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State Route 58

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

  1. Rte 58 Seg 1(a) From Route 101 near Santa Margarita to Route 33.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 58, but was signed as Route 178 until 1964. The renumbering occurred as part of the renumber of former US 466 as Route 58. This segment was defined in 1933, signed in 1934.

    Status Status

    Trout Creek Bridge (05-SLO-58 3.1)

    In December 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project, located near the town of Santa Margarita in San Louis Obispo County, that proposes to replace the Trout Creek Bridge on Route 58 (05-SLO-58, PM 3.08). The proposed project will construct a two lane bridge with bicycle lanes in each direction. The project is funded and programmed in the 2016 SHOPP with an estimated total of $8.9 million, which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2019-20. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 SHOPP.

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 0072B. 05-SLO-58 3.1. Route 58 Near Santa Margarita, at Trout Creek Bridge No. 05-49-0091. Replace bridge. Begin Con: 8/12/2020. Total Project Cost: $13,324K.

    In May 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP Amendment 05-SLO-58 3.1 PPNO 0072B ProjID 0515000099. Route 58 Near Santa Margarita, at Trout Creek Bridge No. 05-49-0091. Replace bridge. Increase const cap to $7,573K; total to $14,910K. Note: Increase in construction capital is due to increase in abutment pile quantity and rock slope protection, volatility in precast pricing, and change in traffic handling and barrier rail type.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Agenda Item 2.1c.(1) Amend Item 51)

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the following financial allocation: 05-SLO-58 PM 3.1. PPNO 0072B. ProjID 0515000099. EA 0L723. On Route 58 near Santa Margarita, at Trout Creek Bridge No. 49-0091. Outcome/Output: Replace bridge, widen shoulders and install bridge rail to current standards. Financial allocation: $9,848,000.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #19)


  2. Rte 58 Seg 2(b) From Route 33 to Route 43.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 58, but was signed as Route 178 until 1964. The renumbering occurred as part of the renumber of former US 466 as Route 58. This segment was LRN 58, but was signed as Route 178 until 1964. It was also defined in 1933, signed in 1934.

    Status Status

    [Buttonwillow]In April 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Kern County that will rehabilitate a 6.5 mi portion of Route 58 with new asphalt paving over existing concrete near Buttonwillow (~ KER 27.542). The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $3,005,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The project had a mitigated negative environmental declaration (MND). The project will involve construction activities resulting in impacts to the habitat of Federally listed threatened and endangered species including the Tipton kangaroo rat, the San Joaquin antelope squirrel, and the San Joaquin kit fox.

    Naming Naming

    "Bakersfield-McKittrick Highway" from Route 33 to Route 43 (~ KER 15.461 to KER 39.926).

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.4] From Route 5 to Route 43. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  3. Rte 58 Seg 3(3) From Route 43 to just west of Van Buren Place near Bakersfield.

    Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Bakersfield or the County of Kern the portion of Route 58 that is located within the city limits of that city if the city or county agrees to accept it. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment: (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 58 shall cease to be a state highway. (3) The portion of Route 58 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81. (4) For the portion of Route 58 that is relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Bakersfield or the County of Kern shall install and maintain within the jurisdiction of the city signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 58. Added by AB 1858, Chapter 315, September 18, 2006.

    In March 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Kern on Route 58 from the Bakersfield city limits west of Allen Road (approx KER 45.943) to Mohawk Street (approx KER 50.642), from Verdugo Lane to the Bakersfield city limits west of Patton Way, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated February 14, 2012, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 491, Statutes of 2010, which amended Section 358 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    In 2006, AB 1858, Chapter 315, September 18, 2006 permitted relinquishment of the portion of this route in Bakersfield. This segment was relinquished in March 2012.

    In 2013, Chapter 525 (SB 788, 10/9/2013) split this into two segments:

    (3) From Route 43 to just west of Van Buren Place near Bakersfield.

    (4) Mohawk Street near Bakersfield to Route 99.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 58, but was signed as Route 178 until 1964. The renumbering occurred as part of the renumber of former US 466 as Route 58. This segment was also defined in 1933, signed in 1934.

    Status Status

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • National Corridor Infrastructure Improvement Program #7: Widening of Rosedale Highway between Route 43 and Route 99 in Bakersfield, and widening of Route 178 between Route 99 and D Street in Bakersfield. $60,000,000. (~ KER 39.994 to KER 50.611)

    Western Segment (Heath Road to I-5: ~ KER 31.879 to ~ KER 44.038)

    In October 2008, the CTC received a notice of preparation of an EIR regarding these routes. The study will evaluate a range of alternative route alignments for Route 58 as a limited access facility from its current terminus at Route 99 to Route 5. Upon completion of the Environmental Impact Report (EIR), a proposed route adoption will be presented to the Commission. The EIR will be divided into three segments:

    1. Eastern Connection – Connection of Westside Parkway to existing Route 58
    2. Westside Parkway – Mohawk Street to Heath Road, 6 Phases
    3. Western Segment – Heath Road to Route 5

    The entire corridor is not fully funded. Funding for the Eastern Connection has been identified in the Regional Transportation Plan, but the project is currently not programmed. Estimated total cost of this segment is $650 million, with construction estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2015. Phase 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the Westside Parkway project are fully funded in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program. Estimated cost, capital and support, is $234 million. Phases 5 and 6 are currently not programmed. The Western Segment is currently not programmed. The Westside Parkway and Western Segment portions have been previously addressed in CEQA and NEPA environmental documents; however, the Eastern Connection remains to be evaluated. This EIR will incorporate by reference the previously analyzed segments to revalidate these segments and evaluate current conditions and impacts of the Eastern Connection segment. This EIR and the subsequent route adoption would incorporate the Westside Parkway into the State Highway System after environmental evaluation of impacts to air, noise and traffic volumes. The Westside Parkway will begin construction in phases in FY 2008-09 utilizing the previous EIR. The Western Segment does not have an estimated start construction date.

    EIR Alternative MapThere are six alternatives being considered:

    • (A) Alternative A proposes to construct a new freeway west of the Route 58/Route 99 interchange. The alignment would travel in a westerly direction for approximately one mile on the south side of Stockdale Highway, at which point it would turn in a northwesterly direction and span the Carrier Canal, Truxtun Avenue, and the Kern River. The proposed route would then connect to the Westside Parkway alignment between Mohawk Street and Coffee Road. The total length of the project from the existing Route 99/Route 58 interchange to Route 5 utilizing Alternative A would be approximately 16.31 miles.
    • (B) Alternative B proposes to construct a new freeway west of the Route 58/Route 99 interchange. The alignment would travel in a westerly direction for approximately one-half mile on the south side of Stockdale Highway, at which point it would turn to the northwest, span the Carrier Canal, Truxtun Avenue, and the Kern River. Alternative B would connect to the Westside Parkway alignment at the Mohawk Street interchange. The total length of the project from the existing Route 99/Route 58 interchange to Route 5 utilizing Alternative B is approximately 16.61 miles.
    • (C) Alternative C proposes to connect existing Route 58 to the Westside Parkway by means of routing new lanes adjacent and parallel to existing Route 99. These additional lanes would run parallel to and independent of Route 99. Movements between Route 58, Route 99 and the Westside Parkway would likely be facilitated by braided ramps and freeway-to-freeway connector ramps. The total length of the project from Route 99 to Route 5 utilizing Alternative C is approximately 18.51 miles.
    • (D) Alternative D proposes to construct a new freeway in the vicinity of Union Avenue (Route 204). The roadway would extend north from Route 58 for approximately one mile, where it would turn to the west and run parallel to the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad tracks. Alternative D would connect to the Westside Parkway alignment at the new interchange at Mohawk Street. The total length of the project from Route 58 at Union Avenue to Route 5 is approximately 18.98 miles.
    • (No Build) The “No Build” alternative would not construct any improvements. Route 58 – East would continue to end at Route 99 where it would jog to the north to tie into Route 58 – West (Rosedale Highway). The Westside Parkway would be constructed as a local facility but would not connect to Route 58, Route 99, or Route 5.
    • (M) Alternative M would evaluate Transit and Transportation Systems Management (TSM) improvements. TSM focuses on low capital, environmentally-responsive improvements that maximize efficiency of existing facilities. An example of TSM improvements would be providing signal interconnects to facilitate the flow of traffic or providing bus turn-out bays to minimize the interruption of buses along a specific route. Specific transit and TSM measures have not been developed at this point. Preliminary traffic data is required to determine the most effective transit and TSM measures. Once the traffic data is available it would be determined if transit and TSM improvements would be separate alternatives or if it is more effective to evaluate a single alternative that includes both transit and TSM improvements.

    In November 2012, it was reported that Caltrans had selected Alternative B.

    In May 2014, it was reported that Alternative B was still the preferred and least expensive option. The EIR, released 15 months late, found Alternative B would improve traffic throughout metropolitan Bakersfield -- but as currently planned would require the demolition of 200 single-family homes, 110 multiple-family structures and 121 commercial buildings. Previously, the freeway alternative through southwest Bakersfield was thought to require the demolition of more than 199 single-family homes, 16 multiple-family structures and 36 businesses. Currently, Caltrans also estimates Alternative B would require 293 full parcel acquisitions, 129 partial parcel acquisitions -- and could displace an estimated 961 people. However, many of the full parcial acquisitions could only end up needing only "sliver takes". The project right now is in public hearing mode. A decision is expected by year's end, and if the project is approved construction could begin by mid-2016. According to the EIR, Alternative B's recommended path would have "adverse effects to the character of ... southwest Bakersfield and (the) Westpark neighborhood," which it would bisect. It also would raise noise levels above the generally acceptable 62-70 decibel range in 484 outdoor areas, which can be mitigated with soundwalls and landscaping. Caltrans has considered Alternatives A and C to be unfeasible since December 2012. Alternative A, a connector southwest of Alternative B, would affect Rancho Vista Historic District. Alternative C, a connector slightly to the northeast of B, would impact Saunders Park. Both the park and the historic district are protected under Federal Highway Administration guidelines. Alternative A would demolish the most structures, and at $691 million in right-of-way and construction costs is the most expensive. Alternative C has the fewest demolitions, but at $665.5 million for right-of-way and construction is the second most expensive proposal.
    (Source: Bakersfield Californian, 5/9/2014)

    In June 2014, the CTC received the draft EIR for review. The EIR noted the environmental impacts as well as the public controversy. It proposed the following mitigations for the route:

    • Landscaping will be incorporated into the project design.
    • Landscaping will incorporate tree replacement at a 1:1 ratio.
    • Replacement habitat will be incorporated into the develop plan for the Westside Parkway.
    • A pre-construction survey will be conducted by a qualified biologist for nesting raptors and loggerhead shrikes.
    • Implementation of measures developed with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife to reduce impacts to the San Joaquin kit fox.
    • A Memorandum of Agreement will be entered into with the State Historic Preservation Officer and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation to identify mitigation measures to reduce potential impacts to the Rancho Vista Historic District.
    • Coordination with the City of Bakersfield to minimize impacts to the Kern River Parkway and Saunders Park.

    In March 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that proposes to construct a new freeway alignment for Route 58 in order to link Route 58 with Interstate 5 (I-5). The project also includes route improvements along Route 58 from I-5 (~ KER 31.879) to Cottonwood Road (~ KER R55.432), and to Route 99 from Wilson Road to Gilmore Avenue. The estimated total overall cost of the project is $629.0 million. The project is not totally funded and currently programmed in the 2016 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for an estimated total $33.0 million for Construction capital, $19 million in federal earmarked funds and $62 million in local Transportation Development Fund sources. The project is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2018-19. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 STIP.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, March 2018 Agenda Item 2.2c(10))

    In March 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Kern on Route 58 from the Bakersfield city limits west of Allen Road (approx KER 45.943) to Mohawk Street (approx KER 50.642), from Verdugo Lane to the Bakersfield city limits west of Patton Way, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated February 14, 2012, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 491, Statutes of 2010, which amended Section 358 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    Westside Parkway (~ KER 45.033 to ~ KER 51.102)

    Westside ParkwayThis segement is under intense discussion regarding upgrading it to freeway. There are a number of potential alignments, all of which are controversial. In August 2001, an alignment was selected. The Kern River Freeway/Parkway would run from the Renfro Road/Stockdale Highway intersection (~ KER 45.033) to Route 178 along the Kern River and just south of Truxton Avenue (~ KER 51.102), and a new freeway along the 7th Standard Road corridor between Route 99 and I-5. Final adoption of the 7th Standard freeway hinges on its incorporation into the General Plans of the Cities of Bakersfield and Shafter. Part of the Southern Beltway has also been approved by the City of Bakersfield, which adopted a partial alignment along the Engle Road corridor in 2001.

    The "Kern River Freeway/Parkway" is also known as the Westside Parkway. The City of Bakersfield is the lead agency for this project. Construction is currently programmed for the 2006- 2007 Fiscal Year. The City of Bakersfield also maintains the Bakersfield Freeways site on the project. Note that there are no plans to make these freeways part of the state highway system. Update: It appears the eventual plans are to incorporate this parkway, when finished, as part of Route 58.

    The Westside Parkway follows a similar route to the Kern River Freeway Project that Caltrans had been working on for many years. Caltrans completed a Tier 1 Environmental Document for the Kern River Freeway Project, which allows the City to now acquire right of way for the Westside Parkway Project. The Tier 1 Document also provides the City a base from which to develop the Tier 2 or Construction Level Environmental Document for the Westside Parkway. Starting at the west end of the project at Heath Road, the Westside Parkway is planned to begin as a four lane divided highway. However, the right of way being acquired for the Westside Parkway will ultimately allow 8 lanes to be constructed, and bridges and other structures are planned to be constructed for this ultimate 8 lane width even if not all the lanes are constructed initially. The Parkway will be at grade (not elevated or depressed) at Heath Road and there will be a signalized intersection with Heath Road. There will also be a signalized intersection at Stockdale Highway, but this will be the last traffic signal on the Westside Parkway. Exit ramps will exist at Allen Road, Calloway Drive, Coffee Road, and Mohawk Street. As the Parkway continues east, it will go under Renfro Road. Whether the Westside Parkway is depressed and Renfro Road remains at its current grade, or whether the Parkway remains at grade and Renfro is elevated, or whether there is a mixture of these two scenarios is currently being analyzed as part of the Tier 2 Environmental Document.

    Continuing east, the Parkway remains at grade and crosses the Rosedale Rio Bravo Water Recharge Area. At Allen Road, the Westside Parkway is currently planned to be at grade with Allen Road elevated to go over the Parkway. The Allen Road interchange has been designed to be offset to the east, minimizing the amount of land needed from the Rosedale Rio Bravo Water Storage District for the Westside Parkway. The City is also purchasing property along the south side of the Westside Parkway east of Allen Road that will be provided to the Rosedale Rio Bravo Water Storage District for groundwater recharge. This additional recharge area is to replace the District recharge property west of Allen Road needed for the Westside Parkway. At Allen Road, the Westside Parkway is planned to expand to 6 lanes as it continues east. As the Parkway approaches Jewetta Avenue, it is planned to start becoming depressed below existing grade. Jewetta will go over the Parkway and will be elevated about 10 feet above existing grade, and the Westside Parkway will be depressed about 12 feet below existing grade at the Jewetta crossing. Calloway Drive is also planned to go over the Westside Parkway. It is hoped that the Westside Parkway can be depressed in this area and Calloway can remain at its existing grade. But studies regarding shallow groundwater in the area are currently underway, and these studies could result in the parkway not being able to be entirely depressed and which would require Calloway to be partially elevated.

    East from Calloway, the Westside Parkway is currently proposed to remain at existing grade until it begins to approach Coffee Road. At Coffee Road, the Parkway would be elevated and go over existing Coffee Road. It is planned to continue elevated and cross over the Friant-Kern Canal. The westbound off ramp is planned to exit onto Brimhall Road as shown. After crossing the Friant-Kern Canal, the Parkway will continue east and south of the Shell Refinery. A portion of the Cross Valley Canal is planned to be realigned in this area to allow for the Parkway construction.

    At Mohawk Street the Westside Parkway will probably be at grade with Mohawk going over the Parkway. The extension of Mohawk Street between Rosedale Highway and Truxtun Avenue is currently planned for construction in 2005, prior to the Westside Parkway beginning construction in 2006. Mohawk is planned to have 6 lanes and a median island, and will go under the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe (BN&SF) railroad tracks and over the Parkway, the Cross Valley Canal, and the Kern River.

    The Parkway will then continue east across the Kern River where it will tie in with Truxtun Avenue just west of Route 99. The first phase of the Westside Parkway construction will be at the east end of the project from either Truxtun Avenue or Mohawk Street, to either Coffee Road or Calloway Drive. The next phases will continue construction west to Allen Road, and then on to Heath Road. The entire project is currently slated to be complete by 2009.

    In August 2008, the CTC approved using Proposition 1B funds for Phase 2 of the Westside Parkway. This involved construction of a new 6 lane expressway in Bakersfield, from Mohawk Street to Coffee Road. The funding would be used to complete right of way acquisition to construct new facility with 6 lanes, connecting Mohawk Street and Coffee Road, and to provide east/west traffic congestion relief, improved traffic operations, providing new access, and improved safety conditions.

    In July 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the Westside Parkway project, which will construct a new east-west freeway referred to as the Westside Parkway within the Route 58 corridor from Heath Road to a point near Route 99 at Truxtun Avenue in the City of Bakersfield and an unincorporated portion of Kern County. The project also includes the extension of Mohawk Street south from Rosedale Highway, across the Kern River, to Truxtun Avenue. The project as proposed will result in significant unavoidable impacts to agricultural resources and transportation/traffic. Specifically, the project would result in the conversion of 79 acres of prime farmland to transportation use. In addition, the level of service decrease at the Mohawk Street/California Avenue intersection cannot be mitigated through a grade separated interchange as the acquisition and relocation of at least four, and as many as eight, major commercial buildings near the intersection is not feasible. Findings of Fact were developed which provide that mitigation measures and/or alternatives to the proposed project that would substantially reduce or avoid these significant unavoidable impacts are infeasible. On December 13, 2006, the City found that there were several benefits that outweigh the unavoidable adverse environmental effects of the project. These benefits include, but are not limited to, reducing congestion; supporting the City’s current and planned development west of Route 99; accommodating potential future multimodal transportation facilities; and providing an alignment for future multimodal transportation facilities that reduces congestion on the transportation network in the western Bakersfield metropolitan area.

    In January 2013, the Kern County COG reported that completion of the Westside Parkway project is anticipated for Spring 2013, at least for the segment from Truxtun Avenue just west of Route 99 to Allen Road. Construction began phases in 2009, after the California Transportation Commission (CTC) allocated $131 million under the State Transportation Improvement Program to the City of Bakersfield. The first phase of the project, the Mohawk Street Extension, connected Mohawk Street from Truxtun Avenue to Rosedale Highway. This phase included three bridges, decorative façades and lighting and new traffic signals. The Mohawk Street Extension opened nine months ahead of schedule on June 30, 2011. As of early 2013, construction was continuing on Phase 2, which continues from Mohawk Street to Allen Road. As of January 2013, the contractor was paving the future freeway lanes and working on the bridges at Coffee Road, Calloway Drive, Jewetta Avenue and at the Friant-Kern Canal. Work also continued on Phase 4, the Truxtun Tie-in. This phase completes the eastern end by constructing the on- and off-ramps between the freeway and Truxtun Avenue. This phase also includes three bridges and a third lane to Truxtun Avenue in both directions from the on- and off-ramps through the Empire Drive intersection. Lastly, as part of Phase 6, the contractor was also finishing work on the Allen Road Bridge. Traffic is expected to move onto the bridge by the end of 2012. All phases under construction are expected to open in spring 2013. The CTC recently allocated $26 million for the final phase of the Westside Parkway, which will extend the freeway to Stockdale Highway and Heath Road. Construction is expected to start in the spring 2013, and wrap up in summer 2014.
    (Source: Kern COG Winter 2012 Newsletter)

    In August 2013, the first segment of the five-mile, $164.3 million Westside Parkway opened between Truxtun Avenue west of Route 99 and Allen Road.  The parkway’s final $30.1 million segment, from Allen Road to the Heath Road and Stockdale Highway intersection, is due to be completed in 2014. Will it be a state highway? Initially, no. The Westside Parkway, from Truxtun Avenue to Stockdale Highway/Heath Road, will be a city-owned and operated facility when it first opens later this year. However, Caltrans is the lead agency for the proposed Centennial Corridor project, which would link Route 58 east of Route 99 with the Westside Parkway freeway at Truxtun Avenue.

    2007 CMIA. The following project was submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding: widening the Rosedale Hwy to 6 lanes from Allen Rd to Route 99 ($20,871K requested). Not recommended for funding. (just W of KER 45.975, since relinquished, to KER 50.611)

    Centennial Corridor (~ KER 50.611 to KER T52.266)

    58 Centennial CorridorThe Centennial Corridor project would be an extension of Route 58; so upon approval, this project along with the Westside Parkway would become the new alignment for Route 58, and the Westside Parkway would become part of the state-owned and operated freeway system. West of Heath Road, the westerly terminus of the Westside Parkway freeway, traffic would use Stockdale Highway to access I-5; and so along with the Westside Parkway, this portion of Stockdale Highway would then also become designated as Route 58. The portion of existing Route 58 (Rosedale Highway) between Mohawk Street and Allen Road is already operated and maintained by either the city or the county. This portion of the roadway was previously relinquished by Caltrans to the city and county to facilitate the TRIP project to widen Rosedale Highway. But even with that relinquishment, this portion of the roadway currently remains identified as Route 58, so there is not any confusion to the traveling public. Once the Westside Parkway and Stockdale Highway are designated as Route 58, the remaining un-relinquished portions of the current alignment of Route 58 between Route 99 and I-5 would then also become city- and county-operated and maintained roadways (except for the short north-south segment of roadway that Route 58 and Route 43 share, which would remain under state jurisdiction as Route 43).
    (Source: Bakersfield Californian, 7/28/13, 2/24/13)

    Note that there are no plans to relocate Route 58 off Rosedale Highway. There are plans to transfer jursidiction over Rosedale Highway to the city of Bakersfield. When this transfer occurs, the route will still be signed as Route 58 but will be relinquished to the City. Relocation of Route 58, in this particular question to the Westside Pkwy or North Beltway most likely will not occur, because these facilities will be designed as local freeways (Update: Future plans changed this: there are plans to make the new Westside Parkway/Centennial Corridor Route 58 after it is completed.).

    In October 2015, it was reported that the City of Bakersfield was considering buying the Wild West Shopping Center at the end of Route 58 at South Real Road for about $7.9 million. The shopping center would be razed to make way for the Centennial Corridor that will connect Route 58 and Route 99 to the Westside Parkway. The nearly 5 acre parcel sits where westbound Route 58 dead-ends into Route 99. For years extending freeway access on Route 58 to the west side has been a top city priority. Once the Centennial Corridor is constructed, it will link up with the existing Westside Parkway. But in its path are dozens of existing homes and businesses including the Wild West center.
    (Source: Kern Golden Empire, 10/14/2015; KVPR, 10/14/2015)

    In October 2015, it was also noted why Caltrans omitted transition ramps for the sorthbound Route 99 to the Centennial Corridor (Route 58) west, and from the Centenial Corridor (Route 58) east to the Route 99 northbound. This is because Caltrans notes that projected SB Route 99 to WB Route 58 movements and EB Route 58 to NB Route 99 would be "nominal."

    In early 2017, Derek updated his Centennial Corridor blog to document the destruction of single family housing along the right of way of the Centennial Corridor.

    In April 2017, there was an update on the the Route 58 beltway improvements that connect to the Centennial Corridor. This project provides traffic improvements along Route 58, from Route 99 to Cottonwood Road, and adds a lane in either direction along Route 99 in the area between Ming Avenue and Wilson Road. The project is 60 percent complete; completion expected in early 2018. Work on the pump plant, which removes water that collects under the road, on northbound Route 99 near Ming Avenue continues. Falsework, or temporary support, for the new connector bridge for Route 99 to eastbound Route 58 is nearly complete. Crews will begin installing steel for the bridge stems and bottom frame in May 2017. Work to widen the bridges at P Street, the Bakersfield Corral Overhead (a railroad bridge), and Madison Street are also underway. Lastly, multiple retaining and sound walls are being constructed along Route 58 on both sides of the freeway. Walls and barrier rails are also under construction along the on- and off-ramps at Chester Avenue, H Street and Union Avenue.
    (Source: Bakersfield.Com, 4/20/2017)

    With respect to the Centennial Corridor itself, which connects Route 58 to the Westside Parkway with possible connections to southbound Route 99, the April update noted the following: The Design Phase is 65 percent complete; and right-of-way acquisition is 98 percent complete. Final design, right-of-way acquisitions of single-family properties, and demolition activities are underway. To date, 202 of the 222 houses and retail properties have been demolished. The City Council has approved purchase agreements for 192 single family properties (99 percent of what must be acquired); nine multi-family properties (100 percent of what must be acquired); and 17 commercial/industrial properties (89 percent of what must be acquired). Sewer, local streets, screen wall and sound wall packages are being prepared and work is expected to begin in summer 2017. On March 29, the City Council awarded the $41.1 million contract for the Kern River Bridge Improvements Project to Security Paving Company.
    (Source: Bakersfield.Com, 4/20/2017)

    In July 2017, I was informed via email that once the Centennial Corridor is project is completed, the Westside Parkway will be designated as Route 58 and Stockdale Highway will be adopted as a temporary alignment for Route 58 westward to I-5, pending completion of a new freeway alignment. [In the map above, the] purple line shows the Centennial Corridor alignment that has been selected and is under construction. The orange line shows the Westside Parkway and the red line shows the interim alignment along Stockdale Highway, which will eventually be replaced by a new freeway alignment that will run to the southwest of the terminus of the Westside Parkway and connect with I-5 a couple of miles north of its junction with Route 43.

    In December 2017, it was reported that the Westside Parkway has essentially been completed since 2015 aside from the Centennial Corridor. The Centennial Corridor is a 1 mile gap between the east end of the Westside Parkway and the current ramp junction of Route 58 and Route 99. At present moment 99% of land parcels required to finish the Centennial Corridor gap have been acquired and construction of rerouting sewers has recently begun.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog, Route 58 - Westside Parkway)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to have a number of allocations (shown as local) for this route: PPNO 3705, Rt 58-Westside Parkway Connector Mainline-Ph1, upping the total funding from $33,001K to $63,211K for construction in FY19-20; PPNO 6943, Rt 58-Westside Parkway Connector Interchange-Ph2, for $30,000K in FY22-23.

    In June 2018, it was reported that on June 8, the U.S. Department of Transportation released more than $1.5 billion in grants to fund what it calls "critical freight, highway, and bridge improvements" via the Infrastructure for Rebuilding America or "INFRA" program created by the Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act of 2015. As required by the FAST Act, USDOT notified Congress on June 5 about the 26 projects selected to receive the $1.535 billion worth of grants via the INFRA program; triggering a mandatory 60-day congressional review period before the agency can, in fact, award them. One of these grants was for "Centennial Corridor State Route 58/99 Freight Improvement Project", with a proposed award of $ 50,000,000 out of a total project cost of $ 386,637,000.
    (Source: AASHTO Jounal, 6/8/2018; USDOT Reportof Awards Under 23 U.S.C. 117 During Fiscal Years (FY) 2017 and FY 2018, 6/4/18)

    In August 2018, the CTC received notice of a State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) amendment to authorize the project to proceed as an Assembly Bill (AB) 3090 reimbursement arrangement (the amendment was approved in October 2018). This would permited the KCOG and Bakersfield to advance the construction of the Westside Parkway – Route 58 Connector Mainline – Phase 1 (Centennial) Project (PPNO 3705) with local funds, with the AB 3090 reimbursement over a three-year period beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2019-20. The approximately 20 mile long Centennial Corridor, defined in the Centennial Corridor environmental document, spans from I-5 to Cottonwood Road east of Route 99. Since approximately 1998, the City of Bakersfield and the Department have delivered major improvements to the corridor toward developing the ultimate project, which included the Westside Parkway, the Route 58 Gap Closure project, and the Route 58/Route 99 Bakersfield Freeway Connector project. The primary purpose of the Centennial Corridor, also referred to as Westside Parkway or Route 58 Corridor, is to improve regional and inter-regional travel and goods movement along Route 58, between the junctions with Route 99 and I-5. The fiscal challenges have required that the improvements be phased as funds became available, through the STIP, Local Measure, federal programs and most recently Senate Bill 1 Trade Corridor Enhancement Program.

    The project was originally programmed for construction in the 2012 STIP for delivery in FY 2015-16. In the subsequent STIP cycles it was repeatedly pushed out to future years due to insufficient STIP funding capacity, and most recently in the 2018 STIP it was pushed out to FY 2019-20 and split into two phases, Phase 1 and Phase 2. Phase 1 primarily provides improvement to the mainline connectors and is ready to proceed to construction. The Westside Parkway Interchange Phase 2 connector is programmed in FY 2022-23 and the final connector phase at I-5 remains to be programmed. Every effort is being made to obtain and secure funding to complete the improvements in the corridor. This project remains the top priority for the region.
    (Source: August 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.1b.(3); October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.1a.(3))

    In October 2018, it was reported that the Belle Terrace overpass would be closed until spring 2020. The closure of this road that crosses over Route 99 is part of the Centennial Corridor project. The Belle Terrace overpass is 55 years old and shorter than the current standard. It will also need to be widened to accommodate additional lanes beneath it when Route 99 is widened. The northbound Route 99 exit to Wible Road/Stockdale Highway is also slated to close permanently on 11/14/2018. In conjunction with the Belle Terrace bridge closure, all traffic will shift to the west side of Wible Road between Ming Avenue and Route 58, with one lane in each direction. Traffic signals will be set to flashing red at the shopping center just north of Ming and at Belle Terrace. In addition to the closure of the overpass, Belle Terrace access will be closed on the east side of Wible Road. Drivers won’t be able to enter or exit Belle Terrace at that location on Wible Road. Drivers will need to follow a posted detour through the end of 2018.
    (Source: Bakersfield Now, 10/26/2018)

    In May 2019, the CTC approved allocating an additional $3,300,000 for the previously approved SHOPP Operational Improvement project (PPNO 6891) on Route 99 and Route 58 in Kern County, to complete construction. The project will widen traffic lanes, add an auxiliary lane and improve signs on northbound (NB) Route 99 between Ming Avenue and Route 58. The project will also replace the Belle Terrace Overcrossing (OC) and reconstruct the NB Route 99/EB Route 58 connector. The project is designated as a Financial Contribution Only (FCO) and therefore is not eligible for G-12 authority. This project is located within a main freight corridor for California funded with various local funds, SB 1 funds, SHOPP funds and federal grants. Many of these projects are in various stages of construction. The overall cost of these projects is estimated to be over $1 billion dollars. In March 2018, the Commission allocated $30,960,000 in Construction Capital, and $0 in Construction Support. The City is funding the cost of Construction Support in the amount of $3,850,000. A cooperative agreement (Co-Op) between the Department and the City, designates the City as the construction implementation agency, responsible for contract administration and associated support cost. The Department, as a project sponsor, provides project oversight and funding for additional Construction Capital cost incurred during construction. The $30,960,000 allocation provided to the City is being invoiced and the Department is reimbursing for actual allowable costs incurred and paid to the contractor. In June 2018, the City augmented the allocated Construction Capital funds and awarded the project contract for $32,460,000. Construction began in October 2018; the contract status is currently active with 27 percent of the construction bid items completed. The project is expected to be completed by April 2020. Since the start of construction, the project has incurred a funding shortfall due to agreed-upon contract Change Orders (CO). The City has negotiated with the contractor, and they both agreed on the amount needed to pay for these COs, and the Department concurred. The total amount needed to pay for these COs is $3,500,000. Based on funding proportions and the terms of the Co-Op agreement , the City will provide $200,000 in local funds, and SHOPP funds will provide $3,300,000. As with the original allocation, the $3,300,000 allocation provided to the City is to be invoiced and the Department will reimburse for actual allowable costs incurred and paid to the contractor. The Department is requesting a supplemental fund amount of $3,300,000 in Construction Capital to complete the construction of this project. Since the City is funding the total cost of Construction Support, the Department is not requesting any Construction Support funds. When this supplemental request is approved, the Department and the City have agreed to amend the Co-Op, requiring that any future cost increases in construction will not come from SHOPP funds. A major portion of the construction cost increase is due to differing site conditions at the soil nail walls. Retaining Walls No. 6 and 62 were type-selected as soil nail walls based on their proximity to existing Wible Road, and the need for “top-down” construction. Field soil investigation prior to wall design, including multiple soil test borings, revealed the existence of layers of loose to medium dense sands. The geotechnical report did include measures to mitigate loose, caving sandy soil during construction. These measures included constructing a berm, using temporary shotcrete to stabilize the excavation, and using full length temporary casings. Furthermore, stability testing would be performed to determine the acceptable lift height of soil and exposure time during excavation. The wall design option as a soil nail wall type remained unchanged through the course of design and went through all the required design and constructability reviews before advertising the project contract. Using over 2,000 soil nails, the 24-foot-high retaining wall supports a 3,500 feet embankment consisting of loose, sandy soil. During construction, excavation at the soil nail wall location revealed a more dominant presence of loose, less competent soils than anticipated and field excavation activities were halted. The Construction Manager then collaborated with the Contractor and Geotechnical Engineer to develop a timely and cost-effective solution that involves “soil mixing” to stabilize the soil and preventing caving of over 56,000 linear feet of soil nail bores. Another significant portion of the construction cost increase is the result of the discovery of an AT&T abandoned conduit during field preparation to demolish the bridge. The conduit was discovered inside the bridge and was determined to contain asbestos. An earlier asbestos survey, that was conducted during the design phase, did not find any asbestos on the Belle Terrace Bridge. The asbestos conduit removal will require additional costs to be safely detached prior to bridge demolition, as contractors are required to adhere to special safety procedures when dealing with items containing asbestos. The cost associated with this operation is $550,000. The bridge demolition operation has been delayed to accommodate a change in the means and methods for demolition of the bridge and mitigation of the asbestos containing conduit. The remainder of the cost increase, $475,000 is due to the additional field work needed to excavate and remove “Unknown Buried Manmade Objects”; consisting of large, unearthed chunks of concrete rubble at the project site.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5e.(1))

    In June 2019, the CTC approved $6,321,000 for an FY 2019-20 AB 3090 reimbursement for the Westside Parkway - Phase 1 (Centennial) project.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5c.(7))

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which appeared to delete the programmed funding for PPNO 3705A "Rt 58-Westside Parkway Connector Interchange-Ph2"
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    Naming Naming

    "Rosedale Highway"

    Col. Thomas BakerBakersfield is named after Colonel Thomas Baker, who tried to develop a waterway from Kern Lake to San Francisco Bay in the early 1860s had a corral here know as "Baker's field." In 1868 the name was transferred to the city.
    (Image source: Find a Grave)

    Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.4] Entire portion: Route 43 to Route 99. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  4. Rte 58 Seg 4Mohawk Street near Bakersfield to Route 99.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was created as a split of the segment from Route 43 to Route 99 in 2013, reflecting relinquishment in Bakersfield.

    Status Status

    Westside Parkway/Centennial Corridor

    For the construction of the replacement Westside Parkway and Centennial Corridor that parallels this segment, see Segment (c) [3] above.


  5. Rte 58 Seg 5From Route 99 to Route 15 near Barstow via Bakersfield and Mojave.

    Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Bakersfield or the County of Kern the portion of Route 58 that is located within the city limits of that city if the city or county agrees to accept it. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment: (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 58 shall cease to be a state highway. (3) The portion of Route 58 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81. (4) For the portion of Route 58 that is relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Bakersfield or the County of Kern shall install and maintain within the jurisdiction of the city signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 58. Added by AB 1858, Chapter 315, September 18, 2006.

    In 2010, SB 1318 (9/29/10, Chapter 421) changed the last sentence to be "the City of Bakersfield or the County of Kern shall install and maintain within the jurisdiction of the city or county signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 58."

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    In 2006, Chapter 315 permitted relinquishment of the portion of this route in Bakersfield.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield This was a portion of US 466. Between US 101 and Bakersfield, US 466 consisted of the present-day Route 41 and Route 46. Between Bakersfield and the Nevada border, US 466 ran concurrant with US 91, now I-15. See the page on US 466, and the Gribblenation Blog entry on the Tehachapi to Bakersfield portion of US 466, for information on how the US 466 routing diverged from the Route 58 routing.

    The portion of the segment, from Mojave (LRN 4 / Route 99) to Barstow (US 91/I-15) was defined in 1919.

    The portion of this segment between Bakersfield (LRN 4 / Route 99) and Mojave (LRN 23 / Route 14 / US 6) was defined in 1931. It representated the state assuming responsibility for a previous county road that had a class of traffic that qualified it for state jurisdiction. The original function of the county road was providing access to the Kern county seat from the far-flung Mojave desert region. It was also noted that the route serves as a relief and alternative for the Ridge Route.

    Route 58 was adopted into the State Highway System in 1919 and was first paved in the late 1930s. The highway was constructed along the natural terrain, using prescriptive rights of way.

    Status Status

    2007 CMIA. The following project was submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding: widening the route to 6 lanes between Route 99 and Cottonwood Rd. ($62,300K) (~ KER R52.526 to KER R55.413). Not recommended for funding. (just W of KER 45.975, since relinquished, to KER 50.611)

    In January 2018, the CTC amended a previous SHOPP allocation: $27,042,000. 06-Ker-58 R52.4/R55.5. Route 58 In Bakersfield from Route 99 to Cottonwood Road (~ KER R52.526 to KER R55.413). Outcome/Output: Rehabilitate pavement using Continuous Reinforced Concrete Pavement (CRCP) and construct auxiliary lane. This project will improve safety, ride quality, and traffic operations. Cost adjustment: CON ENG $3,410,000. $4,055,000.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.5b(1))

    Cottonwood Road to Route 184 Improvements (~ KER R55.413 to KER 59.7)

    Cottonwood ImprovementsIn August 2016, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project on Route 58 (06-Ker-58, PM R55.4/R59.7 — between Cottonwood and Route 184) in Kern County that will rehabilitate the roadway on a portion of Route 58 in the City of Bakersfield. The project is programmed in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total programmed amount is $34,982,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    In July 2017, the CTC approved $37.3 million for pavement rehabilitation and roadway upgrades to a five-mile segment of Route 58 from Cottonwood Road to 0.3 mile east of the Route 58/Route 184 separation to repair damage caused by winter storms and heavy freight traffic.

    In September 2016, it was reported by Gary Richards (but echoing a response from Joe Rouse) that all the green paddle mile markers that had once been on Route 58 and Route 14 have been removed. According to Joe, Caltrans HQ Traffic Ops was approached by staff in District 9 about removing the milepost markets, for the reasons that created confusion when it came to responding to roadway incidents (for the CHP, Caltrans and local law enforcement continue to use postmiles to locate roadway incidents). Because mileposts are not a requirement in the California MUTCD, Caltrans concurred with their request. The green mile markers were located on the freeway portions of Route 58 from roughly Tehachapi to the San Bernardino County line and on the freeway portions of Route 14 in Kern County.
    (Source: Joe Rouse on AAroads, 9/8/2016)

    Tehachapi Climbing Lanes

    In January 2020, it was reported that Caltrans plans to soon release to the public plans on three sections of truck-climbing lanes that would allow motorists to pass big rigs traveling on Route 58 from Bakersfield to Tehachapi. Caltrans' Project Initiation Document for the State Route 58 Truck Climbing Project still needs final approval. It was slated to be completed in Summer 2019. Lanes being considered are: starting halfway between General Beale and Bena roads (~KER 71.409) and ending shortly before Route 223 (~ KER 75.41); beginning shortly before Bealeville Road (~ KER 76.886) and extending to Hart Flat (~ KER 80.24); and starting before Broome Road (~ KER R84.992) and ending before the Tehachapi Creek Bridge. The proposal at this point is to widen asymmetrically on the outside shoulder. The layout proposed would include a 14-foot truck climbing lane; however two of those feet would be comprised of barrier striping. Some alternatives and challenges to each location included widening or realigning Bena Road, removing or extending Broome Road Bridge, and obtaining right-of-way for encroachment to the parcels surrounding the new lanes. Even though there currently is no local or state funding for the projects, Caltrans is eager to find money for the preliminary environmental and engineering studies for all three truck-climbing lanes.
    (Source: Tehachapi News, 1/17/2020)

    Tehachapi-Dennison Road Interchange (~KER R94.204)

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP which continued the programmed funding for PPNO 3482 "Tehachapi Dennison Rd interchange". Programmed was $2,704K in prior year funding.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    Cache Creek Bridges (06-Ker-58, PM R99.0/R100.3)

    In May 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed: Route 58 in Kern County. Replace existing Cache Creek Bridges on Route 58 near the city of Tehachapi. (PPNO 6674) (06-Ker-58, PM R99.0/R100.3) This project is located on Route 58 near the city of Tehachapi in Kern County. The project proposes to replace the eastbound and westbound bridges. The project proposes to address the current critical condition of the bridge decks and various corrosion issues. Repair strategies were evaluated and replacing both bridges was determined to be the preferred strategy. The proposed project is estimated to cost $16.8 million. The project is fully funded and is currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for $16.6 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Rightof-Way (capital and support). The project is estimated to begin construction in 2018. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 SHOPP.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, May 2018 Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    In May 2019, it was reported that Caltrans was hosting a public information meetings for the Cache Creek Bridge Replacement project. This project will replace the eastbound and westbound Cache Creek bridges on Route 58 in Kern County approximately 5 miles east of Tehachapi. Preliminary construction work has already begun but road closures are not scheduled until the end of May 2019.
    (Source: Caltrans District 9 FB Post, 5/6/2019)

    In March 2015, the CTC authorized $2,394,000 for a project in Kern County near Tehachapi (06-Ker-58, R99.2/R99.8), at the Sand Canyon Road Undercrossing (Bridge No. 50-0345R): Replace eastbound bridge and resurface ramps to restore bridge load capacity.

    In September 2006, the CTC considered a resolution to relinquish right of way in the County of Kern, near Mojave, at Randsburg Cutoff Road and along Business Route 58, from 2.7 miles northerly of State Route 14 to about 4.8 miles easterly of State Route 14, consisting of superseded highway. (6-Ker-58-PM 107.5 and 108.9/117.8)

    Mojave Bypass (~ KER M108.149 to KER R127.641)

    In Sepember 2003, a new four lane freeway bypass near the town of Mojave. Diamond interchanges are located at each end and at Route 14. The bypass begins just east of the junction of Route 58 and Randsburg Cutoff Road and ends near Airport Road a couple of miles east of Mojave at Route 58. This may eventually be a continuation of I-40. According to Caltrans, the old routing will become Business Route 58. An interchange is being built at the south end of the Mojave Bypass for WB Route 58 to SB Route 14 and NB Route 14 to EB Route 58 movements. This will create a single stop light for those most common movements at the existing Route 14/Route 58 intersection. For other movements, you will travel north on Route 14 all the way to Route 58 through Mojave. There are currently insufficient traffic volumes for a Route 14 freeway to the Route 58 freeway.

    The Mojave Bypass will end on its eastern end at California City Blvd., about where the current freeway alignment begins west of Boron. This means that Route 58 will be full freeway from Bakersfield (Route 99) to the Kern County / San Bernardino County line EXCEPT for two at-grade intersections west of Tehachapi. Specifically, there is a 2-lane segment of Route 58 that runs about 4 miles of both sides of Kramer Junction (Route 58/US 395 intersection). However, this isn't all there yet, as Paul D. DeRocco reports that the bypass ends at around 25th St. in Mojave, and there remain four or five at-grade intersections before the freeway starts up again just east of California City Blvd.

    The October 2004 CTC agenda showed a resolution to relinquish right of way in the County of Kern, between Business Route 58 West to 1.9 km east of Business Route 58 East, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads, frontage roads and cul-de-sacs (6-Ker-58 108.998/117.19,6-Ker-14 18.579/20.008 ). The County, by cooperative agreement, dated October 8, 2002, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    The July 2005 CTC agenda showed a funding request in Mojave from 4.1 kilometer west of West Junction Route 14 to west Junction Route 14, and from east Junction Route 14 to 6.8 km east of east Junction Route 14 to rehabilitate Route 58 for relinquishment.

    There are also plans to have an interchange with 20 Mule Team Parkway on the new Route 58 freeway (~ KER R136.394).

    Kramer Junction Upgrade (SBD 0.000 to R9.0)

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed a comprehensive Route 58 project. It converts over thirty miles of two-lane conventional highway to four-lane expressway and constructs an interchange at the Route 58/US 395 junction (~ SBD 5.357).

    There are also plans for widening and realigning a 13-mile segment of Route 58 centered on Kramer Junction, where Route 58 intersects with US 395, in San Bernardino County. This section of Route 58 is currently a non-standard 2-lane highway between a 4-lane freeway to the west and a 4-lane expressway to the east, and the project would close this gap. This 2-lane segment includes an at-grade signalized intersection at Route 58/US 395 (Kramer Junction), an at-grade crossing of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) railroad west of that intersection, and numerous uncontrolled at-grade driveway and street access points. There is also an at-grade railroad crossing on US 395 north of the Route 58/US 395 intersection that slows traffic and contributes to accidents when traffic backs up during train crossings.

    [Kramer Jct.]In April 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will construct roadway improvements including lane widening, median and shoulder installation to an 11.1 mile portion of Route 58 from the Kern County line to 5.7 miles east of Kramer Junction near the city of Barstow. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $32,243,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The project received a mitigated negative environment impact declaration (MND). The project will involve the acquisition of new right-of-way and construction activities resulting in impacts to the habitat of Federally listed threatened species including the desert tortoise and the Mohave ground squirrel. As a result, an MND was completed for this project.

    In October 2013, the CTC received a draft EIR regarding a project in Boron. This project in San Bernardino County will widen a portion of Route 58 from two lanes to four lanes, as well as construct a Route 58/US 395 Interchange and an overhead structure at Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway near the town of Boron. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $199,509,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. Alternatives considered for the proposed project include:

    • No Build Alternative.
    • Alternative 1 - This alternative would construct a four-lane divided expressway with partial control of access, an interchange at the Route 58/US 395 junction and a railroad grade separation approximately 2.5 miles east of Kramer Junction.
    • Alternative 1A - This alternative is the same as Alternative 1 with the exception of a different interchange geometry at the Route 58/US 395 junction .
    • Alternative 2 - This alternative would construct a four-lane divided expressway with partial control of access, an interchange at the Route 58/US 395 junction and a railroad grade separation approximately 3.9 miles west of Kramer Junction.
    • Alternative 3 - This alternative would construct a four-lane divided expressway with partial control of access, an interchange at the Route 58/US 395 junction and a railroad grade separation approximately 2.6 miles west of Kramer Junction.

    In October 2015, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will realign and widen Route 58, and construct a railroad grade separation and an interchange at the Route 58/US 395 junction. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $194,838,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program.

    58 Kramer Route AdoptionAlso, in October 2015, the CTC adopted a portion of Route 58 as a controlled access highway from the Kern/San Bernardino County line to 3.7 miles east of US 395. A Project Report and an Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement were approved on July 1, 2014. A Notice of Determination for compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) was published and filed with the State Clearinghouse on July 2, 2014. A Record of Decision for compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was submitted to FHWA for publication in the Federal Register then approved on September 29, 2014. This route adoption corresponds to a segment of a project that consists of realigning and widening a portion of Route 58 from a two-lane conventional highway to a four-lane divided expressway, located north of existing Route 58 from the Kern/San Bernardino County line (PM SBD R0.0) to 3.7 miles east of US 395 (PM SBD R9.0). The proposed project includes construction of a spread diamond/cloverleaf interchange at Route 58/US 395 Junction and an overhead structure at the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway intersection. The new four-lane divided controlled access highway will implement route continuity, increase capacity, reduce congestion and improve traffic safety. The portion of Route 58 proposed for route adoption will be a four-lane divided expressway located north of existing Route 58. Just west of the proposed adoption segment, Route 58 is a four-lane facility adopted by the California Highway Commission as a freeway on November 20, 1958. Just east of the proposed adoption segment, Route 58 is a two-lane facility adopted by the Commission as a controlled access highway on January 24, 1986. The segment of existing Rotue 58 between approximately PM SBD T0.44 to PM SBD R8.1 will be relinquished to the County of San Bernardino. The realignment and widening of the Route 58 Project has been planned with the approval of a Project Study Report in 1991 where several alternatives were proposed. The Project Report and the Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS) were approved on July 1, 2014 with the realignment of Route 58 to the north of its existing alignment being the preferred alternative.

    In August 2017, the CTC approved an allocation of $192,630,000 ($77,800,000 for Fiscal Year 2017-18, $84,235,000, for Fiscal Year 2018-19, and $30,595,000 for Fiscal Year 2019-20 with funding only available in the years that they are programmed) for the STIP Kramer Junction project (PPNO 0215C) on Route 58 in San Bernardino County. This is a STIP Construction Manager/General Contractor (CMGC) project and the funds are programmed in three different fiscal years. The requested allocation amount eliminates any funding uncertainty and provides an incentive to the Contractor to deliver the project more quickly and efficiently (FY18, FY19, and FY20). This project was programmed in the STIP for $139,427,000 in Construction Capital and $15,668,000 in Construction Support with delivery scheduled in October 2016. It was originally going to be delivered using the traditional Design-Bid-Build method. However, the Department selected this project as a pilot project for the CMGC delivery method. The CMGC method is innovative and allows a greater flexibility for delivery. Due to the recent statewide STIP Program funding shortfall, it was determined to keep this project in the STIP, it would need to be programmed over three fiscal years with no cost adjustment allowed during the 2016 programming. CMGC process results in a more accurate construction cost at award and reduces change orders due to the early involvement of the contractor in project design. The CMGC process also requires an Independent Cost Estimate to verify the construction cost of the project is reasonable. After implementing numerous innovations and completing negotiations, the agreed contract price for this project was set at $162,800,000, which is within 3.3 percent of the Independent Cost Estimate. In addition, the capital cost increased because the Department determined that adding a long life pavement treatment to the Route 58 project would reduce the amount of required future maintenance. The total construction capital cost including contingencies, state furnished materials, and supplemental work for this project is $172,630,000. The increase in construction support is twofold. Firstly, the delay of a year due to the unexpected underfunding of the STIP; which resulted in an escalation of the cost by $633,000. Second, during design, the work plan was revisited and it was determined that the construction support cost should be increased based on a similar project in the area. The support/capital ratio for this project was increased to 11.6 percent which is consistent with the Hinkley Route 58 re-alignment project which is completing construction this month. The Hinkley project is 22 miles away, in a remote location similar to Kramer, with a support/capital ratio of 11.4 percent. This accounts for the remaining $3,699,000 of the $4,322,000 cost increase for construction support. The Department is ready to award this project upon approval of this funds request. The Department and contractor have completed a robust risk analysis. The availability of water for this project has been identified as a risk. The Department has included contingency as part of this request for this risk.

    Rte 58 Kramer JctIn January 2018, a project update noted that the project’s design has been completed. Right of Way acquisition continues with a few parcels requiring condemnation. Utility relocation plans are almost complete. Caltrans and the CMGC have agreed upon a Guaranteed Maximum Price. Construction is scheduled to begin late-2017 and end late 2020.
    (Source: Caltrans District 8 Powerpoint Presentation, January 2018)

    In January 2018, a project update noted that the project is still in the early stages, as crews continue to work on clearing and grubbing (earthwork), utility relocations, environmental protection fence installations, and Railroad overhead bridge column installations. Currently the project is approximately 20% complete. The majority of construction activity continues to be away from the current Route 58 Expressway.
    (Source: Caltrans Commuter Alert, 7/5/2018)

    In October 2019, it was reported that Caltrans would be opening a portion of the new segment of Route 58 near Kramer Junction. The new segment is located at Kern County Line spanning approximately one mile and again east of Kramer Junction for approximately one mile. This includes the interchange with US 395. At the same time, the old section of Route 58 will be closed to through traffic from approximately one mile east of the Kern County Line to approximately three miles east of Kramer Junction. Essentially, all lanes of the new, 13.3-mile road are open except for a short portion east of Kramer Junction. Final work is also nearing completion on bridges that will carry US 395 traffic over BNSF Railway tracks, work that is being performed by the railroad. The nearly $200 million project was begun in January, 2018. The project should be completed by June 2020.
    (Source: Caltrans District 8 Commuter Alert, 10/23/2019; AntelopeValley Press, 11/3/2019)

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, included PPNO 0215C, 4-lane expressway, Kramer Junction Phase 1 (CMGC), in the Interregional portion of the STIP with no change in programming: $244,936K in prior year funding.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In June 2020, it was reported that the Kramer Junction Expressway was open to traffic.
    (Source: AARoads, PDERocco, "Re: CA-58 Kramer Junction Bypass", 6/23/2020)

    Hinkley Upgrade (SBD 21.8 to SBD 31.1)

    Rte 58 Hinkley BypassThere is a portion of 4-lane expressway (10 miles or so), and then 2-lane highway through Hinkley, and just past Lenwood Road west of Barstow. Caltrans proposes to construct a 4-lane divided freeway/expressway to close the 10-mile gap from 2.8 miles west of Hidden River Road (PM SBD 21.8 ) to 0.7 miles east of Lenwood Road (PM SBD 31.1). There is currently an environmental study in process.

    Route 58 LenwoodIn May 2013, the CTC received notice of a proposed EIR related to a project that would widen a portion of Route 58 from two lanes to four lanes. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost for construction and support is $194,925,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15. There are four alternatives being considered: (1) No Build Alternative. (2) Southerly Alignment (Identified Preferred Alternative). A new alignment would diverge from the existing alignment of Route 58 west of Valley View Road and rejoin the existing Route 58 alignment just east of Lenwood Road. The alignment would run approximately 0.5 mile south of the existing Route 58 alignment. (3) A new facility would run along the existing Route 58 alignment. At the easterly end of the project the alignment would be adjusted to avoid encroachment on the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) railroad tracks. (4) Northerly Alignment. A new alignment would diverge from the existing alignment of Route 58 east of Frontier Road and would rejoin the existing Route 58 alignment just east of Lenwood Road. The alignment would run approximately 0.5 mile north of the existing Route 58 alignment.

    In October 2013, the CTC considered for future approval of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will widen a portion of Route 58 from two lanes to four lanes in and near the town of Hinkley. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $194,925,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program.

    In June 2014, the CTC authorized $137,487,000 for the STIP project to widen Route 58 to 4-lanes in Hinkley, from Valley View Drive to Agate Road. The project will add 18 new lane miles and construct two overcrossings.

    In August 2015, it was reported that work on the Hinkley Bypass was progressing. The $201 million project was awarded to Skanska USA Civil and is expected to be finished by December 2016. Crews have already started work. The project will widen and realign Route 58 from a two-lane conventional highway to a four-lane expressway. Two interchanges will be built at Hinkley Road and Lenwood Road. The expressway will be extended approximately 2.89 miles west of Hidden River Road to approximately 0.7 miles east of Lenwood Road. The expressway will have 12-foot standard lanes, 10-foot standard shoulder widths and a 78-foot-wide median. The existing Route 58 will remain open during construction. Hinkley and Lenwood roads are closed to traffic. However, off-road enthusiasts are creating difficulties for construction. They are upset about the construction because once the project is completed there will be no means of legally crossing the expressway for off-road enthusiasts. This blockage will extend from Barstow to Kramer Junction and possibly beyond. Fences will be erected on both sides of the highway, which will prevent off-roaders from crossing legally. Off-road enthusiasts are advocating for Caltrans to add an underpass in the Hinkley area so off-roaders can get to one side from the other. The belief is that if an underpass is not added, some off-roaders will break the law and cut holes in the fences.
    (Source: Victor Valley Daily Press, 8/1/2015)

    In November 2016, it was noted that they've recently opened the Hinkley Rd overpass, and closed the detour via Dixie Rd, so they can fill in the gap in the new roadbed. The Lenwood Rd overpass is not yet paved.
    (Source: pderocco @ AAroads, 11/2/2016)

    In March 2017, it was reported that the Hinkley Bypass was getting closer to opening. In preparation, Caltrans and its contractor Skanska was shifting eastbound Route 58 traffic from the existing highway to the new alignment on the Route 58 Hinkley Expressway. Westbound traffic will remain on the existing highway for until early April, then will shift to the new Route 58 Hinkley Expressway. The project began in June 2015 and is widening and realigning the highway from two lanes to a four-lane expressway. In addition, two interchanges on the widened and realigned section of the highway are being built. One is at Hinkley Road, the other at Lenwood Road.
    (Source: Desert Dispatch, 3/12/2017)

    In June 2020, the CTC authorized relinquishment of 16 segments of right of way, consisting of collateral facilities on superseded portion of State Route 58 (Barstow-Bakersfield Highway) and Realigned Route 58 from Wagner Road to Lenwood Road, in the County of San Bernardino along Route 58 near Hinkley (08-SBd-58-PM R22.64/R30.53) under the terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated April 22, 2014.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.3c)

    The new portion of the Route 58 freeway then begins, from ½ mile east of Lenwood Road to I-15 (~ SBD R29.922 to SBD R34.687). Caltrans has begun the process of scoping out the Hinkley section of Route 58 for upgrade to 4-lane expressway and the portion surrounding Kramer Junction won't be too far behind. In 2007, funding for construction of the Hinkley 4-lane expressway ($130,400K) was requested from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA), but the project was non-recommended.

    In August 2015, the CTC authorized relinquishment of 08-SBd-58-PM R33.4, 08-SBd-15-PM 71.5/72.0: Relinquishes right of way in the city of Barstow along Route 15 on Main Street (formerly Route 31, formerly Route 66) and at “L” Street, consisting of superseded highway and collateral facilities. There's a little bit of Route 58 in there as well, near Main Street. The City, by freeway agreement dated November 19, 1990, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State, and by Resolution No. 4868-2017, agreed to waive the 90-day requirement and accept the relinquishment.

    Near Barstow, the new Route 58 interchange has been completed (~ 058 SBD R34.653, ~ 015 SBD 69.949), and the old interchange is now signed as plain old "Old Highway 58"—no shield, no nothing (~ 015 SBD 75.031). The old routing was up for relinquishment in April 2004. According to Joe Rouse, the original plan was to build a freeway tying in with the then-existing highway just west of Barstow (about ¾ mile E of where Community Blvd ends at Old Hwy 58). A large interchange and short freeway spur was built on I-15 as part of that. This spur ended at Main Street and the interchange was signed as such. When the new Route 58 freeway was completed southwest of Barstow, this interchange was removed and replaced with an extension of L Street and a new diamond interchange.

    The April 2005 CTC agenda showed a resolution to relinquish right of way in the City of Barstow, between Irwin Road and I-15, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

    Naming Naming

    CHP Officer Gerald N. Harris Memorial InterchangeThe interchange at Route 99 and eastbound Route 58 in the County of Kern (~ KER R52.591) is named the "CHP Officer Gerald N. Harris Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Officer Gerald Nathan Harris, who was born in 1938 in the City of Bakersfield, California. Officer Harris graduated from North High School in 1957, and enlisted in the United States Marine Corps shortly thereafter. After several years of service, he was honorably discharged on December 5, 1965. Officer Harris was a service salesman employed by Three Way Chevrolet prior to becoming a California Highway Patrol Officer. Officer Harris graduated from the Department of the California Highway Patrol Academy in 1967 with Academy Class CTC-IV-67, and was assigned to the Santa Fe Springs Area, where he served for approximately one year before being transferred to the Bakersfield Area, where he spent the remainder of his career. Officer Harris, badge number 5554, was killed in the line of duty on February 27, 1974, while directing traffic at an intersection in the City of Bakersfield, where he was struck by a hit-and-run driver. The impact of the collision left Officer Harris with a broken leg and other injuries, which, at the time, did not appear to be life threatening. When Officer Harris subsequently required special medical treatment, the president of Continental Telephone in the City of Bakersfield volunteered his company’s medical plane to take him to a hospital in San Francisco for special treatment, but Officer Harris, unfortunately, died shortly thereafter from an embolism. Officer Harris was a hardworking, dedicated officer who loved his job and enjoyed the people with whom he worked, and who, throughout his career, received several letters commending him on his exemplary service, including one from then Wasco Chief of Police, Robert Duke, and several thank you letters from those whose lives he saved or changed dramatically. Officer Harris was good natured, gracious, honest and loyal, and would always go out of his way to help those in need. In his spare time, he enjoyed weight lifting, the Police Olympics, softball, volunteering to teach bicycle safety to children in schools, and spending time with his family and friends. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 119, Resolution Chapter 131, August 28, 2014.
    (Image source: Scoopnet; Calif. Assn. of Highway Patrolmen)

    Rosa ParksThe segment of this route between Rout 99 and Route 184 (~ KER R52.591 to KER R59.396) is named the "Rosa Parks Highway". This highway was named to honor Rosa Parks on her 89th birthday. Rosa Parks was born on February 4, 1913, in Tuskegee, Alabama. On December 1, 1955, she was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. This will for equal rights was considered the start of the equal rights movements, and was the impetus for a boycott of Montgomery buses, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., by approximately 42,000 African-Americans for 381 days. This boycott let to the United States Supreme Court ruling that Montgomery's segregation law was unconstitutional on November 13, 1956; on December 20, 1956, Montgomery officials were ordered to desegregate buses. As a result of this event, Rosa Parks has been considered to be the "Mother of the Modern Day Civil Rights Movement". Her courage and conviction laid the foundation for equal rights for all Americans and for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. She was also the first woman to join the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP, and was an active volunteer for the Montgomery Voters League. She cofounded the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development in 1987 to motivate and direct youth to achieve their highest potential through the "Pathways to Freedom" program. She is the recipient of many awards including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, and the first International Freedom Conductor Award from the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 134, Chapter 110, on August 15, 2002.
    (Image source: The Negro Woman in History Blog)

    Kern County Korean War Veterans Memorial HighwayThe segment of this route between Route 184 and the Kern County/San Bernardino county line (~ KER R59.396 to KER R143.832) is named the Kern County Korean War Veterans Memorial Highway. It was named in honor of the Veterans of the Korean War from Kern County. From June 25, 1950, until July 27, 1953, the United States was involved in a bloody conflict with North Korea and China following the North Korean invasion of South Korea. Of the 1,789,000 Americans that served in Korea for the purpose of preventing the Communist takeover of South Korea, 36,516 Americans died, 103,284 were wounded, 7,245 were prisoners of war, and 8,176 are still unaccounted for. There were 42 Kern County military personnel killed in action in Korea, three died while missing, two died while captured, and six died from wounds, and approximately 8,120 Korean War veterans lived in Kern County as of 2004. In 2004, thirty-six Korean veterans organized as the Korean War Veterans Association (KWVA), Charles N. Bikakis Chapter, P.O. Box 10133, Bakersfield, CA 93389-0133. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 209, Chapter 194, September 16, 2004.
    (Image source: Flikr)

    In Bakersfield, this is named the "Bakersfield-Tehachapi Highway", based on its endpoints.

    Business Routes Business Routes

    • Bakersfield: Edison Highway
    • Tehachapi: Between Exit 148 (Route 202) and Exit 151, along Tehachapi Boulevard.
    • Boron: Twenty Mule Team Blvd.

    Named Structures Named Structures

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Boron, in Kern County, 3.9 mi W of Boron. (~ KER R138.935)

    CHP Officer Kenneth L. Archer and Officer Robert G. CareyAdditionally, at PM SBD 18.3 in San Bernardino County, there is a memorial to CHP Officer Kenneth L. Archer and Officer Robert G. Carey. California Highway Patrol Officer Robert G. Carey was piloting a departmental helicopter on February 24, 1982, in response to an emergency call of a downed aircraft in the Harper Lake area north of Route 58, when he and his fellow officer, flight observer Kenneth L. Archer, gave their lives in the line of duty as their helicopter crashed at Harper Lake. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 174, Chapter 143, September 18, 2000.
    (Image source: Facebook)

    National Trails National Trails

    The segment of this route from Bakersfield to Route 155 was historically named the "Lions Trail".

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.4] From Route 14 near Mojave to Route 15 near Barstow.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.4] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Kern 58 T52.22 R55.66
Kern 58 R55.66 R55.71
Kern 58 R55.71 R56.69

Exit Information Exit Information

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Interstate Submissions Interstate Submissions

Submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1956 and 1968; not accepted either time. Route 58 is constructed to freeway standards from the jct of Route 99 in Bakersfield to 19 miles east to the jct with Route 223, and begins again as freeway at a point .5 miles east of the Route 223 intersection to approximately 1 mile before Tehachapi Pass. Freeway begins again near the Edwards Air Force base for approximately 19 miles to a point east of Boron.

The question is often raised of why this has not been designated as a continuation of I-40. After all, it was submitted once -- it could be submitted again. Sparker addressed this in an AAroads post on 7/10/2016, which is as good an explanation as any (minor editing was done to fit the conventions of this website):

As with the Route 99 corridor, any push for Interstate status for Route 58 will have to come from political forces in the affected regions; there is little possibility that Caltrans itself would initiate such an action. Local political action was responsible for the last three [non-chargable] Interstate conversions (I-110 in '81, I-710 in '84, and I-880 in '86); in each case, a congressman from the area (the late Glenn Anderson, D-Gardena, in the case of the first two) was on point for the necessary AASHTO/FHWA vetting. Part of the problem is that the actual construction involved in Interstate upgrades is considered within Caltrans to be just another drain on their resources -- and that the budgeting process that is involved in apportioning funds to each district would be substantially disrupted by "piling on" such an outlay in addition to the requirements of the STIP under which they are operating. Unless an improvement to Interstate standards on one of the corridors in question is actually contained within the currently effective STIP, even considering 5 to 15-year windows for upgrades to any is thought of as an "off-book" project. It's not like it was with the pre-'73 Division of Highways; Caltrans is an omnibus tranportation/transit agency with as much $$ volume going to localized (mostly urban/suburban) programmed projects -- just examine any of the last three or four STIP's on a line-item level! [Ed: And if you note, the first interstate submissions for this route were prior to 1973] Long-distance corridor work, unless severely substandard facilities are involved (like Route 99 between Route 198 and the Fresno area), is undertaken if and only if there is sufficient funding available -- which, given the more recent bias toward street/transit issues in denser locales, is not always a given.

In short, Interstate conversion isn't cheap -- and Caltrans' priorities are presently focused on localized issues; they won't run point on such long-distance upgrades. If either Route 58 or Route 99 is to gain Interstate status -- despite being warranted by commercial traffic stats -- it will come from outside. Since the Route 99 corridor is already listed (via an addendum to the High Priority Corridor 54 description) as a future Interstate, the only legislative action required for signage would be for a member of Congress to pick a number and tack it onto the existing legislative description; the existence of the state plan to expand Route 99 would likely serve as a de facto "25-year-window" for facility compliance. Arranging for the same treatment for Route 58 would require an entirely new corridor designation (Barstow to Buttonwillow); the process would be similar if not identical to the language added to the yearly federal funding bill that eventually resulted in I–42 in NC. Again, that would have to come from a congressional source with sufficient clout to steer it through the committee process. In the case of either corridor, it's likely that Caltrans would approach either "mandate from above" with their usual shrug of the shoulders; they'd likely spread any upgrade projects over as many STIP terms as they could, and carry on as before, with work progressing at a marginally faster rate than before.

Blue Star Memorial Highway Blue Star Memorial Highway

This route was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 203, Ch. 324 in 1969.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 58:

Interregional Route Interregional Route

[SHC 164.13] Between Route 5 and Route 15.

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that became LRN 58 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act as the route from Mojave to Needles via Barstow. In 1925, Chapter 279 authorized the highway commission “...to acquire necessary rights of way and to construct and maintain a highway, which shall constitute and be a state highway, extending from Needles or from a point to be selected by the California Highway Commission upon the route of the state highway extending from San Bernardino to Needles in the county of San Bernardino to a point to be selected by the California Highway Commission and the state of Arizona opposite the town of Topock, Arizona or at such other point thereon as may be selected by said California Highway Commission...”

In 1931, Chapter 82 authorized extension of the route from Bakersfield to Mojave, with the state taking jurisdiction over a former county route. In 1933, the route was extended further, from [LRN 2] near Santa Margarita to [LRN 4] near Bakersfield. By 1935, the route was codified in the highway code as follows:

[LRN 2] near Santa Margarita to the Arizona State Line near Topock Arizona via Bakersfield, Mojave, Barstow, and Needles

Later in 1935, it was amended by Chapter 513 to add the following, "together with an extension from a point on such [LRN 58] near Needles easterly by the most direct and practicable route to the Arizona-California line at the Colorado River, including a bridge over and across said river to be constructed, owned, operated, and maintained jointly with the state of Arizona". This definition remained until the renumbering in 1963.

The route was signed as Route 178 between US 101 (LRN 2) and Bakersfield, as US 466 between Bakersfield and Barstow, and as US 66 between Barstow and the Arizona border. After 1964, this routing was signed as Route 58 between Santa Margarita (US 101) and Barstow. Between Barstow and the Arizona line, portions were the unsigned National Trails Highway ("old US 66"), and portions were I-40. It should be noted that this is one of the few routes where the pre-1963 legislative route number was the post 1963 signed route number.


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 57 Forward Arrow Route 59

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