy Vehicle lanes from Manchester Avenue to Route 78, replace the San Elijo and Batiquitos Lagoon bridges, and build soundwalls. Phase 1 is programmed in the State Transportation Improvement Program and is fully funded. The total estimated cost of this phase is $481,820,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2015-16. The remaining phases are not yet funded. The locally preferred alternative was Alternative 4: 8 + 4 buffer.

In August 2014, it was reported that the North Coast Corridor program, a $6.5 billion package that would add freeway, rail, bicycle, pedestrian and environmental improvements along a 27-mile stretch from La Jolla to Oceanside, won unanimous approval from the California Coastal Commission. The new freeway lanes, called express lanes, would be added to the middle of I-5, eventually stretching the entire 27 miles and costing an estimated $3.5 billion. Like the I-15 express lanes, they would be open to carpools, buses, motorcycles, select clean air vehicles and toll-paying solo drivers.
(Source: UT San Diego, 8/13/14)

In May 2016, it was reported that work will begin in late Summer 2016 on part of the $6.5 billion North Coast Corridor Program — led by the California Department of Transportation and the San Diego Association of Governments — that will ultimately stretch 27 miles from La Jolla to Oceanside. The plan includes an ambitious collection of transportation, environmental, and coastal access projects that will take shape over the next 30 years. Key among them is adding four express lanes to I-5. The $700 million first phase of the corridor project will begin in the next several months with freeway work in Encinitas, where an eight-lane bridge that crosses the San Elijo Lagoon will slowly be replaced with a larger, wider structure. Work will also begin on another freeway bridge that crosses the Batiquitos Lagoon in Carlsbad. The $700 million Phase 1 work will include:

All of the Phase 1 construction is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2020. The price tag includes $480 million for the highway improvements, $140 million for railway improvements and $80 million for environmental work. The freeway between La Jolla and Oceanside carries an average of more than 700,000 vehicle trips a day, according to SANDAG. Growth forecasts vary, but the county’s population has more than doubled since the freeway was built, and traffic is certain to increase in the decades ahead.
(Source: San Diego Union Tribune, 5/8/2016)

In September 2015, it was reported that property acquisition was underway for a future park and ride and direct access ramp at Manchester Avenue (≊ 005 SD R38.539) in Encinitas along I-5 north county corridor. Plans call for a 5-acre Park and Ride, with five acres to be set aside for agriculture and 10 acres for open space. The projects are part of Caltrans’ $6.5 billion package of rail, freeway and lagoon improvements for the I-5 corridor. They’re scheduled to be completed during phase one of plans, 2016 to 2020. It was also reported that, in August 2015, the California Coastal Commission unanimously signed off on the widening plan, which would widen I-5 to include four new express lanes and provide a series of rail, public transit, bicyclist and pedestrian improvements between La Jolla and Oceanside. Four lanes designed for car pools, buses and toll-paying solo drivers would be built along the middle of the freeway. Two conventional lanes would also be added. The project was estimated to cost $6.5 billion to be funded through a combination of federal, state, and local funds. Environmental groups had expressed concerns about the impact on wildlife living in six coastal lagoons, 32 acres of wetlands and 74 acres of coastal sage. Developers have since said they’ve addressed these concerns. Now that planners have received approval from the CCC, a carpool lane from Manchester to Birmingham will begin construction next year. That will be the first phase of an 11-mile HOV extension from Manchester to Route 78.
(Source: AAroads Pacific Southwest Forum, 9/30/2015)

In 2017, the following was noted: The I-5 Express Lanes Project will be constructed in three phases from 2013 – 2040. Once completed, the project will result in four Express Lanes, two in each direction, along I-5 from La Jolla Village Drive in San Diego to Harbor Drive in Oceanside. The three phases include:

Phase 1 (2013-2020)

Phase 2 (2021-2030)

Phase 3 (2031-2040)

(Source: SANDAG, I-5 Improvements FAQ)

The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to include a number of items related to this:

In the SB1 Project List, as of June 2018, under the Solutions for Congested Corridors Program program, the following appears: I-5 North Coast Corridor HOV Extension: In the Cities of Encinitas and Carlsbad from Manchester Avene to Paolmar Airport Road. Construct one High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane in each direction; construct multi-use facility at Manchester; Construct bike paths and construct soundwalls. $195,000,000.

In August 2018, it was reported that the CTC approved $195 million in SB 1 funding for the I-5 North Coast Corridor HOV Extension, which includes 18 miles of high occupancy vehicle lanes in both directions from Encinitas to Carlsbad, software and infrastructure to help traffic flow, a Park and Ride facility and bicycle and pedestrian paths. The budget for the overall project is $266 million. Specifically, the CTC approved that $227,078,000 be allocated from the Budget Act of 2017, Budget Act Items 2660-301-0890 and 2660-309-0042 for construction and $39,000,000 for construction engineering for the State-administered multi-funded SB 1 SCCP/STIP project.
(Source: Times of San Diego, 8/21/2018; August 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.5s.(7))

In November 2018, it was reported that local, state and federal transportation officials held a press event marking the start of construction on eight miles of new carpool lanes on I-5 in Carlsbad and Encinitas. The project, which officially starts construction in mid-November, is part of the larger North Coast Corridor program to add 13 miles of carpool lanes, seven miles of bike and pedestrian paths and 1.5 miles of rail corridor double tracking in North County. The first work on the program began in 2016. The I-5 expansion in North County faced intense opposition from environmentalists several years ago as it was being debated at SANDAG. Opponents argued that past expansions of freeways have failed to reduce traffic congestion, instead only encouraging more people to drive on them. Researchers refer to this phenomenon as "induced demand." In 2015 Caltrans itself put on its website a policy paper from UC Davis' National Center for Sustainable Transportation detailing the evidence behind induced demand. The paper says the data show projects to add capacity to freeways result in more vehicle trips and more greenhouse gas emissions.
(Source: KPBS San Diego, 11/2/2018)

In December 2019, it was reported that local transportation planners received a milestone approval when the California Coastal Commission issued a permit for express lanes on I-5 from Carlsbad to Oceanside. The new lanes will be built from Palomar Airport Road to Route 78, with construction beginning in the fall of 2020 and completion scheduled in 2022. When this segment is finished, there will be express lanes for 20 miles, from the I-805 merge to Route 78.
(Source: Times of San Diego, 12/17/2019)

In January 2020, it was reported that the Build NCC program has officially reached the halfway point. Coinciding with the halfway point, the Caltrans and the SANDAG Build NCC highway construction crews will begin work to rebuild the inside of the highway bridge over the San Elijo Lagoon. As part of this work, construction crews will shift northbound and southbound I-5 traffic to the new outside highway bridges. The same number of lanes will remain in each direction; however, motorists will experience a curve in both directions over the San Elijo Lagoon highway bridge. The traffic shifts are anticipated to take place in early February and will be completed at night over the course of two weeks. The traffic shift marks a significant milestone in the construction of the San Elijo Lagoon Bridge. Following the traffic shift, construction crews will move forward with demolishing the old bridge and complete the project with the construction of the new inside bridge. Once complete in 2022, the Build NCC program will accommodate the addition of one new High Occupancy Vehicles (HOV) lane (or carpool lane) in each direction, between Lomas Santa Fe Drive in the City of Solana Beach and Route 78 in the City of Oceanside.
(Source: The Coast News, 1/30/2020)

The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, had a number of allocations and programming continuations related to this:
(Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

PPNO
Project
Prior
20-21
21-22
22-23
23-24
24-25
0615F HOV extension, Phase 1, Encinitas Seg (CMGC)(SCCP) 71,078K 0 0 0 0
0615G HOV extension, Phase 1, Carlsbad Seg (CMGC) 0 0 0 89,063K 0 0
0615G HOV extension, Phase 1, Carlsbad Seg (CMGC) 0 0 0 -89,063K 0 0
0615G HOV extension, Phase 1, Carlsbad Seg, Pckg 1 (CMGC) 0 0 0 10,000K 0 0
0615H HOV extension, Phase 1, Carlsbad Seg, Pckg 2 (CMGC) 0 0 0 40,000K 0 0
0615I HOV extension, Phase 1, Carlsbad Seg, Pckg 3 (CMGC) 0 0 0 39,063K 0 0
0615 Del Mar-Camp Pendleton, widen, env 9,730 K 0 0 0 0 0
1410 Rt 78-Rt 5/Rt 805-Rt 52, HOV to Express Lns Conversion 0 0 0 0 18,000K 0

In May 2020, it was reported that Build North Coast Corridor (NCC) crews have entered the next stage of construction. Specifically, crews began shifting construction operations from the I-5 median to the outside shoulders in both north and southbound directions between Birmingham Drive in the City of Encinitas and Palomar Airport Road in the City of Carlsbad. This transition was performed in two phases: (1) Birmingham Drive to Batiquitos Lagoon, and (2) Batiquitos Lagoon to Palomar Airport Road. Together, both phases of the transition are anticipated to take a total of eight to 10 weeks to complete (excluding Saturday and Sunday nights, and holidays). The transition will occur during overnight shifts, between 7:30 p.m. and 5 a.m., and begins with the relocation of concrete barriers (k-rail) from the I-5 median to the outside shoulders followed by restriping of the I-5 travel lanes to shift traffic toward the median. Crews have worked over the past 18 months to complete inside freeway widening and new median barrier construction. By shifting work to the outside, crews will be able to complete the I-5 widening work to accommodate one new Carpool/High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane in each direction on I-5. Once complete, I-5 will be widened an average of eight to 10 feet and all existing I-5 on and off ramps within the Build NCC project limits will be realigned to tie into the future widened freeway.
(Source: Coast News Group, 5/11/2020)

La Jolla Village Drive to Genesee Ave Auxilary Lane (SD R28.6/R29.3)

The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 1136. 11-San Diego-5 R28.6/R29.3. I-5 In the city of San Diego, from north of La Jolla Village Drive to south of Genesee Avenue, on southbound. Construct a 0.5 mile auxiliary lane. Begin Con: 1/31/2019. Total Project Cost: $6,750K.

In December 2018, it was reported that the CTC allocated $5.9 million allocated to a project that will construct a half-mile auxiliary lane on southbound I-5 from north of La Jolla Village Drive to south of Genesee Avenue to improve traffic flow and decrease delay.
(Source: Times of San Diego, 12/7/2018)

In December 2018, the CTC approved the following allocation: $5,950,000. San Diego 11-SD-5 R28.6/R29.3. Route 5 In the city of San Diego, from 0.2 mile north of La Jolla Village Drive to 0.1 mile south of Genesee Avenue. Outcome/Output: Construct a 0.5 mile auxiliary lane in the southbound direction. This project will improve operational functionality by reducing delay. (Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-14-11; March 2014.) (Time Extension FY 17-18 CONST and CON ENG expires on December 31, 2018.) (This is a Financial Contribution Only (FCO) to San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG).) PPNO 11-1136.
(Source: December 2018 CTC Minutes, Item 2.5b(1) Item 10)

Genesee Avenue Interchange

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

In September 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to reconstruct the I-5/Genessee Avenue Interchange in the city of San Diego (≊ 005 SD R29.466). The scope of work includes replacing existing overcrossings at Genesee Avenue and Voigt Drive, ramp widening at Genesee and at Sorrento Valley Road interchanges, construction of I-5 auxiliary lanes, realignment of Gilman Drive and various measures to improve pedestrian and bicycle access. The entire I-5/Genesee Interchange Reconstruction project will be constructed and designed in phases. Phase 1 includes the reconstruction of the I-5/Genesee Interchange, the addition of auxiliary lanes north of Genesee Avenue, and improvements to the Sorrento Valley Road on-and off-ramps. Phase 2 includes the addition of auxiliary lanes south of Genesee Avenue, replacement of the Voigt Drive Overcrossing and realignment of Gilman Drive. Phase 1 is fully funded with local and federal dollars and is estimated to begin construction in 2014. Phase 2 is fully funded through Plans, Specifications, and Estimates only. Depending on the availability of funding, construction of this phase is estimated to begin between 2015 and 2020. The realignment and widening of the Genesee southbound off-ramp (PPNO 0129P) is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). Total cost of this portion of the project is $12,987,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The approximate estimated cost of the entire Interstate 5/Genesee Interchange Reconstruction Project, including the SHOPP funding, is $145,000,000. The SHOPP scope of work as described scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 SHOPP. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to traffic, biological resources, aesthetics, noise, and paleontology to a less than significant level by incorporating measures to minimize, avoid, restore, and replace impacted resources. As a result, an MND was completed for this project.

In May 2013, the CTC authorized $8,423,000 to realign and widen the Genesee southbound off-ramp. The CTC also authorized $8,000,000 of Prop 1B funds to reconstruct I-5 Genesee Bridge and interchange including ramps and retaining walls; add Type 1 bicycle facility between Voigt and Sorrento Valley Road.

In January 2007, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Diego on Vista Sorrento Parkway (≊ 005 SD 28.332), north of Sorrento Valley Boulevard, consisting of frontage road.

In January 2010, the CTC authorized use of ARRA funds for a project that consists of extending the high occupancy vehicle lanes from the Route 5/Route 805 merge (≊005 SD R30.584R) to Carroll Canyon, constructing a north facing Direct Access Ramp with Carroll Canyon and extending Carroll Canyon to Sorrento Valley road. This project is an excellent candidate for Recovery Act funds as the project will likely create approximately 660 jobs in San Diego County. In accordance with AB 3X-20, which authorizes the Commission to allocate bond funds displaced by Recovery Act funds, SANDAG plans to request that the $57,500,000 in CMIA funds be reprogrammed to other eligible projects in the region at a future Commission meeting.

In October 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of San Diego along Route 5 on Roselle Street (11-SD-5-PM R30.4), consisting of roadway and sidewalks.

2007 CMIA. A number of projects on I-5 in San Diego County were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding. These projects included the North Coast Corridor, Stage 1A, Unit 1 ($64 million requested); the N Coast Corridor, Stage 1B, Encinitas HOV ($327 million); the N Coast Corridor, Stage 1C, Carlsbad HOV ($92 milllion); the N Coast Corridor, Stage 1F, Voigt Dr-I-805 HOV ($158 million); and the N Coast Corridor, Stage 1E, Genesee Av interchange ($78 million). None were recommended for funding.

In August 2015, the CTC vacated right of way in the city of San Diego along Route 5 at 0.2 mile north of Carmel Mountain Road (11-SD-5-PM R32.0), consisting of a drainage easement no longer needed for State highway purposes.

I-5/Route 56 Interchange (≊ 005 SD R32.932)

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

In San Diego: In July 2005, the CTC received a notice of EIR preparation for Route 5 and Route 56 in San Diego County (≊ 005 SD R32.932) that would provide a connector between Route 5 and Route 56 near Del Mar Heights (NOP). This is funded in the 2005 Transportation Bill. The alternatives being considered are:

In San Diego, TCRP Project #82 reconstructed the I-5/I-805 interchange, from Genesee Avenue to Del Mar Heights Road. The basic plan was to extend C/D (Collector/Distributor) roadways along I-5 from Route 56 to I-805. Trucks would also be directed onto the C/D roads, so they would also serve as truck bypass lanes, separated from the main lanes by concrete barriers. The "C/D lanes" (4 in each direction) are labelled as the "LOCAL BYPASS" (not truck lanes). Northbound the signage (from both I-5 and I-805) is "LOCAL BYPASS/Junction 56 EAST", reflecting that one must use the bypass to access Route 56); southbound it is "LOCAL BYPASS/Carmel Mountain Rd". The bypass includes a new Carmel Mountain Rd exit in both directions. Route 56 traffic going south merges into the bypass (≊ 005 SD R31.795).

In April 2007, the CTC considered an amendment to TCRP Project #82.2 that changed the project from constructing of northbound and southbound auxiliary lanes from Via De La Valle (≊ 005 SD R36.288) to Lomas Santa Fe Drive (≊ 005 SD R37.398) (including soundwalls and bridges) to extending the existing HOV lane from just south of Via de la Valle to just south of Manchester Avenue, and realigning ramps at the Lomas Santa Fe Drive Interchange. The original proposal was part of a larger project to revise the interchange at Lomas Santa Fe Drive. However, the estimated cost of the interchange work increased beyond the region’s funding capability. The auxiliary lane work was then removed from the larger project and is now being constructed as part of another project. A Value Analysis Study suggested that the region would likely be able to fund the interchange work if the construction was combined with a planned extension of a High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane in each direction from just south of Via de la Valle to just south of Manchester Avenue. The HOV work would provide significant congestion relief by allowing HOV users to continue through an area of daily recurring congestion. By removing the scope of the auxiliary lanes and combining the interchange work and the HOV extension project, the region expected to be able to fully fund the project. The project is scheduled for completion in FY 2009/2010.

In October 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) has been completed: I-5 and Route 56 in San Diego County. Construct roadway and interchange improvements on I-5 and Route 56 in and near the city of San Diego. (11-SD-5, PM R32.7/R34.8, 11-SD-56, PM 0.0/2.5) (EA 17790). This project proposes to provide direct connections between I-5 and Route 56 in San Diego County. This project is not fully funded and is included the San Diego Association of Governments 2016 Regional Transportation Improvement Program for $16.9 million, which includes local funding for preliminary engineering. The project will be constructed in multiple stages upon further programming. Construction is estimated to begin in 2020.

In August 2015, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Solano Beach on Marine View Avenue (11-SD-5-PM R37.1), consisting of a reconstructed city street.

In October 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Encinitas adjacent to Route 5 along Regal Road (11-SD-5-PM R40.69), consisting of non-motorized transportation facilities.

Leucadia Blvd to Palomar Airport Road Auxiliary Lane (11-San Diego-5 PM R42.2/R47.1)

The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following NEW Mobility item of interest: 11-San Diego-5 PM R42.2/R47.1 PPNO 1320 Proj ID 1118000134 EA 43041. I-5 in Encinitas and Carlsbad, from south of Leucadia Boulevard to north of Palomar Airport Road. Construct auxiliary lanes to facilitate merging movements and upgrade facilities to Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards. Programmed in FY22-23, with construction scheduled to start in January 2023. Total project cost is $23,258K, with $21,577K being capital (const and right of way) and $1,681K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
(Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

Palomar Airport Road to Cannon Road Auxillary Lane (11-SD-5 R47.0/R48.0)

The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 1279. 11-San Diego-5 R47.0/R48.0. I-5 In Carlsbad, from Palomar Airport Road to Cannon Road. Construct auxiliary lane in southbound direction for operational efficiency. Begin Con: 2/18/2022. Total Project Cost: $8,026K.

In March 2019, the CTC provided the following support allocation: 11-SD-5 R47.0/R48.0 PPNO 1279 Proj ID 1117000206. I-5 In Carlsbad, from Palomar Airport Road to Cannon Road. Construct auxiliary lane in southbound direction for operational efficiency. PA&ED $207,000.
(Source: March 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) Item 29)

In June 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP support allocation: $1,209,000 11-SD-5 R47.0/R48.0 PPNO 1279 ProjID 1117000206. I-5 In Carlsbad, from Palomar Airport Road to Cannon Road. Construct auxiliary lane in southbound direction for operational efficiency. PS&E $1,209,000. (Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-14-11; March 2014.)
(Source June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) Item 37)

The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Mobility item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 11-San Diego-5 PM R47.0/R48.0 PPNO 1279 Proj ID 1117000206 EA 43017. I-5 in Carlsbad, from Palomar Airport Road to Cannon Road. Construct auxiliary lane in southbound direction for operational efficiency. Programmed in FY21-22, with construction scheduled to start in November 2021. Total project cost is $8,026K, with $5,524K being capital (const and right of way) and $2,502K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
(Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

In the City of Carlsbad, the small segment at KP 78.0 (≊ 005 SD R48.46) was up for relinquishement in September 2002.

I-5/Route 78 Interchange (≊ 005 SD R51.183)

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

In June 2015, it was reported that Caltrans is in the process of rebuilding the I-5/Route 78 interchange that spills traffic into a residential neighborhood. Caltrans first shared information on proposed interchange improvements in January 2015, and followed up with additional community briefings since then. This was reolated to a number of planned I-5 corridor improvements, and the necessity to upgrade both ends of Route 78 before future work on I-5 begins. The roadway improvements would be designed to ease expected traffic flow for 30 years out. There was a specific community concern about flyovers; the community wanted flyovers to be eliminated as an idea. Caltrans indicated that a flyover would be studied for traffic, cost and impact on neighborhoods, along with other alternatives. However, they appreciated community feedback, and it provided Caltrans great ideas, including consideration of a roundabout and bike lane. In addition to objections to noise and pollution, residents expressed concern over the lack of progress in Buena Vista Lagoon restoration, which the interchange will cross. Another big concern of residents and city council members was the speed of traffic that exits the interchange and barrels through a South Oceanside neighborhood.
(Source: The Coast News, 6/10/2015)

Orange County Line to Route 22

HOV Lane - San Diego County Line to Avenida Pico (ORA 0.000 to ORA 3.391)

In March 2020, it was reported that, as part of the agreement not to extend the Route 241 toll road, the TCA will collaborate with Caltrans and OCTA to advance plans of having the high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane on the I-5 extend from Avenida Pico to the San Diego County line, as well as complete the project to widen Ortega Highway in San Juan Capistrano. The collaboration will entail the agencies executing the Alternative 22 proposal (Los Patrones Parkway) and “conclude the Agency’s efforts to identify solutions for a southerly extension of the 241 Toll Road,” the agenda report on the subject states.
(Source: San Clemente Times, 3/12/2020)

In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which included programming of $5,500K for engineering for PPNO 2863J "Managed lanes, San Clemente, Av Pico-SD Co Line"
(Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

In December 2011, the city of San Clemente has asked Caltrans to remove a 16-foot sound wall that was constructed along the I-5 Freeway near South El Camino Real. San Clemente's city attorney thinks Caltrans might have violated the California Environmental Quality Act by not notifying residents east of the freeway that the wall was planned. They have also asked Caltrans to reopen the environmental-review process for the $5.3 million project, which also calls for a see-through wall on the west side of the freeway atop the El Camino Real overcrossing (≊ 005 ORA 1.651). In February 2012, Caltrans offered to consider changes to the design. Changes could include extending and lowering the existing wall, though Caltrans told the city in October that the wall is the height required to meet a mandatory level of sound reduction for residents west of I-5.

Avenida Pico / San Juan Creek Widening (≊ 005 ORA 3.391/OR 8.808)

In March 2012, it was reported that a new $275 million project will add a carpool lane in each direction and rebuild the Avenida Pico interchange, including widening the northbound Avenida Pico on-ramp to three lanes. Construction is expected to start in late 2013. In early March 2012, the OCTA board authorized the acquisition of ten properties, most commercial and one residential building, to make way for construction. Some of the properties include: Saint Andrew's by the Sea Methodist Church, Victoria Land Partners, and Faith Lutheran Church of Capistrano Beach.

The CTC minutes from February 2012 clarified the March 2012 report above. In late February 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that widen I-5; adding one HOV lane in each direction and re-establishing and constructing auxiliary lanes between Avenida Pico (≊ 005 ORA 3.391) and San Juan Creek Road (≊ 005 ORA 8.808); in the cities of San Clemente, Dana Point, and San Juan Capistrano. The project is not fully funded, however, the project is entirely funded through the environmental, planning, design, and right of way phases with federal and local dollars. The total estimated project cost is $275,000,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources, aesthetics, noise, and water quality to a less than significant level. Proposed mitigation measures include pre-construction surveys for rare and endangered species, establishment of fenced Environmentally Sensitive Areas (ESA), incorporation of sound control features in final project design, landscaping, and adherence to Best Management Practices (BMP) for erosion and water quality.

In November 2012, it was reported that the OCTA has approved projects on I-5 in S Orange County. In 2013, construction will begin to add lanes, improve interchanges and ease congestion at Avenido Pico to San Juan Creek Road. Approximately 241,000 vehicles currently travel through the area daily, leading to traffic and congestion during peak hours. By 2040, the number of vehicle trips is expected to rise by 24 percent, or 300,000 vehicles traveling across the freeway. Construction will come in three phases, with the final segment of Avenida Pico to Vista Hermosa expected to be completed in 2016. Upon completion of that project, work will begin in 2018 to widen the stretch from the Route 73 toll road to El Toro Road.
(Source: OC Register, 11/12/2012)

In January 2013, it was reported that the first work being done on “Segment 2” of the larger Orange County Transportation Authority project, the widening of I-5 between the San Clemente city line (≊ 005 ORA 0.0) to just south of Avenida Vista Hermosa (≊ 005 ORA 4.072), has begun. The project will widen I-5 to accommodate a high occupancy vehicle lane through the length of the project and is slated to last until 2014. The third segment of the total project, which includes the widening of the Avenida Pico exchange, is scheduled to begin construction in 2014 and last until 2017.
(Source: San Juan Capistrano Patch, 1/11/2013)

In May 2013, the CTC received notice that the OCTA was going to propose amending the 2012 STIP for the I-5 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane – South of Avenida Vista Hermosa to South of Pacific Coast Highway project (PPNO 2531E) to reduce Regional Improvement Program (RIP) construction by $10,000,000, from $47,381,000 to $37,381,000 and backfill with Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Program funding. It is also proposed to reprogram the $10,000,000 in RIP funds to the design phase of a new STIP project, I-5 widening – El Toro Road to Route 73 (PPNO 2604B) in Orange County.

In January 2014, freeway construction started on the project that will add carpool lanes between San Juan Creek Road and Avenida Pico.

In January 2014, it was reported that the $275 million I-5 widening that will add carpool lanes between San Juan Creek Road in San Juan Capistrano and just past Avenida Pico in San Clemente could lead to a second widening in San Clemente. Specifically, a new OCTA long-term transportation plan will propose I-5 carpool lanes between Pico and the San Diego County line. However, there is no timetable for the second project, and the OCTA has yet to determine the project’s scope and a source of funding for it. Work could begin on the current I-5 widening project late this month, with completion by the end of 2016. The second widening project (widening I-5 in downtown San Clemente) figures to be costly and could be tricky, with tight tolerances, impacting homes and businesses. A wider freeway would not only need a broader roadbed but longer bridges, new sound walls and re-engineered on- and off-ramps. The San Diego Association and Caltrans are proposing widening I-5 by 2035 to 12 lanes from La Jolla to the north end of Oceanside, 27 miles north. Beyond that, a long-term plan from the San Diego Association shows four toll express lanes from Oceanside north to the county line. The San Diego County group is figuring four toll express lanes will be needed based on population and traffic projections, but it's too far out to be certain. Additionally, some San Clemente residents have voiced fears that ending the southbound carpool lane at Pico will create a bottleneck right away, narrowing I-5 there from five to four lanes on an uphill.
(Source: OCTA Blog)

In September 2015, it was reported that pile driving was scheduled to begin in late October 2015 for the new portion of the Avenida Pico bridge on the southbound side of I-5 in San Clemente. Reconstruction of the Avenida Pico interchange is part of the $230 million I-5 South County Improvement Project, which also extends the carpool lane from San Juan Creek Road in San Juan Capistrano to Avenida Pico in San Clemente. Before pile driving can begin, crews have to excavate the massive piles of dirt where the new portion of the bridge is being built. The dirt, known as surcharge, ensures the ground beneath it is completely compacted and will fully support the new bridge. Crews also will install temporary shoring adjacent to southbound lanes to support the existing freeway while the bridge is being built. In parallel, crews will be reconstructing the sound walls along the southbound I-5 freeway, between Camino de Estrella and the bridge over Avenida Vaquero. Further north, near the PCH connector to I-5, efforts continue to widen three bridges and finish several retaining walls.
(Source: OCTA Blog, 9/23/2015)

In December 2015, it was reported that crews have finished driving about one hundred steel piles for the new I-5 bridge over Avenida Pico in San Clemente, part of the $230 million I-5 South County Improvements Project. Pile driving is set to resume in January 2016 for another part of the Pico bridge, which must be widened to accommodate the new carpool lanes. The steel piles will support the footings of the new bridge.
(Source: OCTA Blog, 12/23/2015)

In February 2016, it was reported that crews recently completed driving steel piles for the foundation of the new bridge being constructed adjacent to the southbound side of the freeway. Now they are focused on building the bridge abutments, which will support the bridge deck. At the same time, construction has begun on the new retaining wall along westbound Avenida Pico, just before the on-ramp to northbound I-5. Crews are excavating dirt and constructing the wall from the top down. The new wall will allow Avenido Pico to be widened to accommodate dedicated turn lanes onto the freeway on-ramps in both directions.
(Source: OCTA Blog, 2/18/2016)

In April 2016, it was reported that pile driving for the Avenida Pico bridge foundation on the west side of the interchange is done, and crews are building the bridge abutments and pilasters, which will support the bridge deck. Work also is beginning on large retaining walls adjacent to the southbound Pico off-ramp and on-ramp. Crews have already begun installing steel beams for the bridge falsework, the temporary structure used during construction of the bridge and bridge deck. The beams will extend across Pico, requiring several full nighttime road closures, currently scheduled for early to mid-April. Once this new portion of bridge is completed, freeway traffic will be shifted onto it and the remainder of the old bridge will be demolished and rebuilt. The traffic shift is expected to take place toward the end of the year.
(Source: OCTA Blog, 4/6/2016)

In July 2016, it was reported that crews have hit some significant milestones on the I-5 South County Improvements Project, a $230 million effort that extends the carpool lane from San Juan Capistrano to San Clemente and reconstructs the Avenida Pico interchange. The new deck on the recently constructed bridge over Avenida Pico has been poured, and crews have lowered the temporary structure supporting the concrete bridge as the concrete cured. The temporary structure, known as falsework, will be moved to the east side of the interchange once work starts there. The deck required 603 cubic yards of concrete, enough to completely cover a football field with about four inches of concrete. The nine-hour pour took 61 trucks that delivered 1,182 tons of concrete. Traffic lanes are tentatively scheduled to be switched over to the new bridge in September, after which crews will demolish the remainder of the old bridge. Then work will begin on the second half of the Pico bridge, starting with pile driving for the foundation. Sound walls have gone up on the southbound side of I-5 between Avenida Vista Hermosa and Camino de Estrella. Drivers exiting at Avenida Vista Hermosa encounter new configurations on some ramps as crews shift traffic to move forward with the next stage of construction. That stage includes a series of long-term ramp closures coming in Summer 2016 at Avenida Vista Hermosa and Camino de Estrella. The full closures – ranging from 55 hours to nine days – will allow crews to work more efficiently to realign the ramps. A little further north, crews are pouring the face of the retaining wall along southbound I-5, just past the PCH/Beach Cities exit. The wall face is constructed using specially crafted form liners that, once removed, will reveal an architectural treatment displaying pelicans and waves. In all, it’s about 21 weeks of work.
(Source: OCTA Blog, 7/6/2016)

In January 2017, it was reported that construction crews would be closing the loop on-ramp from westbound Camino Las Ramblas to southbound I-5 for an extended period, beginning Friday, February 3. The ramp closure is part of the $230 million I-5 South County Improvements Project, which extends the carpool lanes from San Juan Capistrano to San Clemente. During the closure, which will be in effect from 10 p.m. Friday, February 3, to 5 a.m. Monday, February 13, crews will realign the ramp to accommodate the widened freeway. Motorists will be detoured to Doheny Park Road and southbound Pacific Coast Highway to access southbound I-5. On the other side of I-5, as part of a separate Caltrans project, repair work has begun on the loop on-ramp from eastbound Camino Las Ramblas to northbound I-5. Crews will be demolishing and replacing the bridge deck and the bridge barrier rails of the on-ramp. The project requires closing the loop on-ramp for four months, through May 31.
(Source: OCTA Blog, 1/31/2017)

In July 2017, it was reported that construction crews have completed the overhead carpool sign installation on southbound and northbound I-5. The lane and full freeway closures for this work on I-5 are now complete. The construction on the I-5 South County Improvements Project began in 2014. The project will add nearly six miles of carpool lanes in each direction from Avenida Pico in San Clemente to San Juan Creek Road in San Juan Capistrano. The overhead sign work is part of the project’s San Juan Creek Road to PCH Segment. The remaining work on this portion of the project includes realignment of the median barrier, landscaping installation and final striping.
(Source: OCTA Blog, 7/31/2017)

In February 2018, it was reported that this project was nearing completion. In the segment from San Juan Creek Road to PCH/Camino Las Ramblas, crews have finished placing the final cap of asphalt and are striping lanes into their final configuration on this section of the project. In the PCH/Camino Las Ramblas to Avenida Vista Hermosa segment, crews were removing debris along the median in the coming weeks to prepare this segment for final striping. In the Avenida Vista Hermosa to Avenida Pico segment, final paving and striping was completed on Avenida Pico, and the roadway is now in its final configuration. During the end of February, crews were finalizing signal timing and completing landscaping. On the freeway, crews still need to place final paving and striping, which requires nighttime temperatures of 50 degrees or higher. All of this working, including the opening of the carpool lines, should be completed in March 2018.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $5,978,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Dana Point and San Clemente from south of Camino De Estrella Road (≊ 005 ORA 5.785) to south of Via California Road (≊ 005 ORA 6.611) that will construct an auxiliary lane between two interchanges and widen overcrossing structure to alleviate traffic delay.

Camino Capistrano (≊ 005 ORA 8.686)

In January 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Orange County that will widen southbound on and off ramps at Camino Capistrano (≊ 005 ORA 8.686), reconfigure the hook-ramp interchange and construct roadway improvements on I-5 in the city of San Juan Capistrano. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated project cost is $19,015,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10.

In May 2016, it was reported that developers of the 416-home Pacifica San Juan development are looking to make life easier for I-5 drivers who use the often-backed-up northbound Camino Capistrano exit. Work will begin in late May 2016 to convert the disjointed intersection at the top of the off-ramp into a roundabout, aiming to smooth the flow of traffic. The roundabout is part of an agreement between the developers and the city to complete a 257-acre residential project originally approved in 1992. The project has had stops and starts, from a landslide to the recession to bankruptcy of the financial backer, officials said. The City Council, on May 17, approved a five-year extension of the agreement, which was to expire this year, so a new builder, Taylor Morrison Homes, can see it through. The development is between the intersection of Camino las Ramblas at Avenida California and Vista Marina at Valle Road, east of I-5, south and east of McCracken Hill, south of San Juan Meadows and west of Lomas San Juan.
(Source: OC Register, 5/24/2016)

In December 2016, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Juan Capistrano along Route 5 on Camino Capistrano, consisting of collateral facilities (12-Ora-5-PM 8.3/8.6). The City, by freeway agreement dated April 17, 2012, agreed to accept title, and by Resolution dated August 2, 2016, agreed to waive the 90- day notice requirement and accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

San Juan Creek Road Roundabout (ORA 8.8)

In July 2019, the Summer 2019 Mile Marker was published, which reported on the new connection at San Juan Creek Road. Prior to 2017, drivers entering or getting off the freeway at Exit 82 for San Juan Creek Road had to contend with an intersection at Valle Road and La Novia Avenue where five road segments came together. The five-leg intersection featured a challenging geometry with poor sight lines and awkward turning movements for drivers. In addition, the lack of traffic signals contributed to both congestion and directional confusion. Following eight months of intersection control analysis, a roundabout intersection was selected as the preferred alternative. Compared with other options, the roundabout required the least right-of-way acquisition and had the highest benefit-tocost ratio. It also cost the least to construct and maintain, and brought safety advantages over signalized intersections. Construction began in June 2016. The design consists of a landscaped center median, a circulating roadway with a width of 20 feet, and single lane approaches on Valle Road, La Novia Avenue and the I-5 entrance and exit ramps. The steep grade on La Novia, hillside conditions in the area, and proximity of the intersection to the freeway increased the difficulty level of the work. They also had to keep the interchange open during the rework. Ten months after construction began, the $1.6 million roundabout opened to traffic in April 2017. San Juan Capistrano arranged for funding from the developer. The American Public Works Association, Southern California Chapter, recognized the project in 2017 as its Traffic, Mobility and Beautification Project of the Year. The Los Angeles chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers honored the I-5/La Novia Roundabout as its Roadway and Highway Project of the Year in 2018.
(Source: Summer 2019 Mile Marker: Answer to Traffic Woes Comes Full Circle)

Ortega Highways Interchange (≊ 005 ORA 9.603)

I-5 Ortega InterchangeIn December 2005, the OCTA approved use of Measure M money to widen the I-5 interchange with Ortega Highway (Route 74). In April 2012, it was reported that groundbreaking on the project will occur in early 2013. The first phase of construction entails rebuilding the Ortega Highway overpass, first demolishing the south side of the bridge and diverting traffic to two lanes on the north side. It also includes widening the overpass and diverting traffic to southbound lanes and building the first portions of the realigned Del Obispo and a new loop-shaped northbound on-ramp. During this first phase, the southbound on-ramp will be closed temporarily so it can be raised 4 feet; the existing northbound on-ramp will be closed to allow for construction of the new one; and Ortega Highway will be closed to traffic to complete the reconstruction of the overpass. In the second phase, travelers will be able to drive on the new Del Obispo alignment—which will eliminate the left-hand turn off Ortega Highway—while work continues on the northbound on-ramp. CalTrans has set aside $28 million to buy the land it needs to complete the interchange project. Businesses that will be demolished include the Chevron gas stations on the east and west sides of Ortega, Arby's and Jack in the Box.
(Source: San Juan Capistrano Patch, April 2, 2012)

In January 2013, it was reported that work on the Ortega interchange would begin in mid-February 2013. The $86.2 million project will completely rebuild the Ortega Highway bridge over I-5, construct a new northbound loop on-ramp, reconfigure the northern portion of Del Obispo Street leading to the bridge and apply several changes to existing on- and off-ramps. Estimated completion is Spring 2015. Additional information on this project can be found here.
(Source: San Juan Capistrano Patch, 1/11/2013)

In June 2015, it was reported that work on the Interstate 5 (I-5)/Ortega Highway Interchange Improvement Project is 80% complete, and the project is expected to wrap up sometime in late 2015. The $86 million project, which began construction in February 2013, widens the Ortega Highway bridge as well as the existing ramps and adds a loop on-ramp to northbound I-5. The project also realigns Ortega Highway to curve into Del Obispo Street. This will improve traffic flow on Ortega Highway as well as ease regional commutes. The deck for the second half of the new bridge was poured at the end of May 2015. The wood forms supporting the structure are set to be removed by late June or early July. Concrete pours to fill the small gap between the north and south sides of the bridge are scheduled for mid- to late July 2015. In late June, motorists will see crews placing white foam blocks at the southbound I-5 off-ramp to Ortega. These strong, lightweight blocks, known as geofoam, are used as fill for the ramp, taking the place of dirt, which requires time to compact. The northbound on-ramp and the remaining portion of the southbound off-ramp are scheduled to be paved by the end of July, but they won’t open until the bridge opens in late August or early September 2015.
(Source: OCTA, 6/16/2015)

In September 2015, it was reported that construction was completed on the Ortega Highway interchange with I-5. The California Department of Transportation and the Orange County Transportation Authority began improvements on the intersection of Ortega Highway and I-5 in February 2013 to relieve traffic congestion around San Juan Capistrano’s primary connection to the freeway. The $81 million project was finished the first week of September 2015 with improved traffic flow and freeway access. Construction included remodeling the bridge over the freeway, widening on- and off-ramps and a new northbound on-ramp loop. The new plans also smoothed out the traffic flow west of the freeway by making Ortega Highway lead into Del Obisbo street and diminishing two intersections to one. The project was officially opened on October 1, 2015. The 2.5-year project includes a reconstructed Ortega Highway bridge over the I-5 freeway, increasing the number of lanes on the bridge from four to eight, including turn lanes and through lanes, realignment of Ortega Highway west of the I-5 into the downtown area of San Juan Capistrano, and a new northbound loop on-ramp; and widened north and south I-5 on- and off-ramps to improve traffic flow. The project highlights a “bridging of history,” as San Juan Capistrano’s Spanish architectural style is reflected in colored concrete on the new bridge and textured retaining walls that were painted by hand. All lanes on the bridge and on- and off-ramps are open as of 10/1/2015, and only minor work remains before Caltrans, the lead agency on the project, gives it final approval.
(Source: OC Register, 9/9/2015, 10/6/2015)

In August 2019, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Juan Capistrano (City) along Route 5 at Ortega Highway and Del Obispo Street (12-Ora-5-PM 9.5), consisting of a reconstructed city street. The City by freeway agreement dated April 17, 2012, agreed to accept the relinquishment and by resolution dated April 2, 2019, agreed to waive the 90-day notice requirement and accept title upon relinquishment by the State.
(Source: August 2019 CTC Agenda, Item 2.3c)

PPNO 2655 and Offshoots: Widening - Rte 73 to El Toro Road (~ ORA 12.4/18.698)

In August 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen I-5 from Route 73 (≊ 005 ORA 12.65) to El Toro Road (≊ 005 ORA 18.692). The total estimated cost is $418,474,000 for capital and support, and construction was expected to commence in FY18-19.

The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to adjust the funding down from $78.03K to $73.735K, and move the construction into FY18-19 from FY19-20 (PPNO 2655). In Laguna Niguel, Mission Viejo and Laguna Hills from Route 73 to Oso Parkway. Add general purpose lane in each direction and reconstruct interchanges at Avery Parkway.

It also adds two projects, PPNO 2655D, Widening, Rt 73-Oso Parkway, Seg1 landscaping, $6M, and PPNO 2655B, Widening, Alicia Pkwy-El Toro Rd, Segment 3 (~ ORA 17.489 to ORA 18.698), $69.911M. This implies there is a Phase 2 somewhere in the pipeline from Oso to Alica (~ORA 14.5 to ORA 17.489)

At the end of December 2018, it was reported that one of the projects planned for Orange County was along I-5 from Route 73 to El Toro Road, where a regular traffic lane in each direction will be added between Avery Parkway and Alicia Parkway. A carpool lane in each direction will be extended from El Toro Road to Alicia Parkway. Avery Parkway and La Paz Road interchanges will also be reconstructed. Period: Mid-2019 to late 2024. Oso Parkway to Alicia Parkway segment will be the section under most construction in 2019. Cost: $548 million.
(Source: OC Register, 12/31/2018)

In December 2018, the CTC approved adding the following project to the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (TCIF) list of projects: Project 131 – I-5 Improvement Project (Segment 1) from Route 73 to Oso Parkway (Segment 1) in Orange County . With the support of the Southern California Trade Corridors Coalition, the Orange County Transportation Authority proposes to amend the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund Program by including the I-5 Improvement Project (Segment 1) as Project 131. The proposed project will add general-purpose lanes on I-5, reconstruct the Avery Parkway Interchange (~ ORA 12.958), reconstruct various ramps, and construct auxiliary lane improvements. These improvements will increase the efficiency and productivity of the facility by minimizing delays in the supply chain and helps to reduce the environmental and local community impacts of freight. The I-5 Improvement Project-Segment 1 is estimated to cost $179.7 million and construction is expected to begin in October 2019. Additionally, the CTC approved the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund Project Baseline Agreement and establish this agreement as the basis for project delivery and monitoring for Trade Corridors Improvement Fund Project 131, the I-5 Improvement Project (Segment 1).
(Source: December 2018 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 4.22; Agenda Item 4.23)

In May 2019, the CTC approved programming an additional $2,841,000 in TCIF funds to Construction on TCIF Project 131, I-5 Improvement Project – Segment 1 (PPNO 2655) in Orange County, for a total TCIF programmed amount of $29,832,000. The I-5 Improvement Project – Segment 1 will add one general-purpose lane in each direction on I-5 between Route 73 and Oso Parkway (approximately 2.2 miles), reconstruct the Avery Parkway Interchange, reconstruct ramps at Avery Parkway, Crown Valley Parkway, and Oso Parkway, and construct auxiliary lane improvements. Segment 1 is part of a larger project to improve the I-5 between Route 73 and El Toro Road. The I-5 Improvement project – Segment 1 received approval for $26,991,000 in TCIF funding at the December 2018 Commission meeting. Since then, a cost increase of $9,274,000 was identified as part of the final project cost estimating project as well as an analysis of the January 2019 construction bids for the adjacent Segment 2 project. The construction bids indicated higher per unit costs for concrete and Time Related Overhead items. To cover the cost increase, it is proposed to program an additional $2,841,000 in TCIF funding and add $6,433,000 in Highway Infrastructure Program funding. The additional $2,841,000 in TCIF funding will be made available from project close-out savings. The project is on schedule to receive a construction allocation at the June 2019 Commission meeting pending concurrent approval of two Resolutions of Necessity on the May 2019 Agenda.
(Source: May 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1c.(5); Agenda Item 4.27)

In June 2019, it was reported that Orange County transportation officials broke ground on a $581 million I-5 improvement project in south Orange County between Route 73 and El Toro Road. The project is largely funded by OC Go, the county’s half-cent sales tax for transportation. The project that will add a regular lane in each direction, extend a second carpool lane between Alicia Parkway and El Toro Road, and improve interchanges and streets. The project is scheduled to be completed in 2025 and will be built in three segments. Several streets that intersect the freeway also will be improved and widened, as well as ramps that enter and exit the freeway. Those major intersection improvements include La Paz Road in Mission Viejo and Laguna Hills, and Avery Parkway in Mission Viejo and Laguna Niguel. The overpass at Los Alisos Boulevard in Lake Forest and Laguna Hills also will be widened. Newly constructed retaining walls will include designs reflecting the ranching heritage of the local communities.
(Source: PR Newswire, 6/6/2019; OCTABlog, 6/20/2019)

In June 2019, the CTC approved an allocation of $121,809,000 for the State-Administered Multi-Funded Local Partnership Program (LPP) (Formulaic)/State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP)/Proposition 1B Trade Corridor Improvement Fund (TCIF) I-5 Widening, Segment 1 (Route 73 to Oso Parkway) (PPNO 2655; ProjID 1214000096) project (12-ORA-5 12.4/14.5). I-5 in Laguna Niguel, Mission Viejo and Laguna Hills from Route 73 to Oso Parkway. Add general purpose lane in each direction and reconstruct interchanges at Avery Parkway. Resolution E-14-37; August 2014.) (Right of Way Certification: 05/21/2019) (RIP CONST savings of $84,000 to be moved to RIP CON ENG.) (Contribution from other sources: $20,754,000.) ALLOCATION IS CONTINGENT UPON APPROVAL OF A BUDGET REVISION BY THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE.
(Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5s.(7))

In February 2020, OCTA provided updates on this project, noting that construction will be done in three segments. Crews began work on the first segment from Oso Parkway to Alicia Parkway in 2019. In March 2020, construction was scheduled to begin on the second segment, a 2.1-mile stretch between Route 73 and Oso Parkway that borders Mission Viejo, Laguna Hills, Aliso Viejo, and Laguna Niguel. Improvements include adding one general purpose lane to increase capacity and reconstructing Avery Parkway to expand it from four to six lanes, increase bike lane width, install sidewalks on both sides of the street, and construct monument walls under the bridge featuring a pastoral ranch theme. Other project improvements include new and improved merging lanes and the conversion of carpool lanes to continuous access to make it easier to enter and exit.
(Source: OCTA Blog, 2/4/2020)

In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which deleted the programmed PPNO 2655B "Widening, Alicia Pkwy-El Toro Rd, Segment 3", and delayed the programmed funding for PPNO 2655D "Widening, Rt 73-Oso Parkway, Seg1 landscaping" from FY22-23 to FY 24-25. It appeared to leave unchanged the programmed funding for PPNO 2655 "Widening, Rt 73-Oso Parkway, Segment 1".
(Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

In May 2020, the CTC approved the following allocation: $9,388,000. 12-Ora-5 17.1/18.9. PPNO 12-2655B. ProjID 1214000100 EA 0K023. I-5 Improvement from Alicia Parkway to El Toro Road - Segment 3. In Laguna Hills, Mission Viejo and Lake Forest from Alicia Parkway to El Toro Road. Extend general purpose lane (southbound) from 1.1 mile south of Alicia Parkway to north of Los Alisos; extend 2nd HOV lane (southbound) between north of Alicia Parkway and south of El Toro Road; extend 2nd HOV lane (northbound) 1.8 miles; replace auxiliary lanes. Allocation: CON ENG $1,261,000; CONST $8,127,000. (As part of this allocation request, the Department is requesting to extend the period of project completion an additional 9 months beyond the 36 month deadline.) (Contribution from other sources: $127,227,000.) (The Department is requesting to add CON ENG to ensure that Caltrans has sufficient state funding to directly draw down for construction support which was omitted when programmed originally.)
(Source: May 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5s.(1))

El Toro Interchange Project

Rte 5 El Toro InterchangeIn July 2018, a public information meeting was held on a proposed modification of the I-5 / El Toro Road Interchange to improve traffic flow, optimize traffic signalization, reduce queuing at freeway on- and off-ramps, and reduce congestion at and through local street intersections adjacent to the I-5 / El Toro Road Interchange within the cities of Lake Forest, Laguna Hills and Laguna Woods. As of July 2018, the project is in the environmental review and preliminary engineering process. An Initial Study (IS) and Environmental Assessment (EA), with proposed Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) will be prepared to evaluate potential effects that could result from the proposed project. The environmental phase started in May 2017 and is anticipated to be completed by late 2019. The draft IS/EA is anticipated to be released for public review and comment in mid-2019. The information meeting presented the following options in addition to the default "no build": (•) Intersection modifications; (•) Flyover interchange; (•) Diverging Diamond; (•) Hook Ramp
(Sources: On the Move Blog, 7/18/2018; ElToro Road Interchange Project Page, July 2018)

In April 2019, it was reported that Caltrans was again conducing public information sessions on the El-Toro Interchange. The project goal is to reduce traffic congestion on the freeway and surrounding streets by improving on-ramps and off-ramps and optimizing traffic signal operations to keep traffic moving. Currently in the environmental review and preliminary engineering phase,  the I-5 El Toro interchange project is part of OC Go (also known as Measure M), Orange County’s half-cent sales tax for transportation improvements. The meetings announced the availability of the Draft EIR, inviting public comments. At the time of the meeting, there were two build alternatives: Build Alternative #2: Flyover and Build Alternative #4: Collector Distributor and Hook Ramps (includes Design Option B).
(Source: OCTA On The Move Blog, 4/18/2019)

PPNO 2473: Rt 405 to Rt 55 Widening (12-Ora-5, PM 21.3/30.3)

The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $12,686 of Advance Project Development Element (APDE) funding for PS&E in FY22-23 for PPNO 2473, Widening, Rt 405-Rt 55

In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which changed the agency for PPNO 2743 from OCTA to Caltrans, changed the title to "Widening, Rt 405-Yale Ave, Segment 1 (LPP)" (previously it was to Route 55). It also changed the programmed funding from $12,628K to $95.338, and pushed the work back to FY24-25. Yale Ave is ORA R25.831.
(Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

In May 2020, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the Interstate 5 (I-5) Improvement Project from Interstate 405 (I-405) to State Route 55 (SR 55) (12-Ora-5, PM 21.3/30.3), which will widen I-5 between I-405 and Route 55
in Orange County. (PPNO 2743). This project is located on I-5 between I-405 and Route 55 through the cities of Irvine and Tustin in Orange County. In cooperation with the Orange County Transportation Authority the project proposes to widen I-5 between I-405 and Route 55. The proposed project would reduce congestion and improve operation efficiency. This project is divided into two segments. Segment 1 is from I-405 to Yale Avenue and Segment 2 is from Yale Avenue to Route 55.   Segment 1 is currently programmed in the 2020 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for $95,338,000 in  Regional Shares for Construction Capital and Construction Support. The project in its entirety is not fully funded. The estimated total project cost is $417,000,000, which includes funding from Surface Transportation Block Grant, Local funds, STIP and LLP. Construction is estimated to begin fiscal year 2024-2025. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2020 STIP.
(Source: May 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

In October 2006, the CTC considered a resolution to relinquish right of way in the city of Tustin, between Browning Avenue (≊ 005 ORA R28.59) and Pasadena Road (≊ 005 ORA 30.154), consisting of frontage roads.

HOV Lane Project Rte 55 to Rte 57 PPNO 2883A - Tustin (≊ 005 ORA 31.072) to Orange (≊ 005 ORA 33.983)

5 Santa Ana HOV LanesIn June 2015, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Orange County that will add one HOV Lane in each direction on a 2.9-mile portion of I-5 within the city of Santa Ana. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program. The estimated cost is $42,471,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program.

In May 2016, the OCTA reported that the roject to improve traffic congestion on I-5 between Route 55 and Route 57 is moving forward. The section of I-5, used by more than 390,000 motorists each day, is currently subject to delays that are expected to increase over time. By 2030, the number of daily travelers is expected to rise to 464,000 – an increase of 19 percent. OCTA, in partnership with Caltrans, is adding a second carpool lane in each direction to relieve traffic congestion, alleviate bottlenecks and improve traffic operations on this corridor within the cities of Santa Ana, Orange and Tustin. The project also includes removing the I-5/Main Street carpool on- and off-ramps. The project is in the final design stage. In this stage, project information is reviewed and updated, the scope of the project is refined, and data is collected on a number of factors such as the latest traffic operations, utility locations, existing road and bridge conditions, terrain and soil properties and drainage. Experts including transportation planners, engineers, environmentalists, landscape architects, geologists and others use the data to develop a complete set of project plans that include a refined estimate of the construction costs and best practices for the construction phase. The plans are about two-thirds complete. Construction is expected to begin in early 2018 and continue through 2020.
(Source: OCTA Blog, 5/17/2016)

The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to delete this project, as the funds have been allocated for FY18-19.

At the end of December 2018, the OCTA seemed to contradict the 2018 STIP. It was reported that along I-5 between Route 55 and Route 57 a second carpool lane in each direction will be added. The concrete barrier adjacent to the existing lanes will be demolished. The demolition will require overnight closures on northbound I-5. Construction Period: Mid-2019 to Mid-2021. Cost: $41.6 million.
(Source: OC Register, 12/31/2018)

In February 2019, it was reported that OCTA and Caltrans were kicking off construction of the I-5 Central County Improvement Project, which will add a second carpool lane in each direction on I-5 between Route 55 and Route 57. Traffic on that stretch of I-5 is expected to climb to more than 400,000 vehicles a day by 2035, a seven percent increase from today’s traffic volume. This two-year project will reduce existing and future traffic congestion and travel time, as well as improve overall traffic operations. The new carpool lanes will be striped for continuous access allowing drivers to move freely between lanes. The project will require removal of the concrete barrier between the carpool and regular lanes and demolition of the I-5/Main Street HOV ramp to make room for the additional carpool lanes. The $41.6 million project is funded with federal dollars and by OC Go (also known as Measure M), Orange County’s half-cent sales tax for transportation improvements.
(Source: OCTA Blog, 2/7/2019; Project Page)

In April 2019, it was reported that work has begun on the I-5 Central Project between Route 55 and Route 57. The I-5/Main Street carpool on- and off-ramps have been permanently closed to allow crews to perform preliminary work leading up to the bridge demolition in early summer 2019. Other activities include removing overhead signs, adjusting traffic signal adjustments, re-striping lanes and installing concrete barriers on southbound Main Street, reducing it to two lanes near the Discovery Cube. Motorists who normally use the Main Street carpool ramp can exit Broadway to get to Main Street. In addition, the existing auxiliary lane on northbound I-5 between Grand Avenue and 17th Street has been closed to create room for a work area to construct new retaining walls and to install new concrete pavement. The Grand Avenue on-ramp and the 17th Street off-ramp remain open.
(Source: OCTA Blog, 4/18/2019)

HOT/Express Lane Project Rte 55 to LA County Line (≊ 005 ORA 31.072) to Orange (≊ 005 ORA 33.983 to ≊ 005 ORA 42.36L)

In December 2019, it was reported that Caltrans was actively studying creating toll lanes on I-5 from south of Route 55 to the Los Angeles County line as soon as 2028. Orange County Transportation Authority board members were briefed Monday, Dec. 9, on plans for further exploring an expansion of the county’s network of tolled lanes – it’s unclear now if that would mean a conversion of all or just some carpool lanes. OCTA staff has started meeting with local officials to hear their thoughts, and the board in April will discuss which freeways the agency could prioritize. It’s not about the revenue, they said, but about finding help for the county’s congested freeways, especially the carpool lanes. In late November, Caltrans finalized a study that says tolling carpool lanes on I-5 from Red Hill Avenue in Tustin to the Los Angeles County line could reduce congestion by up to 42%. By 2035, drivers could be saving up to 11 minutes on general-purpose lanes and up to 43 minutes on tolled lanes, the study said. Such a project could cost from $329 million to $1 billion.
(Source: OC Register, 12/10/2019)

In January 2010, the CTC approved relinqishment of right of way in the city of Santa Ana along Route 5 between Santa Ana Boulevard (≊ 005 ORA 31.78) and Seventeenth Street (≊ 005 ORA 32.507), consisting of relocated and reconstructed city streets and frontage roads

In July 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Santa Ana along Route 5 between Santa Ana Boulevard and Seventeenth Street (12-Ora-5-PM 31.8), consisting of a collateral facility that is appurtenant to a previously relinquished collateral facility and was inadvertently omitted from said relinquishment.

In January 2018, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Santa Ana along Route 5 between Seventeenth Street and Main Street (12-Ora-5-PM 32.5/33.3), consisting of collateral facilities. The City, by freeway agreement dated February 21 1989, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State, and by resolution, dated November 21, 2017, waived the 90-day notice requirement.
(Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.3c)

Artistic Panels

Newspaper reports in February 2009 have indicated that art projects installed along I-5 S of Route 22 (≊ 005 ORA 33.983) are melting and shredding. These panels were part of a $956,000 project by the California Department of Transportation "to provide aesthetic enhancements on existing sound walls and to deter graffiti where sound wall vine coverings are not feasible." Caltrans put about 2,400 of these panels on freeways throughout Orange County. The project was funded by specifically designated funds for transportation-related beautification projects from the Transportation Enhancement Activities (TEA) program within the federal Intermodal Surface Transportation Enhancement Act. Each panel cost approximately $250, and were created by Orange County artist Janet Inez Adams. There are four images: one abstract flower, and three wildflowers native to Orange County. Caltrans believes the damage to the panels are from vehicular accidents, not vandalism.

In May 2019, the CTC added the following into the SHOPP: 12-Ora-5 30.8, On I-5 In Santa Ana, at Main Street. Repair precast wall panels. PPNO 2839, Proj ID 1219000043. Total Cost: $542,000.
(Source: CTC Agenda, March 2019 Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Item 24)

Orange County — Route 22 (≊ 005 ORA 33.983) to LA County Line

I-5 has been beautifully reconstructed between Route 91 (≊ 005 ORA 42.072L) and Route 22 (≊ 005 ORA 34.084). North of Route 91, the freeway narrows to three lanes and the pavement gets horrid. However, it appears that construction to fix this section of I-5 (specifically, from Route 91 to the Los Angeles County border) together with a companion project up to I-605, should begin in 2006, depending on land acquisition and bond sales. Caltrans needs to acquire 68 parcels for the freeway, including full and partial properties. The state's goal is to purchase all land by next June. This has started showing up on the CTC RADAR. The August meeting agenda shows an amendment to designate $21M in funding for the Los Angeles County segment widening, and there is also discussion on the Orange County portion of the widening.

In August 2016, the CTC authorized relinquishment of two segments of right of way in the city of Anaheim (City) along Route 5 on Disney Way (12-Ora-5-PM 34.0/36.9), consisting of collateral facilities. The City, by freeway agreement dated November 9, 1992 and by amendment to freeway agreement dated July 9, 1996, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The City, by letter dated May 20, 2016, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept the relinquishment.

In December 2006, the CTC considered a resolution to relinquish right of way in the city of Orange, at Chapman Avenue (≊ 005 ORA 35.012), consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets and frontage road.

In August 2010, they authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 between the southerly city limits and South Harbor Boulevard (12-Ora-5-PM 35.2/37.0), consisting of collateral facilities.

In August 2012, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Santa Cruz Boulevard (12-Ora-5-PM 35.6), consisting of collateral facilities; it also relinquished right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Anaheim Way (12-Ora-5-PM 35.6/35.9), consisting of collateral facilities.

In January 2011, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on South Anaheim Boulevard (≊ 005 ORA 36.635), consisting of collateral facilities; right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Gene Autry Way (≊ 005 ORA 35.978), Santa Cruz Street (≊ 005 ORA 35.746), and Stanford Court (≊ 005 ORA 35.775), consisting of collateral facilities, and right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 at Katella Avenue (≊ 005 ORA 36.257), consisting of collateral facilities.

2007 CMIA. Two projects on I-5 in Orange County were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding. These projects were a transitway interchange at Gene Autry Way ($17.5 million) (≊ 005 ORA 35.978) and the I-5/Route 74 interchange ($38 million). Neither was recommended for funding.

In January 2011, the CTC reqlinquished right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 at Katella Avenue (≊ 005 ORA 36.257), consisting of collateral facilities.

In July 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the City of Anaheim, between Cherry Street (≊ 005 ORA 37.048) and Euclid Way (≊ 005 ORA 39.486), consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets, frontage roads and cul-de-sacs.

In July 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Palm Street (12-Ora-5-PM 37.1/37.3), consisting of relocated or reconstructed city streets and frontage roads.

In August 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 between Ball Road (≊ 005 ORA 37.622) and Santa Ana Street (≊ 005 ORA 38.528), consisting of reconstructed city streets.

In July 2006, the CTC considered Resolution No. R-3638, relinquishment of right of way between PM 37.7 and 37.9 in the City of Anaheim, on Disneyland Drive between Ball Road and 0.2 mile northerly of Ball Road, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city street and frontage road.

In August 2012, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Illinois Street (12-Ora-5-PM 38.1), consisting of collateral facilities; and right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Westmont Drive, consisting of collateral facilities.

In January 2011, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 at the intersection of South Walnut Street (≊ 005 ORA 38.544) and West Broadway Street (≊ 005 ORA 38.67), consisting of collateral facilities.

In August 2011, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on W. Lincoln Avenue (≊ 005 ORA 38.93) and N. Manchester Avenue (≊ 005 ORA 39.192), consisting of collateral facilities.

In June 2014, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Euclid Street, Loara Street, and Wilshire Avenue (12-Ora-5-PM 39.1/39.6), consisting of reconstructed city streets. The City, by freeway agreement dated November 9, 1992, and by amendment to freeway agreement dated July 9, 1996, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expires June 8, 2014.

In December 2004, the CTC considered a resolution to relinquish right of way in the City of Anaheim, at Mariposa Place (≊ 005 ORA 39.568), consisting of a cul-de-sac. The City, by freeway agreement dated November 9, 1992 and by amendment to freeway agreement dated July 9, 1996, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expired November 10, 2004.

In August 2012, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Fir Avenue, Ivy Lane, Maple Street, Holly Street, and Catalpa Avenue (12-Ora-5-PM 40.4/40.6), consisting of collateral facilities.

In June 2018, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim (City) along Route 5, on Ventura Street, consisting of collateral facilities (12-Ora-5-PM 41.1). The City, by freeway agreement dated November 9, 1992 and by amendment to freeway agreement dated July 9, 1996, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expired May 3, 2018.
(Source: CTC Agenda, June 2018 Agenda Item 2.3c)

In March 2016, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Buena Park along Route 5 from Western Avenue to Stanton Avenue (12-Ora-5-PM 43.1/43.7), consisting of relocated or reconstructed city streets. The City, by freeway agreement dated June 28, 2005, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expired January 18, 2016.

In November 2006, the Control City for Orange County was changed to Santa Ana. However, it isn't signed consistently.

In October 2010, the widening of I-5 between Route 91 and the northern Orange County line was completed.

Los Angeles County — General General

In June 2015, it was reported that, in its latest analysis of California Highway Patrol data from 2012, the Southern California Associations of Governments (SCAG) included sections of this route in its list of freeway sections in L.A. County and the Inland Empire with the highest concentrations of truck crashes per mile annually. These sections were I-710 at Route 60 in the East L.A. Interchange, with 7.2 accidents; I-710 between I-105 and the Route 91, with 5.8 accidents; the convergence of Route 60 and Route 57, with six crashes; and I-5 between I-710 and I-10, also in the East L.A. Interchange, with 6.6 crashes. The analysis also identified that the second-highest number of truck crashes can be found on three parts of Route 60 between I-605 and I-710, between the I-15 and Route 71 — the Chino Valley Highway, formerly known as the Corona Expressway — and immediately east of I-215. That category also includes I-10 between Route 71 and I-215, I-605 between Route 60 and I-10, and Route 710 between Route 91 and the Port of Long Beach as well as between I-5 and I-105. With the nation's largest combined harbor, the Los Angeles area also is one of the busiest in the country, if not the world, for trucking. I-710 often handles more than 43,000 daily truck trips, Route 60 up to 27,000 and I-5 about 21,500, according to Caltrans.
(Source: LA Times, 6/2/2015)

Los Angeles County - Orange County Line to Route 710

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

Interstate 5 Major Improvement Project — General

Detailed information on the I-5 Improvement project may be found at http://www.dot.ca.gov/dist07/travel/projects/I-5/. The project is divided into the following segments, with the indicated schedule as of 2011:

Segment Name Location on I-5 Project Approval Anticipated Initiate Right of Way Process Begin Construction
Carmenita Interchange Carmenita Road Approved 6/20/01 Summer 2008 Winter 2011
A Route 91 to I-605 Approved 12/31/07 Summer 2009 Winter 2011
B I-605 to I-710 February 2015 February 2017 Winter 2019
C I-710 Interchange February 2015 February 2017 Winter 2019

Interstate 5 Major Improvement Project — Route 91 (≊ 005 ORA 42.36L) to I-605 (≊ 005 LA 6.811)
Overall Project

[TCRP 42.1]According to plans, commuters will have to wait until 2016 to see what is predicted to be a $1.4-billion expansion from the Orange County line through the L.A. County cities of La Mirada, Norwalk, Santa Fe Springs and part of Downey to the junction with I-605 Freeway. This is TCRP Project #42.1 ’150; Route 5; widen Santa Ana Freeway to 10 lanes (two HOV & eight mixed flow), Orange County line to Route 605, with related major arterial improvements, in Los Angeles County ’150; Orange County line to Route 605. This project is to widen Route 5 from six lanes to ten lanes (two HOV and eight mixed flow) from the Orange County line to Route 605 and will also improve related major arterials. This project will improve the level of service during peak hours and improve access to regional transit. The project is now projected to be completed in FY 2015/2016. The funding for this project includes $387 million in funds from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and SAFETEA-LU monies.

In April 2007, it was announce that full funding ’150; $1.2 billion ’150; has been secured to widen the Santa Ana (I-5) Freeway at the gateway between Orange and Los Angeles counties, from the county line in Buena Park north to the San Gabriel River (605) Freeway. Construction on the 6.4-mile stretch is to begin in 2009 and will take about seven years to finish. In Norwalk, 21 homes must be razed to make way for the wider freeway. Five homes have already been bulldozed as of April 2007, the remaining residents must vacate by November 2007. In Buena Park, the Western Avenue bridge over I-5 was demolished in November 2006. The Stanton Avenue and Beach Boulevard bridges will come down next, though some lanes will always remain open on Beach as that bridge is slowly dismantled beginning in spring 2008. Work on the Orange County side is scheduled for completion in 2010.
(Source: Orange County Register, 4/5/2007)

In March 2007, the CTC was asked to comment on the Draft EIR. This EIR provided the following options:

In July 2008, the CTC approved an increase in funding for this project due to cost increases. This project will widen I-5 with HOV and mixed-flow lanes from just south of Artesia Avenue to just north of the Florence Avenue overcrossing. The project will eliminate the bottleneck as a result of a lane-drop between the Orange/Los Angeles county line, improve the performance of major intersections and interchanges along the corridor, and improve access to regional transit and HOV facilities. This amendment proposes to increase the programmed amount for PA&ED, PS&E and Right of Way Support to address GF-RIP support expenditures on the project. These support components are now capped at this programming level for this fund type and any future increases, if necessary, will be funded through other means. It is also proposed to increase construction support from $34,500,000 to $80,068,000. Construction support is currently funded with $34,500,000 in LACMTA funds. An additional $45,568,000 is needed to fully fund the component.

According to material submitted to the August 2008 CTC, the project in Los Angeles County would widen the facility from three lanes in each direction to four mixed-flow lanes and one HOV lane in each direction for a total of ten lanes near Buena Park. The project is programmed with Corridor Mobility Improvement Account funds, Regional Improvement Program funds, Interregional Improvement Program funds, Traffic Congestion Relief Program funds, Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Program funds, Federal Demonstration funds, and local funds. The total estimated project cost, capital and support, is $1,240,524,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11.

Rte 5 Construction Segmentation Orange County Line to Rte 605In September 2010, the CTC received notice of a proposal to amend the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) Program, the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and the Traffic Congestion Relief Program (TCRP) for the Route 5 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV), Orange County Line to Route 605 project (PPNO 2808) in Los Angeles County as follows: Split the project into five constructible segments Revise the programmed components for the overall project Revise the schedule for staging and construction purposes. This project is a $1.24 billion project and includes $387,000,000 in Proposition 1B - CMIA funding. This project will widen Interstate 5 through the addition of one mixed-flow lane and one HOV lane in each direction from just south of Artesia Avenue to just north of the Florence Avenue overcrossing. The Route 5 corridor is one of the most congested areas in the Los Angeles basin. It connects Los Angeles county (population 10 million) and Orange County (population 3 million), two of California’s largest counties. Construction of this project will eliminate the bottleneck as a result of the lane drop between the Orange / Los Angeles County line, improve the performance of major intersections and interchanges along the corridor and improve access to regional transit and HOV facilities. The project will also upgrade the corridor to meet current Department and FHWA design standards, improve freeway Level of Service during AM and PM peak hours, reduce travel time delays and congestion related accidents and improve the mobility in the region. The proposal is to split the $1.24 billion project into five manageable segments to facilitate construction staging and delivery, and maximize efficiency and contract bidding competitiveness. The proposed segments are:

  1. I-5 South; OCL to Route 605 - North Fork Coyote Creek Overcrossing to Marquardt Avenue
  2. I-5 South; OCL to Route 605 - Artesia Boulevard (OCL) to Coyote Creek Overcrossing
  3. I-5 South; OCL to Route 605 - Shoemaker Avenue to Silverbow Avenue
  4. I-5 South; OCL to Route 605 - Silverbow Avenue to Orr and Day Road Overhead
  5. I-5 South; OCL to Route 605 - Orr and Day OH to Route 605; and striping for entire project - Segments 1-5

The project is funded from a variety of sources, including $387 million of CMIA funds. The Proposition 1B Bond Act mandates that the inclusion of a project in the CMIA program be based on demonstration that the project can commence construction or implementation no later than December 31, 2012. The project location spans through both industrial and residential areas, with the need to acquire or obtain easements for 344 parcels. Right of way issues on a project of this magnitude are substantial. There were delays due to changes in the Code of Civil Procedures for Order of Possessions, changes in the Streets and Highways Code regarding the right of way appraisal process and delays due to the closure of Department 59 of the Los Angeles Superior Court which hears eminent domain cases. Many parcels were identified as needing further investigation, monitoring, or clean up, leading to additional delays in the right of way process. Right of way mapping and acquisition activities were further delayed due to staffing issues related to the state mandated furlough program and the lack of available STIP and TCRP funding.

In November 2010, the CTC amended the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) Program, the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and the Traffic Congestion Relief Program (TCRP) for the Route 5 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV), Orange County Line to Route 605 project (PPNO 2808) in Los Angeles County as follows: ’149; Split the project into five constructible segments ’149; Revise the programmed components for the overall project ’149; Revise the schedule for staging and construction purposes. The Route 5 HOV Orange County Line to Route 605 project (PPNO 2808) is a $1.24 billion project and includes $387,000,000 in Proposition 1B - CMIA funding. This project will widen Interstate 5 through the addition of one mixed-flow lane and one HOV lane in each direction from just south of Artesia Avenue to just north of the Florence Avenue overcrossing. The proposed segments are:

  1. Segment 1 (PPNO 4153): In Santa Fe Springs from North Fork Coyote Creek Overcrossing to Marquardt Avenue. Construct one HOV lane and one mixed-flow lane in each direction; reconstruct the Alondra Avenue/North Fork Coyote Creek Bridges and adjacent frontage roads. ($109,520,000)
  2. Segment 2 (PPNO 2808): In La Mirada, Santa Fe Springs and Cerritos, from the County Line (Artesia Boulevard) to Coyote Creek. Construct one HOV lane and one mixed-flow lane in each direction; reconstruct Valley View Avenue Interchange, Coyote Creek Bridge and adjacent frontage roads. ($416,204,000)
  3. Segment 3 (PPNO 4154): In Norwalk, from Shoemaker Avenue Bridge to Silverbow Avenue Overcrossing. Construct one HOV lane and one mixed-flow lane in each direction; reconstruct the Silverbow Pedestrian Overcrossing, three bridges and adjacent frontage roads. ($214,421,000)
  4. Segment 4 (PPNO 4155): In Norwalk, from Silverbow Avenue Overcrossing to Orr and Day Overhead. Construct one HOV lane and one mixed-flow lane in each direction; reconstruct three bridges and adjacent frontage roads. ($302,159,000)
  5. Segment 5 (PPNO 4156): In Norwalk, Santa Fe Springs and Downey, from Orr and Day Overhead to Route 605 Interchange. Construct one HOV lane and one mixed-flow lane in each direction; Construct pedestrian overcrossing at Buell Cecilia; reconstruct the Florence Avenue Bridge and widen the railroad overhead. ($198,220,000)

This project is funded from a variety of sources, including $387 million of CMIA funds. The Proposition 1B Bond Act mandates that the inclusion of a project in the CMIA program be based on demonstration that the project can commence construction or implementation no later than December 31, 2012. It is proposed to consolidate the CMIA funding into Segments 1, 3, and 4. These are the segments the Department is confident can be delivered by the 2012 deadline through active risk management. The key areas that have been focused on are right of way acquisition and utilities. Due to issues affecting delivery, the schedule has now slipped as shown in the following table. These issues included the complexities of the project and its affect on the cities along the corridor (La Mirada, Santa Fe Springs, Norwalk, and Downey), the individual City’s concerns that affected negotiation and approval of each City’s Freeway Agreement. Additionally, the project location spans through both industrial and residential areas, with the need to acquire or obtain easements for 344 parcels. Right of way issues on a project of this magnitude are substantial. There were delays due to changes in the Code of Civil Procedures for Order of Possessions, changes in the Streets and Highways Code regarding the right of way appraisal process and delays due to the closure of Department 59 of the Los Angeles Superior Court which hears eminent domain cases. Many parcels were identified as needing further investigation, monitoring, or clean up, leading to additional delays in the right of way process. Right of way mapping and acquisition activities were further delayed due to staffing issues related to the state mandated furlough program and the lack of available STIP and TCRP funding. The most significant right of way challenges are within the limits of segments 2 and 5. These segments include 114 parcels, mostly commercial, with extensive right of way acquisition and utility relocation issues. The overall construction estimate has increased due to the discovery of previously undocumented existing utilities, unanticipated changes to required design strategies and more costly foundation designs due to unfavorable soil conditions in the area. It should be noted, however, that the end of construction and project benefits for the entire corridor will be realized by the end of 2016, as indicated in the original CMIA Baseline Agreement schedule.

In August 2011, the CTC updated the schedule for this project, which will add one HOV lane and one mixed flow lane in each direction on the I-5 mainline freeway, reconstruct Alondra Avenue bridge, Alondra Avenue/North Fork Coyote Creek bridge, and reconstruct adjacent frontage roads. This project was originally planned to be ready for advertisement in March 2011. However, difficulties in obtaining necessary federal and county permits for the project, including right of entry permits to conduct hazardous waste investigations, delayed the project baseline design, R/W and construction milestones. In March 2012, it was reported that construction was about to begin on the $110 million project. The Alondra Boulevard Bridge Project is expected to be completed by mid-2015.

In August 2011, it was reported that construction is expected to start in late 2011 and continue through 2016 on the approximately $1.6 billion, six-mile widening project. The project will include an estimated 365 parcels of land to be acquired. Most of the affected property owners have been notified as of August 2011 that their properties are required and will be visited or have already been visited by agents to discuss the valuation of the site, sale and relocation. The only unknown properties impacted might be a small percentage in the Florence Avenue area, pending completion of design, which is about 80% finished. Plans are to widen the freeway, currently averaging three lanes in each direction, to five lanes both ways including a high occupancy vehicle, or carpool, lane. The widening will match the width of the freeway in Orange County to the point east of La Mirada. The project has been divided into six segments, two in Santa Fe Springs and four in Norwalk:
(Source: Los Angeles Wave)

  1. First to get under way this fall is construction of a new, 10-lane bridge taking Carmenita Road in Norwalk and Santa Fe Springs over the freeway at Excelsior Drive. It will be built beside the current two-lane bridge, which will be demolished when the new structure is completed in late 2015. Also planned are the re-alignment and upgrading of frontage roads between Alondra Boulevard north of Excelsior and Shoemaker Avenue. Estimated cost is $380 million. The 1.2-mile stretch will take about 65 parcels of land.
  2. In early 2012 widening will start on the freeway portion between North Fork Coyote Creek and Marquardt Avenue in Santa Fe Springs with reconstruction of bridges at North Fork Coyote Creek and Alondra Boulevard and upgrading frontage residential roads. Cost is estimated at $110 million. Completion is expected in mid 2015.
  3. Three other segments, all in Norwalk, are:

    • (1) About 1.29 miles from Shoemaker Avenue and Rosecrans Avenue northwest to Silverbow Avenue west of Bloomfield Avenue, including alignment and reconstruction of bridges at Alondra, Shoemaker and Rosecrans and removal of the pedestrian crossing at Silverbow and the re-alignment of the Firestone Boulevard frontage road. It will affect 48 parcels and cost about $214 million. Construction begins in late 2012 and ends in mid 2016.
    • (2) About 1.89 miles from Silverbow Avenue to Orr and Day and Studebaker roads affecting 196 parcels and costing about $302 million. Work includes bridges at San Antonio Drive, Imperial Highway and Pioneer Boulevard and a new southbound off-ramp at Imperial Highway. Construction is to start in late 2012 and end in mid-2016.
    • (3) About 1.71 miles on 56 parcels from Orr and Day Road and Cecilia Street northwest to Florence Avenue and the San Gabriel River at the Downey city limits. Work includes widening bridge structures at Orr and Day and Florence Avenue and construction of a pedestrian crossing at Cecilia and Buell streets. Work is to start in mid-2013 and be completed in late 2016 at a cost of $198 million.
  4. A sixth segment planned is reconstruction of the bridges at Valley View Avenue in La Mirada from Artesia Boulevard northwest to Coyote Creek, upgrading Valley View, Artesia Boulevard and Coyote Creek frontage roads and re-alignment of the Firestone Boulevard frontage road. Cost is estimated at $416 million. Work is to start in mid-2013 and be finished in mid-2016.

In May 2013, it was reported that Caltrans and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LACMTA) propose to amend the CMIA Baseline Agreement, the 2012 STIP and Traffic Congestion Relief Program (TCRP) Project 42 for the Route 5 Carpool Lane-Orange County Line to I-605 project (I-5 South Corridor project) in Los Angeles County to program an additional $35,709,000 from Los Angeles County’s Regional Improvement Program share balance and to update the project funding plan and schedule for the corridor. This solves a known funding gap on the corridor. As has been previously reported, the location of this project is extremely complex, with the Department’s Risk Management Plan indicating potential increases for acquiring right of way and associated costs for delays and hazardous materials. Specifically, city requirements necessitated setbacks more than originally planned which added significant right of way costs and additional complications with public utilities. The FHWA began requirements that property be purchased at the value of existing mortgages if the amounts were higher than fair market value, significantly adding to right of way costs. Additional scope added at the Valley View Bridge also increased right of way and construction costs. In December 2012, the Commission approved a financial allocation adjustment (Assembly Bill 608) for award savings on the I-5 North – Empire/Burbank project, returning $35,709,000 in RIP funds to Los Angeles County’s regional share balance. LACMTA now proposes to program the $35,709,000 to the I-5 South Corridor to fund increases to support and capital components on the various segments. This action, along with the proposal to increase federal demonstration and CMAQ funding will further close the gap in funding for the overall project.

In June 2013, the CTC approved amending the 2012 STIP, the CMIA Baseline Agreement, and TCRP Project #42 for the Route 5 Carpool Lane-Orange County Line to I- 605 project (I-5 South Corridor project) in Los Angeles County to program an additional $35,709,000 from Los Angeles County’s share balance and to update the project funding plan and schedule for the corridor.

In December 2014, it was reported that the project still has four years to go. Contractors for Caltrans have torn the freeway apart, demolished bridges and rebuilt them, and removed some of the off- and on-ramps. It’s all part of the $1.8 billion, 6.7-mile widening project to add a general-purpose lane and a car pool lane on each side to the existing six-lane freeway. The state also has purchased 426 parcels – some in part, other in full – including residential, commercial, industrial, governmental uses. One of the largest to go was the seven-unit shopping center at the northwest corner of Florence Avenue and Orr and Day Road. The widening project consists of six segments – two of which have yet to start. The Alondra Boulevard project – from just north of Valley View Avenue to just north of Alondra is 80% complete. The Carmenita Road segment from just north of Alondra to Shoemaker Avenue is 56% done; Rosecrans and Bloomfield Avenue from Shoemaker to Silverbow Avenue, 43%; and Imperial Highway/Pioneer Boulevard from Silverbow to Orr and Day Road, 42%. The Florence Avenue segment to the north and Valley View Avenue to the south have yet to begin.The next significant milestone expected to be completed will be the new Carmenita Road bridge. The road will be widened from its two-lane width to 10 lanes. It is expected to be completed in mid-2015.
(Source: Pasadena Star News, 11/29/2014)

The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, included PPNO 2808A, Carmenita Rd interchange (IIP)(TCRP)(rpt 6-10)(CCA 6-19, in the Interregional portion of the STIP with no change in programming: $151K in prior year closeout funding.
(Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

Route 5 South HOV Lane-Segment: Route 91 to Coyote Creek

In June 2015, the CTC allocated $19,690,000 towards the widening from from Artesia Boulevard (≊ 005 ORA 42.36L) to Coyote Creek Overcrossing (005 LA 000.34).

Route 5 South HOV Lane-Segment: N Fork Coyote Creek OC to Marquardt Ave

In August 2011, the CTC approved $6,736,000 in Prop 1B state-administered CMIA project fundings for the Route 5 South HOV Lane-Segment 1 in Santa Fe Springs, from North Fork Coyote Creek Overcrossing (005 LA 000.34) to Marquardt Avenue (≊ 005 LA 1.802). This funding will reconstruct Alondra Avenue bridges (≊ 005 LA 1.7), widen I-5 freeway by adding two lanes in each direction (one mixed flow and one HOV), and reconstruct frontage roads.

On November 28, 2011, the CTC awarded the construction contract with a cost savings of 20,308,000, reducing the original CMIA allocation for construction from $65,555,000 to $45,247,000, from the I-5 Carpool Lane - Orange County Line to I-605 (Segment 1) project (PPNO 4153) in Los Angeles County.

Route 5 South HOV Lane-Segment: Valley View / Alondra Bridges

In July 2014, construction began on the $1.8 billion I-5 Freeway expansion near Norwalk. The initial impact was on the northbound lanes between Valley View Avenue (≊ 005 LA 1.204) and Rosecrans Avenue (≊ 005 LA 3.475). Construction will follow through the summer, closing four off- and on-ramps and shifting traffic into other lanes as work is done. The Shoemaker Avenue bridge over the freeway reopened to much fanfare in May. Updated project information can be found at i-5info.com.

Route 5 South HOV Lane-Segment: Carmenita Road

[TCRP 43] In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed widening and improving the SB Carmenita Road Interchange (≊ 005 LA 2.44). This is TCRP Project #43. This project, costing $165 million, should start in summer 2009. In November 2007, the CTC had more information on this interchange. The proposed project is the re-construction of an interchange at Route 5 and Carmenita Road. The project would provide added capacity for two HOV lanes and two mixed flow lanes, as well as provide for a grade separation for a railroad crossing south of the freeway. It has received a mitigated negative EIR. The reconstruction design proposes an arterial overcrossing structure with a railroad grade separation (maintaining existing freeway profiles). The scope of work includes raising the profile grade of Carmenita Road to span both the Route 5 freeway and the Union Pacific Railroad located to the southwest of Route 5. An overcrossing structure above the freeway and an overhead structure above the railroad will be constructed. The interchange will be reconstructed to be consistent with the ultimate configuration of the Route 5 HOV project.

Ground for this segment was broken in late June 2011. The bridge is two lanes wide at present. The new bridge will widen it to 10 lanes, according to Caltrans, with a scheduled completion date of 2015. The $380 million project is financed by federal, state and local funding, which includes $15 million from the state’s 2006 Proposition 1B and $288.7 million programmed through Metro. This project is the first of six, totaling $1.24 billion, to improve I-5 from the Orange County line to the San Gabriel River Freeway (I-605). The Carmenita project will replace the existing two-lane steel overpass with a ten-lane concrete structure nearly five times its current size, and widen the freeway by adding one High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV), or carpool lane, and one general purpose lane in each direction from Alondra Boulevard to Shoemaker Avenue, a distance of 1.2 miles.

Route 5 South HOV Lane-Segment: Shoemaker Ave to Silverbow Ave

Shoemaker SegmentIn April 2012, the CTC approved $335 million total allocation for two segments of the I-5 South Corridor Widening and Improvement Projects from the Los Angeles/Orange County line to I-605 (≊ 005 LA 2.804 to ≊ 005 LA 3.976)

In February 2013, it was reported that work had begun on Segment 3, from Shoemaker Avenue to Silverbow Avenue. This will widen the 5 freeway for 1.2 miles between Shoemaker and Silverbow avenues by adding a general purpose lane and HOV lane in both directions. The project will also widen three bridges over the freeway — at Shoemaker, Rosecrans and Bloomfield. Metro is contributing $42 million of the $214 million cost of the project, with Metro’s money coming from Prop C (1990) and Measure R (2008) sales tax increases approved by county voters. The Rosecrans, Shoemaker and Bloomfield Avenue bridges will be demolished and reconstructed to accommodate the wider freeway.

In January 2018, it was reported that, for the first time since 1954, drivers did not have to use a circuitous detour to get from the northern segment of Bloomfield (~ 005 LA 3.661) to the southern segment. In 1954, construction of I-5 resulted in Bloomfield deadending on the S side of the freeway at Rosecrans Avenue — you could reconnect about a quarter-mile to the east by picking up Firestone and continuing N to Bloomfield. As part of the $1.9 billion I-5 widening project between I-605 and the Orange County line, Caltrans elevated the freeway and created an underpass for Bloomfield (and reconnecting the two ends). Once complete, the existing six-lane freeway will expand with a general purpose and car-pool lanes on each side. Other parts of the major project done include bridges at Alondra Boulevard, Carmenita Road and Shoemaker Avenue. Meanwhile, the new Florence Avenue bridge is expected to open later in 2018. The Norwalk and Pioneer boulevards and Imperial Highway phases also are expected to be completed by the end of 2018. The new Valley View Avenue bridge isn’t expected to open until 2020.
(Source: Whittier Daily News, 1/10/2018)

In November 2018, Caltrans tweeted that "The brand new Norwalk Bl off ramp from NB I-5 in #Norwalk is scheduled to OPEN at 5am Wed 11/21." On 11/30/18, Caltrans District 7 reported that the new Norwalk Blvd. off ramp from northbound I-5 is open to the public after a four month closure (~ LA 4.391). The ramp is part of a project to add lanes to I-5 through Norwalk and to reconstruct the I-5 interchange at Norwalk Blvd. Where the ramp meets Norwalk Blvd., there are now three lanes: left turn to San Antonio Dr; right turn onto Norwalk Blvd.; or straight to Imperial Highway.
(Source: District 7 Blog, 11/30/2018)

In November 2019, it was reported that Caltrans has announced the opening of a fourth lane in each direction of I-5 through Santa Fe Springs and Norwalk. The lane opening is part of a $1.9 billion bond project adding one general purpose lane and one carpool lane in each direction of I-5 between the I-605 and the Orange County line. In October, a fourth northbound lane on the I-5 opened to traffic from Alondra Boulevard to north of Imperial Highway. A fourth southbound lane opened from Imperial Highway down to the Orange County line at Artesia Boulevard. When the Florence Avenue interchange project finishes in spring 2020, Caltrans will extend the open fourth lanes to the I-605 interchange. The entire project is anticipated to wrap up by late 2021, when the Valley View Avenue interchange project completes.
(Source: Downey Patriot, 11/4/2019)

Route 5 South HOV Lane-Segment: Silverbow to Orr and Day Road

In April 2012, the CTC approved $335 million total allocation for two segments of the I-5 South Corridor Widening and Improvement Projects from the Los Angeles/Orange County line to I-605 (≊ 005 LA 2.804 to ≊ 005 LA 3.976)

In May 2013, it was reported that Metro and Caltrans broke ground in late May on the I-5 Carpool Lane Widening/Imperial Highway and Pioneer Boulevard Project, the fourth of six segments to begin construction. The I-5 Carpool Lane Widening/Imperial Highway and Pioneer Boulevard Project will widen nearly two miles of freeway in Norwalk by adding one carpool lane and one regular lane in each direction from Silverbow Avenue to Orr and Day Roads; and bridges at San Antonio Drive, Imperial Highway, and Pioneer Boulevard will be rebuilt to accommodate the wider freeway. The improvements also include a new southbound I-5 off-ramp at Imperial Highway, new sound walls and frontage roads. The project is primarily funded ($167.5 million) by Proposition 1B, a 2006 voter-approved transportation bond. To date, nearly $15 billion in Proposition 1B funds have been put to work statewide. The project also received $104 million in state transportation funds and $30.5 million from Metro’s Proposition C and Measure R.

In August 2013, it was reported that Caltrans will fully close the southbound Santa Ana Freeway (Interstate 5) off-ramp at Pioneer Boulevard/Imperial Highway (≊ 005 LA 4.98) beginning Thursday, August 15 at 8 a.m. The ramp will remain fully closed for eight months, through April 2014, when a new elevated off-ramp is complete and re-opens.

Firestore Blvd / Downey Widening (≊ 005 LA 3.636)

Rte 5 Widening Rte 605 to Rte 710In April 2008, the CTC reviewed a notice of preparation for an EIR for roadway improvements near Commerce. The proposed project would construct additional lanes and upgrades to existing lanes and shoulders to current standards. The project is programmed in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program for environmental only. The project is fully funded for Project Approval/Environmental Document in the amount of $2,592,000 in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (Transportation Facilities Account) - Regional Improvement Program ($432,000) and Federal Demonstration funds ($2,160,000). Depending on the alternative selected, the total estimated project cost ranges from $900 million to $1.6 billion (including right of way and construction). Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2016-17. The proposal intially saw the following options:

According to the Caltrans website, the improvements to I-5 will finally remove the left-exit for Firestone Blvd.

In November 2011, the Downey Patriot provided more information. According to the Downey public works department, 12 homes in northeast Downey will be impacted by the widening freeway, which will overtake Dollison Drive and turn several streets in the area into cul-de-sacs. Florence Avenue, one of the major frontage roads along the I-5 Freeway, will also be widened to accommodate another lane, which is expected to help ease traffic along the overcrossing from Studebaker Road to Orr and Day Road. By 2013, all six projects will be under construction. Caltrans officials anticipate construction will conclude in 2016.

In March 2013, it was reported that the NB I-5 Firestone off-ramp (the infamous left-exit) would close permanently in April 2013.

I-605/I-5 Interchange Improvements (~ LA 6.667)

The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $18,170 in Advance Programming Development Element funds in FY20-21 for PPNO 4624, Rt 605/5 Interchange improvements (~ LA 6.667).

In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which appears to move the funding for this project from FY20-21 to FY21-22.
(Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

In March 2016, the Los Angeles MTA presented its full proposal for what transit lines could be built -- and when -- if Los Angeles County voters approve a half-cent sales tax increase in November 2016. This proposal included funding for the I-5 South Corridor Improvements (I-605 to I-710). The new project will add 1 Mixed-Flow lane and 1 HOV lane in each direction, from I-710 to I-605 for a total of 7 miles, for a total of 5 Mixed-Flow lanes and 1 HOV lane in each direction.
(Source: Los Angeles Times 3/18/2016; Metro Board Report 3/24/2016)

Los Angeles County — I-710 to Route 134

In July 2019, it was reported that bridge construction is proceeding just off the I-5 Atwater Village, wherea giant white beam is sticking out of the Los Angeles River (~ LA 23.706). That large white structure is part of a bridge that, when complete, will connect pedestrians, cyclists, and equestrians traveling between Atwater Village and Griffith Park. Construction on the North Atwater Bridge began in the spring of 2018, and now the bridge’s larger pieces are starting to materialize in the river bed. Shirley Lau, a civil engineer with the city’s engineering bureau, says the bridge’s “superstructure” will be up by the end of the year. That matches up with earlier projections that pegged the bridge being complete this fall. While construction is underway on the North Atwater Bridge, a portion of the bike path closest to the project is closed and will remain shuttered until December.
(Source: Curbed LA, 7/9/2019)

For a short period of time in October 2015, a sign error mistakenly labeled "Los Feliz Blvd" as "Los Fezil Blvd" (≊ 005 LA 24.33). Luckily, someone was there to take a picture. The sign fail was the fault of the manufacturer, and that Caltrans' design engineers—who have professional licensing throughout California—wrote very specific instructions for the sign to be made. However, the manufacturer, which was hired by a subcontractor, messed up. The Caltrans inspector on site quickly noticed the misspelling after workers put up the sign, and took it down within 30 minutes, Chandler said. Crews then put back up the original sign they had that they had been trying to replace. The reason this sign was being replaced in the first place was because Caltrans has been working for months repaving I-5. One of the safety enhancements was to upgrade the signage on the freeway with newer signs that are more reflective so they're easier for drivers to see at night. The subcontractor will be delivering a new and correct sign to Caltrans to replace the "Los Fezil Blvd" one, at no extra cost since it was the manufacturer's mistake, by November.
(Source: LAist, 10/29/2015)

I-5 HOV Lanes - Route 134 to Route 210.

Route 134 Interchange

There appear to be plans for a study to improve the I-5/Route 134 interchange (≊ 005 LA 26.793) (March 2001 CTC Agenda). This study should be complete in early 2001; it is District 7 TCRP Project #154. It plans to explore completing the "back moves", i.e., from Eastbound Route 134 to Northbound I-5, and from Southbound I-5 to Westbound Route 134.

In Burbank, there are plans to construct a new interchange. [Per Sept. 2002 CTC Agenda.]

HOV Lane Project - Route 134 to Route 170 (Overall)

There are plans to add HOV lanes between Route 134 and Route 170. This is not on the TCRP list, but is SAFETEA-LU High Priority Project #570, which funded $400K. It was considered by the CTC in May 2001, but there has been no action since. However, the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account allocated $73 million for this project. According to the Daily News, the cost is about $605 million, and construction should start in spring 2009. In May 2008, the scope was changed to add an Empire interchange to the project. It will be constructed in four segments: I-5 HOV lanes from N of Buena Vista to Route 170; lanes from S of Empire Ave to Buena Vista, including the Empire interchange; S of Burbank Blvd to S of Empire Ave; and Route 134 to S of Burbank Blvd. This also involves railroad realingment. The second and third segments have been moved to FY 2009-2010. In July 2008, this was formalized by the CTC. This project is to construct one HOV lane in each direction for approximately ten miles on Route 5 from Route 134 to Route 170. The work involves the reconstruction and modification of the Burbank Boulevard interchange, the realignment of a short segment of Route 5, railroad realignment and elevation, and the construction of a grade separation at Buena Vista. The amendment added the Empire Avenue Interchange project to the scope of the Route 5 CMIA Project. This would close a one-mile gap, completing the HOV lanes along the Route 5 corridor from Route 134 to Route 170. Benefits would include mainline improvement, direct access to the Burbank airport, and safety enhancements as a result of the elimination of an adjacent railroad at-grade crossing. The cost and funding for the combined project is equal to the sum of the cost and funding of the individual projects. The combined cost is $609,539,000.

In July 2009, the CTC received a proposal to use local Proposition C funds to move forward with the HOV lane project in Burbank. The plan also involves funding changes to the other two segments along the corridor to consolidate all CMIA funds on the Route 5-South of Burbank Boulevard to south of Empire Avenue project (PPNO 3986) and STIP programming on the Route 5-South of Empire Avenue to north of Buena Vista Street project (PPNO 3985). With respect to the segment from South of Burbank Boulevard to south of Empire Avenue: The total project cost has increased from $50,844,000 to $123,765,000. The majority of the increase is due to the need to realign a portion of the mainline and reconfigure the interchange from a cloverleaf type interchange to a tight diamond interchange to meet geometric standards. The need to acquire additional property, the complexity of the interchange, as well as additional utility relocation costs substantially increased the right of way and construction estimates. With respect to the segment from South of Empire Avenue to north of Buena Vista Street: The total project cost has increased from $248,627,000 to $315,500,000. The majority of the increase is due to the extensive railroad work on the project. During design, it was determined to be more cost effective for the railroad work to be completed by Southern California Regional Rail Authority (Metrolink) through a C&M contract. The C&M agreement streamlined the design and approval process, brought in railroad experts and placed Metrolink in direct responsibility for their own lines. As details of the design evolved, the estimates for the project were updated to reflect the complex staging and coordination of the railroad and roadway. This is particularly challenging because both freeway and railroad must be kept in operation during the entire construction period.

In May 2012, it was reported that costs for this project were coming in higher than expected (which would be covered by reallocating money from different funds). In particular, there was a $9,000,000 cost increase to the design phase. The increase was because (a) The initial proposal of replacing the flood control channel with a shallower but wider covered channel in order to maintain the existing freeway elevation was not acceptable to the US Army Corps of Engineers. The recommendation was to cap the existing channel using concrete piles and precast slabs. This resulted in the redesign of 20 – 30 percent of the completed highway and construction staging plans. (b) Plans for the relocation of utilities within the railroad right of way were not acceptable to the Burbank City Council because of the length of construction. Alternate methods of utility relocation were redeveloped and designed. (c) It was necessary to redesign portions of the railroad plans to be consistent with the reworked utility relocation and the redesigned roadway staging plans. The additional design work activities, along with extremely complicated right of way coordination, resulted in a seven month delay to project delivery. The design has now been delivered and was scheduled for a construction allocation at the May 2012 Commission meeting.

HOV Lane Project - Route 134 to Route 170 Segment: Route 134 to S of Burbank Blvd

In late April 2011, Caltrans broke ground on the segment from Magnolia to Route 134. The $57.8 million project will create a high-occupancy vehicle lane between the Ventura Freeway and Magnolia Boulevard in Burbank, a segment of 2.7 miles in each direction.

In January 2012, it was reported that construction was back on track for the HOV construction between Route 134 and Magnolia Blvd in Burbank. Construction had been delayed so that Caltrans could iron out electricity and gas line issues with the city-owned utilities in Glendale and Burbank. Construction on this segment is expected to be competed in 2014.

In September 2019, it was reported that with the completion of the Empire interchange, it is time for three of the five Burbank Boulevard onramps and offramps to shut down for long-term construction. Accordingly, the northbound off-ramp to westbound Burbank Boulevard, the southbound offramp and the westbound onramp to I-5 south have been shut down. Caltrans says drivers in need for a detour for the northbound I-5 loop off-ramp to westbound Burbank Blvd. can continue north I-5 and exit at Empire Avenue/San Fernando Blvd., turn right and take San Fernando Blvd., then turn right on Burbank Blvd. Drivers can take the following detour options for the Southbound I-5 off-ramp to Burbank Blvd.: (1) Exit at Empire Avenue; turn right on Empire Avenue; turn right on Lincoln Street; turn right on Victory Place and continue to Burbank Blvd. (2) Exit at Empire Avenue; turn left and take San Fernando Blvd. to Burbank Blvd. (3) Exit at Verdugo Avenue; turn right and take Front Street to Burbank Blvd. The detour to the westbound Burbank Blvd. loop on-ramp to southbound I-5 is to use the Empire Avenue onramp or the southbound I-5 on-ramp at Verdugo Avenue/Front Street. The entire I-5 Freeway project’s completion is slated for 2021.
(Source: CBS LA, 9/30/2019)

HOV Lane Project - Route 134 to Route 170 Segment: S of Burbank Blvd to S of Empire Ave

In late May 2012, the CTC approved $224.1 million for work on the I-5 HOV lanes from Magnolia Boulevard to Buena Vista Street in Burbank. The project extends from Empire Avenue to Burbank Boulevard and includes interchange modifications and railroad realignment. The work is scheduled to begin in early 2013 and the total project cost is estimated at $452 million.

In March 2020, it was reported that a 36-hour weekend closure of the road was scheduled for April 25-27, 2020 as part of a project to demolish and replace the Burbank Boulevard bridge over the freeway. As part of this project, Burbank Boulevard between San Fernando Boulevard and Front Street will be closed in both directions to vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians starting at 12:01 a.m. on March 14, 2020 and will reopen sometime in 2021. The new bridge will be longer than the old one because I-5 is being widened to add carpool lanes in both directions. That also means more lanes on Burbank Boulevard, bicycle lanes in both directions and a wide sidewalk. The I-5 shutdown will likely be the largest freeway closure in the Los Angeles area since 10-mile sections of I-405 Freeway were closed during weekends in July 2011 and September 2012, dubbed "Carmageddon" 1 and 2.
(Source: NBC LA, 3/5/2020)

In April 2020, it was reported that the Burbank Blvd bridge demolition went smoothly. The Burbank Boulevard bridge was demolished by giant hydraulic hammers which broke off chunks that fell on a 2-foot-deep (0.61 meter) bed of sand placed underneath to prevent damage to freeway pavement. The closure at the east end of the San Fernando Valley began Saturday and demolition of the bridge was completed before noon Sunday, earlier than expected. There is a great time-lapse video of the demolition on YouTube; a 4-minute long version is also available.
(Source: NBC Los Angeles, 4/27/2020)

HOV Lane Project - Route 134 to Route 170 Segment: Lanes from S of Empire Ave to Buena Vista, including the Empire interchange

In November 2010, the CTC approved combining the Route 5 Empire Avenue Interchange project (PPNO 3985) and the Route 5 Burbank Boulevard reconstruction project (PPNO 3986) for staging and construction purposes and to revise the schedule and funding plan accordingly. As background, at its meeting in July 2008, the Commission approved a CMIA baseline amendment for the Route 5 HOV widening project in Los Angeles County to combine the original CMIA project (PPNO 0142F) with the STIP Route 5 HOV/Empire Interchange project (PPNO 3985) and split the resultant project into four constructible segments. Two of the segments (PPNOs 0142F and 3987) have been delivered. It is now proposed to combine the remaining two segments (PPNO 3985 and 3986) for construction purposes.

In March 2011, Caltrans broke ground on a nearly $70-million project that will add new carpool lanes on both directions to the 4.4-mile stretch of the I-5 between the Route 170 Freeway interchange and Buena Vista Street. Funding for the project comes from nearly $40 million in federal stimulus money and $22.6 million in Los Angeles County Proposition C revenue. In addition to the carpool lanes, the project will also include repairing damaged pavement, installation of sound walls and the realignment of the Hollywood Way on- and off-ramps. Crews will first reconstruct the Empire Avenue interchange. The new interchange will be at West Empire Avenue near the Scott Road off-ramps to the I-5 and will connect Empire Avenue west of Victory Place to San Fernando Boulevard through an undercrossing with Victory Place, railroad tracks and the freeway. The off-ramp will be converted to allow full access to the freeway from Empire Avenue and San Fernando Boulevard. The existing San Fernando Boulevard undercrossing of the freeway will be eliminated. In one of the largest of the project’s impacts, the Burbank Boulevard bridge over the I-5 will be closed for nearly 14 months as crews reconstruct the overpass with new on- and off-ramps starting in 2013. Demolishing the Burbank Boulevard bridge will partially cut off access to the downtown area. Vehicles traveling northbound on the I-5 will only be able to turn right to reach the Burbank Town Center and vehicles traveling southbound will only have the option of turning right toward Costco and the Empire Center.

In February 2012, it was reported that Caltrans was offering contractors millions of dollars in incentives to finish the Burbank portion of the I-5 project ahead of schedule. The incentives come after representatives for Caltrans heard concerns that the work on the I-5 corridor through Burbank would isolate neighborhoods around the Empire Center and limit access to Bob Hope Airport. They hope the incentives will shave up to a year off the project timeline. An estimated $5 million to $7 million in incentives for the contractors will shorten the construction time by six to nine months for the Empire Interchange and four to six months for the Burbank Boulevard interchange if the early benchmarks are met, according to the agencies. About $2 million to $3 million in incentives will help with the Burbank interchange work. Some of the concern arose from a request to close San Fernando Boulevard to facilitate railroad and utility relocation work. The agencies estimated the street could be closed for roughly three years, prompting fears among Burbank officials that the closure would isolate some residents. The early closure of San Fernando is critical to accommodating a project schedule that preserves state funding for the project, transportation officials have said. Further delays would result in a funding lapse that would jeopardize the entire project.
(Source: Los Angeles Times, 2/24/2012)

San Fernando Blvd ClosuresIn May 2014, as part of the Empire project, Caltrans permanently closed a portion of San Fernando Road. Specifically, the northbound I-5 Lincoln Street off-ramp and southbound San Fernando Boulevard on-ramp will be closed permanently. The southbound Scott Road/Burbank Boulevard off-ramp will be closed when San Fernando Boulevard is closed and will be integrated into the new Empire Avenue interchange. This is part of a $355 million project that will improve I-5 in Burbank between Magnolia Boulevard and Buena Vista Street. It includes elevating the railroad tracks, building a new interchange at Empire Avenue, reconstructing the Burbank Boulevard Bridge, adding carpool lanes in both directions and more.

In May 2019, there was additional information on the rework on the Empire Avenue interchange. Existing Empire Avenue is becoming "Old" Empire Avenue, with a 3-way stop at Victory Place. Maria Street is being extended to meet "New" Empire Avenue, and "New" Empire Avenue will pass under Victory Place and I-5 to connect with the continuation of San Fernando Road on the other side of I-5.
(Source: My5LA Tweet, 5/31/2019)

At the end of September 2019, it was reported that the newly-constructed Empire Avenue interchange has opened.
(Source: CBS LA, 9/30/2019)

In January 2020, it was reported that the signage for the Scott Road exit was removed, and replaced with signage for Empire Avenue/San Fernando Road.
(Source: Caltrans District 7 Retweet, 1/31/2020)

HOV Lane Project - Route 134 to Route 170 Segment: I-5 HOV lanes from N of Buena Vista to Route 170

In May 2010, Caltrans put out a request for bid to construct HOV lanes, retaining walls, sound walls and replace concrete pavement in Burbank from 0.3km South of the Cohasset Street Undercrossing (≊ 005 LA 31.675) to 0.1km North of the Sheldon Street Overcrossing (≊ 005 LA 36.075). This includes replacement of the Cohasset St. Bridge, built in 1960. The estimate was $63M.

Caltrans Freight Corridor Improvement Project (Route 134 to Templin Highway, LA 27.0 to LA R67.0)

Rte 5 Freight CorridorIn February 2019, it was reported that Caltrans was holding initial public meetings on the proposed Caltrans Freight Corridor Improvement Project on I-5 in Los Angeles County. The proposed project involves improvements at bridges on I-5 from Route 134 (Ventura Freeway) in Glendale to Templin Highway north of the Santa Clarita Valley in northern LA County. It would provide increased vertical clearance of 16 feet, 6 inches at eight bridges in the Sun Valley area of Los Angeles and eliminate load capacity restrictions for heavy loads at the Los Angeles River Bridge, the I-5/Route 134 interchange and the Templin Highway undercrossing.
(Source: SCV News, 2/13/2019)

According to the initial study, the purpose of the I-5 Freight Corridor Improvement Project is to:
(Source: I-5 Freight Corridor Project: DISTRICT 7 – LA – 5 (PM 27.0/R67.0): Initial Study with Proposed Negative Declaration / Environmental Assessment, January 2019)

The project addresses restrictions from reduced vertical clearance as established in Caltrans’ Highway Design Manual and load capacity restrictions as identified in federal guidelines. The proposed project will increase vertical clearance at Roscoe Blvd. Overcrossing (OC), Sunland Blvd. OC, Olinda St. Pedestrian Overcrossing (POC), Tuxford Off-ramp OC, Lankershim Blvd. OC, Peoria St. OC, Laurel Canyon Blvd. OC, and Sheldon St. OC. This will be accomplished by replacing the bridges and raising the bridge profiles by approximately 1 to 2 feet at the Overcrossings and about 4 feet at Olinda St. POC. The proposed project will also eliminate the load capacity restrictions for heavy loads at the Los Angeles River Bridge and Separation and Templin Highway Undercrossing by repairing the steel girders and un-staggering the steel cross frames at the Los Angeles River Bridge and Separation and by replacing the Templin Highway Undercrossing. It is expected that each bridge will have shallow spread footing at abutments and possibility of deep foundation at bent locations. Utilities will be protected in place or relocated during the construction of the bridges. The bridges located in Sun Valley will be widened to accommodate the State of California’s Complete Streets Policies. Complete streets will include facilities that are planned, designed, operated, and maintained to provide safe mobility for all users, including bicyclists, pedestrians, transit vehicles, truckers, and motorists, appropriate to the function and context of the facility. These facilities will include ADA curb ramps, sidewalks, bike lanes, and aesthetic treatments at all bridges in Sun Valley. Olinda St. POC will also be converted to a combined Pedestrian/Bicycle Overcrossing (BOC). The proposed project includes the following bridges, listed from south to north:

  1. Los Angeles River Bridge and Separation (Bridge No. 53-1075 Left/Right (L/R); PM 27.07)
  2. Roscoe Blvd. OC (Bridge No. 53-1216; PM 33.28)
  3. Sunland Blvd. OC (Bridge No. 53-1114; PM 33.68)
  4. Olinda St. POC (Bridge No. 53-1467; PM 33.98)
  5. Tuxford Off-Ramp OC (Bridge No. 53-1218 S; PM 34.82)
  6. Lankershim Blvd. OC (Bridge No. 53-1118; PM 34.99)
  7. Peoria St. OC (Bridge No. 53-1119; PM 35.35)
  8. Laurel Canyon Blvd. OC (Bridge No. 53-1219; PM 35.94)
  9. Sheldon St. OC (Bridge No. 53-1120; PM 36.00)
  10. Templin Highway UC (Bridge No. 53-1810 L/R; PM 65.97)

The Build Alternative is proposed to go into construction under three separate phases (or segments):

In July 2019, the Federal Register published a Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California related to this project. The actions by the Federal agencies, and the laws under which such actions were taken, are described in the Final Environmental Assessment (FEA) with Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the project, approved on May 30, 2019, and in other documents in the FHWA project records.
(Source: Federal Notice, 7/22/2019)

In December 2019, the CTC had on its agenda for future consideration of funding the following project: 07-LA-5, PM 27.0/R67.0 I-5 in Los Angeles County. Construct roadway improvements including increasing vertical clearances on a portion of I-5 in Los Angeles County. (PPNO 5281). This project is located at various locations on I-5 from Route 134 to the Templin Highway Undercrossing in Los Angeles County. This project proposes to improve freight efficiency and replace 10 bridges to provide vertical clearance of 16’- 6 and rehabilitate two bridges. The proposed project addresses the current non-standard load bridge vertical clearance and load capacity restrictions resulting in detour and delay of travel time. This project is not fully funded and is currently programmed in the 2016 SHOPP for $15.6 million for PA&ED and estimated to begin in 2021. The total estimated project cost is $414.8 million. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 SHOPP.
(Source: December 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

HOV Lane Project: Route 170 to Route 14

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

In late September 2010, Caltrans broke ground on a $140.2-million project to add carpool lanes to a nearly 10 miles of I-5 from Route 170 (≊ 005 LA 36.336) to Route 118 (≊ 005 LA 39.373). The project will also widen under-crossings and reconstruct the carpool connector between Route 170 and I-5. The project is scheduled to be completed in fall 2015.

[TCRP 41.1, 41.2]There is also a plan to add HOV lanes from Route 170 to Route 118, and from Route 118 to Route 14 (TCRP Project #41). There are various alternatives, owing to the nature of the I-5/Route 170 interchange, but the basic plan is to add one HOV lane in each direction, with truck lanes in the section near Route 14. The overall project involves the construction of one High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane in each direction in the median on Route 5, from Route 170 to Route 14. The project also involves constructing new soundwalls on each side of freeway, widening several under-crossings, ramp improvements, and reconstructing Route 5/170 Interchange to provide direct HOV connectors between Route 5 and Route 170. The overall project has been segmented into two subprojects for implementation: #41.1 (Segment 1): Route 118 to Route 14 ’150; HOV lanes with mitigating soundwalls; #41.2 (Segment 2): Route 170 to Route 118 ’150; HOV lanes. Bids for the HOV lane project were $15,790,000 over the engineer’s estimate, likely due to industry wide material shortage of concrete and reinforcing steel and by increases in oil prices resulting in higher costs for asphalt concrete and fuel. Instead of descoping the project, Caltrans utilized $7,000,000 in TCRP funds from Project #50 (Route 71 Freeway) and an additional $8,790,000 provided by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LACMTA) to allow the project proceed according to the revised schedule. This was originally scheduled for completion in October 2009. In June 2006, the CTC agenda noted that the HOV lanes for the #41.1 portion, Route 118 to Route 14, are currently under construction, and that construction of the soundwalls will commence upon the completion of the HOV lanes. However, completion of the HOV lanes was extended to Fiscal Year 2011 due to delays in awarding the project and for additional working days for the construction contract. As for the #41.2 portion, Route 170 to Route 118, the June 2006 CTC agenda noted that the project’s cost has increased due to a revised noise report requiring additional soundwalls, additional widening to meet FHWA requirements, and the escalation in cost of construction materials, such as steel and concrete, and right-of-way. The schedule was updated to allow adequate time to complete design and right-of-way acquisition and begin construction in the FY 2007-08; completion (as of June 2006) was scheduled for Fiscal Year 2009. Construction actually started in October 2010.

Los Angeles County — I-210 to Kern County Line

I-5 Roadway Rehabilitation Project [½ mi S of Route 14 (apx 005 LA R43.877) to 1½ mi N of Lake Hughes Road (apx 005 LA R59.508)]

In 2014 the state will repave I-5 from San Fernando Road (apx 005 LA R43.877) to Lake Hughes Road (apx 005 LA R59.508)

In January 2018, it was reported that Caltrans is conducting a $171 million project to smooth the drive on I-5 though Santa Clarita in northern Los Angeles County. The I-5 Roadway Rehabilitation Project will replace concrete on 15.8 mi. of freeway from a mi. south of Route 14 (apx 005 LA R43.877) to a mile and a half north of Lake Hughes Road (apx 005 LA R59.508). To assure a smoother ride, concrete paving will be continuously upgraded in the outside lanes (lanes three and four). In lanes one and two, broken slabs will be replaced, and the full length of lanes one and two will receive profile grinding to ensure a smooth surface for vehicles. In portions of the roadway with asphalt pavement, concrete pavement will be installed. The guardrail will be upgraded to the current standard. Construction of carpool lanes also called HOV or high occupancy vehicle lanes on I-5 in the area is anticipated under a separate project following completion of the I-5 Roadway Rehabilitation Project (discussed below). Metro (Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority), in cooperation with Caltrans, is conducting the final design for the proposed HOV lanes and extensions of the truck lanes along I-5 from state Route 14 to south of Parker Road in northern Los Angeles County. Construction on the HOV lanes is anticipated to begin in 2019.
(Source: Construction Eqpt. Guide, 1/17/2018)

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

Route 14/I-5 HOV Connector (apx 005 LA R45.495)

[005-014 interchange]Construction started in late 2008 on a $156 million project to elevate a two-lane car-pool lane to connect car-pool lanes on I-5 and Route 14. The project should be done by 2012. The project appears to have gone to bid in November 2007, with an estimate of $120M for the connectors in Los Angeles County (Santa Clarita) on I-5 from 0.2 Km South of the Balboa Boulevard overcrossing to 0.9 Km South of Weldon Canyon and on Route 14 from the I-5/Route 14 separation to 2.0 Km North of the Sierra Highway undercrossing. According to the Daily News, in mid-August 2008 transportation officials broke ground on the project. When the $161 million, two-lane elevated connector is finished in 2012, drivers will no longer have to get out of the car-pool lane on one freeway and weave through traffic to get back into the car-pool lane on the other. The direct car-pool lane connector will be the third in Los Angeles County. The others are at the Route 57/Route 60 interchange in Orange County and the I-105/I-110 interchange in South Los Angeles. Most of the construction and road closures will be done during off-peak hours. The roughly half-mile-long, nearly 70-foot-high connector is being paid for by a mix of federal, state and county transportation money.

In December 2012, the HOV connector between I-5 and Route 14 opened. The long-awaited connector allows motorists in the HOV lanes on I-5 and Route 14 to remain in the HOV lanes while traveling between the two freeways. It opened in late December and a ribbon-cutting ceremony was held in January 2013 to celebrate the project, which began in 2008 and cost $175.8 million.

HOV Lane Project: Route 14 (LA R45.618) to Parker Road Interchange in Castaic (LA R58.99)

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

[Santa Clarita HOV]In March 2009, the CTC recieved a draft EIR for review concerning a project in Los Angeles County will construct high occupancy vehicle lanes in each direction and roadway improvements from I-5/Route 14 interchange to just south of Parker Road Interchange near the City of Santa Clarita. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed with Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEALU) funds and private funds in the amount of $63,200,000. The total cost of the project is estimated to be between $506,000,000 and $605,000,000. Assuming the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. There are three alternatives:

In February 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration a project in Los Angeles County that would construct high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes, truck climbing lanes, and additional auxiliary lanes on I-5 from Route 14 on the south to Parker Road on the north. Proposed improvements include extending the existing HOV lanes on Interstate 5 from Route 14 to south of Parker Road and adding truck climbing lanes from the State Route 14 Interchange to Calgrove Boulevard (northbound) and to Pico Canyon Road/Lyons Avenue (southbound). The project is scheduled in phases. The construction of the truck lane improvements from the Route 14 Interchange to south of the Pico Canyon Road/Lyons Avenue Interchange is fully funded with Proposition 1B in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program for $75,000,000 for capital and support. This phase also includes $55,000,000 of local funds. Construction of this phase is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The total estimated project cost of all phases is $456,000,000. A Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) has been prepared as the project will involve construction activities resulting in biological impacts including the loss of oak woodlands.

In early November 2010, it was reported that funding sources and environmental reviews have been completed for this project, called the "Interstate 5 Gateway Improvement Project". It will be constructed in three phases, cost upwards of $500 million, and will add two truck lanes and a high-occupancy-vehicle lane both southbound and northbound on I-5 from the Route 14 interchange north to Parker Road. Construction will likely not start until late 2011 or 2012. Caltrans, the project lead, has a design team working on the first truck lanes, from Route 14 to Lyons Avenue. Selection of a contractor will start in the fall of 2011, with construction starting shortly after. The project will take two to three years to complete. This first phase alone will cost $130 million. The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority will use $56 million from Measure R, the half-cent sales tax Los Angeles County voters approved in November 2008. Caltrans will pay for the remaining $74 million with SHOPP funds, Raptis said. Federal dollars have helped too, with $1.6 million used for environmental reviews. The second and third phases of the project will add a carpool lane, an auxiliary lane and second truck lanes to Santa Clarita’s stretch of I-5, from the Highway 14 interchange to Parker Road.

In November 2011, it was reported that the first phase of the widening project was going out to bids, with construction anticipated to start in early 2012. The first phase will extend truck lanes from just north of Newhall Pass to Calgrove Boulevard on the northbound side and from the Pico Canyon Road/Lyons Avenue bridge to just north of the Newhall Pass on the southbound side. Caltrans estimated that constructing the first phase would cost $100 million; bids are coming in at $43 million. The $543-million project's second phase will extend high-occupancy vehicle lanes on the I-5 through Santa Clarita.

In May 2012, local and state officials announced a $72-million project to add truck lanes on I-5 through Newhall Pass and into Santa Clarita. The truck lanes are needed to separate heavy big-rig traffic from passenger vehicles and create safer, quicker passage for a growing population in the Santa Clarita Valley. The southbound truck lane will extend 3.7 million from Pico Canyon Road/Lyons Avenue in Santa Clarita to Route 14 (3.7 miles); the northbound lane will run 1.4 miles from Route 14 to Gavin Canyon. Construction is slated to be completed in early 2014.

In December 2014, it was reported that Caltrans held a ribbon-cutting for completion of the I-5 Truck Lane Project. The project, which began construction in May 2012, has added a fifth mixed-flow lane to northbound I-5 between Route 14 and the Gavin Canyon undercrossing, a distance of 1.4 miles. The 3.7 miles of southbound I-5 improvements include a fifth mixed-flow lane between Pico Canyon Road/Lyons Avenue and a half-mile south of Gavin Canyon, and a new segment of truck lane that begins north of Weldon Canyon and merges with the existing truck lane north of the Route 14 connector. New median and outside retaining walls were also built to accommodate the widening.

In April 2018, it was reported that Metro was applying for TCRP (Trade Corridor Relief Program) funds in addition to SB1 funds for the Interstate 5 Golden State Chokepoint Relief Project, which would add an HOV lane and truck lanes between Route 14 and Parker Road in the Santa Clarita area. I-5 is a critical international trade corridor stretching nearly 800 miles in California and running from Mexico to Canada. This segment is hemmed in by mountains and there are no parallel freeways — which makes traffic highly vulnerable to traffic accidents and weather disruptions. Project estimates found it would save 2.2 million hours of truck travel time valued at $35 million over the first 20 years of operation in addition to speeding up car travel and making it safer by separating cars and trucks.
(Source: Metro The Source, 4/19/2018)

In June 2018, it was reported that on June 8, the U.S. Department of Transportation released more than $1.5 billion in grants to fund what it calls "critical freight, highway, and bridge improvements" via the Infrastructure for Rebuilding America or "INFRA" program created by the Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act of 2015. As required by the FAST Act, USDOT notified Congress on June 5 about the 26 projects selected to receive the $1.535 billion worth of grants via the INFRA program; triggering a mandatory 60-day congressional review period before the agency can, in fact, award them. One of these grants was for "Interstate 5 Golden State Chokepoint Relief Program (I-5 Component)", with a proposed award of $ 47,000,000 out of a total project cost of $500,347,000.
(Source: AASHTO Jounal, 6/8/2018; USDOT Reportof Awards Under 23 U.S.C. 117 During Fiscal Years (FY) 2017 and FY 2018, 6/4/18)

In November 2018, it was reported that the City of Santa Clarita was exploring a partnership between the agencies involved in the I-5 improvements and suggested to report back monthly to identify traffic patterns and an emergency plan. The emergency plan would be implemented if the I-5 shut down for accidents, weather or construction. The agencies include: the City of Santa Clarita, Department of Public Works, Department of Regional Planning, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, and Fire Department. All would collaborate with Caltrans and the California Highway Patrol. The partnership would also analyze traffic flow and suggest solutions to the traffic issue on I-5 in the Santa Clarita / Castaic areas. The agencies would also solicit feedback from the Castaic Town Council and the West Ranch Town Council. The I-5 corridor through the Santa Clarita Valley has been identified as a “critical choke point” in California’s highway system, especially when weather related closures impact areas like Castaic, which have limited alternate routes. Along the I-210 corridor in the San Gabriel Valley, Caltrans, in partnership with Los Angeles County Public Works and adjacent cities, has been developing a very promising Integrated Corridor Management pilot to improve mobility and handle emergency situations that heavily impact the freeway. “A similar partnership is needed in the Santa Clarita Valley along the I-5,” said the motion.
(Source: KHTS AM 1220, 11/27/2018)

High Occupancy Toll Lanes - Santa Clarita Area (Route 14 (LA R45.618) to Parker Road)

In February 2013, it was reported that Metro officials were looking into building a new combination of toll and carpool lanes along 13-1/2 miles of I-5 in northern Los Angeles County (what's new here is the toll aspect). Allowing toll users on the new lanes would allow them to be constructed by 2018, instead of waiting 30 years for sales tax revenue to accumulate for the project. The agency proposes to use Fast Trak toll devices to charge solo or two- occupant vehicles a varying charge for using the lanes, which would be free to carpools with three or more people. The lanes would extend in both directions between the Antelope Valley (14) Freeway on the south, and Parker Road in Castaic, in 2018. Under current Measure R schedules, those lanes are 30 years away from opening.

In April 2013, Members of the Planning and Programming Committee for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority voted unanimously to approve the toll road concept and file the environmental impact report for the project. As proposed, the project would add two new 13.5-mile carpool lanes through the Santa Clarita Valley from Parker Road in Castaic to the I-5 junction with Route 14, one in each direction.

In May 2013, the CTC received notice of the preparation of an EIR regarding a project in Los Angeles County that will construct high occupancy toll lanes on I-5 from Route 14 to Parker Road in the City of Santa Clarita and unincorporated Los Angeles County. The project was originally proposed to construct high occupancy vehicle lanes. A Final Environmental Impact Report was approved for the project in September of 2009. The Department and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority are now proposing to implement high occupancy toll lanes instead of the previously proposed high occupancy vehicle lanes on this 13.5-mile portion of I-5. In August 2013, the CTC approved this for future consideration of funding.

In April 2014, it was reported that Metro and Caltrans have decided to publicly finance the HOT project instead of seeking a public-private partnership (known as a PPP). This is because it is less expensive to publicly finance the project by using $352 million in now-available Measure R and other funds and a federal low-interest loan for $175 million. This project as originally proposed was also unusual because it included new sound walls for I-210 in Pasadena and Arcadia and Route 170 and I-405 in Los Angeles, and adding extra lanes for a short stretch of Route 71 in Pomona. Under the public financing deal, those projects will be built separately. The toll revenues would be reinvested and used for transit services and traffic operations in the 5 freeway corridor in the Santa Clarita Valley. The current forecast calls for the HOV lanes on I-5 to open in 2021, the soundwalls to be completed in 2019 and for the additional lane on the southbound side of Route 71 to be done in 2021 and the lane on northbound Route 71 to be finished in 2028.

In March 2016, the Los Angeles MTA presented its full proposal for what transit lines could be built -- and when -- if Los Angeles County voters approve a half-cent sales tax increase in November 2016. This proposal included funding for the I-5 North Capacity Enhancements (from Route 14 to Lake Hughes Rd.): Conversion of the existing facility (4 Mixed-Flow lanes in each direction) with a new project starting from Route 14/I-5 Interchange to Lake Hughes Rd. in Castaic along I-5 for a total of 14 miles. The new project consists of adding 1 Truck lane and 1 HOV lane in each direction, while maintaining existing mixed-flow lanes"
(Source: Los Angeles Times 3/18/2016; Metro Board Report 3/24/2016)

In October 2018, it was reported that U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao came to the Santa Clarita Valley to formalize the presentation of a $47 million grant to Metro to build truck lanes and extend high-occupancy vehicle, or carpool, lanes running through the SCV. Chao was joined by Rep. Steve Knight (R-Palmdale), Los Angeles County 5th District Supervisor Kathryn Barger and Santa Clarita Mayor Laurene Weste to talk about the I-5 Golden State Chokepoint Relief Program the grant is planned for. With the goal of reducing congestion along the I-5, the program would yield a new southbound 4.7-mile truck lane between Pico Canyon and Route 14, while a 3.4-mile northbound truck lane would run between Route 14 and Calgrove Boulevard. The funds also would extend HOV lanes 13.4 miles from the Route 14 and the I-5 interchange in Santa Clarita to Parker Road in Castaic. The $47 million Infrastructure for Rebuilding America grant was awarded through the efforts of Knight and Barger, Chao said. Metro is contributing over $250 million in local sales tax dollars for the project, according to Barger’s office. Metro’s funding will also be matched with more than $200 million in Senate Bill 1 gas tax funds approved by California legislators in 2017.
(Source: SCV Signal, 10/1/2018)

In May 2020, the CTC approved the following allocation: $247,000,000. 07-LA-5 45.0/59.6 & 41.4/43.8. PPNO 07-3189B. ProjID 0700000391. EA 2332E. I-5 Golden State Chokepoint Relief. In northern Los Angeles County at the I-5 / Route 14 split. Construct truck lanes, HOV lanes, auxiliary lanes, soundwalls, and an ITS hub station. Widen seven bridges and improve access to weigh station.
(Source: May 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5s.(7))

In January 2012, the CTC approved relinquishement of right of way in the city of Santa Clarita along Route 5 on Wayne Mills Place (07-LA-5-PM R53.5), consisting of collateral facilities.

In June 2008, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Los Angeles, on The Old Road at 0.1 mile north of the Route 126 Freeway (7-LA-5-PM R55.6, 7-LA-126-PM R5.7), consisting of superseded highway right of way.

In November 2019, Caltrans completed installation of a gate just N of Lake Hughes Road (~ LA R59.546). This gate allows drivers to turn around and travel back in the other direction when road conditions are dicey. The gate is said to be about 300 feet north of Lake Hughes Road in Castaic. When the interstate is closed because of ice and/or snow on the Grapevine, it will be rolled open to create a turnaround across the median, officials said.
(Source: ABC23 Bakersfield, 11/26/2019; LATimes 11/26/2019)

In May 2007, there was a report of plans to update I-5 to address the growth in northern Los Angeles County, where the population is expected to grow to 1.18M by 2030. Specifically, in Summer 2007, Los Angeles County plans to start construction on the Hasley Canyon interchange (LA R56.592) in Castaic. The project will include a bridge replacement and the construction of roundabouts to ease congestion. That project is expected to be completed by early 2010. Long-term projects for the freeway include the construction of a carpool lane as well as a truck climbing lane from Route 14 to Castaic. Construction on the $259M project is expected to begin in the summer of 2010. As of May 2007, the City of Santa Clarita was also constructing the $50M second phase of a project funded by the city of Santa Clarita to improve the Magic Mountain Parkway freeway interchange.
[Santa Clarita Signal, May 18, 2007]

Gary Richards (Mr. Roadshow) reported that Caltrans will begin replacing the rough concrete with rubberized asphalt in late 2010 from Castaic (apx 005 LA R58.99) to the Visa Del Lago Road overcrossing (apx 005 LA R74.328), a yearlong project.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $130,000,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in and near Gorman, from Vista Del Lago (apx 005 LA R74.328) to the Kern County Line (apx 005 LA 88.566), that will rehabilitate 127 lane miles of road way to improve safety and ride quality. Project will replace pavement on outside shoulders, grind and overlay median shoulders and ramps, place concrete termini on seven ramps, install ADA curbs, replace bridge approach and departure slabs, and replace dike.

I-5 "Westside Extension" — Kern → Tulare → Kings → Fresno → Madera → Merced → Stanislaus → San Joaquin Counties

In November 2007, Caltrans put out a request for bids to remove the Brake Check area N of Lebec from 0.1 Km North of Cressey Cattlepass Bridge to 0.7 Km South of the Lebec Road Overcrossing (06N-Ker-5 3/3.6). This had been closed since 1995.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

According to Gary Roberts (Mr. Roadshow), plans call for the widening I-5 to six lanes through Madera, Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Kern counties. Long-range plans call for eight lanes. But don't hold your breath.

In March 2012, the CTC authorized SHOPP funding on I-5, 06-Fre-5 22.8/26.8 Near Coalinga, from north of Tuolumne Avenue to south of Route 33. $2,171,000 to construct double thrie beam median barrier to reduce the number and severity of traffic collisions along 4 centerline miles.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

Tumey Gulch Bridge Replacement Project (06-Fre-5, PM 44.4/45.4)

Tumey Gulch Bridge Replacement ProjectThe following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 6725. 06-Fresno-5 44.4/45.4. On I-5 Near Mendota, at Tumey Gulch Bridge No. 42-0246L/R. Replace bridge. Begin Con: 7/3/2020. Total Project Cost: $16,531K.

In December 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project located on I-5 near Mendota in Fresno County that proposes to replace the existing Tumey Gulch Bridges (No’s 42-0246L and 42-0246R) with new bridges. The project proposes to address deficiencies of the bridges and safety issues by replacing them with new bridges of a different design due to existing soil conditions. The proposed project is estimated to cost approximately $16.5 million. This project is currently fully funded and currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for approximately $16.5 million. Construction is estimated to begin in 2020. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP. The CTC also approved an allocation of $1,900,000 for Project Support and Engineering for 06-Fre-5 44.4/45.4. PPNO 6725. Project No. 0615000046. I-5 Near Mendota, at Tumey Gulch Bridge No. 42--0246L/R. Replace bridge.
(Source: December 2018 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.2c(1); December2018 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b(2b), Item 13)

In June 2020, the CTC approved the following allocation for CONST and CON ENG: $15,851,000. 06-Fre-5 44.4/45.4. PPNO 06-6725. ProjID 0615000046. EA 0S830. I-5 near Mendota, at Tumey Gulch Bridge No. 42-0246L/R. Outcome/Output: Replace deficient structure with new bridge to address settlement and movement at the abutments. As part of this allocation request, the Department is requesting to extend the award of the construction contract an additional 6 months beyond the 6 month deadline.
(Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #14)

The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 3214. 10-Merced-152 11.3. Route 152 Near Los Banos, at Route 33 Interchange; also on Route 5 (MER PM 6.3) at Route 165 Interchange. Improve the truck turn radius. Begin Con: 6/15/2022. Total Project Cost: $4,529K.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $1,271,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Santa Nella at the Santa Nella Weigh Station Facilities (~ 005 MER 23.577) that would restore two structures, improve lighting and replace guardrail to improve safety for vehicle traffic.

[TCRP 108]TCRP Project #108 plans to add a northbound lane to the freeway through the Mossdale "Y", from I-205 (~ 005 SJ R12.593) to Route 120 (~ 005 SJ R14.872) in San Joaquin County -- specifically, to extend the #1 lane in the northbound direction of Route 5 from Route 205 to Route 120. The project will provide five continuous through-lanes on northbound Route 5 within this segment. In June 2006, it was reported to the CTC that the project is ready to go to construction, but that the schedule required updating due to the previous transportation funding shortfalls (with a corresponding escalation of project costs). The project is now scheduled to complete in FY 2006-2007.

In September 2011, it was reported that the pavement rehabilitation near Stockton is taking an interesting approach. This approach, known as "continuously reinforced concrete pavement", is made from concrete reinforced with steel and is estimated to last 40 years. Concrete roads in the state are more commonly built with breaks - called joints - that help keep the surface from cracking as the concrete changes shape. Using reinforcing steel makes this project different.

French Camp Road Interchange

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

Seemingly related to HPP #3494, during its April 2006 meeting the CTC considered the draft EIR for construction of an interchange at French Camp Road (San Joaquin County Sign Route J9), together with an extension of Sperry Road in the City of Stockton in San Joaquin County (PM 22.1/23.6). There were three alternatives being considered: (1) Full-Build Alternative: Interchange improvements, auxiliary lanes, and eight-lane Sperry Road extension; (2) Reduced-Build Alternative: Interchange improvements, auxiliary lanes, and four-lane Sperry Road extension; (3) No-Build Alternative. The report found that there will be potentially significant impacts associated with traffic circulation changes and biological issues, and thus indicated that an Environmental Impact Report is being prepared.

PCNO 7239Seemingly related to HPP #2067, during its July and September 2006 meetings the CTC considered reprogramming funds into a project to reconstruct the interchange at I-5 and French Camp Road in the city of Stockton (City). In the 2006 STIP, SJCOG proposed programming construction funding in FY 2007-08 for the project. The Commission was unable to program the project in the 2006 STIP, due to insufficient funding capacity for San Joaquin County. Since the adoption of the 2006 STIP, SJCOG and the City have been looking for ways to fully fund this project. The City is the implementing agency for the project, and indicates the environmental document of the project is nearly complete. The PS&E phase will be done and the project will be ready for construction in FY 2009-10. SJCOG is requesting the Commission reprogram the $16,667,000 from Route 12 (Bouldin Island) Passing Lanes (PPNO 7350) to CON in FY 2009-10 for the new I-5/French Camp Interchange project. The $16,667,000 of RIP funds, in combination with $23,333,000 of local funds from the City, will fully fund the project. In July 2009, the CTC approved this for future consideration of funding, given the negative FEIR.

I-5 Project Near StocktonIn December 2007, the CTC received an EIR regarding a project near Stockton that would construct roadway improvements including a new interchange on Route 5 near Stockton. The project is fully funded in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The total estimated project cost, capital and support, is $40,000,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10.

In January 2011, it was reported that the I-5/French Camp Interchange project was programmed in the 2010 STIP with $18,229,000 in Regional Improvement Program (RIP) funds for construction in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012-13. The RIP programming had been delayed twice due to limited STIP capacity. However, the City of Stockton had continued with project development using local funds. It was expected that this project will be ready for a RIP allocation in June 2011, and an advance allocation was not feasible, nor was an AB 3090 replacement project. Therefore, it was proposed that the CTC delete $18,229,000 RIP construction from this project, fund construction with $18,229,000 of SJCOG Measure K funds, and begin construction in August 2011. (Information Only in January 2011). This was approved in March 2011.

In August 2016, the CTC authorized relinquishment of two segments of right of way in the city of Stockton (City) along Route 5 at French Camp Road (10-SJ-5-PM R22.5), consisting of collateral facilities. The City, by freeway agreement dated January 29, 2008, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expires July 24, 2016. At the same time, the CTC also authorized relinquishment of six segments of right of way in the county of San Joaquin (County) along Route 5 between Manthey Road and French Camp Road (10-SJ-5-PM R22.0/R22.7), consisting of collateral facilities. The County, by freeway agreement dated May 13, 2008, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expires July 21, 2016.

Stockton Auxilliary Lanes

In January 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Joaquin County that will construct HOV lanes, auxiliary lanes, traffic operation systems, soundwalls and rehabilitate pavement. Phase 1 of this project, from 8th Street Undercrossing (PM 25.0) to Hammer Lane Undercrossing (PM 32.9) is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account. Total estimated project cost of Phase 1 is $119,500,000 for capital and support. Construction of Phase 1 is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Resources that may be impacted by the project include: farmlands, visual resources, biological resources, water quality, paleontological resources, residential relocations, and noise. Potential impacts associated with the project can all be mitigated to below significance through proposed mitigation measures.

In August 2012, the CTC approved SHOPP funding of $41,779,000 on I-5 SJ PM 25.1/28.6 in and near Stockton, from Charter Way to Country Club Boulevard. Outcome/Output: Rehabilitate roadway, including reconstruction of the existing eight freeway lanes, widening inside shoulders, reconstructing outside shoulders and auxiliary lanes in order to improve safety and ride quality along 28 lane miles.

[Rte 5 Widening]There are also plans to add an Auxilliary Lane from the Monte Diablo on-ramp (~ 005 SJ 28.04) to the Country Club off-ramp, northbound. In March 2009, the CTC recieved more specifics on this project in the notice of preparation of an EIR. The proposed project would construct two additional lanes on Route 5 (one in each direction) between Country Club Boulevard and Eight Mile Road, modify two existing interchanges (Hammer Lane and Eight Mile Road), and construct two interchanges (Otto Drive and Gateway Boulevard). It is proposed that the project be funded from San Joaquin Measure K funds, future bond funds, developer contributions, and local public facility fees generated by ongoing development. The total estimated project cost is $500,000,000. Construction of the mainline improvements is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010, with the interchange improvements to follow in phases with final completion estimated for FY 2020. The alternatives being considered are:

A project to add HOV lanes in North Stockton was submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding ($225 million). It was not recommended for funding.

In December 2015, the CTC approved the following SHOPP funding: 10-SJ-05 26.5 I-5 In Stockton, at the Stockton Channel Viaduct Bridge No. 29-0176 L/R. Bridge rehabilitation to address structural and load carrying capacity deficiencies. $815,000K.

Sacramento Area — Sacramento and Yolo Counties

In January 2018, the CTC amended the following into the SHOPP: 03-Sac-5 10.8/11.6 I-5 Near Elk Grove, from Elk Grove Boulevard Overcrossing to 0.4 mile south of Laguna Boulevard Overcrossing. Extend Elk Grove Boulevard onramp merge lane in the northbound direction. PA&ED: 02/15/2018 R/W: 04/15/2018 RTL: 05/01/2018 BC: 10/15/2018 Total Cost: $1,240,000.
(Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.1a(1))

South Sacramento HOV Lanes (~ 005 SAC 12.994 to ~ 005 SAC 26.654)

In Sacramento County, HOV lanes are planned between the I-5/I-80 interchange (~ 005 SAC 26.654) and Pocket Road (~ 005 SAC 16.147) (STIP Project #1, June 2002 CTC Agenda Item 2.5b(1))

[Map]In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed constructing HOV lanes in Sacramento County. In December 2007, the CTC received notice of preparation of an EIR regarding construction of these lanes. The proposed project would construct bus/carpool lanes on a portion of Route 5 in and near Sacramento in Sacramento County. The project is not fully funded. Sacramento Transportation Authority has agreed to contribute $121 million of Measure A funding. The total estimated project cost is $200,000,000. This project should be ready for construction in Fiscal Year 2011-12, depending on the availability of funds.

In May 2013, the CTC received notice of the preparation of an EIR for a project in Sacramento County will add bus/carpool lanes to I-5 from 1.1 miles south of Elk Grove Boulevard (apx 005 SAC 10.802) to US 50 (apx 005 SAC 22.461). The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program for design and right of way only. The total estimated cost for construction and support is $125,200,000. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. There are four alternatives under consideration: (1) No Build Alternative; (2) Bus/Carpool HOV lanes in both directions plus additional lanes in each direction from 1.1 miles south of Elk Grove Blvd. to just south of the I-5/US 50 interchange; (3) Includes the construction of mixed flow or general-purpose lanes in both directions rather than HOV lanes; (4) convert an existing lane to a HOV lane. This alternative would re-stripe and sign the existing inside shoulder lane to prohibit non-HOV traffic during peak periods.

In October 2013, the CTC considered for future approval of funding an FEIR regarding a project that would construct High Occupancy Vehicle lanes and sound walls in both directions from US 50 (apx 005 SAC 22.461) to Morrison Creek on I-5 (~ 005 SAC 12.994). Phase 1 is funded through Plans, Specification, and Estimate with federal dollars, and is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program for Right of Way only. The total estimated cost is $127,200,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. Phase 2 (PPNO 5836) will construct High Occupancy Vehicle Lanes from Morrison Creek (~ 005 SAC 12.994) to south of Stone Lake Creek (apx 005 SAC 8.841). Phase 2 is not yet funded. The total estimated cost for capital and support is $70,600,000. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2019-20.
(Note: Neither of the named creeks above are actually named on the bridges. A tip of the hat to Sacramento Area Creeks Council's "Know Your Creeks" page, and particularly, their Sacramento County Creeks Map, for helping me discover where Morrison and Stone Lake Creeks were.)

In the SB1 Project List, as of June 2018, under the Solutions for Congested Corridors Program program, the following appears: Sac 5 Corridor Enhancement Project/I-5 HOV Lanes-Phase 1: In Sacramento County, on I-5, from Beach Lake Bridge at Morrison Creek (SAC 012.40) to US 50 (apx 005 SAC 22.461). Construct: 17 lane miles of HOV or bus/carpool lanes; Class IV Bikeways parallel to I-5 on Franklin Blvd from Big Horn Blvd in the City of Elk Grove to the Cosumnes River Light Rail Station at the intersection of Franklin Blvd and Cosumnes River Blvd in the City of Sacramento; Two new sound walls near Freeport Blvd and Pocket Road. $15,000,000.

In April 2019, it was reported that construction would begin in July 2019 on a $382 million project along the I-5 corridor from the river to Elk Grove. Caltrans will be installing HOV lanes, resurfacing the road, and demolishing a pedestrian overpass near 43rd Street which is not ADA compliant. The project is expected to take four to six years.
(Source: CBS 13 Sacramento, 4/26/2019)

In July 2019, it was reported that Caltrans was announcing the start of a massive, several-year-long $370 million reconstruction project, which includes replacing the road surface. The project will take three years and involve extensive lane closures at times, prompting traffic congestion and detours, officials said. Project finish date is set for late 2022. The project will include the addition of carpool, or high-occupancy vehicle lanes in both directions south of downtown. State officials say they want to add the lanes now to prepare for several thousand planned housing units in the coming years in the Delta Shores area of Sacramento and south of there. The project area will run from one mile south of Elk Grove Boulevard to the bridge over the American River, just north of downtown.
(Source: SacBee, 7/26/2019)

Cosumnes River Boulevard Interchange (~ 005 SAC 14.804)

[Consumnes River Blvd Bridge]In March 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project located in the southwest quadrant of the City of Sacramento that would extend Cosumnes River Boulevard from its current westerly terminus at Franklin Boulevard to an interchange at I-5 (~ 005 SAC 14.804), and then farther west to an at-grade intersection with Freeport Boulevard (Route 160) in the currently unincorporated town of Freeport. The project would improve route continuity, reduce existing and projected traffic congestion improving traffic safety, and redistribute traffic along I-5, thereby reducing travel time and delay. The proposed action would accommodate future development of the project area both west and east of I-5 in accordance with the land uses in the adopted City of Sacramento General Plan. The EIR evaluated two build alternatives in addition to the no build alternative. Alternative A: Franklin to Freeport North Alignment and Alternative B: Franklin to Freeport South Alignment. Alternative A was identified as the preferred alternative because it would avoid bisecting the Bufferlands property, has the support of the local landowners, and parallels the Lower Northwest Interceptor alignment and the Freeport Regional Water Project pipeline, thereby reducing right-of-way requirements for roads and utilities. According to Caltrans, the project is estimated to cost $110,172,000 and is fully funded with STIP ($15,608,000) and Local ($94,564,000) funds.

In December 2012, the CTC approved allocating $18,191,000 for the locally administered multi-funded Proposition 1B State-Local Partnership Program (SLPP)/State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) I-5 / Cosumnes River Boulevard Interchange (PPNO 3L42). The project will construct interchange and roadway extensions for the I-5 / Cosumnes River Boulevard Interchange in the city of Sacramento, between the Meadowview Road and Laguna Boulevard Interchanges on Route 5.

A portion of this roadway is already constructed, extending from Franklin Boulevard east to Route 99, where the roadway becomes Calvine Road within unincorporated area of Sacramento County. Calvine Road is a major arterial, extending to the east to Grant Line Road and servicing major growth areas in south Sacramento County. The proposed project will improve circulation in southern Sacramento by providing route continuity between I-5 and Route 99. In addition, this project will provide access to land currently targeted for development in the City and County General Plans. Traffic studies predict that this project will accommodate anticipated travel demand through the year 2025. Construction of the I-5/Cosumnes River Boulevard interchange was originally identified in a study of the Route 148 corridor conducted by the Department in the early 1960s. On February 27, 1963, the Department adopted the Route 148 freeway corridor segment between I-5 and Route 99. In 1974, the Commission withdrew the freeway designation of Route 148 due to financial constraints. In a memorandum dated July 1, 1974, the County of Sacramento’s Department of Public Works recommended that the City of Sacramento maintain the adopted route as an east-west transportation corridor that would be less than freeway status. The City of Sacramento then embarked on the necessary steps to begin preserving right-of-way within the Route 148 corridor. On November 4, 1981, the Sacramento City Council certified an Environmental Impact Report for the Route 148 Arterial Plan and adopted the route alignment for the arterial. That approval allowed the City to begin reserving the right-of-way for the future development of Route 148 and to construct segments of the approved route as funds became available. After approval of the Route 148 Arterial Plan, the name of the proposed facility was changed to Cosumnes River Boulevard. The names Route 148 and Cosumnes River Boulevard are synonymous and refer to the same proposed facility within the city of Sacramento. The estimated construction cost for the interchange is $36,000,000 and right of way costs are roughly $6,000,000. The project is programmed in the State Transportation Improvement Program and includes funds from the Regional Surface Transportation Program, Sales Tax Measure A, and local developer fees.

2007 CMIA. Two projects on I-5 near Sacramento were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding. These projects were a I-5 to Route 113 direct connector, auxiliary lanes from Consumnes River to Pocket Rd, and the Richards Blvd interchange ramp widening. None were recommended for funding.

I-5 Depressed Section Repair/Renovation (~ 005 SAC 22.461 to 005 SAC 24.657)

Also in Sacramento, the city of Sacramento has plans to bridge over the depressed section of I-5 to reconnect to its waterfront.

There are also plans to close the depressed section of freeway in 2008 for major repair work lasting eight months. The sunken section of freeway has sprung leaks, and the roadway is in danger of flooding if a heavy winter storm hits. Beginning in February or March and lasting through October, Caltrans will close one or two freeway lanes in each direction from Richards Boulevard (apx 005 SAC 24.657) on the north to the I-5 junction with US 50 (apx 005 SAC 22.461) on the south. This section of freeway is the busiest stretch on I-5, north of Los Angeles. Caltrans officials said they had contemplated doing the $55 million project the normal way -- at night and during weekends -- but figured that could take five years. The portion of the freeway, called the "boat section," is 34 years old and sits beneath river level, literally surrounded by water. Years of leaks are crumbling the roadway. Drainage pipes have become clogged with silt and can't keep up. Workers will dig up the roadway, replace the extensive pump and drain system underneath, then rebuild the road and a 6-inch concrete slab underneath. The new drainage system will be electronically controlled and monitored. Until the fix, Caltrans inspectors will continue to drive through the section during storms to see if the pumps are keeping up.

In March 2005, the CTC considered a resolution to vacate the public’s right to use roadway connectors from I-5 in the City of Sacramento, along I-5 between N Street and Capitol Mall and between Capitol Mall and L Street (03-Sac-5 PM 23.5). The connectors were constructed around 1964 as part of the I-5 freeway project. At the time, Capitol Mall (formerly LRN 6 which was signposted as US 40) was the principal route for traffic traveling between Sacramento and San Francisco resulting in high volumes of inter-regional and local traffic using the same corridor. Upon completion of the freeway system in Sacramento, inter-regional traffic on Capitol Mall was almost completely eliminated. Traffic operation studies have concluded that these connectors are no longer necessary. The connectors are currently maintained by the City of Sacramento and reimbursed by Caltrans. Terminating the public’s right to use the connectors creates excess land that can be combined with other excess parcels and sold.

In July 2010, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Sacramento along Route 5 at Richards Boulevard (3-Sac-5-PM 24.7) on Bercut Drive and Jibboom Street, consisting of collateral facilities.

In March 2018, it was reported that the CTC approved funding for several projects directed at improving freight traffic through Sacramento. This includes a $247 million bridge project to replace structures on the I-5 South Connector Undercrossing between U.S. Highway 50 and I-80 in an effort to improve permit load capabilities. Another project will shore up the West End Viaduct along I-5 so that the bridge can accommodate heavier loads. The projects in the Sacramento are scheduled for completion between 2022 and 2026.

American River Bridges (03-Sacramento-5 PM 22.1/26.7)

In March 2018, it was reported that Caltrans is exploring what could be the biggest Sacramento freeway redo in modern times – tearing down and replacing the twin freeway bridges that carry I-5 over the American River. Caltrans says the half-mile spans just north of downtown are among 45 pinch-points the agency has identified on three major freight corridors – I-5, I-80, I-10/Route 60 – that force oversized trucks onto sometimes long and costly detours. In some cases, overpasses are too low. A notorious one on I-80 in Berkeley less than 5 miles from the Oakland port is only 14 feet, 9 inches tall, more than a foot lower than the 16-foot modern federal standard for existing bridges. Federal standards for new bridges are 16 feet, 6 inches. In other cases, 1960s-era bridges are no longer considered strong enough to carry extra-heavy commercial vehicles that traverse state highways daily. In Sacramento, officials have identified three "no-go" zones for big trucks, all within a few miles of each other on I-5 near downtown. The most notable are the dual spans over the American River and Discovery Park. The other two are bridges over land, one that carries I-5 traffic over the downtown railyard and another over Broadway just south of downtown. Some heavy trucks, typically more than 80,000 pounds, will take a 51-mile detour by exiting I-5 at Florin Road or farther south. From there, they work their way over to Sunrise Boulevard, then use Greenback Lane and Elkhorn Boulevard and finally loop back to Route 99 to rejoin I-5 near the airport. The costs of the potential projects are high, and the number of vehicles involved is low compared to the average daily traffic using those freeways. The vehicles in question are the biggest of commercial trucks, larger than the typical 80,000-pound supermarket or Costco delivery trucks. They typically require a special permit in California and include 9-axle or larger trucks carrying cranes and other large construction equipment; parts of prefabricated buildings; farm equipment; or electric transformers. Sometimes they travel at slow speeds at night with CHP escorts. Statewide, Caltrans officials say they issued about 146,000 permits for single trips to oversized vehicles in 2017. That's 400 trips a day. The physical condition of the I-5 bridges over the American River add to the uncertainty. The state recently downgraded their load carrying capacities, and no truck heavier than 80,000 pounds – about the size of a large supermarket delivery truck – is allowed on them. If Caltrans decides to tear down and replace all three I-5 sections, the tab could hit $1.5 billion. That could include carpool lanes and a separate area for bicycles and pedestrians. But work could span more than five years and would involve extensive lane closures – and possibly full freeway closures at times. The project would require a formal environmental review process, during which the state will solicit public comment and concerns. If engineers determine they can keep the existing spans but strengthen them to hold bigger trucks, the retrofit cost would be considerably less, about $400 million.
(Source: Sacramento Bee, 3/5/2018)

The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Bridge Restoration item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 03-Sacramento-5 PM 22.1/26.7 PPNO 5868 Proj ID 0317000340 EA 3H390. I-5 in the city of Sacramento, from 0.5 mile south of Route 50 to Route 80 at South Connector Undercrossing No. 24-0267 (PM 22.42) and at American River Viaduct No. 24-0068L/R (PM 24.82). Improve to standard truck capacity. Programmed in FY21-22, with construction scheduled to start in October 2022. Construction, R/W, PS&E, R/W Sup, and Con Sup phase(s) are NOT authorized. Total project cost is $247,230K, with $179,810K being capital (const and right of way) and $67,420K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
(Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

Metro Air Parkway

Rt 5 Metro Air ConnectionIn May 2018, the CTC accepted the environmental document and approved for future consideration of funding the Metro Air Parkway/I-5 Interchange Project (~ SAC 31.452). The Project will construct a new road connection to the I-5 Freeway by extending the Metro Air Parkway, constructing an interchange with a loop on-ramp in the southwest quadrant, building a three lane overcrossing to accommodate future freeway design concepts, relocating South Bayou Way and North Bayou Way, realigning drainage ditches, and repositioning overhead utilities. The Project is estimated to cost $20,000,000 and is fully funded through construction with private funds secured by the Metro Air Park property owners. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2018-19.
(Source: CTC Minutes, May 2018 Agenda Item 2.2c(10))

In June 2018, the CTC approved a new public road connection: 03-Sac-5-PM 31.4, New Public Road Connection to I-5 at Metro Air Parkway Interchange in the county of Sacramento. The County of Sacramento (County) proposes to construct a new public road connection to I-5 by means of a new interchange located at PM 31.4. The Metro Air Parkway/I-5 interchange will provide primary entrance and egress to the Metro Air Park Special Planning Area (SPA), an industrial business park. The proposed interchange is the most cost effective solution for providing adequate access to the SPA while maintaining acceptable level of service on I-5 and adjacent interchanges within the project limits. Within the project limits, I-5 is a four-lane freeway that runs east and west, with a 70-84 foot median and continuous thrie-beam barrier. The County developed the plans for the interchange in response to the aforementioned SPA. In July of 1999, the Department approved the Project Study Report and the Project Report (PR) on December 20, 2010. Soon after, the project was put on hold due to a lack of project construction funding. On April 11, 2018, the Department approved a Supplemental PR that documented updates to the traffic analysis and geometric approval drawings and confirmed the findings in previously completed technical studies. The proposed interchange will be constructed in two phases. Phase One (Interim) of the project will construct portion of a Type L-7 overcrossing interchange with single-lane northbound diagonal on and off-ramp, a single-lane southbound diagonal off-ramp and a single-lane southbound loop on-ramp. Phase One construction is expected to be complete by 2020. Based on traffic studies, it is anticipated that Phase Two (Ultimate) construction of the interchange will be needed after year 2030. Ultimate improvements will add a single-lane northbound loop on-ramp and a single-lane southbound diagonal on-ramp, widen the overcrossing and modify the ramp terminal intersections. In addition, continuous auxiliary lanes will be constructed on I-5 in the northbound and southbound directions between Route 99 and Metro Air Parkway. Traffic congestion thresholds as annotated in the cooperative agreement executed on April 23, 2018 will initiate the Ultimate phase of construction. Phase One is fully funded through construction with private developer fees collected and administered by the County. The construction cost estimate of Phase One is $18.6 million. The Federal Highway Administration granted final approval for the break in access to the interstate on August 23, 2011.
(Source: CTC Agenda, June 2018 Agenda Item 2.3b(1))

In June 2020, the CTC approved an allocation of  $1,940,000 for the locally-administered Proposition 1B (Prop 1B) Trade Corridor Improvement Fund (TCIF) Metro Air Parkway Northbound Auxiliary Lane (PPNO 8575) project: 03-Sac-5 30.2/31.2 PPNO 03-8575 ProjID 0320000096 EA 1J130 Metro Air Parkway Northbound Auxiliary Lane. In Sacramento on I-5 from the Route 99 interchange to Metro Air Parkway interchange. Construct northbound auxiliary lane. The programmed TCIF funds are to be split: $0 for construction engineering and $1,940,000 for construction capital. Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-18-54; May 2018. ALLOCATION IS CONTINGENT UPON APPROVAL OF A BUDGET REVISION BY THE DEPARTMENT FINANCE AND ON THE PASSAGE OF THE 2020 BUDGET ACT
(Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5g.(5a))

In August 2011, the CTC approved $13,734,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Sacramento, from Sacramento River Bridge (~ 005 YOL 0.01) to 0.2 mile north of Adams Creek Bridge (~005 YOL R13.80), that will rehabilitate 49.0 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the traveling surface, minimize costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $277,000 in SHOPP funding, programmed in Fiscal Years 2012-13 and 2013-14, for repairs in Nevada, Sacramento and Yolo Counties on Route 5, Route 20 and US 50 at various locations that will upgrade crash cushions and guardrail to meet the current National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) 350 standards and improve safety.

North of Sacramento — Colusa, Glenn, Tehama, Shasta, Siskiyou Counties

SR 20 Williams ProjectIn October 2014, the CTC approved a future road connection to I-5 as part of a project related to Route 20. The project is located approximately 2,000 feet east of the I-5/Route 20 interchange in the City of Williams (~ 005 COL R18.692) in Colusa County. The project will create a new public road connection between the I-5 northbound off-ramp and Husted Road, construct improvements on Route 20 for turning movements, extend Margurite Street 3,200 feet from Ella Street to Route 20, and install a concrete culvert and drainage for the new segment of Margurite Street. As a result of this project the designation of Route 20 between I-5 and Husted Road will change from “freeway” to “controlled access expressway”. Impacts that require mitigation measures to be reduced to a less than significant level relate to Transportation & Traffic, Cultural Resources, Paleontology, Air Quality, Noise, Biological Resources and Climate Change. Mitigation measures include, but are not limited to: preparation and implementation of a traffic management plan, monitoring efforts for archaeological and paleontological artifacts during construction including measures to address the inadvertent discovery of cultural or paleontological resources, development and implementation of a lead compliance plan, measures to reduce noise, dust and emissions from construction equipment and operations, implementation of erosion control and stormwater pollution prevention measures, preconstruction surveys and establishment of buffer zones and other avoidance and compensatory measures to minimize impacts to nesting birds, the Swainson’s Hawk, the Burrowing Owl, and the Giant Garter Snake, and measures to minimize the spread of invasive plant species. The project is estimated to cost $6,860,000 and is fully funded through construction with STIP ($3,500,000) and Local ($3,360,000) funds. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2014/15.

In 2007, the CTC did not recommend funding requests for improvements to the South Avenue interchange in Tehama County (~ 005 TEH R7.487).

Los Molinos Phase III Project / 99W & Gyle Road (~ 005 TEH R13.969)

In May 2017, the CTC authorized deletion of the Los Molinos Phase III project (PPNO 2528) from the STIP. Additionally, TCTC also proposes to amend the 99W & Gyle Road (~ 005 TEH R13.969) to South Main Street & I-5 Overcrossing project (PPNO 2569) in Tehama County to delay Design (PS&E) and construction by one Fiscal Year (FY) and increase the project funding. The Los Molinos Phase III project is programmed in the 2016 STIP for improvements along State Route 99 including paved shoulders and pedestrian improvements. The project is the last phase of a series of improvements in Los Molinos and was delayed until FY 20-21 due to funding constraints realized in the 2016 STIP cycle. The project was going to be delivered in conjunction with a project with a similar scope programmed in the 2016 State Highway Operations and Protection Program (SHOPP) which will update this location to current American’s with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements. The SHOPP project scope includes curb ramps, sidewalk gap closures, drainage, paving and lighting. However, due to ADA mandates, the SHOPP project cannot be delayed but is able to incorporate the scope in the Los Molinos Phase III Project. The 99W & Gyle Road to South Main Street & I-5 Overcrossing project is programmed in the 2016 STIP with the Environmental (PA&ED) phase programmed in FY 17-18 and PS&E in FY 18-19. Also as part of the 2016 STIP, construction was reduced by $2,595,000 and delayed from FY 18-19 to FY 19-20. This road is the adopted I-5 alternate detour route which is used by oversized permitted vehicles and is critical for local manufacturing, lumber and agriculture industries. The project scope includes resurfacing and reconfiguring the roadway as well as work at the signalized intersection of South Main Street and I-5. In lieu of upgrading the signalized intersection, a roundabout is now being considered at that location which has added work to the environmental analysis and project cost. [Note: Although the street is named "State Highway 99W", it does not appear to have postmile mileage, and so may be former state highway. Note that Gyle Road is County Sign Route A11.]

Additionally, in June 2017, the CTC amended the SHOPP to delete the Los Molinos Phase II project and to amend in the changes above.

There are plans to add a truck climbing lane near Red Bluff (appears to be near Wilcox Road, ~ 005 TEH 31.014). This was discussed during the March 2005 CTC Meeting, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1). This project is fully funded in the 2004 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP), and had a negative environmental declaration.

In January 2012, the CTC approved 2.9 million to extend on-ramps and reduce the number and severity of collisions at the Bowman Road overcrossing on I-5 (~ 005 TEH 41.511) just south of Cottonwood.

In August 2008, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way along I-5 in the county of Tehama near Red Bluff at Adobe Road (~ 005 TEH R27.442), consisting of a relocated and reconstructed county road.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $41,999,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in Tehama and Shasta Counties, in and near Red Bluff, from south of Adobe Road (~ 005 TEH R27.442) to the Gas Point Road Overcrossing (~ 005 SHA 0.907) that will rehabilitate 40.9 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the road surface, minimize the costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

Cottonwood Hills Truck Climbing Lanes

In 2007, the CTC considered a number of requests for funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA). one request was funded: Cottonwood Hills Truck Climbing Lanes ($22.902M) (005 SHA R1.2/R4.2).

In August 2011, it was reported that Caltrans recently wrapped up a $16.479 million dollar project that saw a third lane open over Cottonwood Hill. A new lane was installed in the north and southbound directions on I-5 from Gas Point Road (~ 005 SHA 0.907) to Deschutes Road (~ 005 SHA R4.292). Construction on the project started in June of 2011, and while rain delayed the completion, it was still finished on schedule. Tullis Construction was the main contractor, but the entire project was a group effort between Caltrans, Shasta Regional Transportation Planning Agency, Shasta County and Tullis Construction. A portion of the project—$13.7 million—was funded by California’s Proposition 1B.
(Source: Anderson Valley Post)

Deschutes Road InterchangeIn April 2012, the CTC approved $6 million for the City of Anderson to fund for construction of the Deschutes Road/Factory Outlets Drive roundabout east of I-5 (~ 005 SHA R4.292). The allocation will allow Anderson and California Department of Transportation officials to move forward with construction likely to start in August 2012. Construction should be completed and the roundabout operating by late-summer 2013. Construction plans include a new northbound off-ramp from I-5 to Deschutes Road and a modern roundabout intersection that will connect three roads and a freeway on-ramp to the off-ramp, all without need of a signal light. Also included is a new retaining wall, a pathway for pedestrians and bicycles as well as lighting and landscaping at the roundabout intersection.

In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed constructing an additional freeway lane in both directions in Shasta County.

Anderson / South Redding Widening (02-Sha-5, PM R3.8/R11.7)

In April 2012, Caltrans was holding open houses regarding plans to widen I-5 to six lanes between Anderson and south Redding. The estimated $60 million project will connect with the six freeway lanes currently scheduled for completion by August or September 2012 in Redding and with the existing six lanes south of Deschutes Road in Anderson that were completed in September 2011.

In December 2016, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Shasta County that will add new lanes on I-5 from the city of Anderson to just south of the city of Redding. The project is programmed in the 2016 State Transportation Improvement Program. The project is not fully funded. The total estimated cost is $65,886,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2020-21. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 State Transportation Improvement Program.

The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to extend and adjust this project into the 2017 STIP, which shows: PPNO 3445A Redding to Anderson-Six Lane-Phase 1 "Little Easy" being adjusted from $12.796M to $14.396M, with construction moved to FY18-19.

The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $1.6M in Advance Project Development Element (APDE) funding for PPNO 3597 North Redding, 6-Lane (APDE). This appears to be the Interstate 5 Union Pacific Redding to Anderson Six-Lane Project. . The project’s major components are as follows:

  1. Replace the South Anderson Overhead (SHA R003.82), where the Union Pacific (UP) Railroad passes under I-5;
  2. Widen three I-5 bridge decks and one culvert;
  3. Add an additional northbound and southbound lane on I-5, within the existing median right of way, for 3.2 miles between the cities of Redding and Anderson in Northern California.

Additional elements include intelligent transportation systems (ITS), electrical infrastructure, safety enhancements, and signage.The total rural project cost is $108,215,000. A state and local share of $80,608,000 (74%) has been assembled in partnership with the State of California, Shasta Regional Transportation Agency (SRTA/MPO), City of Anderson, and Shasta County. The TIGER request is for $25,000,000, or 23% of the project cost. The project runs from SHA R3.8 in the City of Anderson to SHA R7.0 south of the City of Redding.
(Source: Project TIGER Request, October 2017)

In May 2018, it was reported that the California Transportation Commission has approved spending $65.7 million to expand I-5 from four to six lanes from Redding to Anderson. The project would add one additional northbound and southbound lane to the freeway, replace a bridge over Union Pacific railroad tracks in Anderson, upgrade lighting, rehabilitate pavement on exits and add new median barriers and other improvements. Widening the freeway would tie into sections of I-5 that are already three lanes in both directions in Redding and Anderson. The $65.7 million is the last piece of funding needed for construction of the $120 million project, said Eric Orr, Caltrans project manager. A large portion of the money, about $92 million, for the project comes from a 12-cent increase in taxes on gasoline and a 20-cent diesel tax increase. Both went into effect this year. If the gas tax is repealed, the I-5 widening project would still proceed because the money has already been programmed. However, without proceeds collected from the increased fuels tax, the work widening I-5 would have been delayed for many more years. The project is expected to take about three years to complete, with four lanes remaining open during the day. There will likely be some lane closures at night.
(Source: Record Searchlight, 5/17/2018)

In October 2018, the CTC approved a request for an additional $6,182,000 in Trade Corridor Enhancement Program (TCEP) and $5,593,000 in State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) funding for the multi-funded TCEP/STIP project (PPNO 3445A) on I-5 in Shasta County, to award the construction contract. The project has State Highway Operation Protection Program (SHOPP) and Non-SHOPP funds, consisting of STIP-RIP, TCEP (Regional), TCEP (State) and Local funds. This supplemental fund request is for TCEP State funds and STIP-RIP funds to cover the Non-SHOPP portion of the cost increase. This project is located on I-5 in Shasta County between the I-5/Route 273 Separation, and 0.4 mile south of the Chum Creek Road Overcrossing, in and near the city of Anderson. The project will improve roadway safety and increase capacity by widening the roadway and structures from 4 lanes to 6 lanes, by replacing/widening the following: The South Anderson Overhead, the Anderson Creek bridges, Deschutes Road, Balls Ferry, the North Street Undercrossing and the Tormey Drain bridges. The project will also make pavement and drainage improvements, upgrade overhead signs, add ITS elements, ramp modifications, and construct retaining walls and concrete barriers. The contract award status is pending approval of this request for supplemental funds by the Commission. If the Commission approves this request, construction would begin in November 2018, and would take 532 working days for completion in October 2021. The increase was due to limited suppliers, and limited supplies, increased complexity, and increased material costs.
(Source: October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.5e.(5))

In January 2019, it was reported that Caltrans District 2 announced the start of construction of the Redding to Anderson Six Lane Project on I-5 in Shasta County. The project will add an additional northbound lane and southbound lane on I-5 for 7.5 miles from the Route 273 and I-5 separation just south of the outlet mall in Anderson to just south of the Bonnyview and Churn Creek Road interchange near Redding, making it a continuous six-lane facility. Preliminary construction began in late 2018 and will continue throughout the winter. Tree cutting, burning and disposal, structure preparation and related work is taking place in the median and along Caltrans’ right of way. Other improvements include rehabilitating the exiting pavement, new median barrier, guard railing, overhead signs and upgraded lighting. Safety improvements include longer acceleration lanes for slower moving trucks. The project includes the widening of eight structures as well as replacement of the Anderson Creek Bridge and the South Anderson Railroad Overhead. Moving into spring and summer of 2019, the public can expect lane closures on I-5 during the evening, if needed. Traffic will be shifted onto new I-5 alignments while bridges are staged for construction. The I-5 onramps and offramps may be closed for up to five days and local detours for freeway access will be clearly marked.
(Source: Redding Daily News, 1/30/2019)

In March 2019, it was announced that the Redding to Anderson Six-Lane (RASL) Project will have a formal groundbreaking on 4/4/2019. The “RASL” Project is slated to be completed in three years. The project is a partnership with Shasta Regional Transportation Agency (SRTA), City of Anderson, and Shasta County. Construction will be carried on by contractor J.F. Shea Construction and a group of subcontractors. Preliminary construction began in late 2018 and it will continue throughout this winter. Tree cutting, burning and disposal, structure preparation and related work is taking place in the median and along Caltrans’ right of way. Currently, no traffic delays or other traffic impacts are anticipated due to this work, but we remind the public to be a partner in safety and slow down. The Redding to Anderson Six-Lane Project will add an additional northbound and southbound lane on I-5 for 7.5 miles from the Route 273/I-5 separation (in Anderson) to just south of the Bonnyview/Churn Creek Road interchange near Redding, making it a continuous 6 lane facility. Other improvements include rehabilitating the existing pavement, new median barrier, guard railing, overhead signs, and upgraded lighting. Safety improvements include longer acceleration lanes for slower moving trucks. The project also includes the widening of 8 structures as well as replacement of the Anderson Creek Bridge and the South Anderson Railroad Overhead. I-5 traffic will be managed with additional Intelligent Transportation Systems.
(Source: District 2 FB Post, 3/4/2019)

The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, adjusted the programming for this project as follows:
(Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

PPNO
Project
Prior
20-21
21-22
22-23
23-24
24-25
3597 North Redding, 6-Lane (APDE) 1,600K 0 0 0 0
3597 North Redding, 6-Lane (APDE) -1,600K 4,800K 0 0 0 0
3597 Fix 5 Cascade Gateway 1,600K 0 0 2,908K 0 0
3445A Redding-Anderson, 6-Ln(Ph1) (SHOPP)(TCEP)(supplemental) 5,593K 0 0 0 0 0

In 2007, the CTC did not recommend funding requests to expand the route to 6 lanes from Bechelli (~ 005 SHA R11.929) to Churn Creek S of Redding (~ 005 SHA R12.158) or construct a I-5/Route 44 direct connector (~ 005 SHA R15.329), and widening the route to 6 lanes from Bonnyview (~ 005 SHA R12.144) to Riverside (~ 005 SHA R6.734) in North Anderson.

Redding Widening

In May 2011, the CTC amended the baseline agreement for a project that will widen I-5 by adding an additional lane in the northbound (NB) and southbound (SB) directions from 0.3 mile south of Smith Road (~ SHA R10.55) to 0.2 mile north of the Route 5/Route 299 Separation (~  SHA R17.543)

In July 2011, Caltrans removed safety cable barriers installed along the I-5 median through Redding. The cables were installed in 2009 to prevent vehicles from crossing the median into oncoming lanes during traffic incidents. They were removed as part of a project to widen the freeway through Redding. When the $2.2 million cable barrier was installed Caltrans had plans to widen the freeway but had no definite timeline when it would receive funding. The Shasta Regional Transportation Planning Agency regularly applied for the needed funds, but didn't expend the award (which occurred in 2011). I-5 is being widened to three lanes in both directions from the Smith Road overcrossing south of Redding (~ SHA R10.85), to north of the Hilltop Drive overcrossing (~ SHA R16.139). The money to widen the highway comes from 2006's Proposition 1B, which was approved by voters statewide and allows the state to sell up to $20 billion in bonds to pay for transportation and transit projects. When the widening project is complete, the cables will be reinstalled, for $443,000. Except for a section of highway between Cypress Avenue and the Route 44 interchange, where there will be a concrete barrier, after the widening is done there will be cable barriers from Gas Point Road to just north of the Route 44 interchange.
(Source: Redding Searchlight, 7/7/11)

In November 2011, it was reported that a $5.9 million project to add two lanes to southbound I-5 at the Route 44 interchange was completed ahead of schedule, thanks in part to a financial incentive from the California Department of Transportation. Caltrans had offered the contractor $64,500 for early completion. Work on the bridge over Route 44 should wrap up in summer 2012.

In January 2013, the CTC approved a $3.7 million bridge rehabilitation project that includes 19 spans in Shasta and Siskiyou counties. These bridges are Flume Creek Road, Creekside, Conant Road, Castella Sidehill Viaduct, Castella, Soda Creek Road, South Dunsmuir, Willow Street, Dunsmuir Avenue, South Mt. Shasta, Moonlit Oaks Avenue, Oberlin Road, Yreka Creek, Miner Street, Miner Street, North Yreka Separation, and Henley Way. The bridges will be rehabilitated by replacing their damaged decks. The decks will be sealed with methacrylate, a viscous material that acts as a bonding agent that keeps the water out to better protect the steel structure. Workers also will place polyester concrete overlays and repair joint seals on the bridges. Work is expected to start in summer 2013 and be complete before fall 2013.
(Source: Redding Record Searchlight, 1/10/13)

In May 2011, Caltrans closed a culvert under I-5 near Mountain Gate that locals had used to cross the freeway (somewhere near 005 SHA R24.528). Caltrans requires workers accessing the culvert to first test the air quality inside the culvert for the presence of toxic gases and an appropriate oxygen level — between 19.5 and 23.5 percent. Then, it mandates laborers pair up, with one person inside working while another watches, to rescue the other if he passes out. Workers regularly encounter rattlesnakes, posing serious danger to a single person in the culvert. Given this, Caltrans could not have the culvert open to the public; Caltrans is facing a lawsuit from the family of a man who died after crawling through a culvert in Mariposa County in 2010 to reach a famous scenic view. Those wishing to cross the freeway must now use a traditional overpass with a 40 mph speed limit and about four feet of room to walk.

Antlers Bridge (005 SHA R039.98).

In June 2007, the CTC considered authorization for replacement of a bridge in Shasta County near Redding. This project is fully funded in the 2006 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $213,881,000. Construction is estimated to begin in FY 2009-10. The project will involve construction activities in the environmentally sensitive habitat of the bald eagle, a federally listed threatened species. In addition, visual concerns related to the construction of a larger bridge than currently exists resulted in a Mitigated Negative Declaration being completed for this project. This could be the Antlers Bridge. In May 2009, Caltrans advertised a project for replacement of the I-5 Sacramento River bridge at Antlers ($230 million)--the project also includes relocating the approaches to the bridge to ease sharp curves on I-5, and entails a massive road cut.

Antlers BridgeIn April 2016, it was reported that the Antlers Bridge was nearing completion, and that it featured artwork that will only be visible for a short time: twenty-five-foot largemouth colorful concrete bass leaping at minnows is repeated four times on the new Antlers Bridge under construction on Interstate 5 about 25 miles north of Redding. There's a few of the art from the current Antlers Bridge spanning the lake’s Sacramento Arm at Lakehead; however when traffic switches to the new bridge, which is expected to happen in late summer or fall 2016, the I-5 blur-by will no longer be a viewing option. The artwork is 150 feet above the lake bottom, or 65 feet from the surface of a full Shasta Lake. After the old bridge, built in 1941, is demolished, the best places to angle for a view will be from the shoreline or boat. The art reflects Caltrans' philosophy of providing a sense of place and grace to designs, of incorporating aesthetic elements into projects. Tutor-Saliba Corporation is contractor for the $125 million bridge replacement. About 1 percent of a project’s budget can be for architectural/aesthetic features. With the Antlers Bridge it’s about 0.2 percent—or $250,000. Largemouth bass seemed a good choice for Antlers Bridge because of their link to the lake. The idea began with senior bridge architect Javier Chavez in the Caltrans Sacramento office (since retired), and became a collaborative effort with others in the architecture unit and district office. Turning fish on paper into something concrete was complicated. The massive fish first were carved in foam, with plenty of back and forth to get eye sockets and other details just right. The foam sculptures then were used to make rubber molds for the concrete. Once the fish in a relief were on the bridge, it was time to bring in the colorists. Jim Currie of Currie’s Quality Painting in Redding and Jerry Stuart of Jerry Stuart Painting Company practiced on a ground-level mockup before stepping into the small basket of a hydraulic lift to color the bridge fish. They used stain, which permeates the concrete and will hold up better than paint to winter rains and searing summer sun in the canyon. Currie and Stuart applied the stain mostly with sprayers. There was much taping to be done to protect from overspray. Currie, a longtime fisherman, wanted the colors to be realistic, not cartoonish. Hues were meticulously blended and multiple coats applied. Each panel took a week or so. Work days were eight to 10 hours. It was highly challenging – as in being way off the ground. The painters also did the faux stonework on the bridge abutments. They had to be sure their work didn’t get in the way of the bridge builders.
(Source: Enjoy Magazine, 3/24/2016)

In May 2016, it was reported that some are upset about the mural on the Antlers bridge. Their concern? Once the old bridge is torn down, no one will be able to see the mural (so why spend the money). Caltrans, on the other hand, is confident that thousands of people will get to enjoy the murals because many boaters, swimmers, and water skiers frequent the area. As for the cost, $250,000 of the budget went into the aesthetics of the bridge including the rock detailing and the fish art. That's less than half a percent of the total cost of the project. This particular project took advantage of some toll credit so now it's being reimbursed and 100 percent federal funding. The federal money was allocated for the project in 2009 and has already been set aside to complete the bridge. The complete project from construction to demolition is expected to be completed by November or December 2016.
(Source: KRCR, May 2016)

In October 2016, it was reported that a small stretch of roadway near Exit 707 (Vollmers) (~ 005 SHA 45.66) has had at least 10 semi truck crashes in the 2014-2016 — including four so far in October 2016 and three in the same month of 2014. Virtually all of the crashes at the exit alternately called "Vollmers," "Dog Creek" and "Delta" happened in the rain, and eight of the 10 occurred in October. The wet weather is only one common factor in the crashes. The spot has a curve that's known to the CHP and truckers alike. "The way it curves and that situation of the road (being wet) causes them just about 100 percent of the time to connect with that guardrail," CHP Sgt. Matt Larsen said, referring to the crashes. But the California Department of Transportation's District 2 office in Redding says the road is fine — people just need to drive more carefully. Others in the trucking industry say signs can be the reminder — or first notice —a trucker needs to avoid catastrophe. Caltrans uses skid tests to measure how well a road will hold up in such conditions, and one conducted there at the beginning of the year had "good" results, said Caltrans District 2 Spokeswoman Denise Yergenson. However, CHP officials say the October factor is probably not a coincidence — the first rains of the year make roads extra slick, since oil and other liquids embedded in the asphalt are activated into liquid form again. The area was recently re-graded. By Caltrans policy, most types of warning signs are only posted if the stretch of roadway is out of compliance with standards.
(Source: Redding Record-Searchlight, 10/22/2016)

In October 2008, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the county of Shasta near the Pollard Flat overcrossing along Route 5 (2-Sha-5-PM R50.4/R50.9), consisting of relocated or reconstructed county roads or frontage roads.

In June 2019, it was reported that bridges on I-5 at the Sims Road Undercrossing in Shasta County and the Crag View Drive Undercrossing in Shasta and Siskiyou counties will be replaced thanks to a $24.8 million project using funding from the California Transportation Commission. The specific allocation was $24,836,000 covering construction and construction engineering for 02-Sha-5 56.6/58.1: I-5 near Pollard Flat, from 0.8 mile south to 0.7 mile north of Sims Road Undercrossing No. 06-0111 (SHA 57.41); also 02-Sha-5 66.3/67.0, 02-Sis-5 0.00/0.04 from 0.5 mile south to 0.2 mile north of Crag View Drive Undercrossing No. 06-0095 (SHA 066.84). Outcome/Output: Replace two bridges by constructing precast concrete bridges to address moisture driven concrete cracking and provide standard acceleration length from the onramps. PPNO 02-3543. ProjID 0218000047. SB 1 Baseline Agreement approval under Resolution SHOPP-P-1819-04B; October 2018. NEPA - CE, 1/30/2018; Re-validation 3/22/2019.
(Source: Siskiyou Daily News, 6/1/2019; May 2019 CTC Meeting, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) Item 2)

In April 2012, the CTC authorized $373,000 to construct a viewing area on I-5, at Castella Vista Point (~ 005 SHA 62.435).

In May 2018, it was reported that the CTC approved spending $57 million to rebuild the pavement on I-5 from Dunsmuir (~SIS 1.79) to Mount Shasta (~ SIS R10.328). The work includes rebuilding the southbound lanes and shoulders with reinforced concrete, widening a bridge at Mott Road (~ SIS 5.607), replacing guardrails and signs, as well as improved striping and drainage and electrical work.
(Source: Record Searchlight, 5/18/2018)

According to Gary Araki, in 2006 Caltrans made a change in the City of Weed. Pre-2006, the transition from SB I-5 to Route 97 used to direct motorists to use exit 747 (005 SIS R18.854), the Central Weed exit; traffic then was routed to use S Weed Blvd, and then turn right to get on to Route 97. In Summer 2006, new signage went up directing SB traffic to exit 748, Edgewood Road (005 SIS R19.534), which is now signed with "To Route 97" (and the Central Weed signage has been removed for Route 97) . In other words, Route 97 traffic is suggested to use Route 265 to get to Route 97 in Weed.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $22,000,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Weed, from 0.1 mile south of Route 5/Route 97 Separation (~ 005 SIS R18.95) to 0.1 North Edgewood Overhead (005 SIS R025.22), that will rehabilitate 25.2 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the road surface, minimize the costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

Shasta BridgeIn October 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will replace the Shasta River Bridge (note that this bridge is not on I-5 proper, but appears to be on the former US 99 alignment next to I-5) (005 SIS R022.62). The existing bridge is a two span concrete bridge built in 1922. The new bridge will be placed in the same location as the existing bridge and will be a single span concrete structure on piles with two traffic lanes. The project is estimated to cost $1,542,000. The project is programmed for funding with STIP ($177,000) and Highway Bridge Program ($1,365,000) funds. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2009/10. On September 23, 2009 the County provided confirmation that the scope addressed in the MND is consistent with the scope of work that is programmed in the STIP.

In May 2012, the CTC authorized SHOPP funding on I-5, in Siskiyou County, 02-Sis-5 R50.6/52.1 Near Yreka, from 0.6 mile south of Shasta River Bridge to 0.2 mile south of Vista Point. $8,200,000 to replace bridge decks and upgrade the structures to maintain structural integrity, reduce the risk to lives and properties, and to meet the current seismic strengthening standards.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $52,000,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Yreka, from 0.3 mile south of Shasta River Bridge (~ 005 SIS R050.86) to 0.1 mile south of Klamath River Road Undercrossing (~ 005 SIS R058.00), that will rehabilitate 28.0 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the road surface, minimize the costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

In August 2016, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project on I-5 (02-Sis-5, PM R58.1) in Siskiyou County that will rehabilitate the water and waste water systems and construct a break room at the Randolph Collier Safety Roadside Rest Area near the city of Yreka. The project is programmed in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total programmed amount is $7,496,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

Commuter Lanes Commuter Lanes

Note: More information on HOV construction is in the Status section above.

In San Diego County, HOV lanes exist between the Mexico and US ports of entry (just a bit S of 005 SD R0.305). These require four or more passengers, and operate 24 hours a day on weekdays. Note that, at least in terms of postmiles. 005 SD 0.0 does not exist, the statewide odometer starts at 0.0 at R0.305.

HOV lanes are also planned for I-5 in San Diego as follows:

  1. From I-8 (≊005 SD R20.163) to I-805 (≊005 SD R30.546R);
  2. From I-805 (≊005 SD R30.546R) to 0.3 mi N of Del Mar Heights Road overcrossing (≊005 SD R34.414) (construction starts January 1998). This is also part of the North Coast Corridor project, PPNOs 0615A, 0615B, and 0615C, which runs from I-805 to Route 78; construction started in 2014.
  3. From 0.3 mi N of Del Mar Heights Road (≊005 SD R34.414) to 0.1 mi N of Manchester Road (≊005 SD R38.547) (construction starts January 1999). This is also part of the North Coast Corridor project, PPNOs 0615A, 0615B, and 0615C, which runs from I-805 to Route 78; construction started in 2014.
  4. From 0.1 mi N of Manchester Avene (≊005 SD R38.547) to Pointsettia Lane (≊005 SD R45.56). This is part of the North Coast Corridor project, PPNOs 0615A, 0615B, and 0615C, which runs from I-805 to Route 78; construction started in 2014.
  5. From Pointsettia Lane (≊005 SD R45.56) to Route 76 (≊005 SD R53.974). Portions of this are part of the North Coast Corridor project, PPNOs 0615A, 0615B, and 0615C, which runs from I-805 to Route 78; construction started in 2014.
  6. From Route 76 (≊005 SD R53.974) to the Orange County line (≊005 SD R72.343).

In Orange County, HOV lanes have been constructed on I-5 between the Route 91 and the Pacific Coast Highway (Route 1). The first segment to open was between Route 405 and Tustin Ranch Road; this opened in October 1992. In November 1995, the segment between Tustin Ranch Road and .2 mi S of 4th Street in Tustin opened. In May 1996, the following segments opened: (1) .1 mi S of Avery Parkway to I-405; (2) .2 mi S of 4th Street to the Santa Ana River, and (3) Route 1 to Ortega Highway. In June 1996, the segment between Ortega Highway and Avery Parkway, opened. HOV lanes between Route 22 and Route 91 opened in 2001. All lanes require two or more occupants, and are always in operation.

In Los Angeles County, planning for HOV lanes on I-5 between Route 91 and I-605 begain with an EIR that was discussed on the January 2002 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.2a). See the main status section for more details on this construction, which was still in progress as of the start of 2018.

There are currently no plans to widen or add HOV between Route 710 and Route 134. The right of way in this area is too constrained to permit such construction.

As of 2018, there was construction in progress to add HOV lanes between Route 134 and Route 170. This is discussed in deep detail in the status section.

HOV lanes have been constructed between Route 170 and Route 118, and between Route 118 and Route 14.

HOV lanes are under construction between Route 14 (LA R45.618) to Parker Road Interchange in Castaic (LA R58.99). There are plans for these eventually to be HOT lanes.

In Stockton, lanes have been constructed/are under construction between 8th Street Undercrossing (005 SJ 25.0) to Hammer Lane Undercrossing (005 SJ PM 32.9).

In October 2013, the CTC considered for future approval of funding an FEIR regarding a project that would construct High Occupancy Vehicle lanes and sound walls in both directions from US 50 (apx 005 SAC 22.461) to Morrison Creek on I-5 (~ 005 SAC 12.994). Phase 1 is funded through Plans, Specification, and Estimate with federal dollars, and is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program for Right of Way only. The total estimated cost is $127,200,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. Phase 2 (PPNO 5836) will construct High Occupancy Vehicle Lanes from Morrison Creek (~ 005 SAC 12.994) to south of Stone Lake Creek (apx 005 SAC 8.841). Phase 2 is not yet funded. The total estimated cost for capital and support is $70,600,000. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2019-20.

In Sacramento County, HOV lanes are planned between the I-5/I-80 interchange (~ 005 SAC 26.654) and Pocket Road (~ 005 SAC 16.147) (STIP Project #1, June 2002 CTC Agenda Item 2.5b(1))

Historical Route Historical Route

The segment of Route 5 from Route 10 to Route 99, and from the northern I-5/Route 99 junction to the Oregon border, is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993.

Some portions of I-5 have been signed as part of Historic Route 99:

ACR 26 requested the Department of Transportation, upon application by an interested local agency or private entity, to identify any section of former U.S. Highway Route 6 that is still a publicly maintained highway and that is of interest to the applicant, and to designate that section as Historic U.S. Highway Route 6. Chaptered July 3, 2007. Resolution Chapter 67.

Naming Naming

Historically, the portion of this route from the Mexican border to the roads connecting to Route 72 is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). This portion has officially been designated as "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1769, Chapter 1569, in 1959.

Purple Heart TrailThe entire route in California has been submitted to be part of the National Purple Heart Trail. The Military Order of the Purple Heart is working to establish a national commemorative trail for recipients of the Purple Heart medal, which honors veterans who were wounded in combat. All states in the union will designate highways for inclusion in the commemorative trail, and all of the designated highways will be interconnected to form the National Purple Heart Trail. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 14, Resolution Chapter 79, July 10, 2001.

John Joseph MontgomeryThe segment of Route 5 from the Mexico border (~ 005 SD R0.4) to Route 94 (~ 005 SD R15.02) is named the "John J. Montgomery Freeway". John J. Montgomery (1858-1911) was one of the pioneers in the field of aviation. He was born in in Yuba City, California, in 1858, and moved to Oakland when he was 5. He was always interested in flight. He attended St. Ignatius College in San Francisco (MS, circa 1880), and Santa Clara College (PhD, 1901). In 1894 Montgomery joined the faculty of St Joseph's College, Rohnerville, California, where he taught mathematics while continuing studies of air and water current impacts on edged surfaces, parabolic and plane. He later experimented with 4 foot and 8 foot wingspread model aeroplanes and built a wind-tunnel to vary experiments in degrees of parabolic wing-curve and length, fore and aft, rudder and rear stabilizer control. At Santa Clara College (now University), he worked part time for Rev. Richard H. Bell, S.J., on improvements in the Marconi Wireless. Montgomery patented an "Improvement in Aeroplanes" in 1906 and in 1909 completed an electric typewriter and patented an alternating current rectifier, which he sold to a San Francisco company. His findings and airplane designs finally earned him a well-deserved place with Octave Chanute and Dr. Samuel Pierpont Langley as American pioneers in controlled flight before the Wright brothers. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 16, Chapter 83, in 1949.
(Image Source: Wikipedia)

The segment of Route 5 starting from Route 94 (~ 005 SD R15.02) in San Diego to the southern I-405/I-5 junction (~ 005 ORA 21.193) is designated the "San Diego Freeway". It was named by the State Highway Commission on April 25, 1957. San Diego refers to the eventual southern terminus of the route (after all merges). The name refers to Saint Didacus of Alcalá, a Franciscan saint of the 15th century. The bay was named by Vizcaíno in 1602, the mission in 1769, the county in 1850 and the new city in 1856.

Richard LinenThe portion of I-5 from Leucadia Boulevard (~ 005 SD R42.697) to La Costa Avenue (~ 005 SD R44.068) in the City of Encinitas is officially named the "C.H.P. Officer Stephen M. Linen, Jr. Memorial Freeway". It was named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officer Stephen M. Linen, Jr.. Officer Linen, Jr. was killed in the line of duty during the morning of August 12, 2001 while issuing a citation on I-5 near Leucadia Boulevard in Encinitas when a drunken-driving suspect collided into his patrol vehicle and struck the officer. Born on July 22, 1970, Officer Linen graduated from California State University, San Diego with a degree in Criminal Justice in 1993. He joined the CHP on July 25, 1994., and began service in the Monterey area as an officer on January 26, 1995. He made significant contributions to traffic safety and assisting the motoring public while assigned to the Monterey, San Diego, and Oceanside Area offices. He was nominated for the Burn Institute's "Spirit of Courage Award" for his 1998 act of bravery and heroism when he rescued a man trapped in a burning vehicle on I-5 in San Diego. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 24, Chapter 127, 9/12/2003.
(Image Source: Find a Grave Memorial)

Officer Sean NavaThe portion of I-5 from Tamarack Avenue (~ 005 SD R49.277) to Route 78 (~ 005 SD R51.259) in the City of Carlsbad is officially named the "C.H.P. Officer Sean Nava Memorial Freeway". Named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officer Sean Nava. Officer Nava was killed in the line of duty during the morning of October 28, 2000 while investigating an earlier traffic collision on I-5 in the City of Carlsbad when a drunken driving suspect collided into him. Born on April 8, 1967, in West Covina, Officer Nava served his country as an Army Military Police Officer in Germany and in Herlong, California. As an Army Military Police Officer, he conducted undercover narcotics investigations with the Army Criminal Investigation Division. Sean Nava was honorably discharged at the rank of sergeant. He joined the California Highway Patrol on July 31, 1989. His first assignment was in the San Jose Area. He made significant contributions to traffic safety and assisting the motoring public while assigned to the Monterey, San Diego, and Oceanside Area offices, and was posthumously awarded the Medal of Valor for his off-duty act of bravery and heroism when he attempted to rescue the driver of a vehicle that had collided with a residence and propane tank, and subsequently erupted in flames. Without regard to his own personal safety, Sean Nava and a citizen made repeated attempts to rescue the trapped driver. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 24, Chapter 127, 9/12/2003.
(Image Source: Find a Grave, California Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

Sean BessantThe portion of Route 5 between Harbor Drive (~ 005 SD R54.391) and Route 78 (~ 005 SD R51.259), in the County of San Diego, is named the Oceanside Police Officer Daniel S. Bessant Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Daniel S. Bessant, who was born in Oceanside, California, on October 16, 1981. Officer Bessant attended local schools in Oceanside where his father served as a member of the faculty. He then served with the Oceanside Police Department for six years, three years as a police officer and three years as a civilian with the department. On December 20, 2006, Officer Bessant was killed in the line of duty while assisting another officer with a traffic stop and was shot from behind by a gang member who was not involved in the traffic stop. Officer Bessant's father, in his role as a teacher, had tried unsuccessfully to intervene with one of the gang members convicted of killing Officer Bessant after noticing that the young man was becoming involved with gangs. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.
(Image Source: Find a Grave Memorial)

Sgt. John BasiloneThe segment of Route 5 between the Basilone Road exit (~ 005 SD R71.375) and the main gate of USMC Camp Pendleton to the S (~ 005 SD R54.402) is named the Gunnery Sergeant John Basilone Memorial Freeway. Sgt. Basilone was a member of "C" Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Regiment, 1st Marine Division who was in charge of two sections of heavy machine guns defending a narrow pass that led to Henderson Airfield in Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, during WWII (1942). Sgt. Basilone, at great risk to life, battled through hostile lines to provide shells for his gunners. For this, he recieved the Congressional Medal of Honor. Later, in 1944, he rejoined the USMC and, on Iwo Jima, single-handedly destroyed an enemey blockhouse while braving a bombardment of enemy heavy caliber file. For this, he was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross and the Purple Heart, and has a life-sized bronze statue in Raritan, NJ. He also has a destroyer, U.S.S. Basilone, named after him (subsequently scuttled, as it was no longer seaworthy). There is a 2nd status in honor of Sgt. Basilone somewhere in San Diego, as well as a bridge and a football field. Supposedly, a postal stamp with his likeness will be issued in 2005. Named by Senate Concurrant Resolution 25, Resolution Chapter 72, on July 23, 1999.
(Image Source: Marine Parents)

[Steed]The segment of Route 5 between the Avenida San Luis Rey exit (presumably 005 ORA 0.642, which is the Ave. San Luis Rey overcrossing, as there is no exit with that name) and the Camino De Estrella exit (005 ORA 5.80) in the City of San Clemente is officially designated the "Officer Richard T. Steed Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of San Clemente Police Officer Richard (Rick) Thomas Steed. Steed was born on December 27, 1947, to Henry and Martha Steed, and grew up in Alexandria, Virginia with his brother Hank and sister Donna. After high school, Steed enlisted in the United States Marine Corps, where he served for eight years and rose to the rank of Staff Sergeant. During his service Rick spent one tour of duty in Vietnam as a radio technician in the Recon Platoon, and also served in Okinawa. Rick was awarded a Navy Commendation Medal, a Good Service Medal, and a Combat Action Ribbon. He also earned his jump wings. While still on active duty Rick became interested in law enforcement and became a reserve police officer with the San Clemente Police Department in July 1975. After receiving his associate of arts degree in criminal justice from Saddleback Community College, Rick was hired as a full-time police officer with the San Clemente Police Department on June 6, 1977. Officer Steed attended the Police Academy at Los Medanos College in Pittsburgh, California, where he was elected class president. On his final patrol shift, on November 29, 1978, Officer Steed answered a call for medical aid in an adjacent beat. Officer Steed announced his arrival to the dispatcher and indicated that he saw a subject approaching from behind his vehicle. As he exited the car and turned toward the subject, Officer Steed was immediately, and without provocation, shot twice with a .38 caliber handgun, and died from those injuries. A massive manhunt involving multiple law enforcement agencies resulted in apprehending the suspect and retrieving the murder weapon. The suspect was incarcerated in a state mental hospital. Officer Steed is the only San Clemente police officer to die in the line of duty was of 2011. Officer Steed was enshrined on Honor Rolls in the Santa Ana Courthouse, Sacramento, and Washington, D.C., and named in the Honor Roll and Officer Down Memorial Internet Web sites, and on memorial bricks in the Vietnam section of the Saddleback College Veterans Memorial and at the Marine Corps Museum in Quantico, Virginia. Additionally, a 64-acre park and sports complex was named the Richard T. Steed Memorial Park, and a plaque prominently displayed at Park Semper Fi near the San Clemente Pier. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 33, Resolution Chapter 73, on August 23, 2011. The dedication was written up in the Orange County Register on 11/29/11. The article notes that the actual sign drops the word "Officer", and indicates there is an attempt in process to correct the sign and include the fact he was a San Clemente Police officer. The sign was later corrected.
(Image sources: Original Sign - OCR 11/29/2011; CorrectedSign - OCR 1/28/2012; Officer Down Memorial Page)

David RosaThe portion of I-5 between Camino Las Ramblas (ORA 6.761) and the Ortega Highway (ORA 9.428) in the County of Orange is named the "Long Beach Fire Captain David Rosa Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Long Beach Fire Captain David Rosa, a 17-year veteran of the Long Beach Fire Department, assigned to Fire Station 10 in the central part of Long Beach. Rosa was shot as he responded to an explosion at a senior living complex, 19 minutes after he and his fellow fire personnel had arrived at the scene of an explosion and subsequent fire. He and his crew, including Firefighter Ernesto Torres, who was also injured, had responded to a predawn call to Covenant Manor, a high-rise housing complex for seniors where they had been met with gunfire from the now burning complex. David Rosa at the young age of 45 died later that same day from his wounds. As a young man, David Rosa always put others before himself and possessed the ability to be focused amid chaos which made him a natural fit to be a first responder. When he was struck by gunfire while responding to the explosion at the high-rise senior apartment complex, David Rosa was doing what he did every day, running selflessly toward danger to protect the most vulnerable. David Rosa was also a great storyteller and teacher who led by example and who was humble, grounded, faithful, and loyal; but most of all, he was loved, and he knew how to love others back. Long Beach Fire Captain David Rosa always made you feel like you were the only person that mattered to him. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 159, Res. Chapter 234, 9/11/2018.
(Image Source: LB Press Telegram, 6/28/2018)

Santa Ana FreewayThe segment of Route 5 from the southern I-405/I-5 junction (~ 005 ORA 21.193) to the Route 5/Route 10/Route 60/US 101 interchange (~ 005 LA 16.326) is named the "Santa Ana" Freeway. It was named by its location. Technically, this is the start of US 101; SB of this interchange I-5 was US 101 until interstate highway numbering came into being).

Waldron G. KarpThe segment of Route 5 from northbound Tustin Ranch Road (~ ORA 28.224) to southbound Tustin Ranch Road (~ ORA R.28.456) in the City of Tustin is named the "Officer and Medal of Valor Recipient Waldron G. Karp Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Tustin Police Department Officer Waldron G. Karp, who, pn January 7, 1973, at 31 years of age, succumbed to gunshot wounds sustained one month earlier when he was shot while assisting Orange County Sheriff’s Department deputies on a call involving a man with a rifle. Becoming a police officer was Karp’s dream job after he served in the United States Navy during the Vietnam War, and he served his community honorably. For his courage in the line of duty, Officer Karp was awarded the Medal of Valor by the Tustin Police Department in 2015, the highest honor awarded by the department. Officer Karp is the only Tustin Police Department officer to be killed in the line of duty, and the story of Officer Karp’s death has been passed from one generation of Tustin Police Department officers to the next. To commemorate Officer Karp’s service, the City of Tustin established the Wally Karp Memorial Ceremony, which honors and retells his story, and established the Wally Karp Memorial Scholarship, which is awarded to a local high school student. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 149, Res. Chapter 144, 8/17/2018.
(Image Source: Find A Grave)

Young Oak KimThe portion of southbound I-5 in the County of Orange, from the eastbound Route 91 exit (ORA 42.671) to near its boundary with the County of Los Angeles (ORA 44.382) is named the "Colonel Young Oak Kim, United States Army, Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Young Oak Kim, born in 1919 in the City of Los Angeles to Soon Kwon Kim and Nora Koh, who had four sons, two daughters, and one adopted son. Young Oak Kim graduated from Belmont High School and attended Los Angeles City College, but dropped out to help support his impoverished family. The United States Army refused his enlistment until Congress enacted a law subjecting Asian Americans to conscription and Young Oak Kim was drafted on January 31, 1941. After spending six months as an engineer, Young Oak Kim was selected for Infantry Officer Candidate School at Fort Benning, Georgia, and, upon graduating in January 1943, was assigned to the United States 100th Infantry Battalion, a unit composed of Japanese Americans from Hawaii. Fearing ethnic conflict between Young Oak Kim and the Japanese American troops, the battalion commander offered Kim a transfer to another battalion, but Kim remained, saying, “There are no Japanese nor Korean here, we’re all Americans and we’re fighting for the same cause”. The 100th Infantry Battalion was sent to fight in North Africa and then in Italy where Young Oak Kim’s map-reading skills and determination led to success in several battles and “impossible missions”. Second Lieutenant Kim’s first deployment was in Salerno, Italy, as part of the Allied offensive against German forces, during which he was wounded near Santa Maria Oliveto, and was subsequently awarded a Silver Star and his first Purple Heart. Young Oak Kim was then promoted to first lieutenant and participated in the Battle of Monte Cassino as part of the Allied attempt to liberate Rome from German control. In planning for Operation Diadem, the Allies needed to determine the location of German tank units. First Lieutenant Kim, as an officer in the joint United States 100th Infantry Battalion and 442nd Regimental Combat Team, volunteered to capture German soldiers to gain military intelligence. On May 16, 1944, with Private First Class Irving Akahoshi, First Lieutenant Kim crawled into German-held territory near Cisterna, Italy, and captured two German soldiers during daylight hours while the enemy rested for evening watch. Using the intelligence from the two captured German soldiers, the Allies broke the Gustav Line and liberated Rome. For his actions, First Lieutenant Kim was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and the Italian Bronze Medal of Military Valor in 1944, and the Italian War Cross for Military Valor in 1945. First Lieutenant Kim also led elements of the 100th Infantry Battalion in battles at Belvedere and Pisa, which helped break the Gothic Line, and enabled the Allies to occupy Pisa without casualties. In France, First Lieutenant Kim was the 100th Infantry Battalion’s operations officer, and fought in battles that liberated the towns of Bruyères and Biffontaine, but he sustained severe wounds from enemy fire in Biffontaine, and was granted a six-month leave in Los Angeles, California, in late 1944. Germany surrendered shortly before he could return to the European Theater of Operations, and Kim, now a captain, was honorably discharged from the United States Army. For his actions, Captain Kim received a second Purple Heart and a French Croix de Guerre, along with a plaque dedicated to him on a Biffontaine church wall. After leaving the United States Army, Young Oak Kim started a successful self-service laundry, which was rare at the time, and earned five times his salary as an Army captain, but, two years later in 1950, war broke out in Korea and he left the business and reenlisted in the Army. Young Oak Kim stated, “As a Korean, the most direct way to help my father’s country even a little, and as a United States citizen, the most direct way to repay even a little of the debt owed to Korea by the United States, was to go to Korea, pick up a gun, and fight”. At his request, Young Oak Kim was sent to East Asia, which was the first time he had ever been to Korea, and, by pretending not to know Korean and with help from people he knew during World War II, he was able to join the infantry. Young Oak Kim was assigned to the 31st Infantry Regiment of the 7th Infantry Division in April 1951 as an intelligence officer and operations officer under Lieutenant General William J. McCaffrey, who had scouted him. Young Oak Kim rescued many United States and South Korean soldiers during battle with the 31st Infantry Regiment playing a major role in pushing Chinese troops back above the 38th parallel, which was first crossed by his unit. In August 1951 during Operation Piledriver, Young Oak Kim’s unit was mistakenly bombarded by the 555th Field Artillery Battalion because it was able to advance too far north past Kimhwa to appear friendly. He was severely injured in the friendly fire incident, but was saved by doctors from Johns Hopkins University who were in Tokyo, and he returned to Korea after two months of recuperation. Upon his return, Lieutenant General McCaffrey put him in command of the regiment’s 1st Battalion and promoted him to major, making Young Oak Kim the first minority officer to command an army battalion in United States history. Under Major Kim’s command, the battalion adopted an orphanage in Seoul and cared for more than 500 war orphans, enabling the orphans to grow up to become artists, musicians, and other successful professionals. After fighting for nearly a year, Major Kim left Korea in September 1952, and, in 2003, the South Korean government honored him for his service to society. After serving in the Korean War, Major Kim became an instructor at the United States Army Infantry School in Fort Benning, Georgia, then served in Germany as a staff officer and was promoted to lieutenant colonel in 1959, and then became an instructor at the United States Army Command and General Staff College. Major Kim returned to Korea in the early 1960s as a United States military advisor to the South Korean army, during which time he was promoted to the rank of colonel. After serving in the United States Army for 30 years, Young Oak Kim attended California State University Dominguez Hills to study history, but left after a year to advocate for greater causes—racial equality, youths, the elderly, and the poor. In 1973, Young Oak Kim joined Special Service for Groups (SSG), a nonprofit health and human services organization dedicated to building and sustaining community-based programs that address the needs of vulnerable and diverse multiethnic communities. Young Oak Kim was nominated to be a board member for the United Way by George Nishinaka, the head of SSG, and went on to become the first person to serve on that board for 10 years. As a United Way board member, Young Oak Kim recognized underserved ethnic communities and worked to provide them with linguistically and culturally competent services. When Young Oak Kim joined the United Way board, the Chinatown Service Center was the only Asian United Way service center, but he added Japanese, Filipino, Vietnamese, and Korean American centers to United Way’s network, and helped to diversify the board through the addition of three more Asian American board members. Young Oak Kim also helped found the Korean Youth Cultural Center, was a founding member of the Korean American Coalition, and, from 1986 to 1988, served as a member of Serving the Family and Friends of the Keiro Homes. Throughout the 1990s, Young Oak Kim served as chairman of the Center for Pacific Asian Family and, under his leadership, the organization became the largest women’s shelter in southern California. In 1986, Young Oak Kim cofounded the Korean Health, Education, Information and Research Center (KHEIR) to provide recent, uninformed immigrants in southern California with health care information and services, and, as one of largest ethnic charity organizations today, KHEIR continues to help immigrants obtain health care and offers them bilingual services in English, Spanish, and Korean. From 1989 to 2005, Young Oak Kim served as chairman of 100th/442nd/MIS WWII Memorial Foundation, a veteran’s association of Japanese American soldiers who fought during World War II. Young Oak Kim also cofounded the Go for Broke Monument, the Go for Broke National Educational Center, and the Japanese American National Museum. These community efforts were instrumental in providing new immigrants with the tools to acclimate and become self-sufficient. On December 29, 2005, Colonel Kim passed away at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, leaving a strong legacy of community service to the residents of southern California. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 188, Res. Chapter 122, 7/10/2018.
(Image Source: CHP Facebook page; Young Oak Kim Center)

Ricardo GalvezThe portion of I-5 between the San Gabriel River Bridge (bridge number 53-213) at post mile 005 LA 7.06 and the Rio Hondo River Bridge (bridge number 53-639) at post mile 005 LA 9.46 in the City of Downey in the County of Los Angeles County is named the "Downey Police Officer Ricardo Galvez Memorial Highway". City of Downey Police Officer Ricardo Galvez was born in April 1986 in the City of Los Angeles. He was raised in the Cities of Los Angeles and Bell Gardens, California, where he attended elementary school and high school. Ricardo began his law enforcement career in 2006 when he was hired by the Downey Police Department as a police aide. In 2008, Ricardo enlisted in the United States Marine Corps Reserve and was stationed out of the Cities of Pico Rivera and Los Alamitos. Ricardo served as a Marine Corps Reservist for approximately six years, during which time he was deployed overseas as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom in Afghanistan and Iraq. Ricardo was hired by the Downey Police Department as a police cadet in March 2010, graduated from the Orange County Sheriff’s Academy in September 2010, and began his career as a Downey Police Officer when he was sworn in on September 2, 2010. Over the next five years, Ricardo worked patrol, establishing himself as a competent and compassionate police officer, and strove to be a K-9 officer, volunteering to become an “agitator” to better prepare himself for the position. On November 18, 2015, after finishing a training session with the department’s K-9 team, Ricardo returned to the station to complete his shift and, while he was seated in his vehicle adjacent to the police station, two individuals approached his car on foot and the individual on the driver’s side of the vehicle fired one round from a handgun into Ricardo’s vehicle, striking and killing him. Ricardo’s compassion and willingness to help others was always on display, and he routinely volunteered his time to coach kids from his home neighborhood in Boyle Heights at “State Park”. That willingness to help was evident when Ricardo, after stopping an elderly female for having expired registration and discovering that she had recently lost her husband and did not have the money to register her vehicle, decided to let her go with a warning and then paid her registration himself. Ricardo was an avid runner and fitness fanatic who could often be seen training for the Baker to Vegas Challenge Cup Relay, which is often referred to as the ultimate foot pursuit, and is a difficult 20 stage, 120-mile relay race that starts in Baker, California, and ends in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ricardo was not only a valued member of his Baker to Vegas Challenge Cup Relay team, but was also instrumental in organizing the Downey Police squad for the event. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 111, Res. Chapter 95, Statutes of 2016, on August 5, 2016.
(Image Source: Downey PD; LBPress Telegram 1/15/2016)

Arnold C. GarciaThe portion of I-5 between East Olympic Boulevard (~ 005 LA 14.132) and South Atlantic Boulevard (~ 005 LA 12.723), in the City of Commerce, is officially named the "Arnold C. Garcia Memorial Highway". This segment was named in honor of Arnold C. Garcia, a Los Angeles County Probation Department group supervisor, who worked the graveyard shift at the Dorothy E. Kirby Center, supervising locked cottages housing some of Los Angeles County's youngest and most troubled offenders. As all Los Angeles County Probation Department employees, Arnold C. Garcia was equipped with only two weapons: muscle and guile. Although department guidelines recommend one guard for every 10 juveniles in custody, Arnold C. Garcia was charged with watching over a 20-bed cottage. During night shifts at the center, Arnold C. Garcia frequently bent the rules, bringing candy and videos for the most well-behaved wards. According to coworkers, he always had his Bible in hand, passing the lonely hours by praying for the wards. On April 4, 1994, Arnold C. Garcia heard a knock from inside one of the bedroom doors. The ward inside, who was serving time for burglary and possession of a concealed weapon, asked for permission to use the restroom. After opening the door, Arnold C. Garcia was struck in the head with a metal object from a disassembled desk in the room. The alleged assailant fled with another ward, but was captured a short time later. Arnold C. Garcia was the first Los Angeles County Probation Department employee killed in the line of duty since the department was formed in 1903, and the tragic death of Arnold C. Garcia serves as a symbol of the increasingly hazardous mission faced by employees at Los Angeles County's three juvenile halls and 20 probation camps. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 130, 8/30/2010, Resolution Chapter 111.
(Image Source: Officer Down Memorial Page)

Golden State Freeway SignThe segment from the Route 5/Route 10/Route 60/US 101 interchange (~ 005 LA 16.335) to Route 14 (~ 005 LA R45.51) is officially named the "Golden State" Freeway. It was named by the Metropolitan Transportation Engineering Board (MTEB) on February 28, 1958, based on the fact that the route traverses the "Golden State" of California. The first segment of the Golden State Freeway opened in 1954 (the segment from the Route 7 (now Route 14)/US 6/US 99 Junction to Weldon Canyon); the last in 1975. The truck route dates to 1954. [The MTEB came into existence sometime after the passage of the Collier-Burns Highway Act of 1947 and lasted until the freeway system was finalized in the late 1950s. It was described as "...a voluntary group of the administrative officials of State, County and forty-three of the Municipalities within the Los Angeles Metropolitan District." Among the forty-seven members of the LAMTAC were the following notables: Leonard K. Firestone, Firestone Tire an Rubber Co.; M. Richard Gross, Treasurer, Richfield Oil Co.; Kenneth W. Kendricks, Dist. Sales Mgr., Standard Oil of California; Harry March, Secretary, Signal Oil Co.; J.W. Miller, Union Oil Co.; D.W. Sanford, Vice President, Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co.; and R.D. Stetson, Manager, LA Div., Shell Oil.]

Burbank Police Officer Matthew PavelkaThe portion of I-5 between West Burbank Boulevard in the city of Burbank (~ 005 LA 29.761) and Hollywood Way in the City of Los Angeles (~ 005 LA 32.375) is named the Burbank Police Officer Matthew Pavelka Memorial Freeway. It was named in memory of Burbank Police Officer Matthew Pavelka (1977-2004). Officer Pavelka served in the United States Air Force from 1997 to 2001, where he was awarded two medals for meritorious service. He was hired as a Police Recruit in August of 2002, attended the Ventura County Sheriff's Academy, and was promoted to Police Officer in January of 2003. He was just 26 years of age when he was called to assist veteran Officer Gregory Campbell with a routine traffic stop at the Ramada Inn on North San Fernando Road on the night of November 15, 2003. Tragically, the two men Officer Campbell had pulled over opened fire, injuring Officer Campbell and killing Officer Pavelka. Officer Pavelka was the first police officer to be killed in the line of duty in the Burbank Police Department's 82 year history. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 156, August 19, 2004, Chapter 150.
(Image Source: Burbank POA)

Ritchie ValensThe portion of I-5 from Route 118 (~ 005 LA 39.416) to Route 170 (~ 005 LA 36.244) in the County of Los Angeles is named the "Ritchie Valens Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Richard Steven Valenzuela, who would come to be known internationally as “Ritchie Valens,” who was born on May 13, 1941, in Pacoima, California, a neighborhood in the San Fernando Valley region of Los Angeles. Ritchie Valens was raised with musical influences of traditional Mexican mariachi music and flamenco guitar, African American rhythm and blues vocal groups, and jump blues, leading him to express an interest in making music of his own. Ritchie Valens was encouraged by his father to learn to play the guitar and trumpet, and his love for music later led him to teach himself the drums. Ritchie Valens became popular for bringing his guitar to his school, Pacoima Junior High School, to sing and play songs to his friends in the bleachers. Ritchie Valens, at 16 years of age, accepted an invitation to play guitar and sing vocals in a local garage band, the Silhouettes, a diverse group that reflected Pacoima’s ethnic mix and was composed of African American, Chicano, and Japanese American members. Ritchie Valens and the Silhouettes played at dances, gatherings, and parties throughout the northeast end of the San Fernando Valley, and Valens’ boisterous vocals and expert guitar skills helped draw big crowds, leading him to be known as “Little Richard of the Valley”. Ritchie Valens was discovered by a talent scout one night in May 1958 when the Silhouettes packed the American Legion Hall in Pacoima. Ritchie Valens was invited by Bob Keane, the owner and president of Del-Fi Records in Hollywood, California, to audition for his record label, eventually signing him to a solo recording contract with Del-Fi Records on May 27, 1958. Ritchie Valens’ first recorded original, “Come On, Let’s Go,” was recorded in July 1958, and became an immediate success. Ritchie Valens struck even greater success with his second single, a dual-sided record featuring the songs “La Bamba,” an acknowledgment of his Chicano heritage, and “Donna,” an ode to his high school girlfriend, Donna Ludwig, whom he met at San Fernando High School, which sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the Recording Industry Association of America. Ritchie Valens’ career skyrocketed, and in the remaining months of 1958, he appeared on Dick Clark’s “American Bandstand” television show, performed alongside Buddy Holly, and played at Alan Freed’s Christmas Jubilee in New York City. Ritchie Valens began traveling the Midwest in early 1959 as a member of a multimember rock ’n’ roll tour called “The Winter Dance Party”. Ritchie Valens’ promising career was heartbreakingly cut short when, on February 3, 1959, after leaving a performance in Clear Lake, Iowa, at the tender young age of 17, he passed away in a private airplane accident with fellow musicians Buddy Holly and J.P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson, a tragedy that was later eternalized as “the day the music died”. To this day, Ritchie Valens is regarded as a rock and roll pioneer and the forefather of the Chicano rock movement, inspiring others at a time when there were very few Latinos in American rock music. Ritchie Valens’ rendition of “La Bamba,” featuring successful blending of traditional Latin American music with classic rock ’n’ roll music, proved to be a historic recording that would come to influence other famous Chicano musicians .Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 23, 8/30/2017, Res. Chapter 128, Statutes of 2017. On August 25, 2018, the Valens family, neighborhood leaders, as well as state and local leaders, came together to celebrate the unveiling of The Ritchie Valens Memorial Highway signage.
(Image source: Pacoima Historical Society; Biography)

Grand Army of the RepublicThe segment of Route 5 that was cosigned with US 6 (i.e., from Route 14 to Route 110) was named the "Grand Army of the Republic Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 33, Chapter 73, in 1943. The GAR is a membership organization founded in Decatur, Illinois on April 6, 1866 by Benjamin F. Stephenson. It's membership was limited to honorably discharged veterans of the Union Army, Navy, Marine Corps or the Revenue Cutter Service who had served between April 12, 1861 and April 9, 1865. The GAR is responsible for the establishment of Memorial Day, which began in 1868 when GAR Commander-in-Chief John A. Logan issued General Order No. 11 calling for all Departments and Posts to set aside the 30th of May as a day for remembering the sacrifices of fallen comrades. The final Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic was held in Indianapolis, Indiana in 1949 and the last member, Albert Woolson died in 1956 at the age of 109 years.
[Information on the GAR excerpted from the pages of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War].

Ridge RoutePortions of this route from the vicinity of Route 14 to the I-5/Route 99 junction are historically named the "Ridge Route". Michael Ballard's site can provide additional specifics. The Ridge Route first opened in 1915 and was paved four years later using mule-powered graders. The 20-foot wide ribbon of concrete hugged the top of the San Gabriel and Tehachapi Mountains - often precariously - as it climbed over the Tejon Pass. A trip from L.A. to Bakersfield took 12 hours, and could be a harrowing experience. Since funds for blasting were non-existent at the time of its construction, its engineers were forced to follow the contours of the hills. This created nearly 700 curves in one 36-mile stretch between Castaic and Gorman. The road was just wide enough for two Model-T's to pass, and to jump one of its few curbs could send a vehicle tumbling hundreds of feet down a canyon. Stretches of the route were so steep that it was common to see cars, which lacked fuel pumps at the time, going up backwards. The current I-5 routing from Route 138 south to Castaic is a bit to the west of the old Ridge Route. From Route 138 to Grapevine, I-5 parallels or sits on the alignment (the southbound lanes up the hill from the San Joaquin Valley sit on the old road). Sometime in the 30's, a new road was built away from the original Ridge Route; this was US 99. I-5 follows most of this alignment, with the exception of the section between Templin Hwy (at Violin Summit, north of Castaic) and Smokey Bear Rd (formerly Hungry Valley Rd). Most of that alignment is now under Pyramid Lake. You can still travel the Ridge Route: From Los Angeles, take I-5 north, exit at Lake Hughes Rd, turn right, and turn left after a few blocks on Ridge Route (yes, that's the street name). It winds its way through the mountains, although most of the curves have been now cut off. You can still see many of the original concrete patches. It comes out at Lake Elizabeth Rd. (Los Angeles County Sign Route N2) Turn left, and you eventually meet up with Route 138. Additionally, a 17.6 mile stretch that runs through the Angeles National Forest was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1997. This section has been closed to the public since floods washed out parts of it in 2005. But one Saturday a month the gates are opened to allow a group of Ridge Route Preservation Organization (RRPO) volunteers entry for the "privilege" of cleaning drains and clearing rocks in hopes of re-opening the old road in the near future. You can find much more history at the RRPO website, and there is also a good article on the Ridge Route from the Automobile Club.
(Source: Some material came from an article on the RRPO in The Signal in March 2010; Image source: SCV Signal)

Pence / Gore / Frago / Alleyn Memorial HighwayThe portion of I-5 between the Rye Canyon Road overcrossing (~ 005 LA R54.167) and Magic Mountain Parkway (~ 005 LA R53.516) in the County of Los Angeles is named the "California Highway Patrol Officers James E. Pence, Jr., Roger D. Gore, Walter C. Frago, and George M. Alleyn Memorial Highway". It was named in honor of four CHP officers who made significant contributions to traffic safety and to the motoring public while assigned to the Newhall Area Office and who were killed in the line of duty in the early morning hours of April 6, 1970, by armed assailants during a traffic enforcement stop in Newhall: California Highway Patrol Officer James E. Pence, Jr., badge number 6885; California Highway Patrol Officer Roger D. Gore, badge number 6600; California Highway Patrol Officer Walter C. Frago, badge number 6573; and California Highway Patrol Officer George M. Alleyn, badge number 6290. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 93, Resolution Chapter 92, on 8/11/2006.
(Image Sources: Flikrriver; LA Morgue Files)

CHP Officers Gayle W. Wood Jr and James E McCabeThe portion of Route 5 between Palomas Wash Bridge (005 LA R060.52) and 5 miles north of Palomas Wash Bridge (005 LA R065.52) in the County of Los Angeles is named the "CHP Officers Gayle W. Wood, Jr. and James E. McCabe Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of California Highway Patrol (CHP) officers Gayle W. Wood, Jr. and James Edward McCabe. Officer Gayle Wesley Wood, Jr. was born March 26, 1937, to Gayle and Dorothy Wood, in Barstow, California. He graduated from Glendale High School in 1954, and attended Life Pacific College. He was employed by the Huntington Beach Police Department as a car and motorcycle driver prior to becoming a CHP officer. Officer Wood, graduated from the CHP Academy in 1969 and was president of his class, and upon graduation he was assigned to the Santa Ana Area Office. After approximately one year with that office, CHP Officer Wood was transferred to the South Los Angeles Area and was assigned to motorcycle duty until being transferred to the Van Nuys Airport in 1973 as a helicopter pilot, where he spent the remainder of his career. Officer James Edward McCabe was born July 8, 1944, to Bud and Ruth McCabe in Los Angeles, California. Officer McCabe graduated from Don Bosco High School in 1962, and continued his education by attending California State University, Los Angeles, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Police Science and Administration in 1974. Prior to joining the CHP, Officer McCabe earned his helicopter license and joined the army, where he served in the Air Operations Division in Vietnam. Officer McCabe graduated from the CHP Academy in 1971 and was assigned to the West Los Angeles Area Office, where he earned his emergency medical technician and paramedic certificates, and was subsequently transferred to the Malibu Area Office, back to the West Los Angeles Area Office, and finally to the Van Nuys Airport for Air Operations, where he spent the remainder of his career. On September 1, 1978, the state suffered a tragic loss when these officers made the ultimate sacrifice while performing their sworn duty. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 70, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 28, 2011.
(Image Sources: SCV Signal, 10/14/2011; ODMP - Wood; ODMP - McCabe)

Deputy Shayne Daniel YorkThe portion of I-5 between Newhall Ranch Road (005 LA R053.57) and Hasley Canyon Road (005 LA R56.596) in Los Angeles County is named the "Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Deputy Shayne Daniel York Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Deputy Shayne Daniel York, who faithfully served the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department as a deputy sheriff assigned to the East Facility of the Peter J. Pitchess Detention Center. Deputy York committed his life to his family and friends, and his career to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and to the safety of his fellow deputies and the residents of Los Angeles County. On August 14, 1997, Deputy York and his fiancée were at a Buena Park beauty salon when two armed men entered and attempted to rob the business and its patrons. Deputy York, his fiancée, and the other patrons of the salon were ordered to lie face-down on the floor. When one of the men identified Deputy York as a law enforcement officer, he shot Deputy York in the back of the head. Deputy York died two days later, on August 16, 1997, at just 26 years of age. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 16, Res. Chapter 86, Statutes of 2015, on July 1, 2015.
(Image Sources: LA County Sheriff Dept on Twitter)

CHP Officer Erick S MannyThe portion of I-5 from the Fort Tejon Exit (005 KER 4.856) to the Grapevine Exit (~ 005 KER 10.404R) in Kern County is named the "CHP Officer Erick S. Manny Memorial Highway" This segment was named in memory of CHP Officer Erick S. Manny. Erick S. Manny was born on May 24, 1970, in Bakersfield, California. He attended Highland High School in Bakersfield, where he was a three-sport athlete, participating in baseball, football, and wrestling. Manny entered the California Highway Patrol Academy on November 13, 2000, and, after graduating, was assigned to the Fort Tejon CHP office on May 11, 2001. Officer Manny was killed in the line of duty on December 21, 2005, when he was in pursuit of a speeding driver on I-5 near the "Grapevine," when he lost control of his patrol car. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 58, Resolution Chapter 114, on 9/10/2007.
(Image Sources: Flikr; Calif Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

Between the southern Route 5/Route 99 junction (~ 005 KER R15.103L) and Woodland (~ 005 YOL R7.022), this route is named the "West Side Freeway". It was named by location (on the "west side" of the San Joaquin Valley). There have also been references to this as the "Apollo Freeway".

Officer Alfred R. TurnerBetween Route 152 (~ 005 MER 17.713) and Route 165 (~ 005 MER 6.04), this route is named the "CHP Officer Alfred R Turner Memorial Highway". CHP Officer Alfred R. Turner was born in a little log and rock house in rural Chester, Arkansas on February 9, 1940. He moved to Susanville, California in 1944, and joined the United States Navy at age 17. Seven years after joining the California Highway Patrol, on December 16, 1975, Officer Alfred R. Turner was shot and killed by a motorist on I-5 near Los Banos, after stopping the vehicle because of a burned-out headlight. Officer Turner was unaware that the car he stopped had just been stolen in San Leandro, and when the officer stepped out of his patrol car, the motorist exited his vehicle, and, as the two men began walking toward each other, the motorist suddenly pulled a .357 magnum revolver and opened fire. Officer Turner was hit with three bullets, but returned fire and hit his assailant with five shots. Officer Turner, although critically wounded, managed to return to his patrol car and radio for help. He died 12 days later. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 80, Chapter 97, on July 14, 1998.
(Image Source: California Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

Officer Dale E. NewbyI-5 from Eight Mile Road (~ 005 SJ 35.283) to French Camp Road (~ 005 SJ R22.52) in Stockton is officially designated as the "CHP Officer Dale E. Newby Memorial Highway". Officer Dale E. Newby graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy and was appointed a peace officer of the great State of California on April 24, 1967. He was killed while in the line of duty on July 17, 1982, during a traffic stop at I-5 and Eight Mile Road. He had stopped a motorist for speeding and erratic driving, After scuffling with the motorist, an ex-mental patient, Officer Newby was shot and killed. The tragedy was compounded when the gunman fled the area and took a hostage, who was subsequently shot and killed by the perpetrator prior to taking his own life. An estimated 850 people attended Officer Newby's funeral, including law enforcement personnel from Massachusetts, Oklahoma, Ohio, New Jersey, Florida, Louisiana, and Michigan, in addition to then Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr. and then Lieutenant Governor Mike Curb. Officer Newby was only 36 years of age at the time of his death and was survived by his wife, Beverly, and their three sons, Sean, Jeffrey, and Dale, Jr. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 89, Chapter 155, September 11, 2002.
(Image Sources: Recordnet; Calif Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

I-5 from Stockton (~ 005 SJ 26.259) to Sacramento (~ 005 SAC 22.475) is officially named the "Carlton E. Forbes Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 62, Chapter 26, in 1982. Carlton E. Forbes was Chief Engineer of the California Department of Transportation from 1974 to his retirement in 1980.

Officer Artie J. HubbardThe portion of I-5 from Pocket Road (~ 005 SAC 16.127) to the southern boundary of the City of Sacramento (~ 005 SAC 14.047) is named the "CHP Officer Artie J. Hubbard Memorial Freeway". This segment was named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officer Artie J. Hubbard. Officer Hubbard was born on December 17, 1951, in Stockton, California. He graduated from East Union High School in Manteca, California in 1970. After high school, Officer Hubbard attended Delta College and graduated in 1973 with an AA degree in Criminal Justice. He joined the California Highway Patrol in January of 1974. After completing academy training, he reported to the Central Los Angeles Office. Throughout Officer Hubbard's years in Central Los Angeles, he was assigned to motorcycle patrol, as a field training officer, and worked protective services details. In 1984, Officer Hubbard was voluntarily transferred to the South Sacramento Office. On April 5, 1985, Officer Hubbard was involved in a serious car accident, where he sustained major head injuries. While bravely responding to an 11-99 (officer needs help) call, Officer Hubbard failed to negotiate a curve and his CHP Mustang slid off the roadway and struck a utility pole. He was placed on life support and was cared for in his parents' home for more than ten years. Tragically, on December 8, 1995, Officer Hubbard, 43, succumbed to his injuries as a result of the collision. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 12, Resolution Chapter 73, on 7/12/2005.
(Image sources: Flikr; Calif Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

Dep Sheriff Sandra Powell-LarsonI-5 between Q Street (~ 005 SAC 23.067) and J Street (~ 005 SAC 23.68) in the City of Sacramento is named the "Deputy Sheriff Sandra Powell-Larson Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Sacramento County Deputy Sheriff Sandra Powell-Larson, who died in the line of duty at 48 years of age while transporting state prisoners on northbound I-5 at 375 feet south of R Street in Sacramento. Deputy Sheriff Powell-Larson graduated from Rio Linda High School in 1968, and began her career with the Sacramento County Department of Social Services. She continued her county career with the Sacramento County District Attorney's Office while becoming a Sacramento County Reserve Deputy Sheriff. Deputy Sheriff Powell-Larson became a full-time Sacramento County Deputy Sheriff on September 30, 1974, while continuing her secondary education at Sacramento City College, where she received an Associate of Arts degree in criminal justice. Deputy Sheriff Powell-Larson was known by her fellow officers for her dedication to the Sacramento County Sheriff's Officers Association, and to the protection of the citizens of our state. Deputy Sheriff Powell-Larson was the first female officer to die in the line of duty in the over 150 -year history of the Sacramento County Sheriff's Office. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 96, Resolution Chapter 113, on 8/18/2006.
(Image Source: California Police Officers Memorial Foundation)

In local usage, I-5 between Sacramento and Red Bluff is called the "West Side Highway". This name derives from the fact the route runs along the west side of the valley.

The interchange of I-5 and US 50 in Sacramento County (~ 005 SAC 22.591) is named the "California State Engineer Memorial Interchange". It was named in tribute to past, present, and future state engineers and related professionals and in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Professional Engineers in California Government (PECG). The men and women who serve Californians as engineers and closely related professionals throughout state government are persons of skill, intelligence, and advanced training who deserve to be recognized for their dedicated service. California’s state engineers and related professionals have paid a high price in serving our state with at least 37 on-the-job deaths in their ranks over the last century. The Legislature desires to promote the safety of the state’s employees and to encourage motorists traveling in and through the state to exercise caution and care when encountering a work zone. California’s state engineers design and inspect the state’s highways and bridges, ensure that schools and hospitals are safe during earthquakes, improve air and water quality, work to reduce fossil fuel emissions, and perform countless other professional functions that create jobs and protect public safety in our state. The Professional Engineers in California Government (PECG) was organized in 1962 in the San Francisco Bay Area area to represent state engineers and address the safety concerns associated with state service, and 2012 represents the 50th anniversary of the organization. PECG represents approximately 13,000 professional engineers, architects, land surveyors, engineering geologists, and closely related professionals serving the public in state government. Nam ed by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

Sergeant Gary R. WagersThe interchange of Route 5 and Route 113 (~ 005 YOL R7.113) is named the "CHP Sergeant Gary R. Wagers Memorial Interchange" This interchange was named in memory of CHP Sergeant Gary R. Wagers, who died in a patrol vehicle collision in the line of duty while pursuing a traffic violator at high speed in the early morning hours of March 15, 2001, on Route 113 at the interchange with Route 5, in Woodland. Sergeant Wagers graduated high school in Allegan, Michigan and was a graduate of California State University, Sacramento. He joined the California Army National Guard in 1970 and retired in 1998 at the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, after receiving many awards, including the Army Achievement Medal, Reserve Commendation Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, and the National Defense Medal. He graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy and was appointed as a State Traffic Officer on August 9, 1979; he was promoted to the rank of State Traffic Sergeant on March 1, 1992. He served in the West Los Angeles, Westminster, South Sacramento, Riverside, Santa Ana, and Woodland Areas as well as at CHP Headquarters and California Highway Patrol Air Operations. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 16, Resolution Chapter 70, on 07/07/2005.
(Image Source: Calif Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

Police Officer Natalie Becky CoronaThe portion of I-5 from Greenbay Road (Bridge 15-0060, COL R3.149) to the Salt Creek Bridge (Bridge 15-0005R, COL R7.991) in the County of Colusa is named the Officer Natalie Corona Memorial Highway. It is named in memory of 22-year-old Davis Police Department Officer Natalie Corona, who was killed in the line of duty. Officer Corona was from Arbuckle, California, a long-time employee and volunteer at the Arbuckle Parks and Recreation Department, and was extremely well loved by the Arbuckle community. The eldest daughter of a retired Colusa County Sheriff’s Department deputy and an Arbuckle elementary school teacher, Officer Corona dreamed of following her father, who served for 26 years with the department and is now the Colusa County District 1 Supervisor, into a career in law enforcement. Officer Corona earned an associate’s degree in administration of justice from Yuba College and began working as a Community Service Officer for the Davis Police Department in 2016. Even after funding for her position ended, Officer Corona continued to show up to work as a volunteer for her position with the Davis Police Department. Officer Corona graduated from the Sacramento training academy in July 2018, was sworn into the Davis Police Department on August 2, 2018, and completed her field training just before Christmas of 2018. Sadly, while handling a three-vehicle minor injury accident on Thursday, January 10, 2019, in Davis, California, Officer Corona was ambushed by a gunman not associated with the accident. Named by ACR 66, Res. Chapter 113, Statutes of 2019, on 07/10/19.
(Image Source: Officer Down Memorial Page)

CHP Officer Charles T. SmithThe portion of I-5 between County Road 25 (~ 005 GLE R21.817) and Route 32 (~ 005 GLE R25.296) in the County of Glenn is named the "CHP Officer Charles T. Smith Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Charles Taylor Smith, who was born April 9, 1928, in Denison, Texas, and had four siblings, Tom, William, Virginia, and Vickie. Officer Smith graduated from Armijo High School in Fairfield, California, and joined the United States Marine Corps shortly thereafter; and after two years in the United States Marine Corps, and after achieving the rank of officer, Charles Smith married his best friend, Juanita (Jae), on November 15, 1948, and had two wonderful children, Terry and Toni. Officer Smith graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy in 1952, and, upon graduation, was assigned to the El Centro Area. Officer Smith was killed in the line of duty on September 9, 1956, during what appeared to be a routine traffic stop for a speeding violation. Both occupants of the vehicle were absent without leave from the United States Marine Corps and were on a crime spree. While he was frisking the driver of the vehicle, the passenger shot Officer Smith three times in the back. Despite being fatally wounded, Officer Smith returned fire and fatally shot both suspects. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 75, Resolution Chapter 113, on September 28, 2011.
(Image Sources: Appeal Democrat; Calif. Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

Officer Robert James QuirkThe portion of Route 5, from the Sunset Hills Drive overcrossing at 005 TEH 38.716 to the Nine Mile Hill overcrossing at 005 TEH 36.371, in the County of Tehama, is named the "California Highway Patrol Officer Robert James Quirk Memorial Highway". It was named after California Highway Patrol Officer Robert James Quirk. Born in 1922, Officer Quirk enlisted in the United States Navy in January 1942 and completed Naval Aviator Training. He was commissioned as a Lieutenant Junior Grade and saw action on the Philippine Islands while serving as a squadron commander of B-24 bombers and flew multiple bombing raids during the battle of Kwajalein. He was recognized for his many achievements and, in 1947, and was honorably discharged from the Navy. In 1951, Officer Quirk moved to San Diego, California, and began working at Consolidated Aircraft Company. In 1954, Officer Quirk was hired by the CHP and assigned to the Compton CHP Office where he worked from 1955 until 1963, when he was transferred to the Red Bluff CHP Office where he served until his untimely death in 1971. On April 11, 1971, after being involved in a foot pursuit, during which time he singlehandedly caught three suspects, Officer Quirk suffered a fatal heart attack. Following in his father’s footsteps is his son, Sergeant Ken Quirk of the Storey County Nevada Sheriff’s Department, who demonstrates the highest standards of law enforcement while carrying his father’s handcuffs and wearing his father’s brass belt buckle. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR 3), Resolution Chapter 73, on 8/15/2013.
(Image Source: Officer Down Memorial Page)

Nomlaki LogoThe portion of Route 5 between Gyle Road (~ 005 TEH R13.962) and Flores Avenue (~ 005 TEH R19.772) in Tehama County is named the "Nomlaki Highway" This segment was named in honor of the people of the Nomlaki Indian Nation, who are the original native inhabitants of Tehama County and have lived in the region since time immemorial. Historically, the Nomlaki greeted the Spanish explorers when they came into Tehama County with the Alferez Gabriel Moraga expedition in 1808. The boundaries of the Nomlaki lands changed with the arrival of the Europeans, but once extended within the Sacramento River Valley including most of present-day Tehama County. The Nomlaki had a sophisticated social, political, and religious structure and were wise stewards of the land and natural resources. The original trails through the Mendocino National Forest and connecting the valley and the mountains were cleared and used by the Nomlaki, some of which evolved into current highways in Tehama and Glenn Counties. Alas, of its original 25,000 acres, the Nomlaki tribal government now has jurisdiction over only approximately 2,300 acres of federal trust land concentrated in a reservation in Tehama County. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 15, Resolution Chapter 93, on 7/12/2007.
(Image Source: Alaska Roads (Oscar Voss), Indian Country Today)

Historically, the portion of this route from Red Bluff (~ 005 TEH 28.38) to the Oregon state line was called the "Cascade Wonderland Highway".

Police Officer David Frank MobilioThe portion of Route 5 from the Riverside Avenue overcrossing (~ 005 TEH R23.344) to the North Red Bluff overcrossing (presumably ~ 005 TEH 28.38) in the City of Red Bluff is named the "Officer David F. Mobilio Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer David F. Mobilio, who was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay area, and graduated from Saratoga High School in 1990. Officer Mobilio moved to the City of Chico, where he met and married Linda Dias, the true love of his life, and decided to pursue his dream of becoming a law enforcement officer. Officer Mobilio graduated from the Butte College Police Academy on November 30, 1995. On October 17, 1997, David Mobilio was hired as a Level II Reserve Police Officer for the Red Bluff Police Department and in 1998 he was promoted to a full-time, permanent police officer. After approximately two years of service as a patrol officer responding to calls ranging from vandalism, domestic violence, robbery, drug violations, and driving under the influence, Officer Mobilio was assigned as a Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) Officer for the Red Bluff Police Department, providing antidrug-use education to elementary schoolchildren. On November 19, 2002, Officer Mobilio covered the graveyard shift for another officer, and at approximately 1:30 a.m. he checked out at a gas station to fuel his patrol car. Following several minutes without communication from Officer Mobilio, thedispatcher attempted to make radio contact with him. Following several more minutes of no response, a sergeant was dispatched to the location and found Officer Mobilio shot to death near his patrol car. Officer Mobilio had been ambushed while fueling his patrol car by an unknown suspect who was later apprehended with the assistance of many allied law enforcement agencies and who was subsequently convicted of murdering Officer Mobilio. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 78, Resolution Chapter 88, on August 24, 2012.
(Image Sources: KRCR; Mobilio Scholarship Page)

Captain Mark Gregory RatledgeThe portion of Route 5 from the Bowman Road overcrossing (~ 005 TEH 41.546) to the northbound Main Street on ramp (~ 005 SHA 1.937) in the City of Cottonwood is named the "Captain Mark Ratledge Memorial Highway" (signed as the "Cottonwood FPD Capt. Mark Ratledge Memorial Highway"). It was named in memory of Captain Mark Ratledge, who began serving the Cottonwood Fire Department as a volunteer in 2003, was promoted to Captain in 2008, and served the department for nine years utilizing expertise he obtained while performing the perilous duties of fire protection as a member of the Redding Fire Department and the United States Forest Service. Captain Ratledge was always willing to share his knowledge and skill as a Training Officer for the Cottonwood Fire Department. Captain Ratledge died, at 35 years of age, on February 29, 2012, after being struck by an out-of-control vehicle while he was working the scene of another accident. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 78, Resolution Chapter 88, on August 24, 2012.
(Image Source: GoFundMe, National Fallen Firefighters Foundation)

Stone Turnpike Memorial FreewayThe portion of Route 5 between the Pit River Bridge in Shasta County (~ 005 SHA R28.447) and the Shasta-Siskiyou County line is officially designated the "Stone Turnpike Memorial Freeway". In the decade of the Gold Rush, miners, farmers, and merchants of the Counties of Shasta and Siskiyou were unable to communicate with the outside world or bring their produce to market except over dangerous pack trails due to the rugged terrain in the Sacramento River Canyon. After other wagon road building efforts failed, Elias B. Stone and his sons secured a state franchise to build a wagon road. With brawn, black powder, mules, and oxen, the Stone family built nine bridges across the Sacramento River, 15 bridges across creeks and gulches, and a narrow road notched into the Sacramento River Canyon's walls, running 43 miles, from the Siskiyou-Shasta county line to the Stone family's ferry boat and landing on the Pit River, a few miles above that river' s junction with the Sacramento River. The Stone family completed the Stone Turnpike in the Sacramento River Canyon in 1861, but after only a few months of collecting tolls, disaster, in the form of the worst winter storm known in the area to that time, destroyed most of their work. The Stone family mortgaged all of its property and rebuilt a better toll road despite several legal entanglements. Other parties finally gained full control of the Stone family's company and the Stone Turnpike in 1868. In the 1870s, the Stone Turnpike became the major north to south stage route to Oregon; in 1887, the steel rails of the Central Pacific Railroad displaced the Stone Turnpike in some sections to complete the rail link into southern Oregon. In 1915, the dusty old stage road became Shasta County's part of the Pacific Highway, the predecessor of US 99, which is now I-5. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 94, Chapter 98, in 1994.
(Image Source: Historical Marker Database)

Shawn BakerThe portion of Route 5 in Siskiyou County from PM 35.7 to PM 39.5, inclusive is designated as the Shawn Baker Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of Shawn Baker, born in 1963. Mr. Baker served his country in the United States Navy for five years. In 1999, Mr. Baker and his family moved to Siskiyou County and eventually settled in Weed, California. On January 31, 2001, Mr. Baker began his career with the Department of Transportation as a permanent-intermittent equipment operator in Yreka, California, and then transferred to the Yreka special projects crew in April 2004. Mr. Baker was hired as a permanent full-time equipment operator in November 2004, then transferred to the Grass Lake maintenance crew in December 2004 and the Yreka special projects crew in April 2006. On April 24, 2013, a group of eight Caltrans District 2 employees was performing rock scaling operations to remove loose material from a rocky hillside on State Highway Route 96 near Happy Camp in Siskiyou County when a rock slide occurred, tragically killing Mr. Baker and Mr. Jones, and injuring a third employee. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 53, Resolution Chapter 4, on 2/3/2014.
(Image Source: George Baker Obituary; Mt Shasta News)

Robert JonesThe portion of Route 5 in Siskiyou County from PM 41.5 (R41.5, near Shamrock Road / Old Hwy 99 N of Grenada CA) to PM 43.5 (R43.5, near Shamrock and Schulmeyer Rd), inclusive, is designated as the Robert Jones Memorial Highway. Robert Jones was born in 1973 in Yreka, California. The Department of Transportation hired Mr. Jones in November 2005 as a temporary employee for the Mount Shasta maintenance crew; Mr. Jones became a permanent-intermittent equipment operator for the Mount Shasta maintenance crew in November 2006, and then transferred to the Yreka special projects crew in December 2006. In June 2008, Mr. Jones was hired as a permanent full-time equipment operator for the Grass Lake maintenance crew, then transferred to the Yreka special projects crew in December 2010. In his spare time, Mr. Jones deeply enjoyed his time as a volunteer firefighter at the Mayten Fire Department. On April 24, 2013, a group of eight Caltrans District 2 employees was performing rock scaling operations to remove loose material from a rocky hillside on Route 96 near Happy Camp in Siskiyou County when a rock slide occurred, tragically killing Mr. Baker and Mr. Jones, and injuring a third employee. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 53, Resolution Chapter 4, on 2/3/2014.
(Image Source: Caltrans Facebook Page)

Named Structures Named Structures

Richard GonzalezThe interchange between I-5 and Route 905 in the County of San Diego (~ 005 SD 3.093) is named the "Caltrans Equipment Operator II Richard Gonzalez Memorial Interchange" . It was named in memory of Caltrans Equipment Operator II Richard Gonzalez, a dedicated maintenance worker. Richard Gonzalez, while working on a special programs crew at the connector of I-15 and Route 94, was struck on the morning of June 20, 2011, and died in the line of duty at the age of 52 as a result of injuries sustained in the collision. Richard Gonzalez was an exemplary employee who gained the respect of supervisors, management, and peers for his devotion to the values of integrity, commitment, and teamwork. Richard Gonzalez's passion was restoration of classic cars and serving as a mentor and role model to his family and friends. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 52, Resolution Chapter 94, on September 15, 2011.
(Image Source: Caltrans Website)

Bridge 57-487, at Del Mar Heights Road in Del Mar in San Diego county (005 SD R034.13), is named the "David A. Hoffman Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1964, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 60, Chapter 69, in 1988. David Hoffman, a 30 year old Caltrans engineer, was killed by an errant motorist as he supervised a construction project on I-5 near Oceanside on March 16, 1987.

George R Volland Memorial BridgeBridges 57-845, 57-844, the Route 54/Route 5 interchange (005 SD 009.40), is named the "George R. Volland Memorial Bridge". George R. Volland, United State Navy veteran of three wars, died of a heart attack brought on by the effort he exerted to assist the children who were injured in a tragic bus accident in Martinez on June 23, 1976. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 60, Chapter 30 in 1998.
(Image source: AARoads)

Dr. Martin Luther KingThe Mission Avenue bridge over I-5 in the City of Oceanside (57-813 005 SD R031.32)is named the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Bridge to honor the life and achievements of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American clergyman, doctor of theology, activist, and leader in the African American Civil Rights Movement, who is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using nonviolent civil disobedience. Dr. King, who has become a national icon, became a Baptist minister and a civil rights activist early in his career. Dr. King led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957, serving as its first president. With the SCLC, Dr. King led an unsuccessful struggle against segregation in Albany, Georgia in 1962, and organized nonviolent protests in Birmingham, Alabama that attracted national attention following television news coverage of the brutal police response. Dr. King also helped to organize the 1963 March on Washington, D.C., where he delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech. There, he established his reputation as one of the greatest orators in American history and said to the crowd: “With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood”. On October 14, 1964, Dr. King received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. In 1965, he and the SCLC helped to organize the Selma to Montgomery marches, and the following year, he took the movement north to Chicago. In the final years of his life, Dr. King expanded his focus to include poverty and the Vietnam War. Dr. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee and was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a United States federal holiday in 1986 and a memorial statue on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. was opened to the public in 2011. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 41, Resolution Chapter 64, on August 5, 2013.

Tommy De La RosaThe interchange of I-5 and Rout 91 in the City of Fullerton (~ 005 ORA 42.211R) is named the “Fullerton Police Detective Tommy De La Rosa Memorial Interchange”. It was named in memory of Fullerton Police Detective Tommy De La Rosa, who at 43 years of age paid the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. Detective De La Rosa was born on May 12, 1947, and served his country during the Vietnam War while in the Marine Corps. Detective De La Rosa joined the Fullerton Police Department on September 26, 1980. While off duty, Detective De La Rosa liked to speak with children from neighborhoods heavy with drugs, gangs, and prostitution and urge them to be good and stay in school. On June 21, 1990, Detective De La Rosa was ambushed and shot five times during an undercover reverse sting narcotics operation, but, although gravely injured, was still able to return fire and fatally wound one of the suspects before succumbing to his injuries. Three other suspects were convicted of Detective De La Rosa’s murder and were sentenced to life without parole. Detective De La Rosa provided the public with exemplary service and dedication to his job throughout his nine-year career with the Fullerton Police Department. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 28, Res. Chapter 128, Statutes of 2015, on July 22, 2015.
(Image Source: Fullerton PD)

Marco Antonio FirebaughThe I-5/I-710 interchange (~ 005 LA 13.752) in Los Angeles County is officially named the "Marco Antonio Firebaugh Interchange". This interchange was named in memory of Marco Antonio Firebaugh, who at the age of 39 years was running for the California State Senate when he succumbed to health ailments on March 21, 2006. Born in Tijuana, Mexico on October 13, 1966, Firebaugh emigrated to the United States when he was a young boy. He worked hard to pay his own way through school and earned his bachelor of arts degree in political science from the University of California, Berkeley and a law degree from the UCLA School of Law. He was the first in his family to attend college and was committed to the notion that free universal public education is the cornerstone of our democratic society and worked hard to improve educational opportunities for all California students. Firebaugh was elected to the California State Assembly at the age of 32 years; and he served in the California State Assembly from 1998 to 2004, representing the 50th Assembly District located in southeast Los Angeles County. During his tenure in the Assembly, Firebaugh was recognized for his impressive legislative and advocacy record on behalf of California's working families and their children, establishing him as a leader and role model in the Latino community. He demonstrated outstanding leadership in introducing legislation aimed at improving the lives of immigrants and low-income families including undocumented immigrants who come to California to work and give their children a better life. He authored air quality legislation that provides funding for the state's most important air emissions reductions programs and that ensures that state funding be targeted to low-income communities that are most severely impacted by air pollution. He also authored legislation funding a mobile asthma treatment clinic known as a Breathmobile to provide free screenings and treatment for school children in southeast Los Angeles and fought hard in the Legislature to make California the first state to outlaw smoking in a vehicle carrying young children to protect them from the hazards created by breathing secondhand smoke. In 2002, he championed AB540, which allowed undocumented California high school students to pursue a college education and pay in-state tuition fees. From 2002 to 2004, Firebaugh served as Chairman of the California Latino Legislative Caucus where he was responsible for managing the development of the Latino Caucus' annual "Agenda for California's Working Families" as a policy document that focuses on issues affecting California's diverse population. Because of his effectiveness both as a policymaker and political leader, Marco Antonio Firebaugh was appointed Majority Floor Leader in 2002, and served as Floor Leader from 2002 to 2004, making him the highest ranking Latino in the Assembly and one of the chief negotiators for Assembly Democrats. Firebaugh also served six years on the State Allocation Board, which provides funding for public school construction and modernization. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 142, Resolution Chapter 132, on 9/7/2006.
(Image Source: Marco's Obituary)

Eugene A. Obregon, USMCThe I-5/I-10/Route 60/U 101 interchange (~ 005 LA 16.335), commonly referred to as the East Los Angeles Interchange, is named the "Medal of Honor Recipient , Eugene A. Obregon, USMC, Memorial Interchange" (it was originally named the "Marine Private First Class Eugene A. Obregon Interchange"). This interchange was named in memory of Medal of Honor Recipient Eugene A. Obregon, USMC. While serving as an ammunition carrier with Golf Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during the Korean War, PFC Obregon was killed in action on September 26, 1950. The machine-gun squad of Private Obregon was temporarily pinned down by hostile fire; and during this time, he observed a fellow marine fall wounded in the line of fire. Armed only with a pistol, Private Obregon unhesitantly dashed from his cover position to the side of the fallen marine. Firing his pistol with one hand as he ran, Private Obregon grasped his comrade by the arm, and despite the great peril to himself, dragged the marine to the side of the road. Still under enemy fire, Private Obregon was bandaging the marine's wounds when hostile troops began approaching their position. Quickly seizing the wounded marine's rifle, Private Obregon placed his own body as a shield in front of the wounded marine and lay there firing accurately and effectively into the approaching enemy troops until he, himself, was fatally wounded by enemy machine-gun fire. By his courageous fighting spirit, and loyal devotion to duty, Private Obregon enabled his fellow marines to rescue the wounded marine. By fate and courage, Private Obregon is one of the valiant Mexican Americans to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor for bravery. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 109, Resolution Chapter 66, on 6/26/2008.
(Image source: Flikr; Alchetron)

Wall Las Memorias AIDS ProjectIn downtown Los Angeles (~ 005 LA 18.868) there are signed directing motorists to "The Wall Las Memorias Project AIDS monument". This designation relates to the The Wall Las Memorias Project, which was founded in 1993 with the mission of educating the Latino community about the HIV/AIDS epidemic and building an eternal monument to honor loved ones who have died from that disease. It was envisioned by local community activist, Richard Zaldivar, who believed that a public symbol would create a focal point for discussion and healing among those impacted by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Over the past decade, The Wall Las Memorias Project has built support for the AIDS monument through innovative prevention programs, leadership training, and grassroots community organizing, which have led to a coalition of elected officials, community-based organizations, churches, schools, entertainers, union leaders, and community members. It was designed by architect David Angelo and public artist Robin Brailsford, and is located at Lincoln Park in the historic community of Lincoln Heights, northeast of downtown Los Angeles. It is designed as a Quetzalcoatl serpent, an Aztec symbol for rebirth, and it consists of eight wall panels, six murals depicting life with AIDS in the Latino community and two granite panels containing the names of individuals who have died from AIDS, and includes a serene park setting for personal meditation. The sign is located on SB I-5 between exit 135 and 136, and on NB I-5 between Plaza de la Raza and the Main Street sign. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 3, Resolution Chapter 102, on 7/16/2007.
(Image Source: Wall Las Memorias Project)

Gene AutryThe I-5/Route 134 interchange is named the "Gene Autry Memorial Interchange" (~ 005 LA 26.979). Gene Autry was best known as a singing cowboy of stage and screen. Wikipedia says the following about Autry: Orvon Grover "Gene" Autry (September 29, 1907 – October 2, 1998), nicknamed The Singing Cowboy, was an American singer, songwriter, actor, musician and rodeo performer who gained fame largely by singing in a crooning style on radio, in films, and on television for more than three decades beginning in the early 1930s. Autry was the owner of a television station (KTLA), several radio stations (KSFO, KMPC, KOGO), and the Los Angeles/California/Anaheim Angels Major League Baseball team from 1961 to 1997. From 1934 to 1953, Autry appeared in 93 films, and between 1950 and 1956 hosted The Gene Autry Show television series. During the 1930s and 1940s, he personified the straight-shooting hero—honest, brave, and true—and profoundly touched the lives of millions of Americans. Autry was also one of the most important pioneering figures in the history of country music, considered the second major influential artist of the genre's development after Jimmie Rodgers. His singing cowboy films were the first vehicle to carry country music to a national audience. In addition to his signature song, "Back in the Saddle Again", and his hit "At Mail Call Today", Autry is still remembered for his Christmas holiday songs, most especially his biggest hit "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer" as well as "Frosty the Snowman", "Here Comes Santa Claus", and "Up on the House Top". Autry is responsible for the creation of the "Cowboy Code" of behavior. Autry is a member of both the Country Music Hall of Fame and Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, and is the only person to be awarded stars in all five categories on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, for film, television, music, radio, and live performance. The named interchange is near the Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum, opened in 1988. Named by SCR 17, Resolution Chapter 61, on July 16, 1999.
(Image Source: Wikipedia)

David M. GonzalesThe interchange of I-5 and Rout 118 in the City of Los Angeles (~ 005 LA 39.416) is named the "David M. Gonzales Medal of Honor World War II Memorial Interchange". It is named in memory of David M. Gonzales, Private First Class (PFC), United States Army. Gonzales was born in 1923 in East Los Angeles and raised in Pacoima, California. David M. Gonzales joined the Army during World War II on March 31, 1944, at Fort MacArthur, and was deployed to the Philippines as an infantry replacement in December 1944. PFC Gonzales’ heroic service on the Villa Verde Trail in Luzon, Philippines, on April 25, 1945, earned him, posthumously, the Congressional Medal of Honor. On April 25, 1945, PFC Gonzales and his unit, Company A, 127th Infantry, 32nd Division, were pinned down by enemy fire when a 500-pound bomb exploded in the company’s perimeter, burying five men of Company A. Without hesitation, PFC Gonzales seized an entrenching tool, and, under a hail of fire, crawled 15 yards to his entombed comrades, while his commanding officer, who also rushed forward to help, was struck and instantly killed by machine gun fire. Undismayed, PFC Gonzales set to work swiftly with the entrenching tool, and continued to dig out the five trapped men, while enemy sniper fire and machine gun bullets struck him. After PFC Gonzales had successfully freed one of the men, he stood up to be able to dig faster, despite the fact that such a position exposed him to greater danger, and while he successfully freed another man, PFC Gonzales was mortally wounded by enemy fire as he finished liberating the third trapped man. In the words of President Harry Truman, “Private Gonzales’ valiant and intrepid conduct exemplified the highest tradition of the military service”. The other two buried soldiers were later saved when the intense enemy fire subsided. PFC Gonzales was killed on April 25, 1945, while serving our country and saving the lives of his comrades on the field of battle during World War II. PFC Gonzales was survived by his then 25-year-old widow, his one-year-old son, and his mother. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 72, Resolution Chapter 148, September 05, 2014.
(Image source: Aerotech News; Wikipedia)

District 7 Fallen Workers Memorial InterchangeThe interchange at I-210 and I-5 (LA 5 R43.904; LA 210 R0.000) in the County of Los Angeles is designated as the "Caltrans District 7 Fallen Workers Memorial Interchange". Highway construction is one of the most dangerous occupations in the United States. The risk of death is seven times higher for highway workers than for other workers, according to a study conducted by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of the United States Department of Labor. The Department of Transportation (Caltrans) has lost 185 employees since 1921. On average, 1,000 Caltrans vehicles are struck each year, and, in addition to the danger to workers, an estimated 85 to 90 percent of people who are killed in highway work zones are drivers and their passengers. The following workers in District 7 are memorialized with this designation:

  1. On June 10, 1926, a Powderman and a Powderman Helper, Thomas Gilbride and Jose Dominguez, were killed while placing a charge for a blast on the Coast Highway near the City of Oxnard.
  2. On April 9, 1927, a Maintenance Foreman, Albert W. Schmuck, was killed while operating a grader.
  3. In 1939, a Highway Maintenance Worker, Fred Pettit, was killed while working on a highway.
  4. On March 31, 1958, a Highway Superintendent, Vaughn O. Sheff, was killed during a landslide while clearing another landslide in the Santa Monica Canyon.
  5. In 1965, a Construction Inspector, Leroy Exum, was killed while working on a highway.
  6. On January 16, 1968, a Caltrans Maintenance Worker, Roger Myhre, was killed by a drunk driver while working on the northbound lane of the San Diego Freeway (I-405) near the City of Inglewood.
  7. In 1970, a Construction Inspector, Thomas R. Brungardt, was killed while working on a highway.
  8. On February 25, 1971, a Maintenance Worker, Donald Parker, was killed by a hit and run driver while working on a lane closure on Route 91 and I-5.
  9. In 1972, a Caltrans worker, Norman Lubig, was killed while working on a highway.
  10. In 1973, a Highway Resident Engineer, Emory Price, was killed while working on a highway.
  11. On September 25, 1974, a Highway Engineering Technician, Claude A. Thiel, was killed by an errant driver while working with a survey crew.
  12. On June 5, 1975, a Highway Maintenance Worker, Arthur Silva, was killed by an errant driver while picking up debris from the center median.
  13. On July 7, 1976, a Highway Maintenance Worker, David Guillen, was killed due to electrocution caused by the branches of a tree touching overhead powerlines while he was helping cut down a tree.
  14. On May 5, 1978, a Highway Maintenance Worker, Donald S. Beasley, was killed by a drunk driver while he was loading trash along a highway.
  15. On May 16, 1978, a Highway Maintenance Worker, Kanika F. Burroughs, was killed by an out of control truck on Route 57 while performing litter pickup on a highway.
  16. On December 12, 1978, a Highway Maintenance Worker, John L. Haynes, was killed by an out of control truck while he was repairing paddle markers on northbound I-405.
  17. On June 29, 1979, an Equipment Operator, Richard A. Singleton, was killed by an errant driver while he was stopped to repair a sweeper along a highway.
  18. On October 22, 1979, two Highway Maintenance Workers, Glen P. Fenwick and Raul Arismendez, were killed by an errant driver on the northbound lane of the Santa Ana Freeway (I-5).
  19. On November 16, 1979, a Highway Electrician I, Samuel Ho, was killed due to electrocution while replacing a ballast for overhead lighting on eastbound Route 134, west of the Harvey exit in the City of Glendale.
  20. On May 29, 1980, a Highway Maintenance Leadworker, Thomas E. Davis, was killed by an errant driver on Route 133 in the Big Bend area of Laguna Canyon Road during an asphalt concrete paving operation.
  21. On January 26, 1981, a Highway Landscape Worker, James H. Copeland, was killed by a hit and run driver while clearing brush along the shoulder of the northbound lanes of the Golden State Freeway (I-5) in the City of Glendale.
  22. On October 5, 1981, a Maintenance Supervisor, Robbie R. Haney, was killed by being pinned under the left wheel of a truck while he was doing repairs.
  23. On October 31, 1988, a Maintenance Supervisor II, Dennis Sparks, was killed in a traffic accident while driving to a field office.
  24. On November 9, 1988, a Heavy Equipment Operator, Cedric Dubenion was killed in a traffic accident.
  25. On December 12, 1988, a Maintenance Equipment Operator, Henry “Rick” Mendoza, was killed while preparing for a lane closure from northbound Route 2 to westbound I-210 when he was struck by an errant truck.
  26. On June 12, 1992, a Landscape Worker, Jerry R. Alcala, was killed by a drunk driver while he was loading debris into a cargo truck.
  27. On July 29, 1992, a Surveyor Supervisor, Callie Joel Buser, Jr., was killed by an errant driver while painting symbols on the shoulder of a highway.
  28. On April 28, 1993, a Landscape Leadworker, Juan Thome, was killed by an errant driver under the influence of marijuana while working on the eastbound lanes of Route 60, the Pomona Freeway, west of Lemon Avenue.
  29. On January 20, 1999, a Maintenance Worker, Paul J. Chavez, was killed in a traffic accident after completing a mud jacking operation on I-210.
  30. On February 23, 2000, a Maintenance Worker, Charles F. Deming, was killed when his truck went over the embankment while he was clearing debris on Route 39 in the Angeles National Forest.
  31. On September 1, 2016, a Caltrans Electrician I, Jorge Lopez, was killed by an errant tractor trailer on the shoulder of Route 14, the Antelope Valley Freeway, in the County of Los Angeles.

In addition to law enforcement and Department of California Highway Patrol officers, contracted highway workers are also at risk of death. The latest data shows that speeding was a factor in more than 35 percent of all fatal work zone crashes, and most work zone fatalities are the result of rear-end collisions caused by driver distraction, inattention, or aggressive driving. Caltrans has adopted a “Slow for the Cone Zone” campaign to raise public awareness and to ask motorists to be alert, slow down, allow extra following room, expect sudden stops, never drive impaired, and avoid distractions, including the use of cell phones, in highway work zones. Fines are doubled in highway work zones and can easily total $1,000 or more for drivers who speed, drive aggressively, text, are otherwise distracted, or cause collisions in a highway work zone. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 263, Res. Chapter 220, 9/11/2018.

Clarence Wayne DeanThe I-5/Route 14 interchange (005 LA R045.58) is officially designated the "Clarence Wayne Dean Memorial Interchange". Officer Clarence Wayne Dean was a 26-year veteran motorcycle cop for the Los Angeles Police Department. He lived in Lancaster, north of the city, and worked out of the Van Nuys station in the San Fernando Valley. He joined the Los Angeles force in 1968 after four years in the Marines, leaving the military with the rank of sergeant. He had been a motorcycle officer for ten years. In November 1993 he hurt his back and took a desk job. A few weeks later, he returned to work healthy enough to go back on the street. On January 17, 1994, a 6.6 earthquake struck the San Fernando Valley's Northridge area. The Newhall Pass sections of the I-5/Route 14 freeway interchange collapsed. Officer Dean was unaware of the collapse. While rounding a turn on a soaring overpass, he sailed into space astride his motorcyle, unable to stop. The interchange was renamed the "Clarence Wayne Dean Memorial Interchange" in his honor. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 111, Chapter 64, in 1994.
(Image Sources: Washington Times; Find A Grave)

At the junction of Route 5 with Route 126 (~ 005 LA R55.217), there will be a "1915 Ridge Route Highway Historical Monument". Begun in 1914 and completed in late 1915, the Ridge Route Highway, officially named the "Castaic-Tejon Route," connected Castaic Junction in Los Angeles County to Bakersfield. It was one of the first products of the newly formed State Bureau of Highways, paid for through the passage of a 1910 bond act. It was considered an engineering marvel of its day and was the first mountain highway built in California. Many credit the 1915 Ridge Route Highway, which opened up travel and commerce between the Los Angeles basin and the San Joaquin Valley, with having prevented California from separating into two separate states. Workers carved out the original 20-foot wide roadway by using horse and mule drawn scrapers and graders, going from ridge top to ridge top across the western San Gabriel mountains. Originally completed as an oiled, graded gravel road, the 1915 Ridge Route Highway was paved in 1919; and was well known for its 697 curves, the most notorious of which was Deadman's Curve near Tejon, that if added together, would make 110 complete circles. The 1915 Ridge Route Highway was replaced in 1933, by a straighter, three-lane highway, which was later widened and became Route 99. On September 25, 1997, 17.6 miles of the 1915 Ridge Route Highway south of Gorman, was accepted into the National Registry of Historic Places. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 98, Chapter 150, October 2, 2001. Note: The Ridge Route Preservation Organziation (RRPO) worked with Assemblyman Runner (author of ACR 98) for the purpose of getting permission to place a historical marker at Castaic Junction, the official beginning of the route on the southern end. ACR 98 directs Caltrans to issue RRPO a permit to construct the monument. Unfortunately, after the passage of ACR 98, they ran into a road block with the permit. They are currently working to resolve the issue.

Bridge 22-0025 (005 SAC 000.01), over the Sacramento River between Sacramento and Yolo counties, was named the "Elkhorn Bridge" or "Elkhorn Causeway" through historical and long usage. The name relates to the location, which is near where the Elkhorn Ferry used to run. The ferry may have run as late as 1971.

In 1969, the Elkhorn Bridge (005 SAC 000.01) was renamed the "Vietnam Servicemen Memorial Bridge" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 145, Chapter 357. The Vietnam Servicemen Memorial Bridge is dedicated to the memory of over 600 men from Sacramento, Placer, Yolo, Yuba and El Dorado County who were killed in action in South Vietnam.

Bridge 24-0004 (SAC 020.00), the bridge over the Sacramento River connecting Sacramento and Yolo counties, is named the "Pioneer Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1966.

Merle HaggardThe portion of Route 5 at the interchange of I-5 and Route 44 in Shasta County in the City of Redding (~ 005 SHA R15.457) is named the "Merle Haggard Memorial Overpass". It was named in memory of Merle Ronald Haggard, who was born to James and Flossie Haggard in April 1937, in Oildale, just north of Bakersfield, California. Merle’s father was a railroad worker, and Merle grew up during the Great Depression. He lived with his family in a boxcar that they had converted into a home. As a child, Merle suffered from a respiratory condition that frequently kept him out of school and confined to bed rest. James Haggard died from a brain tumor when Merle was nine years of age. After his father’s death, Merle became rebellious. In an attempt to straighten her son out, his mother put him in several juvenile detention centers, but it had little effect on Merle’s behavior. As a teenager, Merle fell in love with country music, particularly the songs of Bob Wills, Lefty Frizzell, and Hank Williams. When he was 12 years of age, Merle was given his first guitar by his older brother. He then taught himself how to play by listening to records. Continuing to rebel, he went to Texas with his friend Bob Teague and, after returning to California, he moved to Modesto, where he made his performing debut with Teague at a bar named the Fun Center. The two were paid five dollars and given all the beer that they could drink. In 1958, at 20 years of age, Merle was sentenced to the California State Prison at San Quentin for burglary and an attempted escape from county jail. While serving a two-and-one-half-year term, he played in the prison’s country band and took high school equivalency courses. In 1959, he was a member of the audience that witnessed Johnny Cash’s first performance at San Quentin. Merle Haggard would later be officially pardoned in 1972 by then-Governor Ronald Reagan. In 1962, Merle Haggard signed with a small label called Tally Records for which he recorded five songs, including his debut single, “Sing a Sad Song,” which rose to No. 19 on the country music charts. In 1965, he formed his own band, The Strangers, before signing with Capitol Records, and later that year the band released its debut self-titled album. The group’s followup album, “Swinging Doors,” reached No. 1 on the country music charts the following year, and in 1967 the group’s single “I’m a Lonesome Fugitive” did the same. Later that year, Merle Haggard continued his runaway success with “Branded Man,” his first self-penned No. 1 song. During the remainder of the 1960s, Merle Haggard produced a string of No. 1 singles, culminating with what would become his signature song and his most controversial recording, “Okie from Muskogee.” Released in 1969, the song became an anthem for middle Americans whose patriotism and traditional values were under attack from Vietnam War protesters and hippies. “Okie from Muskogee” crossed over to the pop charts and in 1970 earned Merle Haggard the Country Music Association’s awards for Single, Entertainer, and Top Male Vocalist of the Year. The album of the same name also won Album of the Year. All told, Merle Haggard released nearly 70 albums and 600 songs, 250 of which he wrote himself. Among his most memorable albums were “The Fightin’ Side of Me” (1970), “Someday We’ll Look Back” (1971), “If We Make It Through December” (1974), and “A Working Man Can’t Get Nowhere Today” (1977). In 1982, he recorded a duet album with George Jones called “A Taste of Yesterday’s Wine,” which yielded the chart toppers “Yesterday’s Wine” and “C.C. Waterback.” The following year, he collaborated with Willie Nelson to record the widely praised compilation “Pancho & Lefty.” In addition to an impressive title track, “Pancho & Lefty” featured the touching ballads “It’s My Lazy Day,” “Half a Man,” “Reasons to Quit,” and “All the Soft Places to Fall”. Merle Haggard was elected to the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1977. In 1994, his wealth of artistic achievements, including 38 No. 1 hits, earned him induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame. Though his musical output waned over the years, he continued to find success with albums such as “If I Could Fly” (2000), “Haggard Like Never Before” (2003), and his 2015 reunion album with Willie Nelson, “Django & Jimmie,” which placed him atop the country music charts one more time. In 2008, Merle Haggard was diagnosed with lung cancer and underwent surgery to remove a tumor. Reflecting on the situation, he referred to it as “the greatest test of my fortitude”. Merle Haggard died at home on his northern California ranch in Palo Cedro in Shasta County on April 6, 2016, his 79th birthday. He had been suffering from double pneumonia and had to cancel a string of scheduled concerts with Willie Nelson. The 11 days he spent trying to recover from his illness had become so difficult that he reportedly told his friends and family that he would die on his birthday. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 139, Res. Chapter 180, 9/9/2016.

Bridge 06-021, the Pit River Arm Bridge at Shasta Lake (005 SHA R028.14) in Shasta county, is named the "Veterans of Foreign Wars Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1941, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 59, Chapter 150, in 1994. The Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States traces its roots back to 1899 when veterans of the Spanish-American War (1898) and the Philippine Insurrection (1899-1902) founded local organizations to secure rights and benefits for their service. After chapters were formed in Ohio, Colorado and Pennsylvania, the movement quickly gained momentum. By 1915, membership grew to 5,000; by 1936, membership was almost 200,000. The VFW planned the establishment of the Veterans Administration, and has been a tireless promoter for veteran's rights. More information on the organization can be found at http://www.vfw.org/.

Harlan D. MillerAccording to the Caltrans publication "Named Freeways, Highways, Structures and Other Appurtenances in California, 1996", Bridge 06-027 (005 SHA 045.54), at Dog Creek in Shasta county, is named the Harlan D. Miller Bridge.  Harlan D. Miller, Chief of the California Highway Commission Bridge Department from 1924 to 1926, advocated aesthetically pleasing as well as physically substantial bridges. It was built in 1956, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 140 in 1974. This was a replacement for the old concrete arch bridge, built on the Pacific Highway in 1927 and now decommissioned. According to California Highways and Public Works, Jan 28, that bridge was was also named after Harlan D. Miller, who was the chief bridge engineer for the California Highway Commission. At the time of his appointment, Mr. Miller had been engaged in engineering work for nineteen years, and was formerly connected with the bridge department of the New York Central Railroad and held a similar position with the state of New Yark. Mr. Miller assumed the position of acting bridge engineer in 1923, at the time all bridge work was transferred from the ·divisions to headquarters and placed under a centralized department. The department was been considerably enlarged under his direction. He was a graduate of the Case School of Applied Science in Cleveland, Ohio, where he was elected a member of the Sigma Xi, the scientific honor society. He has been with the California Highway Commission for five years. Mr. Miller died on October 19, 1926. A few days before his death, the CHC designated he structure as the Harlan D. Miller bridge in recognition of his service to the state. You can still see the old bridge from I-5 if you know where to look, and that the Caltrans Library has a lovely photo showing both the new bridge and the old bridge.
(Image source: California Highways and Public Works, Dec 1924)

Ear Sholes / Dan HeryfordBridge 06-192L (005 SHA R051.80), the Sacramento River Bridge O.H., is officially named the "Earl Sholes Memorial Bridge", and the highway bridge 06-193L (005 SHA R052.11), is officially named the "Dan Heryford Memorial Bridge". On May 25, 1950, in the vicinity of the twin bridges, Shasta County Undersheriff Earl Sholes and Shasta County Deputy Sheriff Dan Heryford were killed by two prisoners that the officers were transporting to Redding on charges that the prisoners had stolen a motor vehicle. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 2, Chapter 61, in 1997.
(Image source: Officer Down Memorial Page - Sholes - Heryford)

This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

National Trails National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.


Midland Trail Sign The portion of this route that was part of US 6 (i.e., from Route 110 to Route 14) was part of the "Midland Trail.

National Park to Park Highway Sign The portion of this route N of Los Angeles that was originally part of US 99 (i.e., from Route 10 to Route 99) was part of the "National Parks to Park Highway".

Pacific Highway Sign The portion of I-5 N of Sacramento was part of the "Pacific Highway".

Lincoln Highway Sign Victory Highway Sign The portion of this route from I-205 to Route 120 (former US 50) was part of the coast-to-coast "Lincoln Highway" and the "Victory Highway". A good page with the history of the Lincoln Highway can be found here. It notes that a 1924 guide book noted that Elk Grove had a population of 500, an express company, telegraph, and no tourist accommodations, while Arno was listed with a population of 100, with meals, a garage, and gas available, one express company, one telegraph company, telephone, one general business place, and one public school. The same Guide lists Galt with a population of 985 with three hotels, two garages, large fruit orchards, and 'The longest iron bridge in California, one mile south of Galt. It also notes that trucks from the Calaveras Cement Company brought cement to pour on the road bed that was given free of charge by many cement companies along the way. In the early 1930's the federal government and the state funds created another state-wide route called Route 99. The new highway skirted the town of Galt east of the Lincoln Highway. The old Lincoln Highway south of Dry Creek Bridge became known as "Lower Sacramento Road", and that portion of the Lincoln Highway that ran through Galt was named "Lincoln Way" to remind the citizens of the community that Galt had played a significant role in the history of transcontinental transportation.

This route is part of the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway All American Road, between Route 44 and US 97.

Business Routes Business Routes

The following are Route 5 Business Loops or surface street former routings. The webside AAroads has a page on I–5 Business Routes, as well as individual information page for most of these business route segments; links to those segments are shown as [AAroads].

Exit Information Exit Information

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Interstate Submissions Interstate Submissions

Approved as chargeable Interstate on 7/7/1947; the original routing was along Route 99, this was later changed to the westerly realignment. This route was originally approved as I-5 (with the route splitting near Tracy into I-5W (current I-580 and I-505) and I-5E). In November 1957, the California Department of Highways suggested using I-11 for this route (to permit use of I-3 [I-280] and I-5 [I-680] in the San Francisco Bay Area, and I-7 [I-405] and I-9 [I-605] in the Los Angeles area), but this was rejected.

As noted above, the designation I-5 was proposed in November 1957 for what is now I-680.

Scenic Route Scenic Route

[SHC 263.3] From the international boundary near Tijuana to Route 75 near the south end of San Diego Bay; and from San Diego opposite Coronado to Route 74 near San Juan Capistrano; and from Route 210 near Tunnel Station to Route 126 near Castaic; and from Route 152 west of Los Banos to Route 580 near Vernalis; and from Route 44 near Redding to the Shasta Reservoir; and from Route 89 near Mt. Shasta to Route 97 near Weed; and from Route 3 near Yreka to the Oregon state line near Hilts.

Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Diego 5 R0.14 3.54
San Diego 5 3.70 4.89
San Diego 5 5.15 9.66
San Diego 5 9.78 R19.49
San Diego 5 R19.73 R20.10
San Diego 5 R20.28 R32.69
San Diego 5 R32.78 R34.76
San Diego 5 R36.08 R36.52
San Diego 5 R37.20 R37.55
San Diego 5 R39.26 R41.98
San Diego 5 R42.56 R42.84
San Diego 5 R46.52 R46.73
San Diego 5 R47.25 R48.72
San Diego 5 R48.89 R50.94
San Diego 5 R51.01 R54.05
San Diego 5 R54.17 R54.86
San Diego 5 R72.03 R72.37
Orange 5 0.00 7.11
Orange 5 8.29 8.68
Orange 5 8.68 8.78
Orange 5 8.92 12.66
Orange 5 12.72 14.79
Orange 5 14.84 19.46
Orange 5 19.64 20.17
Orange 5 20.50 21.51
Orange 5 21.56 21.80
Orange 5 22.04 23.92
Orange 5 24.84 25.19
Orange 5 25.98 26.71
Orange 5 26.71 26.89
Orange 5 26.89 33.28
Orange 5 33.52 34.48
Orange 5 34.59 36.81
Orange 5 36.93 44.40
Los Angeles 5 1.51 1.69
Los Angeles 5 2.25 2.66
Los Angeles 5 2.73 3.00
Los Angeles 5 3.32 7.06
Los Angeles 5 7.17 8.39
Los Angeles 5 8.53 9.43
Los Angeles 5 10.88 11.69
Los Angeles 5 12.63 13.06
Los Angeles 5 13.57 14.25
Los Angeles 5 14.38 18.53
Los Angeles 5 18.56 18.99
Los Angeles 5 19.04 20.05
Los Angeles 5 20.25 20.45
Los Angeles 5 20.73 25.94
Los Angeles 5 26.30 27.09
Los Angeles 5 27.19 28.73
Los Angeles 5 28.80 34.45
Los Angeles 5 34.49 41.01
Los Angeles 5 R51.24 R51.63
San Joaquin 5 23.95 26.52
San Joaquin 5 26.96 29.56
San Joaquin 5 29.65 34.26
Sacramento 5 10.66 11.05
Sacramento 5 11.90 12.33
Sacramento 5 16.00 16.52
Sacramento 5 16.62 17.79
Sacramento 5 17.84 23.78
Sacramento 5 24.18 24.82
Sacramento 5 25.32 26.69
Sacramento 5 29.71 30.13
Sacramento 5 30.18 30.44
Sacramento 5 32.54 32.94
Sacramento 5 33.72 33.98
Yolo 5 R7.02 R7.74
Yolo 5 R7.83 R9.01
Colusa 5 R6.39 R7.36
Colusa 5 R17.82 R18.0
Colusa 5 R18.57 R18.86
Glenn 5 R8.86 R9.08
Glenn 5 R9.55 R9.96
Glenn 5 R25.41 R25.70
Tehama 5 R8.85 R9.19
Tehama 5 R24.46 R25.42
Tehama 5 R25.73 R26.81
Tehama 5 R27.29 R27.46
Tehama 5 R27.46 R27.78
Tehama 5 R28.30 R30.17
Shasta 5 R0.44 R0.69
Shasta 5 R5.08 R5.82
Shasta 5 R11.94 R15.73
Shasta 5 R19.12 R21.40
Shasta 5 R21.71 R22.47
Siskiyou 5 R47.15 R47.73

Blue Star Memorial Highway Blue Star Memorial Highway

The portion of this route that is former US 99 was designated as a "North-South Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947. This route (I-5) was designated as a "North-South Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 61, Ch. 116 in 1971.

Interregional Route Interregional Route

[SHC 164.10] Entire route.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 5:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that was to become LRN 5 was first defined in 1909. In appears that in 1925, the segment from Point San Quentin to San Rafael was added.

The route was again extended in 1933 with a segment from Stockton to Mokelumne Hill. By 1935, it was codified into law as follows:

  1. Stockton to Santa Cruz via Hayward, together with a connection from Hayward to Oakland, and including that San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge approach, described in Section 1 of Chapter 9, Statues of 1993, which starts from the westerly side of Market Street in Oakland at a point between Thirty-Seventh and Fourtieth Streets.
  2. [LRN 4] near Stockton to [LRN 65] near Mokulumne Hill.

It was not a primary highway. In 1961, Chapter 1146 rerouted the highway in San Jose, changing the definition to:

  1. [LRN 56] to [LRN 68] near Story Road
  2. [LRN 68] near San Jose to [LRN 4] near Stockton via Hayward
  3. [LRN 68] near Oakland to the route described in subdivision [2] of this section near Hayward
  4. [LRN 4] near Stockton to [LRN 65] near Mokulumne Hill.

Chapter 2155 in 1963 extended the route to West Point.

The signage of this route was as follows:

  1. From LRN 56 (signed as Route 1) near Santa Cruz to LRN 68 (signed as Bypass US 101, and what is now US 101) near Story Road. This segment was originally signed as Route 17, and now is both Route 17 and I-880.
  2. From LRN 68 (signed as Bypass US 101, now US 101) near San Jose to LRN 4 (signed as US 50, now roughly I-5) near Stockton (originally near French Camp) via Hayward. This segment appears to have been signed as Route 21 between US 101 and Warm Springs; it is present-day I-680. It appears there were plans for this to be Route 17; see Route 680 for details.

    Near Warm Springs, this segment also includes a short spur from LRN 69 (present-day I-880) to LRN 5 (I-680); this is present-day Route 262.

    LRN 5 was signed as Route 9/Route 21 between Warm Springs and Irvington, near Mission San Jose. This is part of present-day I-680.

    LRN 5 then ran between the present-day Route 238/I-680 junction near Irvington to the (signed) Route 9/US 50 junction near Hayward. This is present-day Route 238.

    LRN 5 was then signed as US 50 (present-day I-580) to Stockton.

    In Stockton, LRN 5 (US 50) ran cosigned with Route 4 from Center St/El Dorado St. to Mariposa Road, where Route 4 split off as LRN 75. Portions of this are present-day I-5. LRN 5 (US 50) continued along Main St to LRN 4 (US 99), where it had a discontinuity (see part 3)

  3. LRN 68 near Oakland to the route described in (2) of this LRN's definition near Hayward. This segment was signed as US 50 between Oakland and Hayward. Parts of this are present-day I-580.
  4. LRN 4 near Stockton to LRN 65 near Mokelumne Hill. This was signed as (pre-1964) Route 8, and is current Route 26. The portion between Mokelumme Hill and West Point was added in 1963, and is more properly a modification to (post-1964) Route 26.

Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 4 Forward Arrow Route 6

© 1996-2020 Daniel P. Faigin.
Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.