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State Route 132

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

  1. Rte 132 Seg 1From Route 580 west of Vernalis to Route 99 at Modesto.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    Additional history was provided in the discussion of the temporary route adoption for the Route 132 West Freeway/Expressway project:
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.3a)

    Route 132 is an east-west corridor in Stanislaus County and the Central Valley. It provides an interregional connection between Tracy and Modesto, serves as a connecting link between major freeway routes I-580, I-5, and Route 99, and is a major truck route. Route 132 also serves as a major access route for an increasing number of Central Valley commuters traveling to work in and around Modesto, Livermore Valley, and the San Francisco Bay Area. In recognition of the regional and statewide significance of Route 132, the section of highway between I-580 and Route 99 was added to the Interregional Road System by Senate Bill 732 in October 1991. Route 132 is functionally classified as a Principal Arterial and is part of the National Highway System.

    Route 132 was adopted by the California Highway Commission (CHC) on June 20, 1956 as a freeway on new alignment (north of its existing location, just south of Kansas Avenue) starting at the San Joaquin River to Route 99. Freeway Agreements were executed with the County, which included future interchanges at North Dakota Avenue, Carpenter Road, and at Route 99. A grade separation at Emerald Avenue was also included. Between the late 1950s to late 1960s, the Department acquired most of the right of way needed for the adopted freeway corridor construction. In 1975, a Notice of Intent to Rescind the Freeway Adoption was passed by the CHC; however, in 1976, the CHC conditionally retained the Freeway Route Adoption if the Department, Stanislaus County and the City of Modesto signed a cooperative agreement to assume responsibility for hardship and protection of the right of way acquired until construction funds for the freeway construction became available; the cooperative agreement was signed March 1, 1977.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 132 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 33 at Vernalis to Mariposa, via Modesto and Coulterville. As such, this segment originally started at Route 33 (LRN 41). Its start was later moved westward to start at I-580 (LRN 5) in 1957. This was LRN 110, defined in 1933 between LRN 65 (Route 99) and LRN 41 (Route 33), extended to LRN 5 in 1957.

    The same 1934 Department of Public Works Guide that defined Route 132 also shows that Route 49 also terminated in Mariposa. In theory, as originally defined, Route 49 and Route 132 were meant to multiplex south of Coulterville on LRN 65 through the Merced River Canyon to Mariposa. However, in field signage Route 132 seems to have never multiplexed Route 49 south of Coulterville. The 1935 Goshua Highway Map of California shows Route 132 ending at Route 49 in Coulterville.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog "California State Route 132 and Signed County Route J132")

    According to one correspondant, back in the 1940s Route 132 consisted of 10 foot concrete squares, thus making the original 2 lane highway (after it was converted from a dirt road) some 20 feet wide. The small gap between the concrete squares had been filled in with a thick tar-like smooth asphalt and the same substance used to make a tapered shoulder about 18 inches out from the concrete to either ride of the road. In 1955, a major improvement began: A California Dept. of Highways crew, equipment and contractors started work in Modesto and slowly proceeded east. They placed a thick layer of modern hot asphalt over the entire old road and even a bit beyond the original shoulder, using road graders and road rollers to smooth everything with a proper rounded higher center so that water would drain off properly. This work progressed eastward at several hundred feet each day.

    The segment of this route between Route 33 and Route 99 was proposed as part of I-5W in 1947 and tentatively approved, as Route 99 was the original plan for I-5 (and N of Route 132 would have been I-5E). Route 132 would have continued the I-5W routing of what is now I-580 (LRN 110 from LRN 5). When I-5 was realigned to the Westerly Alignment, the proposal for I-5W was cut back to near Tracy (current I-580).

    Status Status

    In May 2017, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 132 on Bird Road and Vernalis Road (10-SJ-132 PM 2.2/2.6), consisting of collateral facilities. The County, by Resolution R-17-13 dated February 7, 2017 agreed to waive the 90-day notice requirement and accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $1,031,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Modesto, from 0.5 mile west of Route 5 to 0.2 mile east of Koster Road (~ SJ 2.671 to SJ 4.454), that will construct left turn lane at intersection to reduce the number and severity of collisions.

    TCRP Project #110 will construct 3.5 miles of new four-lane expressway from Route 33 to the San Joaquin county line (~ SJ 3.362 to SJ 6.94).

    In July 2017, it was reported that Caltrans is currently working on a project to improve traffic flow and safety on Route 132. The project at the intersection of Route 132 and River and Kasson roads (~ STA 1.445) includes adding traffic signals, expanding the intersection and improving left-hand turn lanes at this intersection. The project will replace stop signs with traffic signals and widen Route 132 at this location to four lanes, extending the 4-foot shoulders to 8 feet. It also will improve existing left-hand turn lanes on Route 132, making it more convenient for motorists on the highway to turn onto Kasson Road and River Road.
    (Source: Patterson Irrigator, 7/13/2017)

    Route 132 Dakota Ave to Gates Road Project (STA 4.5 - STA 11.7)

    Rte 132 Dakota Gates ProjectThis project will construct an access-controlled facility (expressway) adjacent to the existing Route 132 alignment or on new Route 132 new alignment, or a freeway/expressway on new Route 132 alignment. The project is in western Stanislaus County, 3.1 miles east of the San Joaquin River Bridge, extending from the Dakota Avenue/Kansas Avenue intersection to the Gates Road/Route 132 intersection. The project will begin at the intersection of Dakota and Kansas, then go west on Kansas and connect to Gates, or go south down Dakota and connect with the existing Route 132, and extend to Route 132 and Gates. There are two alternatives adjacent to the existing Route 132 and two alternatives adjacent to Kansas. Route 132 has experienced an increase in traffic due to the rise in commuter traffic, which transports residents from their affordable housing in the Sn Joaquin Valley to higher-paying jobs in the Bay Area. That has resulted in congestion and an increase in collisions during the peak commute period. This project is intended to connect this stretch of Route 132 to the Route 132 West Expressway Project, which will extend from Route 99 in Modesto to Dakota and is scheduled to begin construction in Spring 2019.

    This project will provide a route for improving mobility west and east through western Stanislaus County, connecting Route 99 in the City of Modesto to I-5; Provide adequate capacity for the regional movement of traffic and goods; Enhance the local road network that would accommodate local agricultural traffic; Provide consistency with existing and planned local, regional and interregional transportation planning by implementing the planned transportation concept facility. The project estimate ranges from $78 million to $143 million, depending on the alignment chosen. A range of costs is typical in the planning phases until more detailed studies can be completed and a preferred alternative is selected. Construction is scheduled to start in 2025, with the project expected to be completed in 2027.
    (Source: Route 132 Dakota Gates Project Page, 11/2018)

    Route 132 West Project (~ STA 11.403 to STA 14.643)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #2296: Widen Route 132 from Route 99 west to Dakota Avenue. $14,400,000

    TCRP Project #109 plans to build four miles of new four lane expressway in Modesto from Dakota Avenue to Route 99, and to improve the Route 99 interchange in Stanislaus County [per May 2002 CTC Agenda, item 2.1b.(2), 2.1c.(5)]. The EIR was completed in September 2002. [per Sept. 2002 CTC Agenda]. According to Compass's Modesto map, a freeway alignment paralleling Kansas Avenue is proposed west of Route 99.

    The 2005 Transportation Bill included $14.4 million to widen Route 132 from Route 99 west to Dakota Avenue.

    In March 2012, the CTC approved a revision to the project limits. The new project limits are from North Dakota Avenue to Route 99. The environmental process has identified a preferred alternative with project limits on Route 132 from 0.2 mile east of Stone Avenue to 6th Street, which is 0.8 mile longer than the current project limits. The Route 99 project limits will remain unchanged. At the same time, there were funding adjustments regarding the pools of funds that were to be used.

    Rte 132 ModestoIn June 2014, additional details were provided. The Route 132 West project proposes to improve two vital transportation corridors within Stanislaus County: existing Route 132 (Maze Boulevard) and Route 99. The two-lane conventional highway provides an interregional connection between I-5 near the City of Tracy to the west and Route 99 in Modesto to the east. Route 132 is the only east-west highway with access across the Tuolumne, San Joaquin, and Stanislaus rivers from Modesto. As such, Route 132 has increasingly served the San Joaquin Valley and has become a major truck route between I-5 and Route 99. The Project proposes to construct a four-lane freeway/expressway on a new alignment in Stanislaus County and in the City of Modesto from Route 99 just south of Kansas Avenue west to near Dakota Avenue. The project proposes to implement either of two build alternatives (Alternative 1 and Alternative 2) or a No-Build Alternative. Both build alternatives would construct a new four-lane freeway/expressway from Dakota Avenue on the west end of the project to east of Route 99 at the Needham Street Overcrossing Bridge on the east end of the project. The major differences between Alternative 1 and Alternative 2 would involve the construction of a southbound Route 99 Needham Street off-ramp (Alternative 1) compared to the reconstruction of a southbound Route 99 Kansas Avenue off-ramp (Alternative 2). Under a No-Build Alternative, existing Route 132 (Maze Boulevard) would remain a two-lane, conventional highway. Route 132 West improvements include providing freeway-to-freeway branch connections from and to Route 99 and a portion of the ultimate freeway corridor west of Route 99, as well as a proposed direct connection from Route 132 to Needham Street, connecting to downtown Modesto. The Needham Street connection requires a new public road connection approval by the California Transportation Commission. In addition to the primary project elements, construction of the project proposes to encapsulate approximately l60,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil near the Route 132/Route 99 interchange. The soil was generated during excavation of industrial property that was purchased to construct the Modesto bypass during the 1960s. Contaminants in the soil include barium, strontium, and lead. The contaminated soil is within three soil stockpiles that exist in Caltrans right-of- way south of Kansas Avenue and within the proposed location for the project.

    The project would consist of two construction phases: the initial construction phase and the ultimate build-out. The initial construction phase is anticipated to begin in 2016 and to be completed within 12 to 15 months. The ultimate build-out is expected to be complete by 2028. The initial construction phase would do the following:

    • Construct general purpose lanes from Dakota Avenue to Route 99
    • Construct the Route 132 and North Carpenter Road interchange (to include the eastbound Route 132 off-ramp and the westbound Route 132 on-ramp)
    • Construct the Route 132 West/Sixth Street and Route 132/Fifth Street extensions
    • Construct various other improvements
    • Encapsulate the soil stockpiles, as described in a Remedial Action Plan

    The anticipated cost of the project is $140 million to $170 million. A combination of federal, state, and local funds has been secured for the initial construction phase.
    (Source: Route 132 Project Page)

    In June 2017, the CTC was informed that the City of Modesto has an estimated savings of $11,392,000 in TCRP construction funds that the City of Modesto will be unable to utilize on TCRP Project 109 - Route 132 Expressway, Phase 1 by the June 30, 2017 deadline. It requested transfer of those savings to TCRP Project 113 - Route 46 Expressway, Segment 4A, which was approved.

    In July 2017, it was reported that Stanislaus County Board of Supervisors was expected to give its support to rebuilding the Route 99 SB off-ramp at Kansas Avenue as part of the Route 132 Expressway project, which will serve as a new, roughly 4-mile route for Route 132 from Dakota Avenue in west Modesto to Needham Street near downtown. Supervisors are being asked to recommend to the California Department of Transportation that the Kansas off-ramp be rebuilt as part of the project. The alternative is to build a southbound Route 99 off-ramp at Needham Street. But a staff report says rebuilding the Kansas off-ramp has the support of Caltrans, Modesto, the county and the Stanislaus Council of Governments, a regional transportation planning agency. Building the Needham off-ramp would entail closing the Kansas on- and off-ramps, which would harm nearby businesses; whereas rebuilding the Kansas off-ramp will not require any of the businesses to move. construction on the expressway should start in spring 2019, with its opening in late 2020. The expressway is phase one of the project to realign a portion of Route 132 and get it off Maze Boulevard. Phase two would turn the two-lane expressway into a four-lane highway at an estimated cost of $132 million. Phase one is being paid for by local, state and federal funding. Phase one suffered a recent hit when the California Transportation Commission took about $11 million in construction funding away, but local officials were able to get more than $3 million of that back. Local officials will work to get the roughly $8 million from the state or federal government. Phase one also could look to Measure L — the transportation sales tax voters approved in November — for all or part of the roughly $8 million.
    (Source: Modesto Bee, 7/17/2017)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $3.500M for PPNO 0944M, Rt 132 Expressway, Phase 1 for the San Joaquin County share. In the Stanislaus County share, the allocation was adjusted from $28.055M to $40.419M, and the project was delayed to FY19-20 for construction. During the March 2018 meeting, there were also a number of protest letters about the Route 132 expressway, protesting the capping and construction over the toxic stockpiles under the proposed routing.

    In April 2018, it was reported that the initial phase of the Route 132 freeway project in Modesto, extending west from Route 99 north of the present Route 99/Route 108/Route 132 interchange, got FHWA approval (a FONSI) and is slated to break ground in a bit over a year. Interestingly,this project uses much of the grading done when Route 132 was originally planned and when Route 99 was constructed through Modesto in the early '60's. Prior to the 1957 relocation of I-5 to the Westside/LRN 238 freeway, where it resides today, this interchange would have functioned as the southern split between I-5E and I-5W, with the latter branch turning west parallel to existing Route 132. The plans for the new freeway (which will be constructed further west as an expressway in phase 2) are interesting in that they call for an extension of the new freeway east across the UP tracks to Needham Street north of downtown Modesto -- but it appears that Route 132 will not actually merge with the main Route 99 carriageways but parallel them on the outside and merge with the existing N-S couplet flanking the existing freeway and forming the present access from Route 99 to Route 108/Route 132. Since the project includes revising much of Route 99 in the area, one wonders if that includes raising or rebuilding the lower-than-standard overcrossings (a common thing for CA freeways designed and built in the late '50's and early '60's), some of which are well below 15' clearance.
    (Source: Sparker at AARoads, 4/2/2018)

    In May 2018, the CTC received and accepted the environmental report for, and approved for future consideration of funding, the following project: Route 132 and Route 99 in Stanislaus County. Construct a new four-lane freeway along an adopted route from near Dakota Avenue to Route 99 in the city of Modesto. (PPNO 0944M) (10-Sta-132, PM 11.0/15.0, 10-Sta-99, PM 15.7/17.5). This project is located on Route 132 in the city of Modesto in Stanislaus County. The project proposes to construct a four lane freeway/expressway. Improvements to the Route 132/Route 99 interchange are also included in the proposed project. The purpose and need of the proposed project are to improve regional and interregional circulation within Modesto and Stanislaus Counties. The proposed project would also relieve traffic congestion along Route 132. The proposed project is estimated to cost $214.0 million over two phases. The project is not fully funded and is currently programmed for $46.4 million in the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), Federal and Local programs. The project is estimated to begin construction in 2019. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 STIP.
    (Source: CTC Minutes, May 2018 Agenda Item 2.2c(12))

    In August 2018, Sparker noted on AAroads: The Route 99/Route 132 trumpet interchange was laid out and planned in the mid-50's to serve as the southern "split" point for I-5, originally slated to follow US 99 in the San Joaquin Valley, into I-5W, which would follow Route 132 over to Route 33 and then take a new-terrain route to near Altamont, at which point it would follow US 50 into Oakland; and I-5E (i.e., what became I-580), simply following US 99 north through Stockton and Sacramento. Although the switch to the Westside alignment had been done by 1958, the basic plans for the interchange weren't changed -- but only the preliminary grading was done; no structures were built, and the corridor was only cleared for about a mile west of Route 99. Currently the route has, after 53 years of existence as a partially cleared corridor, been budgeted for construction; it'll be a 4-lane Route 132 facility immediately west of Route 99 but shrinking to a 2-lane undivided expressway after that. It's the only limited-access state highway project in the area since the Turlock bypass was opened in 1973. Instead of freeways, both state and local jurisdictions have concentrated on developing a series of arterials serving the ever-expanding housing area north and east of central Modesto; projects concerning Route 108 (the effective "spine" of the housing expansion) are part & parcel of that regional effort.

    In October 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) has been completed: Route 132 in Stanislaus County (10-Sta-132, PM 11.0/15.0, 10-Sta-99, PM 15.7/17.5). Construct a new four lane expressway on an adopted route in the city of Modesto. (PPNO 3125) This project is located on Route 132 in the city of Modesto in Stanislaus County. The project proposes to construct a four-lane freeway/expressway south of Kansas Avenue from Dakota Avenue to east of Route 99 at the Needham Street Bridge Overcrossing. This project proposes connection improvements along Route 99 and a direct-connector flyover ramp from northbound Route 99 to westbound Route 132. The proposed project addresses the need to improve regional and interregional circulation, relieve traffic congestion along the existing Route 132 and enhance existing and proposed transportation network. Also included in the proposed project is the need for remediation of three hazardous soil stockpiles. The proposed project is estimated to cost $5.1million and is currently programmed in the 2018 State Highway Operations and Protection Program (SHOPP) for approximately $5.1 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in 2020. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
    (October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.2c(13))

    Rte 132 Temp Route AdoptionIn June 2019, the CTC approved a temporary route adoption of North Dakota Avenue (10-STA-132 PM T11.4/T11.9) as a conventional highway, to connect existing Route 132 along Maze Boulevard to the proposed Route 132 new alignment east of North Dakota Avenue, 0.5 mile north of existing Route 132 alignment. Caltrans noted in the request that realignment of Route 132 is part of the overall Route 132 West Freeway/Expressway project needed to improve regional and interregional circulation, relieve traffic congestion along existing Route 132 (Maze Boulevard), and enhance operations for the existing and proposed transportation network. The Department approved the Final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Assessment (FEIR/EA) on March 2, 2018, and the Project Report on March 9, 2018. The Commission approved the FEIR/EA on May 16, 2018 by Resolution E-18-56. The temporary route adoption is part of the overall Route 132 West Freeway/Expressway project, which will be constructed in two phases. Phase 1 of this project will consist of the construction of a new Route 132 alignment just south and parallel to Kansas Avenue, west of North Dakota Avenue to the Needham Street Overpass, east of Route 99. The new alignment will include three new grade separations. Initially, Route 132 will be constructed as one lane on each direction. Phase 1 will also include the construction of a new public road connection from the Needham Street and Kansas Avenue Extension intersection to Route 132. Connections to existing Route 132 east of Route 99 will be provided via a pair of Route 132 eastbound and westbound couplet roadways alongside Route 99 (approximately 0.5 mile long). Phase 1 construction is expected to be complete by 2021. Phase 2 will be constructed in the future and will consist of widening Route 132 to two lanes in each direction, improving connectivity between Route 99 and Route 132, and associated improvements to Route 99.

    Within the proposed temporary route adoption limits, North Dakota Avenue is currently a two-lane undivided county road. It traverses flat terrain adjacent to a nut processing facility and a small community of residential properties. The adoption limits will connect the new Route 132 West Freeway/Expressway at the north end to the existing Route 132 conventional highway at the south end. A future project is currently in development to evaluate build alternatives along the Route 132 adopted corridor, in the westerly direction, from North Dakota Avenue to Gates Road near the San Joaquin River. The proposed temporary Route 132 will generally consist of two 12-foot lanes, a two-way-median-left-turn lane, and 8-foot paved shoulders. There are 12-foot right and left turn lanes into the nut processing facility. The speed limit is 45 mph.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.3a)

    Additionally, in June 2019, the CTC authorized a new public road connection at Needham Street and Kansas Avenue Extension intersection to Route 132 in the city of Modesto. The City of Modesto, in cooperation with Stanislaus County, Stanislaus Council of Governments (StanCOG) and the Department, proposes to construct a new public road connection (NPRC) to Route 132 freeway at the modified Needham Street and Kansas Avenue Extension intersection. The connection will provide direct access to the City of Modesto east of Route 99 via the existing Needham Street Overpass (OP) across the Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR), as well as connecting the business and residential areas via the new Kansas Avenue Extension. The proposed NPRC is expected to reduce traffic congestion in downtown City of Modesto by utilizing the only existing grade separated UPRR crossing on Needham Street, east of Route 99.

    Route 132 was adopted by the California Highway Commission (CHC) on June 20, 1956 as a freeway on new alignment starting at the San Joaquin River to Route 99. Freeway Agreements were executed with the County, which included future interchanges at North Dakota Avenue, Carpenter Road, and at Route 99. A grade separation at Emerald Avenue was also included. Between the late 1950s to late 1960s, several right of way parcels were acquired along the adopted freeway corridor west and east of Route 99. In 1975, a Notice of Intent to Rescind the Freeway Adoption was passed by the CHC; however, in 1976, the CHC conditionally retained the Freeway Route Adoption if the Department, Stanislaus County and the City of Modesto signed a cooperative agreement to assume responsibility for hardship and protection of the right of way acquired until construction funds for the freeway construction became available. The cooperative agreement was signed March 1, 1977.

    Two Project Study Reports were developed in 1991 and 1993. In 1998, the Department approved a Revised Project Study Report including interchange alternatives east of Route 99. In 2001, Needham Street OP was built with the intent to connect to the future Route 132 freeway. In February 2003, a Value Analysis was completed validating the baseline design features, including the Needham Street connection to Route 132, east of Route 99. The proposed new public road connection (NPRC) is part of the overall Route 132 West Freeway/Expressway project, which will be constructed in two phases. Phase 1 of this project will consist of the construction of a new Route 132 alignment just south and parallel to Kansas Avenue, west of North Dakota Avenue to the Needham Street OP. The new alignment will include three new grade separations. Initially, Route 132 will be constructed as one lane on each direction. Phase 1 will also include: removal of existing Route 99 northbound ramp connections to Kansas Avenue, just north of the proposed NPRC, and the construction of the NPRC ramps at Needham Street and Kansas Avenue Extension. Connections to existing Route 132 east of Route 99 will be provided via a pair of Route 132 eastbound and westbound couplet roadways alongside Route 99 (approximately 0.5 mile long). Phase 1 construction is expected to be complete by 2021.

    A NPRC is needed to support the regional circulation plan by minimizing vehicle miles travelled and increasing utilization of the grade separated Needham Street OP, access route to downtown City of Modesto. Based on traffic studies, truck traffic will mostly utilize the Route 132 couplets along Route 99. The Final Traffic Operations Analysis Report for the Route 132 West Freeway/Expressway Project (July 2012) estimated 2000 vehicles per day will utilize the NPRC to exit Route 132, while 1500 will use it to access Route 132. The new connection will provide direct access to the eastern side of the City of Modesto resulting in a reduction of congestion and travel time to downtown Modesto and grid roadways; a reduction of 3,500 vehicle miles traveled daily is expected. The NPRC will make the use of the overpass much more accessible.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.3b)

    In June 2019, the CTC approved an allocation of $64,919,000 for the locally-administered Multi-Funded Trade Corridor Enhancement Program (TCEP)/State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) Route 132 Expressway, Phase 1 project (PPNO 0994M, ProjID 1000000424) (10-STA-132 R10.5 11.2/R14.8) Route 132 In Modesto, on Route 132 from 0.2 mile east of Stone Avenue to 6th Street, and on Route 99 from I Street to Woodland Avenue. Construct 2-lane expressway and improve Route 132/Route 99 interchange.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5s.(11))

    In September 2019, it was reported that the Modesto City Council has approved a $92 million contract, paid for from gas tax revenues, along with county, state and federal monies, to begin construction in Fall 2019. Bay Cities Paving and Grading will build nearly 4 miles of new road just north of downtown Modesto. Construction is expected to begin in November, with the new Route 132 due to open in February 2022. After phase one is completed, plans call for expanding Route 132 toward Tracy, all the way to I-5 and I-580. The first phase only will be an expressway with traffic signals or traffic circles at either end. All construction will be east of Hart Road, no help to sections of Route 132 with the worst congestion. The expressway will be upgraded to freeway in a future phase. The key intersections will be Maze Blvd at Dakota Road, Kansas Avenue at Dakota Road, and at the intersection of Route 132/northbound Route 99 off-ramp/Franklin-Kansas Avenue/Needham Avenue, where four different arterials will intersect at one traffic signal. Carpenter Road is the main arterial for the west side of Modesto. Westbound Route 132 will have an overpass of Carpenter Road, but no exit ramp.
    (Source: KRCA 3, 9/26/2019; Modesto Bee, 10/14/2019)

    In March 2020, it was reported that there are concerns about the soil being removed for the Route 132 / Route 99 projects. The issue is the disposal plan for tons of dirt contaminated with toxic barium, the dirt coming from the former FMC chemical plant, which was situated north of Kansas Avenue near Route 99. Crews are removing 400,000 cubic yards of dirt to create a sunken expressway on the new route, which was acquired by the state more than 60 years ago. The two lanes and a median will pass under Carpenter Road and Rosemore Avenue. The contractor will soon provide a bypass route for traffic while the Carpenter Road bridge is constructed. Rosemore will be closed for bridge construction. When asked about dust control, the city said a certain amount of dust and haze are natural for the Northern San Joaquin Valley due to agriculture and windy conditions. City spokesman Thomas Reeves said water is being sprayed at the construction sites to prevent dust clouds. The excavation and containment project for the three mounds of barium-tainted soil is proceeding with a strict regimen of dust control and monitoring to keep people from being exposed to toxins, the city said. Barium is a dangerous heavy metal that can affect the lungs, heart and other organs. The state has said the concentrations of barium, strontium and lead in the soil are too low to cause cancer and other health problems. Crews are moving a stockpile of contaminated dirt on the east side of Route 99, near the south end of Franklin Street. The dirt trucked from that berm is placed over two mounds in the expressway route on either side of Emerald Avenue. The berm west of Emerald is about 900 feet long. The tainted soil will be encapsulated in concrete behind retaining walls and bridge abutments along the expressway or underneath the pavement. The tainted dirt placed in “non-traveled” areas will be covered by native soil, the city said. For years, local residents and critics of the remediation plan had hoped the contaminated berms would be hauled away from Modesto. That would cost an estimated $20 million. The contaminated soil operation is monitored by closed-circuit cameras watched by Caltrans and the state Department of Toxic Substances Control. “Material handling protocols are in place to ensure that all personnel working on the project and the surrounding community are protected from exposure,” the city said. Workers at the stockpiles are wearing personal protection badges that detect exposure to barium. Truck beds carrying the tainted dirt are covered at all times. Decontamination measures are used to make sure barium is not spread outside the construction zone. Those procedures include wiping down equipment, tires and workers’ shoes. In addition, an independent consultant is monitoring the work at the stockpiles. So far, no barium has been detected above the safe levels established by the state, the city said.
    (Source: Modesto Bee, 3/3/2020)

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, has three programmed items on this project:
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    PPNO
    Project
    Prior
    20-21
    21-22
    22-23
    23-24
    24-25
    0944M (Modesto) Rt 132 2-lane exprsswy, N. Dakota Av-Rt 99 (Ph1)(TCEP) 40,419K 0 0 0 0
    0944M (Caltrans) 2-lane expressway, N.Dakota Av-Rt 99 (Ph 1)(incr at 6-19 vote) 1,509K 0 0 0 0 0
    0944A (Modesto) Rt 132 4-lane exprsswy, Dakota Av-Needham St, Ph2 0 0 0 3,841K 0 482K

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.6] Entire portion.


  2. Rte 132 Seg 2From Route 99 to Route 49.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    Note that Route 132 seemingly continues E of Route 49 as County Sign Route J132 (really, County Sign Route J20) to Route 120.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route [LRN 110] from "Fresno-Tracy West Side Highway to the Sonora-Mariposa Road via Modesto" as a state highway. In 1934, Route 132 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 33 (later I-580) at Vernalis to Mariposa, via Modesto and Coulterville. In 1935, LRN 110 was codified into the highway system as:[LRN 41] (Route 33) to [LRN 65] (Route 49) via Modesto.

    Additional information on the history of Route 132 may be found in Tom Fearer's Gribblenation Blog Blog entry: California State Route 132 from the Old Basso Bridge east to CA 49.

    Status Status

    In October 2018, it was reported that the CTC approved SB1 funding for a project to rehabilitate the Snake Ravine Bridge (STA 046.82, Bridge 38-0062) on Route 132 in town of La Grange. The original bridge was built in 1918.
    (Source: Sierra Sun Times, October 2018)

    Naming Naming

    Modesto Police Officer Leo Volk, Jr., and Modesto Police Sergeant Steve May Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 132 from 6th Street (approx. STA-099-14.77) to Garner Road and Claus Road (STA 19.010) in the City of Modesto in Stanislaus County is named the "Modesto Police Officer Leo Volk, Jr., and Modesto Police Sergeant Steve May Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Modesto Police Officers Leo Volk Jr and Steve May. On the morning of May 21, 1973, Officer Leo Volk, Jr., a three-year veteran of the Modesto Police Department, began pursuing a fugitive vehicle and, during the pursuit, became victim to a serious collision that left him pinned for 40 minutes before rescue crews could reach him. Officer Volk died from his injuries at 7:30 a.m. on May 21, 1973, leaving behind his wife and toddler son. Unfortunately, this meant that Officer Volk gained the unfortunate distinction of being the first officer to die in the line of duty in the history of the Modesto Police Department. It also memorializes Sergeant Steve May. On the morning of July 29, 2002, a suspect fled from police and initiated a vehicle pursuit in which the suspect sped recklessly through a residential neighborhood, running multiple stop signs at a high rate of speed, and eventually ramming the patrol car of Sergeant Steve May. Sergeant May sustained major injuries, including a fractured skull and fractures to his face, jaw, clavicle, right forearm, and left leg. On July 23, 2009, Sergeant May died from complications resulting from the injuries he sustained in the 2002 collision, leaving behind his wife of 30 years and his two grown children, as well as his parents and sister. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 46, 8/31/2017, Res. Chapter 136, Statutes of 2017
    (Image source: Modesto Bee, Stanislaus County Officers Memorial Page)

    Deputy Sheriff Dennis (Randall) Wallace Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 132 from Root Road (STA 20.645) to McEwen Road (STA 25.167) in the County of Stanislaus as the "Deputy Sheriff Dennis Randall Wallace Memorial Highway" (signed as "Deputy Sheriff Dennis Wallace Memorial Highway"). Stanislaus County Deputy Sheriff Dennis Randall Wallace was born in May 1963, in Ceres. He was raised in Modesto. He attended Thomas Downey High School. After high school, Deputy Sheriff Wallace went to work for Gallo Winery in the security department. In 1995, Deputy Sheriff Wallace enrolled in the night academy at the Ray Simon Criminal Justice Center. After graduating in 1996, he was hired by the City of Hughson as a police officer. The next year, he was hired by the Stanislaus County Sheriff’s Department, where he spent the next 20 years. As a deputy, Deputy Sheriff Wallace worked in numerous assignments, including the Patrol, Community Deputy Program, Youth Services, and as a Bailiff. He enjoyed all aspects of his job, but the areas he enjoyed the most were in Youth Services as a School Resource Officer/DARE Instructor and as a Community Program Deputy for the City of Hughson. He got involved with children as a Youth Services Deputy. Deputy Sheriff Wallace was also a natural as a Community Deputy. He loved Hughson. He loved all the community programs, especially the ones for the kids, such as Trunk or Treat. He was often seen at the high school using his position more as a mentor or counselor than as an officer. He often used enforcement stops as opportunities to counsel people on the laws and various codes. Numerous people stated that they got stopped by Deputy Sheriff Wallace and were warned and simply educated about their habits or misdeeds. Deputy Sheriff Wallace also took money from his own pocket, and bought bike helmets and teddy bears that he kept in his trunk. He would hand them out to kids in the community when they were needed. Deputy Sheriff Wallace’s favorite time of year was Christmas. He just loved the giving aspect of it. He loved helping put together and then delivering Christmas baskets and gifts to the shut-ins and the less fortunate in the Hughson area. Deputy Sheriff Wallace was given several recognitions during his career. Two that stand out involved occasions where a life was saved. In one instance, he and two other men observed a suicidal man on the railroad tracks and in the path of a train in Hughson. Deputy Sheriff Wallace was able to talk to the man to the point where he stepped away from the tracks. He was then grabbed by Deputy Sheriff Wallace and the others to keep him from taking his own life. The other incident involved Deputy Sheriff Wallace giving a small baby cardiopulmonary resuscitation and resuscitating her. Her mother later stated that if it were not for Deputy Sheriff Wallace, her daughter would not be alive today. In July 2013, Dennis graduated college and obtained his bachelor’s degree. Deputy Sheriff Wallace spent his adult life warning and encouraging kids about the importance of getting their education. Away from work, Deputy Sheriff Wallace spent 26 years as a high school football official, 16 of those as a referee. He retired in June 2016. Deputy Sheriff Wallace also spent a few years officiating high school soccer. In both sports, it again gave him the opportunity to pour into the lives of youths. Deputy Sheriff Wallace was also very involved in the 4-H and FFA programs. Deputy Sheriff Wallace’s death is very tragic, but not because of how it happened. His death is tragic because it was senseless, and it took from the community someone who truly cared. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 181, Res. Chapter 147, 8/17/2018.
    (Image source: Law Enforcement Appreciation Day FB Page; KCRA 3)

    United States Secret Service Special Agents Donald W. Robinson, Donald A. Bejcek, and George P. LaBargeOn March 5, 1983, United States Secret Service Special Agents Donald W. Robinson, Donald A. Bejcek, and George P. LaBarge were on official business while traveling in a vehicle from Merced, California, to Yosemite National Park. These special agents were en route to their assignment to protect the life of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom during her official visit to Yosemite Valley. Tragically all three of these special agents perished on that date in a vehicle accident while traveling on Route 132. In 2014, the California Legislature authorized the placement of a memorial plaque on Route 132 at the site of the March 5, 1983, accident, which shall be located between highway marker 300, located west of the Jalapa Road eastbound lane, and highway marker 371 at the county line with Mariposa/Tuolumne eastbound lane (somewhere between ~ MPA 3.00 to MPA 3.71). Authorized by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 98, Res. Chapter 38, 5/30/14.
    (Image source: Officer Down Memorial Page (Robinson), Officer Down Memorial Page (Bejcek), Officer Down Memorial Page (LaBarge))

    Historical Route Historical Route

    The portion of this segment between the Stanislaus county line near La Grange and Route 49 has been designated as the "Historic Yosemite Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 27, Chapter 69, in 1989.


Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was signed as part of the original signage of state routes in 1934. It was LRN 110 between I-580 (also LRN 110) and Route 49 (LRN 65). The original routing continued along present-day Route 49 to Mariposa; this was LRN 65. This seems to imply that the portion between Coulterville and Mariposa was cosigned as Route 49 and Route 132.

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.6] From Route 99 to Route 65. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Interregional Route Interregional Route

[SHC 164.16] West of Route 99, and between Route 99 and Route 108.

Note: The segment between Route 99 and Route 108 was added by SB 532 (Chapter 189, 10/11/2009)

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 132:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route "Tulare-Lindsay Road near Tulare to Orange Cove" as part of the highway system. In 1935, this was codified in the highway code as LRN 132, with the definition:

"[LRN 134] near Tulare to Orange Cove"

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. This was/is Route 63.


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 131 Forward Arrow Route 133

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Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.