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State Route 299

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

  1. Rte 299 Seg 1From Route 101 near Arcata to Route 395 at Alturas.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment was actually two segments: “(a) Route 101 near Arcata to Route 5 at Redding via Weaverville. (b) Route 5 at Redding to Route 395 at Alturas.”

    In 1998, Chapter 828 combined segments (a) and (b), giving “(a) Route 101 near Arcata to Route 395 at Alturas.” This eliminated the discontinuity in Redding, which arose due to a short multiplex with Route 273 in downtown Redding. At the northerly (now southerly) junction of Route 299 (Eureka Way) and Route 273 (Market Street), Route 299 eastbound went south on Route 273 for about two blocks, then made a left turn towards Tehama Street east to the Route 299 freeway headed towards I-5; Route 299 westbound from I-5 merged into Shasta Street, then made the right turn on Market (Route 273) and then the left to Eureka Way. Note that this short multiplex was not of equal distances westbound and eastbound.

    Between Adin and Canby, this route is cosigned with Route 139, although it is legislatively Route 299.

    In 2002, a highway location routing was adopted along Lake Boulevard from Route 273 to I-5. This segment of Route 273 from Route 299 at Market Street to Route 273 at Lake Boulevard will be cosigned Route 273/Route 299. The former Route 299 segment from Route 299 at Market Street to I-5 will be designated as Route 44.

    The connecting segment of US 395 between the end of this segment and the start of the next segment is cosigned as US 395/US 299, although it is legislatively US 395.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield This segment was originally signed as Route 44. In 1935, it was re-signed as US 299.

    The segment of Route 299 between US 101 and Redding was LRN 20. The portion between US 101 and Weaverville was defined in 1915; the remainder of the route to I-5 in Redding was defined in 1909. The segment of Route 299 between Redding and US 395 was LRN 28. The portion between Redding and Alturas was defined in 1909; the remainder was defined in 1915.

    The original routing of US 299 from Arcata east through Blue Lake used the following alignment:
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog on Rte 299, 11/2018)

    • From US 101 in Arcata; West End Road to a crossing of the Mad River to a junction with unsigned LRN 85 (modern CA 200).
    • Glendale Drive through Essex into Blue Lake.
    • Blue Lake Boulevard east through Blue Lake to the modern expressway grade roughly located at the confluence of the North Fork Mad River and Bald Mountain Creek.

    The modern Route 299 alignment uses a freeway grade over the Mad River where it meets a junction with Route 200 where it drops to a two-lane configuration east of Blue Lake. The new alignment of Route 299 first appeared as a proposed route east of Blue Lake on the 1969 State Highway Map. The modern freeway bypass of Blue Lake on Route 299 appears by the 1975 Edition of the State Highway Map.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog on Rte 299, 11/2018)

    Status Status

    General Segment Information

    This is constructed to freeway standards from Route 101 to E of Blue Lake, and from Route 5 to the Old Oregon Trail.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route: High Priority Project #2080: Reduce congestion and boost economies through safer access to the coast by realigning Route 299 between Trinity and Shasta Counties. $5,600,000.

    Arcata to Willow Creek (Route 96)

    In August 2012, the CTC approved SHOPP funding of $3,603,000 on Route 299 in Humbolt Cty PM HUM 0.0/43.0 near Arcata, from Route 299/US 101 Separation to South Fork Trinity River Bridge. Outcome/Output: Install new metal beam guard railing to reduce the number and severity of the run-off-road collisions and to comply with the recommendations of the Traffic Investigations Report.

    In October 2019, the CTC approved the following pre-construction allocation: 01-Hum-299 R1.5/R2.0. PPNO 2430 Proj ID 0116000018 EA 0F530. Route 299 Near Arcata, from 1.5 miles east to 2.0 miles east of Route 101 at the Route 200/Route 299 Separation No. 04-0184. Establish standard vertical clearance. PS&E $857,000 (Programmed) $1,010,000 (Allocated) R/W Sup $26,000
    (Source: October 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2b) #2)

    In August 2019, the CTC approved the following emergency G-11 allocation: 01-Hum-299 R8.5/R9.0. PPNO 2531 Proj ID 0119000104 EA 0J800. On Route 299 Near Blue Lake, from 1.4 to 1.9 miles east of Blue Lake Boulevard. Following a series of heavy rain beginning in January 2019, a portion of the roadway began to settle. Department staff monitored the settlement and placed asphalt in the sunken section of roadway. On April 19, 2019, the Department determined the settlement was beyond its abilities and an emergency contract is required. This project will reconstruct and restore the roadway alignment and profile while ongoing geotechnical investigations continue. $4,500,000 : $1.500K Con Eng; $3,000K Const.
    (Source: August 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5f.(1) #4)

    Blue Lake Widening (01-Hum-299 R14.7/R15.7)

    In January 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Humboldt County that will construct eight-foot wide shoulders and close a 1,100-foot gap in the climbing lane segments on a portion of Route 299 near the community of Blue Lake. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $4,645,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14.

    In June 2017, the CTC added the following to the SHOPP: 01-Hum-299 R14.7/R15.7 On Route 299: Near Blue Lake, from 2.2 miles east of Simpson Road to 3.2 miles east of Simpson Road. Widen shoulders, and install rumble strips and guardrailing. $0 (R/W) $1,386,000 (C) PA&ED: 09/01/2018 R/W: 07/01/2019 RTL: 07/01/2019 BC: 12/01/2019

    In May 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP Amendment: 01-Hum-299 R14.7/R15.7. PPNO 2435. ProjID 0116000045. Route 299 Near Blue Lake, from 2.2 miles east of Simpson Road to 3.2 miles east of Simpson Road. Widen shoulders, and install rumble strips and guardrailing. Amend Const Capital from $1,386K to $1,584K. Increase in construction capital is due to the addition of a maintenance vehicle pullout area to improve worker safety.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Amendment item #5)

    In October 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP Safety Allocation: 01-Hum-299 R14.7/R15.7 PPNO 2435 Proj ID 0116000045 EA 0F690. On Route 299 Near Blue Lake, from 2.2 miles east to 3.2 miles east of Simpson Road. Outcome/Output: Improve safety by widening shoulders, installing rumble strips and high visibility striping, and upgrading guardrails. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions. $1,944,000
    (Source: October 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5f.(3) #1)

    In December 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Humboldt County to repair and stabilize two segments of Route 299 near Blue Lake (01-HUM-299, PM 20.2/20.5); including realigning lanes, installing underdrains and constructing two tieback walls. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $21,069,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 SHOPP. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources and hydrology/water quality to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to hydrology/water quality and biological resources in the project area will be mitigated through restoration of existing wetlands and riparian areas to pre-project conditions. On-site revegetation planting will be provided to replace trees and shrubs removed during project construction.

    Cedar Creek Widening (01-Hum-299 20.5/30.2)

    Rte 299 Cedar Creek/Willow Creek RepairsIn December 2018, it was reported that the CTC allocated $885,000 of support costs for the advancement of a project on Route 299 in Humboldt County near Willow Creek from 1.5 miles east of East Blair Road to 0.4 miles west of Cedar Creek Road. The proposed project would widen shoulders. The CTC minutes showed the following for this: 01-Hum-299 20.5/30.2 PPNO 2427. Project No. 0116000010 Route 299 Near Willow Creek, from 1.5 mile east of East Bair Road to 0.4 mile west of Cedar Creek Road, at various locations. Widen shoulders.
    (Source: Redheaded Blackbelt, 12/11/2018; December 2018 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b(2a), Item 2)

    In June 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP scope amendment: 01-Hum-299 20.5/30.2 PPNO 2427 ProjID 0116000010. Route 299 Near Willow Creek, from 1.5 mile east of East Bair Road to 0.4 mile west of Cedar Creek Road, at various locations. Widen shoulders. Increase in construction capital and support is due to additional quantities and higher unit prices identified after more detailed site evaluations and design calculations. Reduction in R/W capital is due to the elimination of property acquisitions. Updated total cost: $10,950K
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Scope Item 5)

    In August 2020, the CTC received notice of the following delegated allocation: $10,343,000. 01-Hum-299 20.5/30.2. PPNO 01-2427 ProjID 0116000010 EA 0F460. Route 299 Near Blue Lake, from 1.5 mile east of East Bair Road to 0.4 mile west of Cedar Creek Road, at four locations. Outcome/Output: Improve safety by widening shoulders, upgrading guardrails, constructing rumble strips and retaining walls, overlaying existing roadway, and adding high visibility striping. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions.
    (Source: August 2020 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5f.(3) #1)

    Willow Creek Repair (~ 01-Hum-299 30.7/37.7)

    In May 2017, the CTC authorized $2.1M in emergency SHOPP funding on Route 299 near Willow Creek, at 0.1 mile north of Cedar Creek Road (01-Hum-299 30.6). Beginning on January 7, 2017 to February 6, 2017, a series of storm events reactivated a previously stabilized slide beyond Department forces ability to control, damaging the roadway. The project will remove slide debris, stabilize slope, install rock slope protection (RSP), and repair roadway. As per geotechnical recommendation, this slide is still active and intervention is imperative to curtail acceleration of slide movement. This work is necessary to prevent further slope failure and roadway damage, and restore safe passage to the traveling public

    In June 2017, the CTC added the following to the SHOPP: 01-Hum-299 30.7/37.7 On Route 299: Near Willow Creek, from 0.1 mile east of Cedar Creek Road to 1.1 miles west of Route 96. Widen shoulders, place high-friction surface treatment (HFST), install rumble strips, guardrail, and cable net drapery. $19,000 (R/W) $11,388,000 (C) PA&ED: 07/01/2018 R/W: 07/01/2019 RTL: 08/01/2019 BC: 01/01/2020

    In May 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP Preliminary Phase allocation: Item 2. 01-Hum-299 30.7/37.7 Route 299 Near Willow Creek, from 0.1 mile east of Cedar Creek Road to 1.1 miles west of Route 96. Widen shoulders, place High Friction Surface Treatment (HFST), install rumble strips, guardrail, and cable net drapery. PPNO 2426. ProjID 0116000011. PS&E $1,668,000 R/W Sup $45,000
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) Item 2)

    In June 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP amendment: 01-Hum-299 30.7/33.4 PPNO 2522 ProjID 0119000025. Route 299 Near Willow Creek, from 0.1 mile east of Cedar Creek Road to 0.2 mile east of East Fork Willow Creek Bridge. Widen shoulders and improve curves at three locations. PA&ED $2,050K PS&E $2,839K R/W Sup $198K Con Sup $6,599K R/W Cap $89K Const Cap $27,989K Total $39,764K Begin const. 10/2022.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) CR Item 22)

    In June 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP support phase allocation: $2,050,000 01-HUM-299 30.7/33.4 PPNO 2522 ProjID 0119000025. Route 299 Near Willow Creek, from 0.1 mile east of Cedar Creek Road to 0.2 mile east of East Fork Willow Creek Bridge. Widen shoulders and improve curves at three locations. PA&ED $2,050,000. (Concurrent amendment under SHOPP Amendment 18H-010.)
    (Source June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) Item 4)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Collision Reduction item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 01-Humboldt-299 PM 30.7/33.4 PPNO 2522 Proj ID 0119000025 EA 0J410. Route 299 near Willow Creek, from 0.1 mile east of Cedar Creek Road to 0.2 mile east of East Fork Willow Creek Bridge. Widen shoulders and improve curves at three locations. Programmed in FY21-22, with construction scheduled to start in October 2022. Total project cost is $39,764K, with $28,078K being capital (const and right of way) and $11,686K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.),
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In August 2020, the CTC amended the SHOPP for this project as follows: 01-Hum-299 PM 30.7/37.7. PPNO 2426 ProjID 0116000011 EA 0F470. Route 299 near Willow Creek, from 0.1 mile east of Cedar Creek Road to 1.1 miles west of Route 96. Widen shoulders, place High Friction Surface Treatment (HFST), install rumble strips, guardrail, and cable net drapery. Changes to Con Support $2,510K $2,248K and Const Cap $11,388K $11,318K. Note: Split environmental mitigation from this project into EA OF471/PPNO 01-2426M.
    (Source: August 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1d) #1)

    Related to the above, in August 2020 the CTC also approved a financial allocation for construction and construction support of  $15,489,000. 01-Hum-299 PM 30.7/37.7. PPNO 01-2426. ProjID 0116000011 EA 0F470. Route 299 Near Willow Creek, from 0.1 mile east of Cedar Creek Road to 1.1 miles west of Route 96. Outcome/Output: Improve safety by widening shoulders, placing High Friction Surface Treatment (HFST), installing rumble strips, upgrading guardrail, and installing cable net drapery. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions.
    (Source: August 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #4)

    In October 2020, the CTC approved an allocation request for $5,456,000 for 01-Hum-299 38.9/39.5, PPNO 01-2434 ProjID 0116000044 EA 0F680. The project is located on Route 299 near Willow Creek, in the County of Humboldt. The project will widen shoulders, upgrade curb ramps to current Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards and install a bus turn-out. The project was programmed in 2016 SHOPP for $2,805,000 in construction capital and $1,103,000 in construction support, with a planned delivery in 2019-20. The project Plans Specifications and Estimate (PS&E) phase was completed in May 2020, and the most recent Engineers Estimate (EE) was completed in June 202, which updated the construction capital cost of the project to $4,353,000; an increase of $1,548,000 or 167.8 percent over the programmed funds. The construction support cost has not increased from the originally programmed amount of $1,103,000. The primary reason for the cost increase is due to the additional work added to the original scope. The original alternatives listed in the PID focused on widening on the west side of the highway by cutting into the hillside on the right. However, in an effort to avoid any impact to residences along the east side of the highway, the Department did not consider any widening to the east. The $2,594,000 originally programmed project was based on an alternative that proposed shoulder widening by shifting the alignment to the west into an existing slope, and constructing bus turnout and ADA curb ramps, as well as the complete street improvements. The June 2019 Project Report (PR) evaluated four design alternatives, which included three alternatives for work on the west side of highway and one alternative on the east of the highway.  All four alternatives were estimated to cost more than the programmed project budget due to higher item quantities and unit prices for earthwork, paving, structural section, landscape, and traffic handling. Due to concerns with the high capital cost of other alternatives, an alternative to widen to the west on the existing highway was selected, and the PR was approved. However, the selected alternative cost exceeds the programmed amount by more than 20 percent. The project design alternative that was originally planned in the PIR included an existing cut slope on the west side of the highway that was determined to unsuitable for the project. A geotechnical investigation of the site concluded that there was a potential high risk of failure during construction. The Department concluded that to solve the slope stability problem, the highway widening must be to the east, and a Mechanically Stabilized Embankment (MSE) wall, estimated to cost $560,000, must be constructed along with it. In addition, during the design phase, it was determined that widening to the west would cause sight distance issues, which could be avoided if the widening were to be to the east and if a wall was constructed. It was also determined that the super elevation would need to be corrected to standard, and by not fully solving this design safety issue, the project would not meet its stated purpose and need statement. This additional structural section resulted in an increase of $532,000. Finally, an increase of $276,000 was realized due to additional traffic handling measures due to implementation of the Department’s Construction Work Zone Speed Limit Reduction Guidelines (April 2020).
    (Source: August 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5d.(2))

    Willow Creek to Redding (I-5)

    Del Loma Turnouts (TRI 21.6-22.6)

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, programs $750K for PPNO 3771 "Del Loma, 21.6-22.6, down river turnouts (SHOPP)", with $15K allocated in FY20-21, $178K in FY22-23, and $557K in FY23-24.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    Big French Creek Road Project (~ TRI 23.27)

    Rte 299 Big French CreekIn Jnaury 2016, a major rockfall occurred onto Route 299 at Big French Creek. A few days later, an emergency contract was awarded because of the threat to public safety, and construction work began. The initial goal was to bring the road back to normal by removing rock and soil, cleaning the roadway and providing a 24-hour traffic-control system with spotters in place. A temporary rockfall protection fence was installed atop barriers along the centerline of the roadway. Originally, it was anticipated that repairs would last six months during the winter season, and once calm weather returned, the story would end there. Then a new mudslide destroyed the protection fence.
    (Source: Unless otherwise noted, this information comes from the Summer 2018 Caltrans Mile Marker)

    Caltrans construction and geotechnical staff were deployed to find a more permanent fix, and realized they had to come up with a new approach. After several months of studies and site surveys, it was decided to create a catchment area that would hold 3,000 to 4,000 cubic yards of slide material. A new contract was awarded. During that time, Caltrans District 2’s teams worked with other agencies to comply with environmental laws in connection with the project. It also was necessary to find disposal sites for large amounts of debris, and work with local businesses and residents. As that work progressed, the area was hit by yet another slide toward the end of 2016. This development posed a serious threat to public safety, and forced Caltrans to close the highway and develop a new plan of action.

    Caltrans was forced to temporarily close the road in January 2017. Meanwhile, road clearing took place despite more slides small and large and during one of the most severe winters in recent memory. After the highway shut down for 37 calendar days, a detour was opened two times per day, limited to school buses, teachers and emergency vehicles. The restored but restricted access raised hopes, but there was still a lot to do. And the threat of another slide always loomed over the project

    In March 2017, as a result of Winter 2017 storm damage, an emergency SHOPP allocation of $11,000,000 was made for the portion of this route near Del Loma, at Big French Creek Road (02-Tri-299 23.3). A series of rock slides continue to occur at this location since January 16, 2016. Geotechnical investigations determined the slope will continue to shed rocks and soil. On February 1, 2016 an Emergency G -11 allocation (EA 2H090) was made to monitor and provide traffic control and site clearing as required to keep the route clear. However, the site continues to be under 24 hour oneway traffic control and rockfall monitoring. Further testing and analysis has determined a new temporary scope. This new project will construct a catchment area at the toe of slope with a temporary barrier wall and rockfall fencing. Supplemental funds are required to complete this work. Supplemental work includes shifting to a 7-day workweek to excavate over 200,000 cubic yards up the slope an additional 200 feet from the original slide due to continued storm events in the fall and winter of 2016 and increased slide activity, continuing 24 hour one-way traffic control, conducting slide monitoring, and constructing a temporary detour in the flood plain of the Trinity River using slide material. The work will restore the roadway to the traveling public without traffic restrictions, reduce the risk of roadway closures, and retain rock, debris and mud flows from the traveled way. A follow-up roadway preservation project (EA 0H680) is currently programmed with scope to be modified as a permanent solution.

    Even after the storms ended, other challenges tested construction crews in 2017. They had to build a detour route that snaked through the very active work zone, coordinate the hydroseeding of denuded areas by helicopter, and even blast away a massive boulder that crashed onto the roadway. Construction was finished after almost two years after construction, at a cost of $40 million. By the time all work was done, Caltrans and its partners had literally moved a mountainside of material — 900,000 cubic yards — and installed a large, state-of-the-art catchment area, new guardrail, drainage system, a rockfall protection fence and wall, and repaved roadways, including disposal sites.

    There are plans to add east and westbound passing lanes near Douglas City between Little Browns Creek Bridge and Trinity River Bridge 05-0018 (TRI R058.00). July 2005 CTC Agenda. (02N-Tri-299 55.7/57.7)

    In January 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Trinity, at Steel Bridge Road (~ TRI 61.006), consisting of a reconstructed and relocated county road.

    Buckhorn Grade Project (~ TRI 71.737 to SHA 5.000)

    Middle BuckhornThere are currently plans to realign the Buckhorn Grade in Shasta and Trinity Counties. This currently is in the Environmental Report preparation phase. [July 2002 CTC Agenda, 2.2.a].

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed improvements to the Route 299/Route 44/Route 36 area. These would complete "Buckhorn" to allow STAA trucks to travel direct from I-5 at Redding to US 101 near Eureka and into the Port of Humboldt, now prohibited due to the existing curvilinear alignment that causes truck off tracking. This is the only viable alternative to get STAA trucks into the north coast. STAA trucks cannot access the Port on US 101 north due to environmental restrictions at Richardson's Grove that pre-empt major improvements to the route. Route 44 widening reduces congestion in the Redding urbanized area and also improves inter-regional through movement for people and goods.

    In 2007, the CTC considered a request for funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA), which was not recommended for funding. This request was for the Buckhorn Grade realignment.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will realign Route 299 near the city of Redding (middle of Buckhorn, PM 2.5 through PM 4.3). The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $13,894,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    According to aNewsCafe.com, the next round of improvements to the Buckhorn Grade on Route 299 west of Redding is scheduled to begin in September 2011. This is the second phase in a four-phase project intended to make the treacherous stretch of road safer and to open the highway between Redding and Arcata to larger trucks. In July 2011, Caltrans awarded a $10.5 million contract to Mercer Fraser of Eureka for the “Middle Buckhorn” project, which involves widening the highway, realigning 10 turns and eliminating seven other turns in a 1.8-mile stretch. Fall 2011 work will include removal of timber cut in early 2011, and installation of erosion control measures. Heavy construction work will begin in spring of 2012. In 2009, Caltrans completed improvements to sections at the base and top of the grade. The section at the top provides an example of what the entire Buckhorn Grade will be like when finished – two westbound climbing lanes, one eastbound descending lane, a four-foot-wide median and broad shoulders.

    In March 2011, the CTC approved funding to install truck climbing lanes near Redding, from 2.5 to 4.3 miles east of Trinity County Line to reduce congestion and minimize traffic delay.

    Upper BuckhornAfter completion of the Middle Buckhorn project, scheduled for fall of 2012, Caltrans will begin realigning two hairpin turns in the Twin Gulches section below Middle Buckhorn. In subsequent years, Caltrans will tackle the relatively mild lower section and the Upper Buckhorn.

    In November 2016, it was reported that the Buckhorn Grade project was completed, with a completion ceremony that was held Monday, 11/21/2016. This massive highway project that has interrupted Trinity County’s Route 299 route to Redding for the past several years, but was completed ahead of schedule and all remaining clean-up work should be finished by the end of November. There are also plans for a roundabout at Lance Gulch Road and Route 299.
    (Source: Trinity Journal, 11/16/2016)

    Buckhorn Summit - Carr Fire Closures (SHA 0.022)

    In August 2018, it was reported that Route 299 has been closed over Buckhorn since July 23, 2018 when the Carr fire was started by mechanical failure of a vehicle at Route 299 and Carr Powerhouse Road at Whiskeytown Lake. Initial assessments identified at least 3,000 hazard trees to be removed and 60,000 feet of burned guardrail needing replacement before the road reopens as well as damaged culverts and pavement that will require long-term repairs. In reality, there are many more trees affected than 3,000 and damage assessments are still being done, especially near the summit. In the meantime, discussions between representatives of Caltrans, Cal Fire and the California Highway Patrol are occurring daily to reassess and form a plan for reopening the highway. Delivery of goods and services, medical needs, student transportation and commuter needs are all part of those discussions. Reopening will likely happen in stages, starting at the eastern end in Redding to allow evacuated residents to return to their properties. Progressive, scheduled openings at certain times of day will also be considered once Cal Fire deems it safe to reopen the highway to the public. With the highway closure still in place, the alternate route in or out of Trinity County to the east is Route 3 to Route 36 into Red Bluff or Cottonwood. From Weaverville, the trip takes approximately three hours to reach Redding. Other alternatives are to head west via Route 299 to Arcata, or north up Route 3 over Scott Mountain to Yreka. The narrow, winding road over Scott Mountain is not advisable for large RVs or allowed for commercial vehicles.
    (Source: Trinity Journal, 8/8/2018)

    In May 2010, the CTC vacated right of way in the city of Redding along Route 299 at 0.08 mile west of Overhill Drive (~ SHA 21.969), consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    The CTC considered the route adoption for a highway location along Lake Blvd in the City of Redding from Route 273 at Lake Blvd to I-5 (~ SHA 24.108 to SHA 24.777).

    Redding to Alturas

    In May 2013, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Shasta County that will rehabilitate a section of the roadway on Route 299, including replacing drainage facilities, installing new pavement, constructing a center median, widening the Salt Creek Bridge (299 SHA 034.56), and other improvements. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $39,392,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved $13.3 million to rehabilitate 36.6 lane miles of pavement to extend the service life of the highway and enhance highway safety in and near Montgomery Creek, from 0.3 mile west of Backbone Ridge Road (apx 299 SHA 34.574) to Big Bend Road (299 SHA 60.044).

    Curve Improvements E of Ingot (02-Shasta-299 PM 44.3/44.9)

    Curve Improvements E of Ingot (02-Shasta-299 PM 44.3/44.9)In March 2019, the CTC amended the following project into the SHOPP: 02-Sha-299 44.3/44.9 PPNO 3742. Proj ID 0219000027. Route 299 Near Redding, from 1.9 miles west to 1.3 miles west of Du Bois Road. Curve improvement. Begin const. 6/7/2022. Total est. cost: $11,935,000.
    (Source: March 2019 CTC Minutes Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Item 17)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Collision Reduction item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 02-Shasta-299 PM 44.3/44.9 PPNO 3742 Proj ID 0219000027 EA 4H930. Route 299 near Redding, from 1.9 miles west to 1.3 miles west of Du Bois Road. Curve improvement. Programmed in FY21-22, with construction scheduled to start in June 2022. Total project cost is $11,935K, with $7,065K being capital (const and right of way) and $4,870K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In June 2020, the CTC approved the following support allocation for this project: 02-Sha-299 44.3/44.9. PPNO 3742 ProjID 0219000027 EA 4H930. Route 299 near Redding, from 1.9 miles west to 1.3 miles west of Du Bois Road. Curve improvement. Allocation: R/W Support $310,000.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) #5)

    In September 2010, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Shasta along Route 299 at 1.0 mile west of Buzzard Roost Road, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes. (apx 299 SHA 52.439)

    In February 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of two segments: (a) right of way in the County of Shasta, between Goose Valley Road (apx 299 SHA 73.283) and Mackinac Street (apx 299 SHA 75.549), consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads; and (b) right of way in the County of Modoc, at the intersection with County Roads 54, 82 and 83, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads..

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $2,000,000 in SHOPP funding for Route 299 in Burney at Burney Creek Bridge #06-0062 (apx 299 SHA 74.85). This work would replace one scoured bridge to maintain structural integrity, reduce the risk to lives and properties, and to comply with Bridge Inspection Report recommendation.

    In October 2017, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Shasta along Route 299 between Hat Creek Powerhouse No. 2 Road and Hat Creek Park at Hat Creek (02-Sha-299-PM 83.5/83.9), consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In May 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Shasta, at County Road No. 9S060 (Lewis Road, apx 299 SHA 96.12), County Road No. 9S061 (Williams Road, apx 299 SHA 96.701), County Road No. 9S02 (Pittville Road, apx 299 SHA 96.836), County Road No. 9S062 (Lee Ranch Road, apx 299 SHA 97.455), and County Road No. 9S066 (Pittville Totten Road, 299 SHA 99.352), consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads.

    In March 2019, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project is located on various locations along Route 299 and Route 139 in Lassen and Modoc Counties (02-Las-299, PM 18.5/25.6, 02-Mod-299, PM 0.5/0.5, 1.1/1.8, 02-Mod-139, PM 0.1). This project proposes to reduce the amount of distressed lane miles by restoring the roadway to a condition of minimal maintenance for a 20-year design life. This proposed project addresses the existing poor pavement condition, late stages of deterioration, and the roadway’s substandard lighting. The project also proposes widening shoulders, reconstruct driveway approaches, and updating the Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) elements. This project is fully funded and programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for approximately $25.2 million, construction is estimated to begin in 2020. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
    (Source: March 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    Butte Creek Bridges (2-MOD-299 0.51, 1.02)

    Rte 299 Butte Creek BridgesIn October 2016, the CTC amended the SHOPP as follows: 2-MOD-299 0.51, 1.02 | Route 299 Near Adin, at Butte Creek Bridge No. 03-001 and at Ash Creek Bridge No. 03-0002. Replace bridges. During the environmental phase, additional work was identified due to increased project footprint and a new community volunteer fire station in the project vicinity. Additional design support is needed to consider hazardous materials, hydraulics evaluations, community impact coordination and park impacts. Construction Support has increased to account for the use of consultants for inspection over two seasons instead of one. R/W support has increased to cover the cost for two additional parcels and their environmental mitigation. These changes add $1,269,000 to the cost of the project. Allocation: $47K $131K (R/W), $5.6MM (C), Support (PA & ED $1.82MM / PS & E $680K $940K / RW Sup $270K $485K / Con Sup $1.15MM $1.86MM). FY 17/18.

    In May 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project located in Modoc County that proposes to replace the Butte Creek Bridge and the Ash Creek Bridge (02-Mod-299, PM 0.5, 1.0). The proposed project will restore long-term reliability and reduce the need for continued maintenance and repairs. This project is programmed in the 2016 SHOPP for $10,836,000 in construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2018-19. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    In August 2018, it was reported that the CTC allocated $8.45 million for the project to replace the Butte Creek Bridge on State Route 299 EB in Adin, and the Ash Creek Bridge on State Route 299 EB in Modoc county.
    (Source: Action News Now, 8/20/2018)

    Caldwell Creek Bridge (02-Mod-299 23.1/23.6)

    In January 2018, the CTC allocated the following: $3,019,000. 02-Mod-299 23.1/23.6. Route 299 Near Alturas, from 0.3 mile west to 0.3 mile east of Caldwell Creek Bridge No. 03-0028. Outcome/Output: Construct a new bridge, realign creek channel to historic location, upgrade guardrail, and replace conform pavement. (Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-16-67; October 2016).
    (Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.5b(1))

    In May 2016, the CTC allocated additional Capital SHOPP funding for Route 299 near Canby, at Caldwell Creek Bridge No. 03-0028 (299 MOD 23.34). Replace bridge. Additional design, survey, and environmental clearance effort is necessary to develop a newly identified full detour instead of the original planned stage construction of the bridge. Also, hydraulics studies have since identified the need to raise the profile of the bridge and address greater creek flows. The increase to support costs also reflects an adjustment using current rates. These changes add $725,000 to the cost of the project.

    Alturas Route 299 Improvements / Canby Highway Advisory Radio Projects

    In December 2012, the CTC received a request to amend the 2012 STIP to delete the Alturas Route 299 Widening project (PPNO 3368) (apx 299 MOD 39.878) and the Route 299/Route 139 Canby Highway Advisory Radio project (PPNO 3382) (apx 299 MOD 21.124) in Modoc County. MCTC has determined that the two STIP projects are no longer a priority in the region due to a continued economic downturn, slow population increase and business demise. It was deferred to the January 2013 meeting, and deferred again to the March 2013 when it was again... deferred. The original need for the project was first identified by the MCTC in mid 1990’s to improve traveler safety and reduce speeds approaching the city. As this segment of two-lane highway enters the City of Alturas, traffic flow can become congested due to the turning movements of vehicles. Business and residential areas exist along this mile long reach where traffic interruptions and queuing occur. Future growth was anticipated, further contributing to congestion and the potential for increased accidents. Shoulder widths vary from 1 foot to 4 feet wide, and mobility of bicycles and pedestrians is a challenge. A project was initiated and programmed in the 1998 and 2000 STIP to address the need by adding a continuous left turn lane, wider shoulders and drainage improvements. Project development work continued over the years until MCTC alerted the Department that local priorities and project support had changed. The unmet need remained until MCTC requested that the Commission reprogram the project in the 2008 STIP, with the Environmental phase to begin in 2011. In a collaborative effort, the Department and MCTC developed a project charter that identified the specific needs of the project; including wider shoulders and crosswalks along with flashing beacons to improve pedestrian mobility and safety, speed radar feedback signs for traffic calming, installation of concrete gutters, culverts and paved areas for drainage improvements. The continuous left turn lane was deleted from the project. However, in August 2012, just after the Department completed the environmental phase, MCTC requested the project be terminated for a second time due to changed local priorities and support for the project. The Department strongly supports the continued development of this project for a number of reasons, including safety, bicyclist and pedestrian support, traffic calming, and congestion issues.

    In May 2013, the CTC received notice that Caltrans, the City of Alturas and the Modoc County Transportation Commission (MCTC) propose to amend the 2012 STIP to reduce the scope of the Alturas Route 299 Improvements project (PPNO 3368); decreasing the programmed Regional Improvement Program (RIP) funding by $1,010,000, from $3,244,000 to $2,234,000, and removing $1,052,000 of programmed RIP Transportation Enhancement (TE) funds. It is also proposed to program $1,173,000 in RIP funding for a new pedestrian improvements project (PPNO 2534) along the Alturas Central Business District in Modoc County. Specifically, in a collaborative effort to identify the specific needs of this project, the department and MCTC have negotiated an agreement to reduce the scope of improvements along Route 299. It is proposed to remove lower priority TE elements from the scope of work, while improving the shoulder width and drainage systems for bicyclists and pedestrians. Three new radar feedback signs for traffic calming will also be installed. This scope reduction will allow $2,062,000 to be returned to Modoc County’s regional share balance. The design work necessary for revising the scope will delay construction from FY 2013-14 to FY 2014-15. MCTC proposes to program a new pedestrian improvement project, the Alturas Central Business District project (PPNO 2534) with $1,173,000 from Modoc County’s regional share balance. The project proposes to improve existing facilities adjacent to surface streets along the central business district of the city of Alturas. This project is higher priority for the county and includes TE eligible elements that will enhance pedestrian mobility in the downtown area.

    In August 2018, the CTC approved $4,074,000 in SHOPP funding for Modoc 02-Mod-299 51.9/52.5: Route 299: Near Cedarville, from 0.6 mile west of Cedar Pass Ski Tow Road to Cedar Pass Ski Tow Road. Outcome/Output: Improve safety by realigning roadway curves, widening lane and shoulder widths, improving roadside clear recovery zone and drainage, and installing a drapery system to prevent rockfall. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions.
    (Source: August 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.5f.(3) Item 4)

    Naming Naming

    Trinity Scenic BywayThe segment between US 101 and Redding (HUM 0.000 to SHA 24.082) is named the "Trinity Scenic Byway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 126, Chapter 131, in 1992.
    (Image source: AARoads)

    The portion between the Shasta county line and the Modoc county line (SHA 0.000 to SHA 99.248) is named the "Lassen State Highway". It was named by Resolution Chapter 498 in 1911.

    Robert (Bob) ThompsonThe portion of Route 299 located between SHA 83.03 and SHA 84.00 in the County of Shasta is named the "Robert “Bob” Thompson Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Robert “Bob” Thompson,a fourth-generation resident of Shasta County and the grandson of ranchers who came to Eastern Shasta County in the 1930s. Robert Thompson’s background in farming and ranching began as a toddler on the Hat Creek Hereford Ranch and, as a young person, he became active in 4-H and the Future Farmers of America (FFA). Robert Thompson attended a two-room schoolhouse for five years in elementary school, was active in student government, athletics, and FFA in high school, and graduated from Fall River High School in 1967. After high school, Robert Thompson attended California State University, Chico where he met his wife of 49 years, Alice Hutchings. While at Chico State, Robert and Alice Thompson’s only son, Perry, was born and Robert Thompson worked several jobs to put himself and his wife through school without incurring large student loan debt. When Robert, Alice, and Perry returned home after college, Robert continued his involvement in agriculture by helping to run the family ranch while Alice began her 37-year teaching career. While Robert Thompson loved working with cattle, farming the land, and being involved in numerous agricultural organizations, he turned his focus to construction to “pay the bills”. With guidance and support from his father, Robert Thompson and his brother-in-law Howard Lakey became founders and coowners of Hat Creek Construction. Robert Thompson and Howard Lakey began operating Hat Creek Construction from humble beginnings with a used Toyota pickup truck and several home remodel projects. As Hat Creek Construction grew, the company began building homes and cabins in the Eagle Lake area and soon the company expanded into road building, hydro construction, and general engineering work. Today Hat Creek Construction is a dominant force in the construction industry and an area leader in asphalt, concrete, and aggregate delivery and placement. Robert Thompson was able to consult and advise until the time of his passing and witnessed his beloved company and team complete its largest season ever, while proudly providing jobs for 125 local employees. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 202, Res. Chapter 151, 8/17/2018.
    (Image source: Hat Creek Construction)

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Bridge 04-0036, over the Mad River in Humboldt County (HUM R001.55), is named the "Thomas L. Devore Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1965, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 94, Chapter 229, in the same year. Thomas L. Devore, a Blue Lake native, died Feb. 1, 1943, when the USS DeHaven, a battleship, sank during its patrol of the Guadalcanal shoreline near the Solomon Islands, at the hands of Japanese warplanes. According to Ernest A. Herr’s description of the USS DeHaven’s demise, “The Last Day of the USS DeHaven,” a combination of factors led to disaster — two engines shut down for maintenance and the inability to quickly determine whether the approaching planes were friend or foe. The 376-foot long ship was escorting landing craft when it was struck by three bombs and damaged by a near miss. The massive warship had only been commissioned 133 days when it sank and took Devore with it.

    Bridge 04-0042, at Redwood Creek in Humboldt County (HUM R022.33), is named the "Don O. O'Kane Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1965, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 58, Chapter 178 in 1970. Don Hunter O'Kane was the publisher of the Humboldt Standard newspaper from 1935 to 1946 and an avid supporter of the development of the state highway system.

    Bridge 04-050, 8 mi E of Willow Creek over the south fork of the Trinity River in Humboldt County (HUM 042.95), is named the "Hlel-Din Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1988, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 158, Chapter 112, in the same year. The Native American village of Hlel-Din was an important gathering place for many tribes to exchange ideas and goods and to seek marriage partners, until it's destruction in the 1850's.

    Bridge 05-0081, over the Trinity River in Trinity County (TRI R003.16), is named the "Raymond A. Nachand Memorial Bridge". Raymond A. Nachand was born in Alton, Illinois in August 1918, and subsequently moved to Burnt Ranch, California in 1937 where he graduated from Hoopa High School in 1938. Mr. Nachand held numerous jobs in the aeronautical industry during and after World War II in southern California. Mr. Nachand subsequently returned to Burnt Ranch where at various times he worked for Moss Mill Lumber Company, drove the school bus from Burnt Ranch to Weaverville, and worked for the former California Division of Highways (now the Department of Transportation) for 22 years, retiring in 1973. Mr. Nachand volunteered for many worthwhile causes in his community and, in this connection, held the positions of firefighter, church elder, hospice worker, and friend to all. In 1976, Mr. Nachand and his wife, JoAnn, opened their richly endowed Ironside Museum in Hawkins Bar to "preserve our heritage and historical interest". The museum continues to be visited by persons who come to Hawkins Bar from around the world. Mr. Nachand passed away on May 17, 1997, at the age of 78 years at his home after several years of illness. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 176, Chapter 160 in 1998.

    Bridge 05-0082 over the Trinity River, 3.5 mi E of the Humboldt county line in Trinity County (TRI R003.44), is named the "Charles William Carpenter Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1989, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Chapter 84, the same year. Trinity County deputy Sheriff Charles William Carpenter was killed in the line of duty on the morning of July 13, 1928, while attempting to arrest three robbery suspects  who had just robbed a store in Willow Creek, California. A shootout ensued and Deputy Carpenter and one of the suspects were killed. The other two suspects fled but one was later apprehended. The other suspect was captured five years later after he robbed a post office in New York City. He was returned to California and sentenced to life in prison on July 7, 1933.

    William D. Abarr Memorial BridgeBridge 05-0006 over the Trinity River in Trinity County (TRI 013.87) is named the "William D. Abarr Memorial Bridge". William D. Abarr, a Caltrans heavy equipment operator, died January 25, 1983, in a massive mudslide on Route 299 in Trinity County. At the time of his death he was operating earth moving equipment that was clearing a slide from Route 299 when another mudslide swept his equipment off the highway. Mr Abarr joined the Department of Highways (Caltrans) in March 1973 after working for the Trinity County Department of Public Works for 13 years. He was a conscientious employee who would go the extra mile to do a good job, and was responsive to emergency calls to sand icy areas to remove rocks or slides and to do other needed emergency work. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 134, Chapter 126, in 1984.
    (Image source: Find a Grave)

    Deputy Kenneth Fredrick PerrigoThe Burney Creek Bridge (Bridge 06-0062, SHA 074.85) on Main Street along Route 299, in the unincorporated area of Burney, County of Shasta, is named the "Deputy Kenneth Fredrick Perrigo Memorial Bridge". It was named in memory of Deputy Kenneth Fredrick Perrigo, who was born in 1958. Deputy Perrigo first worked for the Shasta County Sheriff's Office as a civilian cook at the main jail facility in 1981. Prior to his appointment as a Deputy Sheriff, Kenneth Perrigo served our country as a member of the United States Coast Guard. Deputy Perrigo was hired as a full-time Deputy Sheriff in1982 and assigned to the Burney Patrol Division. Deputy Perrigo was one of the charter members of the Shasta County Sheriff's Office Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team. Deputy Perrigo was a board member of the Shasta CountyPeace Officers Association. Deputy Perrigo was Scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 216 inFall River Mills. On Monday, October 21, 1991, Deputy Perrigo arrested two suspects for being intoxicated in public, and was transporting themto the Shasta County main jail in Redding, California, when the suspects shot him in the back and head several times using Deputy Perrigo's secondary service weapon, and he died in the line of duty that day. The suspects were subsequently apprehended without incident, following an almost five-day pursuit, deemed the largest and longest in the County of Shasta's history. President George H. W. Bush telephoned Deputy Perrigo's wife, Debra, to express his condolences. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 78, Resolution Chapter 88, on August 24, 2012.
    (Image source: Shasta County Sheriff on FB)

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Francis B. Mathews Memorial Rest AreaFrancis B. Mathews Memorial Rest Area (Salyer), in Trinity County, 3 mi E of Salyer (~ TRI 3.661). Named in memory of Francis B. Mathews. Mr. Mathews was a well respected attorney and community leader in Trinity and Humboldt Counties for over 50 years. He was also a a real estate developer, logger, builder, fishing boat and marina owner. Although he was known largely for his representation of timber, logging, and sawmill companies, his pro bono services and dedication to the citizens of Trinity and Humboldt Counties and the Hoopa and Yurok Indian tribes were well known throughout the region. His reputation for integrity and his dedication to community endeavors were unsurpassed. As an Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts of America, Francis B. Mathews sat on the scout council and was an active fundraiser and contributor to the scouting programs in Trinity and Humboldt Counties. He served in the Army Air Corps during World War II. He was instrumental in the founding of Trinity Village at Hawkins Bar in Trinity County, a large planned community built upon reclaimed land. Lastly he was a naturalist and lifetime birdwatcher who donated his entire bird book collection of over 3,000 books to California State University, Humboldt. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 38, Chapter 110, September 17, 2001.
      (Image source: Waymarking)
    • Moon Lim Lee Rest Area Moon Lim Lee (Weaverville), in Trinity County, 5 mi E of Weaverville (~ TRI 56.949). Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 88, Chapter 16, in 1986. It was named in honor of Moon Lim Lee by the State of California Transportation Department. Moon Lim Lee's name comes from the activities of his father, Lim Sue Kin. The father operated a Weaverville restaurant in the late 1800s with the name, Sam Lee. Located on Main Street, its name means three fold prosperity in a Cantonese dialect. Lim Sue Kin became widely know as Sam Lee, Thus, the family name changed in a manner not uncommon for that period. Moon Lim Lee was a prominent businessman and served on many boards and committees that worked for the betterment of of Trinity County. He was appointed by Governor Ronald Reagan to the California Highway Commission in 1967 and served as a commissioner for eight years. His effort in saving Won Lim Miao helped produce Weaverville Joss House State Park.
      (Information source: Heritage West Books website on California's Chinese Heritage; Image source: East Valley Times; Find a Grave)
    • Hillcrest, in Shasta County, 3.9 mi E of Montgomery C.B. (~ SHA 60.639)

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.8] From Route 101 near Arcata to Route 96 near Willow Creek; and from Route 3 near Weaverville to Route 5 near Redding.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.8] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.8] From Route 89 near Burney to Route 139 near Canby.

    Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Humboldt 299 0.00 0.10


  2. Rte 299 Seg 2From Route 395 near Alturas to the Nevada state line via Cedarville.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains unchanged from its 1963 definition.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    Although the road itself looks to have been a state route (part of LRN 28) since 1935, there is no evidence that this was signed. It connected to NV 8A, which puts any US highway signage in doubt.

    Status Status

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 3607. 02-Modoc-299 51.9/52.5. On Route 299 Near Cedarville, from 0.6 mile west of Cedar Pass Ski Tow Road to Cedar Pass Ski Tow Road. Curve improvement. Begin Con: 9/18/2018. Total Project Cost: $5,419K.


Exit Information Exit Information

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 299:

Interregional Route Interregional Route

[SHC 164.18] Between Route 101 and Route 89, and between Route 139 and Route 395.


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 296 Forward Arrow Route 305

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Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.