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State Route 1

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Routing Routing

  1. Rte 1 Seg 1(a) Route 5 south of San Juan Capistrano to Route 101 near El Rio except for the portion of Route 1 relinquished:

    (1) Within the city limits of the City of Dana Point between the western edge of the San Juan Creek Bridge and Eastline Road at the city limits of the City of Laguna Beach.

    (2) Within the city limits of the City of Newport Beach between Jamboree Road and Newport Coast Drive.

    (3) Within the city limits of the City of Santa Monica between the southern city limits and Route 10.

    (4) Within the city limits of the City of Oxnard between Pleasant Valley Road and Route 101.

    (g) The relinquished former portions of Route 1 within the Cities of Dana Point, Newport Beach, Santa Monica, and Oxnard are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For those relinquished former portions of Route 1, the Cities of Dana Point, Newport Beach, Santa Monica, and Oxnard shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1. The City of Newport Beach shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portions of Route 1 within its jurisdiction, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression.

    (h) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interest of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Los Angeles the portion of Route 1 within the city between the southern city limit of the City of Santa Monica (~ LA 33.3) and Route 105 (~ LA 25.9), if the department and the City of Los Angeles enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment:

    (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 1 shall cease to be a state highway.

    (3) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (4) The City of Los Angeles shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 1, including any traffic signal progression, to the extent applicable.

    (5) For the portion of Route 1 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Los Angeles shall install and maintain within its jurisdiction, signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1 to the extent deemed necessary by the department.

    Change Notes:

    In 2001, AB 635, Chapter 757, 10/11/2001 authorized relinquishment of the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of Dana Point and is between the western edge of the San Juan Creek channel overcrossing and the city limits of the City of Laguna Beach to the City of Dana Point. It was up for relinquishement in January 2005... and again in July 2005.

    In 2008, AB 1366, Chapter 717, 9/30/2008 authorized relinquishment of the portion of Route 1 located within the city limits of that city and between Pleasant Valley Road and US 101, as well as reauthorizing the Dana Point relinquishment:

    (g) (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Dana Point, the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of that city and is between the western edge of the San Juan Creek channel overcrossing and the city limits of the City of Laguna Beach, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the commission and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. (2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, that portion of Route 1 so relinquished shall cease to be a state highway. (4) For portions of Route 1 that are relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Dana Point shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    (h) The commission may relinquish to the City of Oxnard the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of that city and is between Pleasant Valley Road and Route 101, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the commission and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. (1) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder records the relinquishment resolution that contains the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, that portion of Route 1 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway and may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81. (3) For portions of Route 1 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Oxnard shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    Note: In March 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishment of the item (h) right of way in the city of Oxnard on Route 1 from Pleasant Valley Road to Route 101, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 717, Statutes of 2008, which amended Section 301 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    Note that the following two previously authorized relinquishments were not in AB 1366, and thus appear to have been silently unauthorized:

    In 2001, SB 290, Chapter 825, 10/13/2001 authorized relinquishment of the portion of Route 1 that is located between Jamboree Road and the southern city limits of the City of Newport Beach to the City of Newport Beach. This was up for consideration by the CTC in June 2004.

    In 2008, AB 2326, Chapter 639, 9/30/2008 authorized relinquishment of the portion of Route 1 within the City of Torrance:

    (a) The commission may relinquish to the City of Torrance the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of the city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state.

    (b) A relinquishment under this section shall become effective immediately following the recordation by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (c) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur: (1) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this section shall cease to be a state highway. (2) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this section may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81.

    (d) The city shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 1, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression.

    (e) For the portion of Route 1 that is relinquished, the city shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    In 2009, SB 532 (Chapter 189, 10/11/2009) authorized relinquishment of the portion in Santa Monica by adding Section 301.2 (this portion was relinquished in May 2012):

    (a) Notwithstanding Section 301, the commission may relinquish to the City of Santa Monica the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of the city, from where the route crosses the city limit south of Ozone Street to the Route 10 westbound offramp, pursuant to a cooperative agreement between the city and the department, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state.

    (b) A relinquishment under this section shall become effective immediately following the recordation by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (c) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur: (1) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this section shall cease to be a state highway. (2) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this section may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81.

    (d) For the portion of Route 1 that is relinquished, the City of Santa Monica shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    In 2009, AB 344 (Chapter 238, 10/11/2009) reauthorized relinquishment of the portion in Newport Beach by adding Section 301.3:

    (a) The commission may relinquish to the City of Newport Beach the portion of Route 1 that is located between Jamboree Road and the Santa Ana River, within the city limits of the City of Newport Beach, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state.

    (b) A relinquishment under this section shall become effective immediately following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (c) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur: (1) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this section shall cease to be a state highway. (2) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this section shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (d) The City of Newport Beach shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portions of Route 1, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression.

    (e) For those portions of Route 1 that are relinquished, the City of Newport Beach shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    In 2010, SB 1318 (9/29/10, Chapter 491) changed the definition of this segment to clarify relinquishments by adding " except for the portion of Route 1 relinquished: (1) Within the city limits of the City of Dana Point between the western edge of the San Juan Creek Bridge and Eastline Road at the city limits of the City of Laguna Beach. (2) Within the city limits of the City of Newport Beach between Jamboree Road and Newport Coast Drive." SB 1318 also rewrote all the relinquishment subsections from (g) onward as:

    (g) The relinquished former portions of Route 1 within the City of Dana Point and the City of Newport Beach are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For those relinquished former portions of Route 1, the City of Dana Point and the City of Newport Beach shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1. The City of Newport Beach shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portions of Route 1 within its jurisdiction, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression.

    (h) The commission may relinquish to the City of Oxnard the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of that city and is between Pleasant Valley Road and Route 101, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the commission and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. (1) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder records the relinquishment resolution that contains the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, that portion of Route 1 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway and may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81. (3) For portions of Route 1 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Oxnard shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    SB 1318 had the interesting side effect of omitting any mention of the following previously authorized relinquishments:

    1. The 2008 authorization of relinquishment (AB 2326, Chapter 639, 9/30/2008) of the portion of Route 1 within the City of Torrance. Note that this was dropped earlier in the confusion of some 2008 bills.

    2. The 2009 authorization of relinquishment (SB 532, Chapter 189, 10/11/2009) of the portion within the city limits of Santa Monica.

    In 2013, SB 788 (Chapter 525, 10/10/13) clarified the definition of this segment to:

    1. Add "(3) Within the city limits of the City of Santa Monica between the southern city limits and Route 10."
    2. Clarify that "(g) The relinquished former portions of Route 1 within the Cities of Dana Point, Newport Beach, and Santa Monica are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For those relinquished former portions of Route 1, the Cities of Dana Point, Newport Beach, and Santa Monica shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1. The City of Newport Beach shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portions of Route 1 within its jurisdiction, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression."
    3. Clarify that "(h) The commission may relinquish to the City of Oxnard the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of that city and is between Pleasant Valley Road and Route 101, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the commission and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment."

    In 2014, AB 2752 (Chapter 345, 9/15/2014) added Oxnard to the list of cities with relinquished portions and added segment (4), and deleted item (h) regarding relinquishment to the city of Oxnard. [Note: It appears that Oxnard has rerouted Route 1 onto Rice Ave (see below), but there is no signage. (ref)]

    In 2015, AB 810 (Chapter 561, 10/07/15) authorized relinquishment of a specified portion of Route 1 to the City of Los Angeles by adding:

    (h) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interest of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Los Angeles the portion of Route 1 within the city between the southern city limit of the City of Santa Monica (approximately postmile 33.3) and Route 105 (approximately postmile 25.9), if the department and the City of Los Angeles enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment:

    (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 1 shall cease to be a state highway.

    (3) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (4) The City of Los Angeles shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 1, including any traffic signal progression, to the extent applicable.

    (5) For the portion of Route 1 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Los Angeles shall install and maintain within its jurisdiction, signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1 to the extent deemed necessary by the department.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was defined in 1963 (Chap. 385).

    As of July 1, 1964, part (1) was planned as freeway for the entire route (i.e., through Orange, Los Angeles, and Ventura counties). Construction of this as freeway was killed around the same time as the Whitnall Fwy, Route 64.

    On May 22, 1964, a portion of the Pacific Coast Freeway in Orange County, from 0.8 mile south of MacArthur Boulevard to 0.2 mile north of Adams Boulevard, 10.2 miles, estimated to cost $63.4 million, had a route adoption.

    Pacific Coast Freeway - Orange CountyThe Pacific Coast Freeway in Orange County, as of 1966, turned south from Route 22 on 7th Street, skirting the wetlands inland from Seal Beach, and pass by Huntington Harbor to the then-proposed Route 39 freeway, which extended due N-S between Beach Blvd. and Golden West Avenue. The likely rationale behind this odd routing was that the portion between the I-405/I-605/Route 22 interchange and Route 39 needed to avoid Huntington Harbor; hence, it stayed well inland. When it intersected the Route 39 freeway alignment, it turned south following the Route 39 trajectory for a mile or so before turning SE again to parallel Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) -- but slightly inland to avoid (a) the wetlands immediately north of PCH and (b) the Edison power plant in SE Huntington Beach. Prior to the mid '70's, when the deletions took place, the Route 1 adopted alignment in L.A. and Orange counties was hardly linear in nature; it twisted around to avoid obstacles along or near its projected alignment (refineries in Torrance and Wilmington, business districts and CSULB in Long Beach, Huntington Harbor and the more densely-developed parts of Huntington Beach, etc.). Interestingly, the original route that was formally adopted in the '60's showed the adopted route directly south of the I-405/I-605/Route 22 interchange as Route 240; it is unclear if Route 1 was to remain on PCH between Route 22 and Route 240 -- or whether any conceptual freeway corridor paralleling PCH was under study or discussion; no map ever showed a future alignment anywhere near that section of PCH. [A study the City of Long Beach did in the mid-'70s regarding this corridor (in which they recommended the Division of Highways drop the proposed freeway route), Route 1 would have used the Route 240 corridor. An alternate routing that used the PCH corridor between 7th Street and Seal Beach would have been feasible, since there was almost no development along that corridor until the mid-'70s. ] It would have likely been a non-starter in any case, since it would have passed through Belmont Shores, a proverbial "poster child" for upscale NIMBY activity. This arrangement was different by 1971, when Route 243 (the original designation of the northern extension of I-605 between I-10 and I-210) was added to the Interstate system that year while the extension was under construction (it was never signed as anything but I-605); Route 240 also disappeared that year, replaced by Route 1. The original adopted route did pass through the US Navy facility, which at that time contained the wetlands yet to be protected by the future Coastal Commission. But any activity toward development of this alignment was dead by the late '70's (Gianturco + Coastal Commission = no new freeways anywhere near the coast). It's probable that the section through Navy land was never formalized by an agreement between the two entities (Navy & the Division of Highways), so it was likely left off the 1969 state map until such an accord could be reached -- a point made moot by the overall route deletion a few years later. The 1981 map's depiction of the corridor was likely due to mis-or non-communication between the Gousha researchers and state agencies, since by that time the deletion of both the Route 1 and Route 39 freeways had taken place. The whole notion of deploying a freeway through Navy territory, coastal wetlands, and anywhere in the vicinity of Huntington Harbor always seemed to be an exercise in futility. Even before the mass adopted-route deletions of 1978-82, the only viable freeway arrangement in the area was to let traffic remain on I-405 to the Route 39 freeway alignment, and take it down to/near the beach from there. Obviously even that concept would have been dead meat by the end of the '70's. In any case, all of these routes, along with the adopted section of the Route 39 freeway between Route 1 and I-5 near Buena Park was deleted soon after the Long Beach segment. The Route 1 freeway would have veered inland near Fountain Valley, and would have intersected Route 55 in Costa Mesa right about 19th Street, where the current Route 55 freeway ends. Curiously, the original projected path east of there is similar to the present location of the Route 73 toll road; both closely bypassed UC Irvine to the south of campus.
    (Source: Scott Parker (Sparker) at AARoads, 8/12/2016; 8/13/2016; 8/13/2016; DTComposer at AAroads, 8/14/2016)

    Pacific Coast Freeway - Long BeachThere were originally plans for a Pacific Coast Freeway in Long Beach. It is shown in the 1966 State Highway Map, as well as a 1966 Thomas Brothers. It originally was to follow the western section of Route 22 (E. 7th Street) east to the present I-405/I-605/Route 22 interchange complex. The "Pacific Coast" freeway concept through Long Beach was deleted about 1978 by the CTC on the advice of Ms. Gianturco, the head of Caltrans in the mid-1970s.

    According to Scott Parker, while the Lomita-Torrance segment of the Pacific Coast/Hawthorne freeway system was rife with controversy, it was the Route 1 segment east of there traveling through Wilmington and Long Beach that attracted the most attention as well as negative sentiments and subsequent comments, since it tore up a number of old-stock houses and commercial structures by passing through an arguably historic district immediately north of downtown Long Beach (more or less along 10th Street). Unlike the Torrance section to the west, this one had been formally adopted, with the ROW "set in stone", since the early '60's. Its eastern end segued onto Route 22 on East 7th Street, which fed directly east into the I-405/I-605 interchange. By the beginning of 1975, Caltrans had acquired about half of the required ROW west as far as the west limits of the adopted section, at Western Ave. in Harbor City; construction, slated to start in late 1978 or early 1979, was to proceed east to west. With the advent of the decidedly anti-freeway Gianturco regime at Caltrans at the beginning of 1975, a review of urban freeway mileage -- whether formally adopted or simply future corridor concepts -- was underway as the beginning of a major "purge". The Long Beach section, since even within its advanced planning stages was the subject of localized protests against its development, stood out -- and became the well-publicized "poster child" for the program of eliminating as much unbuilt urban freeway mileage as possible. So by mid-1976 the plans had been shelved, the adoption rescinded, and the ROW put up for sale; the last state-owned property had been disposed of by 1980. Of course the Torrance extension, which had been on indefinite hold since 1974, was itself formally rescinded at the same time -- so the full Route 1/Route 107 "loop" from the east side of Long Beach to I-405 in the Lawndale vicinity was off the books after that. And with the Coastal Commission having, after 1977, effective "veto power" over projects within the shoreline watershed (which decidedly included the territory traversed by that loop), the entire notion of a freeway approximating that original concept would be D.O.A. from that point forward.
    (Source: Scott Parker on AARoads ("Re: The Torrance Freeway would have changed the face of the South Bay"), 7/19/2019)

    According to a 1971 report by the City of Long Beach about the Pacific Coast Freeway (Route 1), most of the freeway proposals for the route in adjoining cities had been killed (with the exceptions of the route adoptions in Huntington Beach and Newport Beach), so that the freeway, once envisioned as running from Oxnard to San Juan Capistrano, would only run from the Harbor Freeway across Long Beach to the San Gabriel River Freeway (indeed, the report refers to the route as the Crosstown Freeway as often as it refers to it as the Pacific Coast Freeway). Since the truncated freeway would be of little benefit, the Long Beach City Manager requested that the State Division of Highways remove the route from the Freeway and Expressway system. The proposed route in Long Beach would have run to the south of Pacific Coast Highway (between Anaheim Street and 10th Street) and a portion of the Pacific Electric right-of-way; the truncated route would have then turned northeast to connect to the western stub of the Route 22 freeway (7th Street) and I-405 and I-605.
    (Thanks to Daniel Thomas for finding this information)

    In the Palos Verdes area, the Pacific Coast Freeway would have connected to the Hawthorne Freeway (Route 107). Whether that freeway (Route 107) would have been solely signed as Route 107 or augmented by auxiliary signs (particularly SB and on the approach signage from I-405) as "TO Route 1" is unknown. One of the corollary aspects of areas with an outsized level of NIMBY activity (such as Palos Verdes) is property valuation. The topography of Palos Verdes is indeed one aspect: North Palos Verdes runs along the northern base of the Palos Verdes hills; to the north is a wide alluvial slope that flattens out a bit south of PCH/Route 1. That alluvial contains large-tract properties; it is zoned for horse ownership, so those with the means to afford horses as well as the sizeable properties required to stable and maintain them have flocked to this area. It's not only prime NIMBY country, but the properties here are also much more expensive to acquire. The decision to veer the proposed Route 1 northward west of Vermont Street and more closely parallel PCH was likely resultant from a combination of topography, finances, and the desire to avoid opposition/complaints from folks with the outsize capability to make their case heard -- and with a better-than-average chance of getting what they wanted. It is likely closely related to the choice not to project/propose a freeway routing closer to the extant Route 1 alignment through Redondo, Hermosa, and Manhattan Deploying a freeway paralleling Sepulveda (Route 1 alignment in the area) would have been a non-starter. Bowing to the obvious, the Division of Highways, and later Caltrans, avoided the routing. Even though they had their master 1959 freeway & expressway plan (with some significant '65 revisions), they had learned to choose their battles carefully -- avoiding planning facilities where they weren't wanted -- particularly where those objecting had a good chance of prevailing! In the Lomita area, one of the principal obstacles to the east-west Route 1 freeway was the presence of the Torrance Airport along Crenshaw Blvd.; it, along with Hawthorne and Santa Monica airports, was one of the main "bases" for corporate jets owned and/or used by the local aerospace industry -- and as such, had virtually sacrosanct local status. Any freeway in the immediate area would have had to limit any vertical aspects of deployment, such as flyovers, high berms, etc. so as not to be construed as interfering with airport operation. The proposed Route 1 freeway routing skirted the southern end of the airport just north of PCH. The freeway would likely have been sited below grade along that stretch, so any interchanges with intersecting streets would not rise significantly above ground level.
    (Source: Scott Parker (Sparker) at AAroads, 8/14/2016)

    Remarkably, plans were under review to construct this freeway as an ocean causeway in the Malibu area (and you thought oil-rigs were bad!) California Highway and Public Works, March-April 1964, said:

    This is the longest freeway planned in District VII; it will extend about 113 miles from the Ventura Freeway north of Oxnard to Serra Junction at Capistrano Beach, in Orange County. The only portions constructed to date are a 6.8 mile section south of Oxnard, and a connection between the Pacific Coast Highway and the San Diego Freeway in Capistrano Beach. Briefly, the status of the route, from north to south in the district, is as follows:

    El Rio to Oxnard: location of the route is being considered in connection with the Oxnard Bypass, on which two public hearings have been held.

    Oxnard to Calleguas Creek, 6.8 miles constructed in 1957.

    Conversion of the existing three-lane Pacific Coast Highway to freeway standards in the vicinity of Point Mugu Naval Station is planned for the future.

    Calleguas Creek to Malibu Canyon Road: California Highway Commission hearing on adoption of route, about 22 miles, was held in Santa Monica February 25, 1964, and two district hearings were held in 1961.

    Malibu Canyon Road to terminus of the Santa Monica Freeway in the City of Santa Monica: In addition to conventional inland locations, route location studies on this 13-mile section are considering the possibility of locating all or part of the freeway on a causeway offshore in the ocean; an alignment along the existing shoreline on a widened beach; or various combinations of causeway and shoreline locations.

    In 1961, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was engaged by the Division of Highways to study the feasibility of the marine location. A report of this study, received in November 1963, is being reviwed by the division and other interested state agencies. The report covers only the marine phase of the project. Conventional land locations are being studied by the division.

    The Corps of Engineers investigated nine alternate offshore and onshore freeway alignments involving earth fills and embankments, beach widening and structures. [...] The report concluded that:

    1. It is engineering feasible to construct the proposed freeway on a marine alignment.
    2. A joint highway-recreational facility extending from Santa Monica to Malibu would enhance the recreational potential of the area.
    3. Maintenance of sand bypassing operations in connection with each of the plans considered are feasible.
    4. It is not expected that builidng any of the considered projects would post any insurmountable problems to the construction industry.

    From Santa Monica south to the end of the route, location studies are being made except in the following areas: 10 miles in Orange County (Huntington Beach-Newport Beach) already adopted; 14 miles between El Segundo and the Harbor Freeway in Wilmington; and about 3 miles between the Marina Del Rey and Olympic Boulevard on the Santa Monica Freeway.

    On February 25, 1964, the CHC held a hearing regarding the Pacific Coast Freeway (Route 1) from Malibu Canyon Road to terminus of Santa Monica Freeway in the City of Santa Monica, 13 miles. The 22.5-mile section of this freeway from Malibu Canyon Road north to Point Mugu was under consideration by the California Highway Commission for route adoption.

    Regarding the Pacific Coast Freeway in Santa Monica, the Santa Monica Surf in 2003 noted:

    [Causeway]Along with the company Seaway Enterprises Incorporated of Beverly Hills, John Drescher (a local businessman), crafted an ambitious scheme. On July 19, 1961, Seaway Enterprises presented the City Council with a thirty-page document, complete with artist renderings, proposing the construction of an island causeway off the coast. Located 4,000 feet from shore, the 30,000-foot long causeway would run parallel to the coastline from Santa Monica beach all the way north to Malibu. In the middle of this artificial archipelago would stretch a 200-foot wide freeway called "Sunset Seaway." It was a remarkable concept. Not only would the brand new highway alleviate the pressure on the coastal road but it would also provide an additional 2.5 million square feet of public beach facing the ocean. The new beaches would accommodate "up to 50,000 persons on peak days," according to the Seaway Enterprises document. In addition to the new land, the area of water between the natural shoreline and the artificial causeway would become a series of marinas accommodating 1,700 small craft.

    On August 29 1961, with Santa Monica City Manager Ernest N. Mobley leading the charge, the Santa Monica City Council established a Causeway and Freeway Committee to "consider and recommend on the desirability and feasibility of the causeway proposal made by Seaway Enterprises and/or any similar proposal." One of the most challenging questions facing committee members was: "Where would all the rock come from?" When the Santa Monica breakwater was constructed in the early thirties, quarry stone had been shipped in barges all the way from Catalina Island; specifically, it was on barges that were towed by tugs and then dumped into the bay at the side of the breakwater. In the case of Sunset Seaway, the estimated tonnage clocked in at a staggering 97 million cubic yards of landfill for the causeway alone and an additional 2.5 million tons of rock to construct a submerged reef to protect it. According to Drescher’s proposal, the causeway would be a phased operation. Rock from the nearby mountains would first be used to create a protective reef. Once in place, the initial landfill for the causeway would come from terracing the mountains, creating an ideal location for new property while at the same time providing some much-needed tonnage. To do this, there would be a conveyor system crossing over Pacific Coast Highway; resulting in millions of tons of rock passing over the heads of motorists below.

    What killed the project was reality. The reality, learned from experience in the Marina Del Rey project, that tidal forces would require regular and costly dredging for silt. The reality of opposition from residents. The reality of construction costs. The reality of legal and legislative headaches, requiring watertight inter-agency agreement just to get the project into planning phases. The reality of the environmental effects of taking 97 million cubic yards of landfill from the nearby Santa Monica Mountains and piling it into the ocean to create a six mile landmass on which to build a highway. The reality of LA Councilman Marvin Braude opposing any city contributions to the project. In September 1965, Governor Edmund "Pat" Brown vetoed the causeway bill. The Causeway Freeway Commission was disbanded in 1966.

    The segment in Santa Monica was relinquished in May 2012.

    Freeway Routing nr Pt MuguIn February 1964, the CHC adopted a freeway routing for Route 1 between Malibu Canyon Road and Pt. Mugu. This routing follows the general alignment of the existing Route 1 from just W of Malibu Canyon Road to just E of Corral Canyon Road, then swings inland slightly to Latigo Canyon Road, and continues W-ly approx 3/4 to 1/4 mi inland from the existing highway, rejoining the latter just W of Trancas Canyon Road. It then continues along the existing highway to Pt. Mugu except for a short stretch near the western limits of the adoption. The plans called for construction of a six-lane freeway with room to expand to eight-lanes when required at an estimated cost of $41.6 million, including rights of way. See the page for Route 64 for an illustration of the Route 64/Route 1 interchange at Malibu Canyon. This routing is also shown in the 1966 Thomas Brothers Guide for Los Angeles County, and it shows on the 1966 State Highway Map, although it is gone by the 1967 map. A 1973 Thomas Brothers doesn't show this routing in Los Angeles County, but does show the portion in Ventura County.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield US Highway Shield The portion of this segment from San Juan Capistrano to Oxnard was added to the state highway system in 1919 as LRN 60. The segment, opened in the late 1920s as part of the Roosevelt Highway, a 1,400-mile road that traced the western margin of the United States. Nationally, Americans found the first highway linking the Mexican and Canadian borders an appropriate memorial for the country's late and famously internationalist president, Theodore Roosevelt. Locally, Southern Californians celebrated the reduced travel time between the various beach towns of the region; the Roosevelt Highway represented the first direct link between Newport Beach and Laguna Beach and between Ventura and Santa Monica. There's a good summary of the early history, including pictures, on the LA As Subject pages from KCET.

    The legislative route was extended in 1925 as far as El Rio (Chapter 309). The segment (Jct. US 101 at Serra to Jct. US 101 at El Rio via Santa Monica) was first signed as Route 3 in 1934 as part of the initial state signing of highways. It was the "Roosevelt Highway" south from El Rio. The highway was named after President Theodore Roosevelt. By October 1935, was also signed as US 101A, and for portions was co-signed with US 6 and US 91.

    As for the numbering as US101A: On July 20, 1935, the highway department notified AASHTO:

    In accordance with the rights delegated to the individual states, we have designated the State Highway from Junction US 101 north of El Rio in Ventura County south along the coast to a junction with US 101 at Serra as Alternate US 101.

    Practically all of the area this route traverses is incorporated, and the designation conforms to that given for an Alternate Route.

    We would like to have this route shown in the description of US Numbered Routes.

    AASHTO subsequently approved this alternate route on September 26, 1937, with an effective date of January 1, 1938. The current Route 1 number was signed in 1964.

    Los Angeles Area

    There has been some interesting discussions regarding the route of this segment (Route 3/US 101A, future Route 1) in the Los Angeles South Bay in the early 1940s. According to one map, it angled slightly northeasterly the current alignment in the middle of Redondo Beach, directly intersecting Camino Real (Sepulveda coming in from Torrance), then sharply angled northwest and then northeast at the north end of Redondo Beach. One explanation for this is an alignment that leaves the current route at Francesca Avenue, then follows Francesca (which angles just east of north then curves back northwest) and crosses the current alignment again to intersect Catalina Avenue (formerly Pacific Avenue), then back to the current alignment at the Hermosa Beach line. Another probable old alignment through Torrance is Newton Street, which skirts the base of the Palos Verdes Hills and intersects (or intersected) PCH at an angle on both ends. This runs through the once-independent village of Walteria, now essentially indistinguishable from the rest of Torrance.
    [Above information from Steve Riner]

    The tunnel under the LAX runways opened in April 1953 as part of the airport expansion to the Interim terminal. The tunnel was funded by a half-and-half combination of a 1945 airport bond issue and a special federal grant. Construction, estimated at $3.5 million, began in 1949. When the 1,909-foot-long divided tunnel was finished four years later, it was the only traffic tunnel beneath a large airport runway in the country

    McClure Tunnel - Nov 1935The McClure Tunnel (originally called the Santa Monica Tunnel) was constructed in 1935 to eliminate the necessity of climbing the Palisades bluff (i.e., the California Incline), and to eliminate the crossing of main city streets and crossing of the railway tracks on Ocean Avenue in the city of Santa Monica. With completion of the tunnel, through traffic proceeding south along the usual highway may go through the bluffs and under the intersection of Colorado Street and Ocean Avenue and under the tracks of the Pacific Electric Railway and then continue South on Lincoln Boulevard toward San Diego. What is interesting about the tunnel is its construction method. Traditional tunnels are constructed by boring. In order to secure satisfactory alignment at reasonable cost it was found necessary to build the tunnel on a curve and make it cross under a portion of the Palisades Park area. In order to secure necessary vertical clearance without dropping the tunnel floor to such extent as would make necessary the reconstruction of a valuable sewer system, or on the otber hand raising the top of the tunnel to such extent that a hump would appear in the track and street above, the designers were forced to make the tunnel flat and wide. Lastly, the ground upon which the tunnel had to be built was not rock and was not capable of safely supporting the load required. The ground was reinforced by driving concrete piles into it so that the piles might act as a substitute for rock. In the case of this tunnel it was also discovered that it was cheaper to construct it via cut and cover, building a barrel as a culvert and then replacing the dirt, park, and streets above. A portion of the street is almost flush with the crown of the tunnel arch. The tunnel is a rigid frame structure resembling a very flat arch with a span of 56' and has a clearance above the pavement of 21'. The tunnel is constructed in 40' foot sections and each of these sections contains approximately 420 yd3 of concrete and 32 tons of bar reinforcing steel. The tunnel was dedicated February 1, 1936.

    The McClure Tunnel replaced an earlier railroad tunnel shown this 1898 film from Thomas Edison's production company. As early as 1886, the Southern Pacific bored a tunnel through Santa Monica's ocean bluffs so that trains traveling through the Santa Monica Arroyo—a natural drainage that once marked the southern edge of town—could turn parallel to the beach toward a long shipping wharf up the coast. Pacific Electric trolleys later used this curved tunnel, which remained in service until shortly before its rotted wooden frame collapsed in 1935. By then the state had already drafted plans to reconfigure the historic conduit. When the dust settled in 1936, Olympic Boulevard traced the old path of the railroad through the arroyo, and a wide, arched concrete tunnel curved through the bluffs where the wooden railroad shaft had been.
    (Source: Southland Blog, 4/29/14)

    In 1941, the Roosevelt Highway was renamed Pacific Coast Highway in much of Southern California.

    Malibu

    Through Malibu, one intransigent landowner, May Rindge, had blocked the construction of the route. Since at least the 1890s, a primitive road had existed, but reached a locked gate at the property line of Rindge's 17,000-acre ranch. Rindge and her late husband had long fought to keep homesteaders off her ranch, and in 1906 she forced the politically powerful Southern Pacific to divert its Santa Barbara line around Malibu and though the San Fernando Valley. In 1907, the county proposed extending the coastal road through Malibu, and in response Rindge posted armed guards at the entrances to her ranch and challenged the county's power of eminent domain in court. A stalemate ensued for years, but the road's prospects improved in the early 1920s when it was incorporated into the newly planned Roosevelt Highway. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the county's right to appropriate the land for the highway in 1923, and the dispute finally came to an end in 1925 when a superior court judge granted the county title to the right-of-way in return for $107,289. Delayed by the litigation, the Malibu segment of the Roosevelt Highway was the last to start construction and open. In February 1925, California Highways and Public Works noted that the contract for the grading of the Coast Boulevard through Malibu Ranch was awarded. The final opening occurred on June 29, 1929, when California Governor C.C. Young, flanked by Miss Mexico and Miss Canada, cut the ceremonial ribbon and a parade of 1,500 cars sped by to navigate the road's curves.
    (Source: KCET Website; CurbedLA 11/21/2018)

    001 in MalibuIn 1947, California rerouted Route 1 in the Malibu area, but it appears the old routing is still visible and used. The 1947 project eliminated the last remaining original 20' pavement along Route 1 between Ventura and Dana Point. The project was constructed in 3 units: the first was a line change around a slide at Latigo Canyon; the second relocated the highway around slide and slipout areas between Corral Creek and Malibu Creek; the third was between Latigo Creek and Corral Creek. The new roadway was an 80' wide divided highway with 2 lanes in each direction. It was also on a higher elevation a bit further away from the beach.

    Pt MuguNorth of Malibu, extensive work was done to reroute the highway around Point Mugu. When highway engineers began plotting the route in 1919, the rocky promontory of Point Mugu presented a colossal challenge. Point Mugu was a near-vertical ridge of resistant volcanic rock -- an igneous dike that in a distant epoch intruded the Topanga formation's softer sedimentary strata--standing some 150 feet tall against the pounding surf. As the westernmost tip of the Santa Monicas, it represented the last visible portion of the rugged mountain range. Just north and west of the point, the land opened up as the Oxnard Plain, while the thrust fault that gave rise to the Santa Monica mountains plunges beneath the waters of the Pacific only to reemerge far to the west as the northern Channel Islands. In 1923-24, Division of Highways engineers blasted a road cut around the base of the headlands. Workers scaled the cliff with ropes and drilled a series of 30-foot holes into the rock. Into the holes went 18 tons of hand grenade powder left over from World War I and 25 tons of black blasting powder, and down came 108,000 cubic yards of rock – much of it used as fill for the adjacent road embankments. By October 1924, a narrow road snaked around the point where waves once lashed at its stony face. This roadway was narrow, dangerous and eroding away. A spate of fatal accidents demonstrated this. Weather was often a factor, but so was the tight, 275-foot radius curve around the point. Drivers plunged their cars off the road and into the Pacific – sometimes leaving little trace except for bloodstained rocks. The tip of Point Mugu earned the dark moniker Dead Man's Rock, and in 1930 Inspector Kenneth C. Murphy of the California Highway Patrol appealed to the state highway commission for help. The commission complied. In October 1937, an army of day laborers began carving a 200-foot-deep road cut through Point Mugu. Workers used 107 tons of explosives, a diesel shovel, a bulldozer, ten dump trucks, and five jackhammers to carve out the new 60-foot-wide roadway. Where the highway once bent around Point Mugu, it would now plow straight through the stony wall. By February 1940, their work was complete. The original road around the rocks survived as a scenic bypass (it's since eroded away), but the main highway now sliced through Point Mugu, leaving only a rocky stub where the Santa Monica Mountains once thrust themselves into the Pacific with a final flourish. This permitted PCH to run to the east of Mugu Rock as it does today.
    (Source: KCET, 7/28/2014)

    Status Status

    In June 2016, it was reported that a Pacific Coast Highway Corridor Study by Caltrans and the Orange County Transportation Authority suggests the possibility of grant-funded roundabouts at El Camino Real’s intersections with Camino Capistrano, Camino San Clemente and Avenida Estacion. It’s part of an analysis of ways to improve safety and mobility for drivers, transit passengers, bicyclists and pedestrians along a 37-mile PCH corridor from Seal Beach to San Clemente. El Camino Real in San Clemente is former Route 1 (officially, Route 1 rejoins I-5 a bit to the north, just above Capistrando Beach). The old Coast Highway/ECR in San Clemente exits from the Route 1 mainline at 001 ORA R0.79. The goal for intersections is to reduce conflicts between pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles. San Clemente City Council members got a synopsis from OCTA on June 13. Joe Alcock, an OCTA manager who worked on the study, said that left-turn bike boxes or left-turn signal phases would be a low-level option for the intersections, while roundabouts are a higher-cost option. Funding could be available to cities through a competitive process. The city already plans to reconfigure El Camino Real along the 0.9-mile stretch from Camino Capistrano to Avenida Estacion, creating a two-way bikeway on the southbound side of the highway as a continuation of Dana Point’s existing two-way bikeway, which ends at Camino Capistrano.
    (Source: OC Register, 6/22/2016)

    Laguna Canyon Channel Bridge No. 55 1106 (12-Ora-1 9.39)

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 2293. 12-Orange-1 9.3. Route 1 In Laguna Beach, at Route 133 (Broadway Street). Replace bridge. Begin Con: 11/19/2019. Total Project Cost: $4,660K.

    In June 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP scope amendment: 12-Ora-1 9.3 9.4 PPNO 2293 ProjID 1213000086 Route 1 In Laguna Beach, at Route 133 (Broadway Street). Replace bridge. The post mile has been revised to better describe the location of work. Increase construction capital because geotechnical investigations revealed the existence of wet and sandy soil that will need to be excavated and backfilled with concrete slurry. Updated cost: $6,681K
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Scope Item 118)

    In May 2020, the CTC approved the following allocation: $4,271,000. 12-Ora-1 PM 9.4. PPNO 12-2293. ProjID 1213000086. EA 0M990. Route 1 in Laguna Beach, at Route 133 (Broadway Street) at Laguna Canyon Channel Bridge No. 55-1106. Outcome/Output: Remove and replace bridge. CON ENG $600,000; CONST $3,571,000. (As part of this allocation request, the Department is requesting to extend the award of the construction contract an additional 6 months beyond the 6 month deadline.)
    (Source: May 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #27)

    In April 2016, it was reported that Orange County Transportation Authority, which partnered with Caltrans to study 37 miles of the highway from Seal Beach to San Clemente, provided the findings from the study to the six coastal city councils. The Pacific Coast Highway Corridor Study identified transit problems and opportunities across the stretch as well as seven subareas, broken down from north to south into Seal Beach (apx 001 ORA 33.224), Huntington Beach (apx 001 ORA 24.649), Newport Beach (apx 001 ORA 19.715), Newport Coast (apx 001 ORA 13.812), Laguna Beach (apx 001 ORA 9.42), Dana Point (apx 001 ORA R1.077) and San Clemente. Several safety issues among bikes, pedestrians and vehicles arose, OCTA Planning Director Kurt Brotcke said during his presentation to board members. Other issues include frequent closures for events, inconsistent aesthetic treatments to the roadway and delays due to traffic congestion and high volumes of pedestrian crossings. In Seal Beach, conflicts occur among bikers, pedestrians and motorists in areas without designated bicycle facilities or sidewalks, the study states. The Huntington Beach area sees heavy pedestrian crossings and traffic back-ups due to full parking lots, and signal timing is not optimized. Heavy pedestrian activity in the Mariner’s Mile and Corona del Mar areas of Newport Beach creates traffic, while the Newport Coast area experiences conflicts between bicycles and vehicles using the right-turn lanes on Newport Coast Drive. Pacific Coast Highway through the Laguna Beach area has a constrained width and narrow or missing sidewalks. The Dana Point area lacks pedestrian facilities and bicycle routes and has stretches that cannot withstand floodwaters. And the San Clemente area has insufficient pedestrian facilities and conflicts between road users at several intersections, according to the study. The City of Newport Beach and OCTA have already started moving forward with improvements at 27 traffic signals along a nine-mile stretch of the highway between west Newport Beach and Newport Coast. The City Council this month approved an agreement with OCTA to install signal equipment and fiber optic cable, update signal timing and install closed-circuit television cameras along Coast Highway at Superior, Riverside Avenue and Dover Drive. The project is expected to enhance traffic signal coordination. Much of the estimated $2.25-million project will be funded by a county grant. Newport Beach has agreed to chip in $450,000.
    (Source: OC Register, April 11, 2016; LATimes, 5/2/2016)

    In September 2016, it was reported that brighter lights, intersections where pedestrians can cross from all corners at the same time and bicyclists who stay off Coast Highway are suggestions that Laguna city leaders offered in reaction to a study of the state highway conducted by the Orange County Transportation Authority and Caltrans. The study found that Coast Highway through Laguna Beach (apx 001 ORA 9.42) is narrow and lacks sidewalks. The Dana Point segment lacks sidewalks, as well as bicycle routes, and has stretches of roadway that frequently flood. In San Clemente, there are roadway segments without sidewalks and there have been reports of near collisions at several intersections. In Seal Beach, there have been issues among bikers, pedestrians and motorists in areas without designated bicycle lanes or sidewalks, the study states. Huntington Beach has heavy pedestrian crossings, and parking overflow backs up onto the roadway. Signals are also not well-synchronized. Heavy pedestrian activity in the Mariner’s Mile and Corona del Mar areas of Newport Beach creates traffic on the road, and in Newport Coast, there have been issues between bicycles and vehicles using the right-turn lane onto Newport Coast Drive. Laguna Beach Mayor Pro Tem Toni Iseman expressed concern about adding bicycle lanes to Coast Highway, as suggested by the report.
    (Source: OC Register, 9/20/2016)

    In March 2017, it was reported that Newport Beach (apx 001 ORA 19.715) residents expressed their discontent to city officials at a recent public workshop regarding proposed changes to Mariners’ Mile, a 1.3-mile zone of Coast Highway (Route 1). The current plan outlines strategies to alleviate automotive congestion and encourage pedestrian movement for the area but eliminated the idea of any particular theme. Residents expressed their disappointment to hear the idea of a nautical theme for the locale being disregarded, demanding to know why the design would not be implemented. Buildings along Mariners’ Mile are no longer nautical, according to Newport Beach city staff. The city hopes to improve traffic flow through Mariners’ Mile. The plan is to expand Coast Highway to six lanes. Currently, the road consists of four to five lanes between Dover Drive and Newport Boulevard. Residents voiced their disapproval about expanding Coast Highway and changing the infrastructure. Some residents were opposed to drawing more automobiles or people to the area. The conceptual plan also includes replacing street parking with a public parking structure, building a bridge for pedestrians to cross Coast Highway as well as providing alternative routes for bike lanes to go through residential streets such as Avon.
    (Source: The Log, 3/9/2017)

    In August 2015, it was reported that Caltrans is beginning a process to replace or repair the Alamitos Bay Bridge (001 LA 000.98) on Pacific Coast Highway. The bridge was built in 1959 over the river channel between Second Street and Loynes Drive. It was widened eight years later, but now has been deemed seismically deficient (in danger of collapse in an earthquake). According to a Caltrans report, the bridge still is safe to use, but an inspection discovered cracks in the concrete curb, potholes on the roadway and cracks in some of the piles and piers. Erosion also has deteriorated the banks under the bridge. This project could have particular significance because it is just north of the Second Street-PCH intersection that some say is the most congested in the city, and is in the middle of the SEADIP (Southeast Area Development and Improvement Plan) area now being studied for an updated land use plan. The Second Street-PCH intersection and PCH itself play key roles in some of the proposed plans. PCH is a southern gateway into Long Beach. Traffic along the state highway has been a sticking point for proposed developments in the area. At the same time, the city has little control over the highway’s configuration because Caltrans maintains it as a state highway. Three alternatives will be considered: a no-build alternative, an option to retrofit the existing bridge and complete replacement with a wider bridge.
    (Source: Gazettes, 8/3/2015)

    In August 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP allocation: $1,273,000. 07-LA-1 3.5. Route 1 In Long Beach, at Lakewood Boulevard (Route 19) at the Los Alamitos Traffic Circle. Outcome/Output: Upgrade the existing roundabout to a standard configuration by adding pavement markings and guide signs to better direct motorists and control movements. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions.
    (Source: August 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) Item 36)

    In late March 2007, the City of Torrance indicated its desire to take over the segment of this route within its city limits (apx 001 LA 14.24 to 001 LA 18.215). Specifically, the Torrance City Council voted unanimously to send a letter indicating its interest in having the state Department of Transportation relinquish control of the 5-mile segment of Pacific Coast Highway and 6-mile stretch of Hawthorne Boulevard within Torrance limits. Sending the letter is a precursor to an estimate the city is required to provide to Caltrans of the cost of bringing each road up to a "state of good repair." City staff members believe it will cost $25M to $30M for each road, which the state would provide to the city in the form of a one-time payment. Bringing the route under city control will allow the city to improve the timing of signal lights to improve traffic flow and reduce the bureaucracy needed to upgrade the roads.
    (Source: Daily Breeze, 3/29/2007)

    The intersection with Route 107 in Torrance (apx 001 LA 15.975) is being reconstructed under TCRP Project #46. This project was to reconstruct the intersection of Hawthorne Boulevard (Route 107) and Pacific Coast Highway (Route 1) by adding turn pockets. The cost to complete PA&ED was significantly underestimated in the original application, and additional TCRP funds are required to complete the phase. With R/W estimated to be over $26,000,000, the overall project cost has exceeded the total TCRP funds available. Per the September 2006 CTC Agenda, until such time as the City of Torrance and the Department can identify additional funds to complete PS&E, R/W, and Construction, those phases have been put on hold. In order to complete PA&ED and closeout the phase, an additional $467,000 of TCRP funds is required. Note: According to the Daily Breeze on 3/29/2007, this project was originally began by the City of Torrance, and was to consist of a right turn lane from northbound Hawthorne Boulevard to eastbound Pacific Coast Highway. The project was estimated to cost about $2 million. Caltrans took over the project, changed the scope of the improvements to include the entire intersection, studied and designed it at a cost of $2 million, and concluded that upgrading the entire intersection would cost $15 million.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $450,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs along Route 1 from Torrance to Malibu from Camino De Las Colinas Road (apx 001 LA 18.05) to Sunset Boulevard (001 LA LA 39.326) that will construct Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) curb ramps at 13 locations to upgrade curb ramps to comply with ADA standards.

    In July 2011, Metro approved about $1.24 million in Measure R funding to improve Route 1 (Pacific Coast Highway) from Artesia Boulevard (001 LA 21.926) to Anita Street (apx 001 LA 20.619), and the intersection of Route 1and Aviation Boulevard under the program—split as $240,000 for Route 1 from Artesia to Anita and $1 million for the Route 1-Aviation junction.

    A study in late 2009 indicated that nearly half of the 125 intersections on the oft-congested 11-mile stretch of Pacific Coast Highway between Torrance and El Segundo need improvements to help traffic flow better. The same study found that many of those upgrades would be relatively easy and inexpensive to implement. Fifty-four of the 125 intersections need modifications along the major commuter route, the study said. The yearlong, $100,000 study included not only analysis and observations by transportation experts, but motorists who drive the route on a regular basis, according to the South Bay Cities Council of Governments, which commissioned the study. The study also found that the three busiest intersections along PCH were Rosecrans Avenue in Manhattan Beach (001 LA 23.927) and Hawthorne (apx 001 LA 15.962) and Crenshaw boulevards (apx 001 LA LA 14.632) in Torrance. The single worst stretch of crowded highway: the segment between Rosecrans Avenue and Manhattan Beach Boulevard. The study also found that Manhattan Beach Boulevard in Manhattan Beach is a "significant choke point" during the evening commute, but southbound traffic usually continues without stopping until vehicles hit Pier Avenue/Aviation Boulevard in Hermosa Beach. (More Details).

    In February 2017, it was reported that the City of El Segundo was revisiting a proposal to change the name of Sepulveda Boulevard (Route 1) to Pacific Coast Highway — a move proponents say will give businesses along the corridor a beachy rebranding. The idea to rename the 2-mile stretch of Route 1 that runs through the city from Imperial Highway (apx 001 LA 25.881) to Rosecrans Avenue came from the El Segundo Economic Development Advisory Council in 2013, when it launched an ambitious marketing campaign to attract new businesses. The efforts have paid off, winning El Segundo the title of most business-friendly city in Los Angeles County in 2015 and surpassing a goal of attracting 100 new businesses by the city’s centennial. The last time outreach was conducted in 2014, the results were mixed: 41 percent of the 86 mostly business owners who responded to surveys liked the idea, 45 percent didn’t, and 14 percent were indifferent. According to city staff, Caltrans would prefer having neighboring Manhattan Beach — where the street also is named Sepulveda Boulevard — sign off as well, but the city has not taken a formal stance and did not respond to a letter from Mayor Suzanne Fuentes in 2015. Sepulveda Boulevard becomes Pacific Coast Highway in Hermosa Beach to the south and Lincoln Boulevard north of Los Angeles International Airport. It becomes Pacific Coast Highway again in Santa Monica (N of the McClure Tunnel). Sepulveda Boulevard has a strong identity in Manhattan Beach, according to historian and former mayor Jan Dennis, who is writing a book just on its history in the city. Manhattan Beach was unwilling to change the name of Artesia Boulevard to Redondo Beach Boulevard when business owners in north Redondo Beach lobbied for that idea in recent years, also with the aim of enhancing the area’s beach identity. In April, it was reported that the El Segundo City Council decided to initiate the name change process without conducting a new round of surveys with businesses on the 2-mile stretch of Route 1 that bisects the town, something that produced mixed results in 2014. If the change is approved by Caltrans, it would make the name of the street inconsistent in Manhattan Beach as it runs through the South Bay, going from PCH in El Segundo, to Sepulveda Boulevard in Manhattan Beach, and back to PCH again in Hermosa Beach and Redondo Beach. El Segundo Public Works Director Ken Berkman said he is still waiting on Caltrans to answer some questions about the process, mostly to do with logistics. The agency previously indicated it would prefer having Manhattan Beach on board as well. The name change is expected to take a year to 18 months to complete, giving businesses time to transition, Berkman said, and could cost the city $15,000. Mail sent to Sepulveda Boulevard addresses would be forwarded for the first 18 months. The City Council still has to pass a formal resolution that would be submitted with its application to Caltrans
    (Source: Daily Breeze, 2/8/2017; DailyBreeze, 4/19/2017)

    In June 2018, Caltrans tweeted: "In #ElSegundo this past weekend street signs were installed changing the name of Sepulveda Bl. to Pacific Coast Hwy between Imperial Hwy & Rosecrans Av. - in the city of El Segundo only, as requested by the city & permitted in advance by Caltrans"
    (Source: Caltrans District 7 Twitter, 6/4/2018)

    Sepulveda Tunnel

    In September 2012, it was reported that construction was beginning on the $3.5 million Sepulveda Tunnel retrofitting project (apx 001 LA 26.355) that promises to better illuminate the road with energy efficient LED lighting. Construction is scheduled to start the first week of October 2012 and continue through November 16, 2012. The work will resume after the holidays, from January 2, 2013 and continue through June 20, 2013. The majority of the work will take place in the overnight hours. The work inside the tunnel, which runs underneath a runway on the south side of Los Angeles International Airport, will address poor visibility and other safety issues. The work is part of a collaborative effort between state and local agencies. Rosendahl brought Los Angeles World Airports, Bureau of Street Lighting, Bureau of Street Services, Department of General Services, and CalTrans to the table to figure out a plan to not only renovate but also maintain the tunnel. The agencies agree to be responsible for tunnel upkeep, properly sweep and maintain the roadway, and power wash the walls and ceiling.

    In March 2013, the LED lighting project was completed.

    LAX Rework (LA 26.968)

    In April 2019, it was reported that Los Angeles airport officials have called for an expansion and reorganization of the nation’s second-busiest airport, including changes to existing runways and the construction of a passenger terminal east of Sepulveda Boulevard. In a 142-page environmental document, city airport officials said the expansion would bring more sophisticated facilities for travelers, improve runway safety, and add at least 21 gates for domestic and international flights. There is some impact of this work on Route 1 (which will also be impacted by the future relinquishment of the segment of Route 1 between I-105, S of LAX and the Santa Monica City Limits). The primary impacts would be reconfiguration of the connections to 96th Street and the entrances from Sepulveda to the Airport proper, the reconstruction of roadways across Sepulveda Blvd (Route 1) including the extension of passenger terminal walkways and roadways.
    (Source: Los Angeles Times, 4/5/2019)

    Lincoln Blvd - Playa Del Rey

    There is a regional transportation improvement project to widen the following portions of Route 1 in Los Angeles County: between 92nd and Grand; between 33rd Street and Rosecrans Avenue; between Hughes Terrace to La Tijera Blvd; between Figi Way and Hughes Terrace. This will also include demolishing the Culver Blvd overcrossing (apx 001 LA 30.926) and constructing a new six-lane overcrossing with longer spans, as well as removal of some medians to turn them into traffic lanes.

    In March 2018, it was reported that Caltrans was hosting a community meeting to discuss plans for widening Lincoln Boulevard between Jefferson Boulevard in Playa Vista and Fiji Way in Marina del Rey. The heavily trafficked 0.6-mile stretch of Lincoln traverses the upper and lower segments of the ecologically sensitive Ballona Wetlands Ecological Reserve. The project, still in its early development stages, includes widening the Lincoln Boulevard bridge over Ballona Creek and the Culver Boulevard bridge over Lincoln. The project may entail work that touches the wetlands, but everything is in the preliminary stages. Caltrans is considering two sets of plans. The first would realign Lincoln and its Culver interchange to the east, expanding the Lincoln Boulevard bridge to accommodate three traffic lanes in each direction (instead of two) plus a sidewalk and bicycle lanes on each side. A new Culver bridge would maintain the existing traffic configuration but add a sidewalk and bicycle lanes to connect with the Ballona Creek Bike Path. The other plan would maintain the existing Lincoln Boulevard alignment by widening the roadway on both sides to accommodate three traffic lanes, sidewalk and bicycle lanes over the bridge, while also widening the Culver bridge to include bike paths and a sidewalk.
    (Source: The Argonaut, 3/27/2018)

    Lincoln Blvd - Santa Monica

    In August 2011, the Santa Monica City Council approved a resolution accepting responsibility for the section of Lincoln Boulevard, also called Route 1, which runs from the I-10 Freeway to the southern city limits (apx 001 LA 33.319). Santa Monica officials have been pushing for control over sections of Lincoln Boulevard since 1996, when City Hall won control over portions of both Lincoln and Santa Monica (Route 2) boulevards. In 2009, the California Legislature approved a bill greenlighting Santa Monica to assume responsibility for the southern section. That bill became effective Jan. 1, 2010. Under the previous arrangement, the Santa Monica Public Works Department had the authority to fill potholes, but major repairs, like sealing the road or adding additional asphalt emulsion, were the responsibility of cash-strapped Caltrans. This resulted in Lincoln having one of the lowest scores (i.e., being in the worst shape) in Santa Monica. It will cost approximately $2.2 million to bring the 1-mile section of road up to snuff and repair the curb, gutter and sidewalk damage that has wreaked havoc on the roadway. Caltrans isn't required to pay for those improvements, particularly after responsibility trades hands from state to City Hall, but it is its practice to do so.
    (Source: Santa Monica Daily Press)

    In May 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Santa Monica on Route 1 between Route 10 (apx 001 LA R34.553) and the southeasterly city limits (001 LA 33.319), under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement scheduled to be signed by the City Manager by May 5, 2012. The City Council authorized the City Manager to sign the relinquishment agreement during the City Council meeting dated August 23, 2011. Authorized by Chapter 189, Statutes of 2009, which added Section 301.2 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    In October 2013, the CTC authorized $2.2 million in Santa Monica on Route 1, from Dewey Street (001 LA 33.303) to Route 10 (apx 001 LA R34.553), with the goal of relinquishing 5.2 miles of roadway (Lincoln Boulevard) to local jurisdiction. City will accept ownership, maintenance, operation and liability over the relinquished facilities.

    In April 2017, it was reported that the City of Santa Monica had finalized its design for a relinquished portion of Route 1, along Lincoln Blvd s of Olympic Blvd (near I-10, the Route 1/Route 2 junction, apx 001 LA R34.591) to Ozone Ave. The first wave of changes will include: (*) A dedicated bus lane during peak hours; (*) Curb extensions; (*) ADA-compliant sidewalk ramps; (*) New crosswalks and improvements to existing ones; (*) Nearly 50 new trees. The project does not include the creation of a formal bike lane, though it will allow for bike riders to use up to 5 feet of the bus lane. An earlier staff report had pegged costs for the first phase at about $2.5 million. A second, more expensive phase, is ultimately planned. It would involve adding stormwater filtration infrastructure and pedestrian lighting.
    (Source: CurbedLA, 4/27/2017)

    In January 2018, it was reported that the City of Santa Monica was considering the Gateway Master Plan, which will address planning in the area “adjacent to the I-10 Freeway that links Downtown to the Civic Center” and to Santa Monica High School, and it could include covering the freeway with decking that could create new space for a park (this appears to include the portion of the freeway that, although considered I-10, is really Route 1). Previous reports on capping the park had explored extending the McClure Tunnel and covering the freeway from Fourth Street (001 LA 35.037) to Ocean Avenue (001 LA 35.11). The new staff report says the Gateway Master Plan offers “a unique opportunity for strengthening connections over the freeway right of way.” It also says the cap park would be a way to offer “an enlarged green space for outdoor enjoyment” where there previously was none. By removing the visual and physical barrier between the city’s downtown and its civic center area, the park could create a new link between the two sections of the city. The report also notes that by providing access to “peripheral parking opportunities,” the park might be able to reduce car congestion in the city’s downtown.
    (Source: CurbedLA, 1/8/2018)

    A (temporary) installation of a statue of Mario of the Mario Brothers has been installed atop a column on I-10 freeway (actually, Route 1, as the visible location is ~ 001 LA R34.812) in Santa Monica. The character is visible from the corner of Olympic and 5th Street and to vehicles entering the freeway at that intersection. It is the work of Bohemia Incorporated and the arts duo said the location had been on their radar for years but it took some time to figure out what to put there. The Styrofoam sculpture is about 32 inches tall and is painted to match the concrete it sits atop.
    (Source: Santa Monica Daily Press, 7/22/17)

    Note: For information on the Santa Monica Pier (approx 001 LA 35.242), see Route 187, as the pier was originally part of that route.

    In April 2017, it was reported that a new type of crosswalk beacon has been installed by Caltrans on Route 1 (Pacific Coast Highway) in the Pacific Palisades neighborhood of Los Angeles. The system is popularly known as a HAWK beacon (the acronym is derived from High-intensity Activated crossWalK). More precisely, it is referred to as a Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon (PHB). The installation is designed to provide superior awareness and enhanced safety when pedestrians use the crosswalk. This is the second PHB in operation that was installed by Caltrans District 7, which includes the counties of Los Angeles and Ventura. The first is on Route 1 at Second Street in the city of Manhattan Beach. When a pedestrian activates the button, the Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon uses flashing and solid lights to instruct drivers to stop. As seen from a driver’s point of view, the configuration of the PHB consists of two red lenses side-by-side over a single yellow lens. The new PHB was installed in March 2017 on Route 1 north of Temescal Canyon Boulevard near Palisades Bowl Mobile Home Park (apx 001 LA 38.109).
    (Source: Caltrans District 7 Blog, 4/7/2017)

    In February 2012, it was reported that the Southern California Association of Governments and the city of Malibu have posted a bid for a Pacific Coast Highway Safety Study for all modes of travel along the 21 mile stretch between the eastern (001 LA 40.744) and western edges of Malibu (apx 001 LA 61.603). The Scope of Work document indicates that the "study will examine current conditions along the roadway and determine accident patterns based on roadway geometry, adjacent land-uses and/or other factors that may be unique to Malibu. The study will analyze and identify potential strategies, (engineering, education and enforcement) to promote improved safety along PCH for all modes of travel including bicycling and walking." The Scope of Work also breaks the long, skinny city into four sections for the study to examine, including: 1) Topanga Canyon Road to Big Rock Road, 2) Big Rock Road to Cross Creek Road, 3) Cross Creek Road to Busch Drive, and 4) Busch Drive to Western City Limits." A $300,000 grant (pdf) from Caltrans provides most of the funding for this portion of the study, which is expected to take 24 months to complete.

    In October 2016, the CTC authorized vacation of right of way in the city of Malibu along Route 1 from 0.4 miles west of Tuna Canyon Road to 0.2 miles east of Tuna Canyon Road (PM 41.1/41.7), consisting of superseded highway right of way. In December 2016, this vacation resolution was amended to correct an incorrect corporation name in a reservation.

    In June 2015, it was reported that the Malibu City Council approved a plan to make Malibu safer. The plan recommends 150 road improvements, both large and small, which include extending bike lanes, adding traffic circles, fixing cracked roads, and adding more parking lots. The $20 million project is hoping to get funding through L.A. County's Measure R sales tax, or through federal or state grants. The plan stems from a study three years in the works. It finds that PCH's busy shoulders are especially hazardous because bicyclists, pedestrians, parked cars and buses are all competing to use it. The study says drivers make dangerous parallel parking moves while going at 45 to 55 mph because the only other alternative to this free on-street parking is paid parking lots and valet. The study finds that it's confusing for drivers who want to park alongside PCH because the street signs and painted red curbs are inconsistent, causing even more reckless driving. Local Malibu residents apparently even put up fake no-parking signs to keep outsiders from taking up their on-street parking spots. Additional recommendations include extending the bike lane from Zuma Beach across the city. The plan also proposes that the most dangerous part of PCH by Las Flores Canyon Road (apx 001 LA 44.121), which has a sharp curve, should be widened. There are also two intersections within 150 feet of each other there, and the plan recommends that one of the signals be removed to make it safer. It also proposes that Malibu parking lots be added so that folks will stop parking alongside the shoulder of the road, where cyclists bike through. The report recommends bike lanes and raised medians, additional pedestrian crosswalks and designated underpasses. It also considers the possibility of a state-of-the-art traffic-signal timing system that could be adjusted for real-time conditions. The existing system was built piecemeal, and engineers must manually change signal times at many intersections. Pedestrian-activated flashing lights at crosswalks are also on the list, as is lane narrowing in the city's western end to encourage vehicles to slow down.
    (Source: LAist, 6/22/2015, LATimes, 7/13/2015)

    A small portion in Malibu was up for vacation in April 2003: 07-LA-1-PM 50.9 Route 1 in the City of Malibu.

    Trancas Creek Bridge (07-LA-1 PM 56.5/56.9)

    Trancas Creek Bridge (07-LA-1 PM 56.5/56.9)In March 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to replace the existing Trancas Creek Bridge with a new bridge structure on Route 1 (07-LA-1, PM 56.4/56.9). The project also proposes to promote multimodal transportation with a Class II bike lane. The project is estimated to cost $53.0 million. The project is fully funded and programmed in the 2016 SHOPP for an estimated total of $49.9 million, which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2021-22. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 SHOPP.
    (Source: CTC Minutes, March 2018 Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    In June 2018, the CTC amended the 2018 SHOPP for this project, noting "Preliminary engineering and consultation with the Los Angeles Dept. of Public Works has determined that a longer bridge is needed to address storm flows. The longer bridge will require significantly more complex right of way which will take an estimated 24 months to acquire and can not be completed within the current schedule. The right of way capital costs are increased in anticipation of real estate price inflation." Construction is now shown in FY20-21. Total Cost is now $54.933M.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, June 2018 Agenda Item 2.1a(2) Item 42)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Bridge Preservation item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 07-LA-1 PM 56.5/56.9 PPNO 4498 Proj ID 0712000094 EA 29140. Route 1 in Malibu, from Guernsey Avenue to Trancas Canyon Road/Broad Beach Road. Replace bridge. Programmed in FY20-21, with construction scheduled to start in March 2021. Total project cost is $54,933K, with $46,628K being capital (const and right of way) and $8,305K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.),
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In March 2019, the CTC made the following emergency allocation: $6,900,000 Los Angeles 07-LA-1 40.7/59.9. Route 1 In and near Malibu, from Route 27 to Route 23. The Woolsey Fire began on November 8, 2018. The fire has burned over 96,000 acres and destroyed existing wood posts, signs, guardrail, support slopes, and fire debris are collecting in the drainage systems. This project will clean fire debris, repair drainage systems, guardrail, signs, and slopes.
    (Source: March 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5f.(1) Item 12)

    In May 2019, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will provide drainage restoration at 19 locations on Route 1 in the cities of Los Angeles, Malibu and unincorporated areas within Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. The proposed project addresses the need to repair and rehabilitate existing drainage along Route 1. The project proposes to restore full functionality of the drainage facilities and prevent further deterioration. More significantly, the proposed project also will include replacement of the existing bridge/culvert on Solstice Canyon Creek (Bridge 53-0030, LA 50.36, built in 1947). The proposed replacement of the bridge and culvert will address the need to improve flood water conveyance and hydraulic conditions to facilitate movement of the endangered steelhead trout population. The project is fully funded and currently programmed in the 2018 State SHOPP for an estimated total of $25.9 million, which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). The project is estimated to begin in 2022.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    In October 2016, the CTC added the following project into the SHOPP: 7-Ven-1 4.0/4.2 | Route 1 In Ventura County, south of Point Mugu State Park (PM 4.0) and Sycamore Canyon Road (PM 4.2). Construct secant walls at two locations as a permanent slope restoration solution to stabilize the slope and prevent continued erosion. Allocation: $766K (R/W), $27.179MM (C), Support (PA & ED $1.2MM / PS & E $1.9MM / RW Sup $100K / Con Sup $2.6MM / Total $5.8MM). FY 19/20. [This project is of particular interest, as it is located right below the Wilshire Blvd Temple Camps (at Route 1 and Yerba Buena Road (7-Ven-1 1.215)

    In December 2018, it was reported that, in October 2018, waves eroded away the beach across the street from the giant landmark sand dune … at Thornehill Broome State Beach (VEN 5.588). In particular, waves have chewed into the sand bench that has held the highway since 1926, where a 10-foot vertical scarp stretches directly beneath the fog line for about 100 feet. Money from the gas tax hike … and other tax sources … has been shuffled by the California Transportation Commission for the repair project. It is estimated that $7.5 million will be needed to repair damaged slope and shoulder, place boulders to protect the slope, and repair any damaged utilities.
    (Source: Malibu Times, 12/8/2018)

    Rice Avenue Rerouting

    Route 1 in Oxnard is currently undegoing extensive construction at the Pleasant Valley Road Interchange (apx 001 VEN 15.061). When this construction is complete in June 2003, Route 1 will be routed onto Rice Ave vice Oxnard Blvd. In 2008, the Ventura County Star reported that on January 1, 2009, the designation of Route 1 will be moved from Oxnard Boulevard to Rice Avenue. That will give the Port of Hueneme a more efficient and direct route to US 101, As part of the Route 1 redesignation, the California Transportation Commission provided $30.5 million to improve and expand the Rice Avenue-US 101 interchange. That project is expected to be completed in 2012. Having control of Oxnard Boulevard will enable the city to undertake a variety of traffic improvement and beautification measures. The city will sequence traffic signals to allow traffic to flow more smoothly and will also install a computerized sensor system to reduce waiting times at intersections, he said. The redesignation of Route 1 also will allow the city to move heavy trucks off Oxnard Boulevard, which also will improve traffic. New landscaping, sidewalks and parking along the main thoroughfare downtown are also in the works. [What's interesting here is that the postmile tool map shows Route 1 on Rice, but postmiles are along Oxnard Blvd.]

    Rice and Fifth IntersectionIn December 2012, it was reported that the City of Oxnard had regained control of Oxnard Boulevard (the former routing of Route 1). This permits the city to reroute Route 1 in Oxnard down Rice Avenue, where construction of a new interchange at US 101 recently ended, except for landscaping and minor touch-ups. The city also has a grant to design and build a bridge on Rice over railroad tracks just north of Fifth Street, a potential trouble spot for the high volume of truck traffic shuttling goods to and from the Port of Hueneme. The agreement with Caltrans concerns Oxnard Boulevard as well as some segments of Fifth Street and Vineyard Avenue now under state control. The portion of Fifth that is affected runs from Oxnard Boulevard to Rice. The Vineyard strip sits between US 101 and Oxnard Boulevard. The move would give the city ownership of the roads, which means local officials would control permits and other issues for streets, sidewalks, medians and driveways. An estimated $15 million in improvements is needed to bring the streets up to city standards, according to a staff report, and ongoing maintenance costs are estimated at $100,000 a year. The upgrades can be paid for by development fees and grants, the report says, and Caltrans is requesting a $1 million, one-time payment to the city that can be used for ongoing maintenance costs.
    (Source: VC Star, 11/26/2012)

    In June 2013, the CTC authorized $1,000,000 for improvements in the city of Oxnard from Pleasant Valley Road to Route 101, from Oxnard Boulevard to Rice Avenue, and from Oxnard Boulevard to Route 101 in order to relinquish roadway

    In February 2016, it was reported that although Rice Avenue is now Route 1, but the only place that was indicated on US was a Route 1 shield on exit 62B Oxnard Blvd -- which was greened out. Additionally, the Route 1 NB shield was greened out on NB Pacific Coast High at Pleasant Valley Road (though not at the offramp itself); there is a standalone TO US 101 shield on NB Route 1 where it transitions onto Rice Avenue; and the END Route 34 sign is still up on WB 5th approaching Oxnard Blvd.
    (Source: "Route 1/Rice Avenue in Oxnard" @ AAroads)

    On AAroads, it was noted that District 7 was unlikely to adopt Rice Ave. until the RR grade separation at Rice Ave. and Fifth St. is completed. The baseline agreement for that separation was signed 8/18/2018. The separation was approved by the CTC as part of the Trade Corridor Enhancement Program at the May 2018 CTC meeting. The project is at the Rice Avenue, Fifth Street (Route 34), and UPRR Intersection. The project also includes construction of two connector roads, one in the southeast quadrant and another in the southwest quadrant of the Rice Avenue grade separation, to provide access between Rice Avenue and Fifth Street. The estimated completion of construction is in 2023.
    (Source: Richardwm15 on AAroads, "Re: Route 1/Rice Avenue in Oxnard", 1/17/2019; Rice/FifthSeparation Baseline Agreement)

    In October 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Oxnard adjacent to Route 1 and US 101 on Wagon Wheel Road (apx 001 VEN 20.655), consisting of collateral facilities.

    Naming Naming

    Pacific Coast HighwayOfficially named "Pacific Coast Highway" per State Highway Code §635. The name derives from the fact the highway runs along the Pacific Coast. This designation came from Assembly Bill 1769, Chapter 1569, in 1959.
    (Image source: Flikr)

    Maps based on the 1956 freeway plan show a coastal freeway, named the "Pacific Coast Freeway" or "Ocean Freeway" between Malibu Canyon and Seal Beach. This route would have run to the W of Los Angeles International Airport along Vista Del Mar. The portion of this route constructed to freeway standards in Ventura County is named the "Pacific Coast Freeway" (per the book LA Freeways), and opened in 1957.

    The portion of this route from its southern terminus in the City of San Juan Capistrano (001 ORA R0.202) to its intersection with Goldenwest Street in the City of Huntington Beach (apx 001 ORA 25.88) is named the "Orange County Korean War Veterans Memorial Highway". It was named in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Korean War, for June 25, 2000, marked the 50th anniversary of the invasion of South Korea by North Korea and the start of the three-year Korean War with combat hostilities ending upon the signing of an armistice agreement by the United Nations and North Korea on July 27, 1953.

    US Submarine Veterans of WWI Memorial HwyThe portion of this route from the intersection of Goldenwest Street in Huntington Beach (apx 001 ORA 25.88) to the intersection of Westminster Avenue in Long Beach (apx 001 LA 0.59) is officially named the "U.S. Submarine Veterans of WWII Memorial Highway." This segment is near the U.S. Submarine Veterans WWII National Memorial West located at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, which honors the 52 boats and over 3,500 sailors lost on World War II submarines and the two submarines lost in the Cold War, the Thresher and the Scorpion. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 98, Chapter 103, August 14, 2000.
    (Image sources: U.S. Submarine Memorials and Artifacts Locator File: Memorials by State, NamesProject by State)

    Jenny OropezaThe portion of Route 1 that runs between Coil Street (apx 001 LA 9.454) and the east side of the main entrance to the Tesoro Refinery (apx 001 LA 8.776), in the community of Wilmington in the County of Los Angeles, is named the "Honorable Jenny Oropeza Memorial Overcrossing". Named in memory of Jenny Oropeza, who was a lifelong public servant and active in her community. She was elected to the Long Beach Unified School District Board of Education, the Long Beach City Council, the California State Assembly, and finally to the California State Senate. During her time as a member of the California Legislature, Jenny Oropeza was a champion for public transportation, health care, education, clean air, equality, and prevention of cancer. Former Senator Oropeza was so admired by her constituents and community that since her death she has been honored by the Democratic Women's Study Club in Long Beach, which posthumously awarded her the Political Leadership Award. In future years the award will be called the Jenny Oropeza Political Leadership Award. Additionally, the Long Beach Community Hispanic Association (Centro CHA) posthumously awarded Senator Oropeza the Create Change Community Service Excellence Award, which will in future years be called the Create Change: Jenny Oropeza Community Service Excellence Award. In recognition of former Senator Oropeza, the Long Beach Lambda Democratic Club created the Jenny Oropeza Ally of the Year Award, which was, similar to the two previously mentioned awards, first awarded in 2011. As a tribute to former Senator Oropeza's dedication to fostering protections for key state public health programs, the Los Angeles County Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure, in joint collaboration with the six other California-based Komen affiliates, known as "the California Collaborative," established the Senator Jenny Oropeza Public Policy Internship position. The City of Long Beach named the community center in Cesar E. Chavez Park the Jenny Oropeza Community Center and the Los Angeles Unified School District dedicated the Jenny Oropeza Global Studies Academy at the Rancho Dominguez Preparatory School. Shortly after taking office in 2000, then Assembly Member Oropeza, became aware that the Alameda Corridor would open in 2002 and all the planned bridges, designed to prevent cars from having to wait for trains to pass at street level, would be completed, except the bridge on Route 1 (Pacific Coast Highway) in the community of Wilmington, the busiest route along the Alameda Corridor. At the time, Route 1 bisected the Equilon Refinery and was therefore the most complicated and expensive bridge to build. Furthermore, there was not enough funding available to complete the bridge on Route 1. Former Assembly Member Oropeza brought together the interested parties, including the California Department of Transportation, the Alameda Corridor Transportation Authority, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the Equilon Refinery, the Union Pacific Railroad, and the City of Los Angeles to solve this problem and was able to help facilitate $107 million in funding from a combination of sources which included state transportation funds, state Proposition 116 bond funds, federal demonstration funds, Metropolitan Transportation Authority funds, and railroad funds. Former Assembly Member Oropeza was also successful in her pursuit to have the long bridge built. This design not only eliminated the train and car conflicts on the Alameda Corridor, but also eliminated these same conflicts on Alameda Street and the San Pedro Branch of the Union Pacific Railroad. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 79, Resolution Chapter 102, on August 29, 2012.
    (Image Source: LB Press Telegram, 11/24/2014)

    Ventura Vietnam Veterans HighwayThe portion of this route in Los Angeles County (001 LA *) is also officially named the "Los Angeles County Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway". Additionally, the portion in Ventura County (001 VEN *) is named the "Ventura County Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway". It was named this because Route 1 has a strong historical significance for the military personnel of the Vietnam War era as it passes beside a significant number of California military bases (United States Naval Weapons Station at Seal Beach, the United States Coast Guard Headquarters at Long Beach, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Point Mugu Naval Weapons Station, the United States Coast Guard Station at Oxnard, the Ventura County Naval Base, Camp San Luis Obispo Military Reserve, the Ventura County California Air National Guard Base, the United States Naval Reservation at Monterey, and Fort Hunter Liggett) on which military personnel were trained and dispatched to Vietnam. More than 350,000 California veterans served in the Vietnam War, which resulted in 40,000 of them being wounded and 5,822 killed or missing in action, representing more than 10 percent of the nation's total casualties. Los Angeles County has the largest number of Vietnam veterans in California and 1,857 of its residents were killed or missing in action during that war. More Californians received the Medal of Honor, the Bronze Star, and the Purple Heart than veterans of any other state. The Los Angeles County portion was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 115, Chapter 94, July 12, 2000. The Ventura County portion was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 135, Chapter 89, June 27, 2002.
    (Image source: Flikr)

    Ofc. Tommy ScottIn 10/15/2008, the City of Los Angeles designated Lincoln Boulevard (Route 1) between La Tijera (apx 001 LA 27.677) and Sepulveda Boulevard (apx 001 LA 27.346) as "Officer Tommy Scott Square". This commemorates the death of the first Airport Police officer killed in the line of duty in the department's 59-year-history. Scott, 35, died April 29, 2005, while trying to detain a transient walking along the airport perimeter. The man first got into Scott's patrol car and drove off with Scott trying to stop him. With Scott hanging onto the side of the car, the man hit a fire hydrant, killing the 4-year veteran of the police force. William Sadowski, 46, pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity last month to a charge of first-degree murder. The death devastated the close-knit, independent police department. Scott, who had worked for the city department of parks before becoming a police officer, joined the force Oct. 7, 2001 and graduated from Rio Hondo Police Academy on Feb. 21, 2002. At the April 29, 2009 ceremony Airport police and city officials unveiled two street signs on Lincoln -- one facing the northbound traffic and the other southbound -- near where Scott was killed. A bronze plaque was put up earlier.
    (Image Source: LA Airport Police Office Association, Summer 2009)

    Roosevelt HighwayRoute 1 was originally named the "Roosevelt Highway", after President Theodore Roosevelt.
    (Image source: Pinterest)

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Van Blom BridgeThe Los Alamitos Bay Bridge (bridge number 53-0064, 001 LA 000.98), and any successor bridge, on Route 1 south of Loynes Drive and north of East 2nd Street, in the City of Long Beach, is named the "Joan Lind Van Blom Memorial Bridge". Joan Lind Van Blom was the first woman to win an Olympic medal for the United States in rowing, winning a silver medal in the single sculls at the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal and in the quadruple sculls at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, and was a member of the team that boycotted the 1980 Olympic Games in Moscow. Van Blom won 14 national titles during her career, holds 11 world records on the indoor ergometer, and medaled internationally as a coach in the Pan American Games. She also motivated students to live healthy and active lives, through her 35-year career with the Long Beach Unified School District as a physical education teacher and curriculum leader (she retired 2012), where she was instrumental in securing a million-dollar grant for rowing machines in each of the school district’s nine high schools. Van Blom taught educators how to teach students to enjoy an active lifestyle and her Facebook page has countless entries from fellow competitors, educators, and friends sharing their appreciation for her gentle guidance over the years. On August 21, 2013, at the Pete Archer Rowing Center, Joan Lind Van Blom collapsed after an indoor rowing session and was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive form of brain cancer. While fighting the disease, she continued to be a role model of grace and style by sharing memories with friends and expressing gratitude to those with whom she teamed, taught, and contacted. Joan Lind Van Blom died the morning of Friday, August 28, 2015. Van Blom was inducted into the Wilson High School, Long Beach State 49er, Century Club, and National Rowing halls of fame and was declared a lifetime member of the Long Beach Rowing Association, marking her never-ending achievement in advocacy for the sport and healthy living;. For all her accomplishments, dedication to rowing, and contributions to the sport’s growth, in December 2014, at the USRowing Annual Awards Reception in Jacksonville, Florida, Joan Lind Van Blom was named the recipient of the 2014 USRowing Ernestine Bayer Award, formerly Woman of the Year, which recognizes outstanding contributions to women’s rowing or to an outstanding woman in rowing. On March 7, 2015, the Beach Crew Alumni Association dedicated a women’s Resolute 8+ racing shell as the Joan Lind Van Blom. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 102, Res. Chapter 94, Statutes of 2016, on August 5, 2016.
    (Image Sources: Gazettes Sports, 3/27/2019; LBUSD News, 2/4/2016)

    Robert E. McClureTunnel 53-008, in Santa Monica, is named the "Robert E. McClure Tunnel" (001 LA 35.179). It opened on February 1, 1936, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 234, Chapter 393, in 1969. Robert McClure was the editor and publisher of the Santa Monica Evening Outlook, a delegate to the 1964 Republican Convention, and a member of the California Highway Commission from 1954 to 1962. He is remembered as "the father of the Santa Monica Freeway". The Tunnel was previously named the Olympic Tunnel.
    (Image source: AARoads; UCLA Special Collections)

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From the Los Angeles-Ventura County line to Route 101 near El Rio; constructed as freeway for 8 mi S of Oxnard.

    • 1959: Entire segment was added to the Freeway and Expressway system (Chap. 1062).
    • 1965: Deleted: Route 107 to Route 91 (Chapter 1372).
    • 1967: Deleted: Route 91 to Route 105 (I-105) (Chapter 674)
    • 1970: Deleted: Route 90 to Santa Monica (Dewey Street) (Chapter 634)
    • 1971: Deleted: Santa Monica to Los Angeles-Ventura County line (Chapter 179)
    • 1971: Deleted: South border of LAX to Route 90 (Chapter 963)
    • 1972: Deleted: Route 22 to Route 47 (Chapter 150)
    • 1972: Deleted San Juan Capistrano to Route 22; Route 47 to Route 107 (Chapter 784)
    • 1981: Deleted I-105 to South border of LAX (Chapter 292)

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.2] From Route 5 south of San Juan Capistrano to Route 19 near Long Beach; and from Route 187 near Santa Monica to Route 101 near El Rio.

    Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Orange 1 0.00 0.33
    Orange 1 0.58 0.87
    Los Angeles 1 R34.58 35.20

  2. Rte 1 Seg 2From Route 101 at Emma Wood State Beach, 1.3 mi north of Route 33, to Route 101, 2.8 mi south of the Ventura-Santa Barbara county line at Mobil Pier Undercrossing.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was added to Route 1 in 1980 (Chap. 740). It was likely added to reflect completion of the freeway portion of US 101 in the area, as the routing was former US 101. In 1992, Chap. 1243 changed "State Park" to "State Beach".

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield This segment was originally added to the state highway system in 1909 as part of US 101, LRN 2. It was signed as US 101.

    Status Status

    In August 2012, the CTC approved SHOPP funding of $16,400,000 on Route 1 PM 22.5/22.0 near the city of Ventura, from 1.0 mile north of the Ventura Overhead to 4.8 mile south of the Seacliff Overhead and Separation. Outcome/Output: Replace 1,800 feet of existing seawall to protect the roadway from sea wave forces. Also, reconstruct and pave adjacent roadway shoulder and bicycle lane, construct new public access stairway and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant ramp to the beach.

    Naming Naming

    This segment appears to be called "Pacific Coast Highway".


  3. Rte 1 Seg 3From Route 101 near Las Cruces to Route 101 in Pismo Beach via the vicinity of Lompoc, Vandenberg Air Force Base, and Guadalupe.

    (a) Upon the commission determining that it is in the best interest of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions it approves, relinquish to the City of Pismo Beach the portion of Route 1 within the city limits of the City of Pismo Beach if the department and the City of Pismo Beach enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

    (b) A relinquishment under this section shall become effective on the date following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (c) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, all of the following shall occur:

    (1) The relinquished portion of Route 1 shall cease to be a state highway.

    (2) The relinquished portion of Route 1 shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (3) The City of Pismo Beach shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 1, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression.

    (4) For the relinquished portion of Route 1, the City of Pismo Beach shall maintain signs within its jurisdiction directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as being from "near Las Cruces to Route 101 near Pismo Beach via the vicinity of Lompoc and Guadalupe". In 1984, it was clarified via an added section that Route 1 also included that portion of the Lompoc-Casmalia Road and Vandenburg Road in the County of Santa Barbara from the intersection of the Lompoc-Casmalia Road and Route 1 north of Lompoc near Mission Hills to the intersection of Vandenburg Road and Route 1 south of Orcutt.

    1966 Vandenberg Expressway In 1966, a new expressway to serve Vandenberg AFB was opened. Prior to 1966, only two narrow, winding ribbons of asphalt passed through the old Camp Cooke (now VAFB) area (presumably, the original Lompoc-Casmalia Road). The new expressway consisted of a portion of Vandenberg Road to the VAFB Main Gate and a portion of Route 1 between the Lompoc Urban Limits and Orcutt.
    (Source: CHPW, Jan/Feb 1967)

    In 1988, the route was relocated to better serve Vandenberg AFB by incorporation of the route of former County Sign Route S20 along Lompoc Casmalia Road between Lompoc and the Base Main Gate at Vandenberg Road, and the expressway along Vandenberg Road. The previous alignment of Route 1 became Harris Grade Road from the intersection of the former County Sign Route S20 with Route 1 at the Lompoc Urban Limits to the junction with Route 135 near E San Antonio Road, and Route 135 from that junction to Vandenberg Road. In 1992, Chap. 1243 deleted the clarification and changed the definition of this segment to the "Route 101 near Las Cruces to Route 101 near Pismo Beach via the vicinity of Lompoc, Vandenberg Air Force Base, and Guadalupe."

    In 2019, SB 504 (Chapter 506, 10/3/2019) authorized relinquishment in the City of Pismo Beach by adding Section 301.5:

    (a) Upon the commission determining that it is in the best interest of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions it approves, relinquish to the City of Pismo Beach the portion of Route 1 within the city limits of the City of Pismo Beach if the department and the City of Pismo Beach enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

    (b) A relinquishment under this section shall become effective on the date following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (c) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, all of the following shall occur:

    (1) The relinquished portion of Route 1 shall cease to be a state highway.

    (2) The relinquished portion of Route 1 shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (3) The City of Pismo Beach shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 1, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression.

    (4) For the relinquished portion of Route 1, the City of Pismo Beach shall maintain signs within its jurisdiction directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield Pre-1964 State Shield A small portion (the segment between the two current Route 135 portions) was originally defined as LRN 2 in 1910, but was later transferred to LRN 56. In 1933, LRN 56 was extended to include the remainder of this segment (Chapter 767). By 1935, this route was under construction between Orcutt and Pismo Beach (in segments). This was signed as Route 1 in the initial 1934 state signage of routes, although a small segment may have been part of US 101.

    In 1934, this segment was signed as part of Route 1 (Jct. US 101 at Las Cruces, via Cambria, Santa Cruz, San Francisco, Pt. Reyes, and Westport to US 101 at Fortuna).

    Status Status

    Salsipuedes Creek Bridge (05-SB-1 15.6)

    Salsipuedes Creek BridgeIn January 2016, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will replace the Salsipuedes Creek Bridge on Route 1 near the city of Lompoc (appx 001 SB 15.614). The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $14,098,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The project will result in less than significant impacts to the environment after mitigation. The following resource area may be impacted by the project: biological resources. Avoidance and minimization measures will reduce any potential effects on the environment. These measures include, but are not limited to, all work in the creek channel will occur between June 1 and October 31, at least two biologists will be retained to monitor on-site activities, non-native species will be removed from the project area to the extent feasible, and the construction of a National Marines Fisheries Service approved rock ramp to improve steelhead passage conditions.

    In June 2018, the CTC approved the following allocation: $7,506,000 Santa Barbara 05-SB-1 15.6. PPNO 1501. Route 1 Near Lompoc, at the Salsipuedes Creek Bridge No. 51-0095. Outcome/Output: Replace the existing bridge to address scour critical issues and preserve the integrity of the structure.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, June 2018 Agenda Item 2.5b(1) Item 28)

    In December 2018, the CTC approved a request for an additional $985,000 for the State Highway Operation Protection Program (SHOPP) Bridge Scour Mitigation project (PPNO 1501) on Route 1, in Santa Barbara County, to award the construction contract. This is an increase of 19% for construction capital. The project is located on Route 1 near the city of Lompoc, in Santa Barbara County. The project will construct a new bridge to replace the existing Salsipuedes Creek Bridge (appx 001 SB 15.614); which has been listed as scour critical since June 1995. The project also includes improving the creek bed by constructing a separate fish passage and removing a check-dam and other obstructions that cause erosion and bridge scour. The performance measure is to replace one bridge, which conforms to the Commission approved Transportation Asset Management Plan. The contract award status is pending approval of this request for supplemental funds by the Commission. Construction would begin in January 2019, and would take 310 working days to be completed in two construction seasons, by October 2020.

    Although 14 contractors, sub-contractors and material suppliers obtained contract plans for the project, only two contractors submitted bids for this project. The Department contacted several contractors, including those who did not submit bids, to discuss the bid results. The contractors stated that this project is located at a site with challenging topography, and includes many difficult, specialty contract items. Some of the difficult items on this contract include the off-site assembly of 100 foot long reinforcement cages for the bridge pile foundation, the transporting these cages to the site and then the lowering of them into place below the existing bridge. Other difficult tasks include the removal of large boulders from an environmentally sensitive site to build a 365 footlong fish ladder. The difficulty to perform this bridge work in a restricted work area presented added challenges and higher risks to contractors. These factors influenced the bidding process by limiting the number of bidders, which resulted in higher contract bids. The Engineer's Estimate (EE) was developed appropriate for the project, including the challenging work location of the existing bridge. And although the Department did not anticipate the limited number of bidders, as it observed that contract plans packages were requested by 14 contractors, the EE was still undervalued as the current trends were below expectations.
    (Source: December 2018 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5e.(8))

    In January 2020, it was reported that the project to replace the Salsipuedes Creek Bridge and construct a retaining wall and fish passage on Route 1 near Lompoc was continuing, with a traffic switch onto the newly constructed southbound bridge on 1/22/2020. The 24/7 traffic signal will be temporarily turned off during this traffic switch. Motorists will encounter traffic control via a pilot car and flaggers from 9 am until 3 pm. When the traffic switch is complete, the traffic signal will be restored allowing two-way traffic on the southbound bridge and construction to begin on the northbound bridge. The width of each lane during construction has been reduced to 11½ feet without shoulders. Oversized vehicles must use an alternate route during this project. The contractor for this $5 million project is CalPortland Construction of Santa Maria, CA. This project is expected to be complete by the end of 2020.
    (Source: Edhat, 1/21/2020)

    Santa Maria River Bridge (05-San Luis Obispo-1 PM 0.0/0.3)

    Santa Maria River Bridge (05-SB-1 50.3/50.6, 05-SLO-1 PM 0.0/0.3)In October 2017, the CTC amended the SHOPP to add the following long-lead item: 05-SLO-1 0.0/0.3: On Route 1 in San Luis Obispo County: Near Guadalupe, at the Santa Maria River Bridge No. 49 -0042; also in Santa Barbara County (PM 50.3/50.6). The bridge is scour critical and needs to be replaced. The existing bridge will be used for traffic handling during construction and then demolished. The highway will need to be realigned as a result of the new bridge location. The new bridge will provide standard lane and shoulder widths and include a protected walkway.

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP as a "Long Lead Project" in March 2018: PPNO 2650. 05-San Luis Obispo-1 0.0/0.3. Route 1 Near Guadalupe, at the Santa Maria River Bridge No. 49-0042; also in Santa Barbara County (PM 50.3/50.6). The bridge is scour critical and needs to be replaced. The existing bridge will be used for traffic handling during construction and then demolished. The highway will need to be realigned as a result of the new bridge location. The new bridge will provide standard lane and shoulder widths and include a protected walkway. * PA&ED phase(s) is authorized. No construction start date. Total Project Cost: $45,690K.

    In October 2019, the CTC amended the SHOPP regarding this item: 05-SLO-1 0.0/0.3. PPNO 2650. Proj ID 0516000074. EA 1H440. Route 1 Near Guadalupe, at the Santa Maria River Bridge No. 49-0042; also in Santa Barbara County (PM 50.3/50.6). The bridge is scour critical and needs to be replaced. The existing bridge will be used for traffic handling during construction and then demolished. The highway will need to be realigned as a result of the new bridge location. The new bridge will provide standard lane and shoulder widths and include a protected walkway. Const capital increased to $33,880K. PA&ED and PS&E pushed to FY20-21. Note: Construction capital increase is due to updated cost estimate reflecting current market pricing for structure and roadway work.
    (Source: October 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Long Lead Item 3)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Bridge Preservation item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 05-San Luis Obispo-1 PM 0.0/0.3 PPNO 2650 Proj ID 0516000074 EA 1H440. Route 1 near Guadalupe, at the Santa Maria River Bridge No. 49-0042; also in Santa Barbara County (PM 50.3/50.6). The bridge is scour critical and needs to be replaced. The existing bridge will be used for traffic handling during construction and then demolished. The highway will need to be realigned as a result of the new bridge location. The new bridge will provide standard lane and shoulder widths and  include a protected walkway. Programmed in FY22-23, with construction scheduled to start in April 2023. Total project cost is $51,109K, with $34,410K being capital (const and right of way) and $16,699K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In June 2020, the CTC approved the following amendment to the 2020 SHOPP Long Lead project: 05-SLO-1 0.0/0.3. PPNO 2650 ProjID 0516000074 EA 1H440. Route 1 near Guadalupe, at the Santa Maria River Bridge No. 49-0042; also in Santa Barbara County (PM 50.3/50.6). The bridge is scour critical and needs to be replaced. The existing bridge will be used for traffic handling during construction and then demolished. The highway will need to be realigned as a result of the new bridge location. The new bridge will provide standard lane and shoulder widths and include a protected walkway. Adjust PS&E cost from $4,290K to $3,517K, and R/W Cap from $530K to $744K, changing the total to $50,550K. Decrease PS&E due to the use of a new lower escalation rate of 3.2% and revised support estimate. Increase R/W capital due to added parcel, title and escrow, increase in mitigation permit fees, and additional underground utility identification.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(5f) #3)

    In August 2020, the CTC approved the following amendment to the 2020 SHOPP Long Lead project: 05-SLO-1 PM 0.0/0.3 PPNO 2650 ProjID 0516000074 EA 1H440. Route 1 Near Guadalupe, at the Santa Maria River Bridge No. 49-0042; also in Santa Barbara County (PM 50.3/50.6). The bridge is scour critical and needs to be replaced. The existing bridge will be used for traffic handling during construction and then demolished. The highway will need to be realigned as a result of the new bridge location. The new bridge will provide standard lane and shoulder widths and include a protected walkway. Note: Correction to amounts programmed for PS&E ($3,517K), R/W support ($455K), construction support ($9,660K), R/W capital ($744K), and construction capital ($33,880) that were incorrectly reported at the June 2020 CTC meeting as unprogrammed.
    (Source: August 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(2d) #10)

    In January 2012, the CTC authorized vacation of right of way in the county of San Luis Obispo along Route 1 at Willow Road (apx 001 SLO 5.054), consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    Naming Naming

    Cabrillo HighwayThis segment is officially named Cabrillo Highway" in the State Highway Code, §635. Juan Rodríquez Cabrillo was the leader of one of the first European expeditions to California. In 1542, Cabrillo led the first European expedition to explore what is now the west coast of the United States. Cabrillo was commissioned by Pedro de Alvarado, Governor of Guatemala, for a voyage up the California coast under the flag of Spain. Cabrillo hoped to find the fabulously wealthy cities known as Cibola, believed to be somewhere on the Pacific coast beyond New Spain, and a route connecting the North Pacific to the North Atlantic. Cabrillo reached "a very good enclosed port" which is now San Diego bay, on September 28, 1542, naming it "San Miguel". He probably anchored his flagship, the San Salvador at Ballast Point on Point Loma's east shore. Six days later, he departed San Diego sailing northward and exploring the uncharted coast line of California. The expedition reached San Pedro on October 6, Santa Monica on the 9th, San Buenaventura on the 10th, Santa Barbara on the 13th and Pt. Concepcion on the 17th. Because of adverse winds Cabrillo turned back, harboring at San Miguel Island, and did not progress beyond Santa Maria until November 11. With a favorable wind later that day they reach the "Sierra de San Martin," probably Cape San Martin and the Santa Lucia Mountains in southern Monterey County. Struck by a storm and blown out to sea, the two vessels are separated and do not rejoin until the 15th, probably near Año Nuevo north of Santa Cruz. The next day they drifted southward, discovering "Bahía de los Pinos" and "Cabo de Pinos." These are most likely Monterey Bay and Point Pinos. On the 18th they turned south, passing snow-capped mountains (the Santa Lucias), and on November 23 returned to their harbor at San Miguel Island, where they remained for nearly three months. Cabrillo died January 3, 1543, on San Miguel Island, and may have been buried on Catalina Island. He died from complications of a broken leg incurred from a fall during a brief skirmish with natives. It was named by Assembly Bill 1769, Chapter 569, in 1959.
    (Image sources: American Road Trips; Wikipedia)

    Scott WilliamsThe portion of Route 1 between the California Boulevard exit (apx 001 SB M29.877) and the Santa Lucia Canyon Road/Floradale Avenue exit in Lompoc (apx 001 SB R26.647) is named the Correctional Officer Scott Williams Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Federal Correctional Officer Scott Williams , who was violently murdered on April 3, 1997 by an inmate while working as a Federal Correctional Officer at the United States Penitentiary in Lompoc. Officer Williams was born in Ventura and graduated from Lompoc High School in 1986. Upon graduating from high school, Officer Williams enlisted in and honorably served the United States Marine Corps, receiving numerous awards for his outstanding service. In December of 1990, Officer Williams, as a reservist, was called to active duty to serve in Operation Desert Storm and received the "Marine of the Year" award. After serving his country overseas, Officer Williams returned to serve his country at home. Upon his return, Officer Williams began working for the Federal Bureau of Prisons in Lompoc as a Federal Correctional Officer in 1993 and was selected as a member of the Special Operations Response Team. Officer Williams was actively involved in his community, where he volunteered with the local Men's Club and the Lions Club. Officer Williams' death is a tragic reminder that the law enforcement officers who serve the public risk their lives on a daily basis. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 28, Resolution Chapter 91, on September 15, 2011.
    (Image Sources: CBP 33 Western Region Blog, 12/7/2012; FBP Fallen Heroes Page)

    Vietnam Veterans Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 1 between Route 166 (apx 001 SB 49.154) and the Santa Barbara County line (apx 001 SB 50.606) is named the "Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway". It was named in honor of the Vietnam Veterans living on the Central Coast. Route 1 has a strong historical significance for the military personnel of the Vietnam War era as it passes through the central coast region, and is home to many veterans' museums and memorials. The State of California has the largest United States veteran population in the nation, making California home to more than 7,000,000 veterans and dependents representing more than 10 percent of California's population. More California residents currently serve as active duty military personnel than do residents of any other state. More than 350,000 California veterans served in the Vietnam War, 40,000 of whom were wounded and 5,822 of whom were missing in action or killed, representing more than 10 percent of the nation's total casualties in that war. More California residents gave their lives in the Vietnam War than residents of any other state, and more Californians were awarded the Medal of Honor, the Bronze Star, or the Purple Heart than veterans of any other state. 220 young men and women from the City of Guadalupe served their country in the Vietnam War, three of whom bravely made the ultimate sacrifice. The residents of Santa Barbara County wish to express their gratitude and appreciation for the sacrifices these Vietnam veterans made for their country by creating a veterans recognition corridor that hopefully will become an ongoing memorial for veterans and their families. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 26, Resolution Chapter 90, on September 15, 2011.
    (Image source: Corco Highways)

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 101 near Las Cruces to Route 227 south of Oceano.

    • 1959: Entire segment defined as F&E (Chapter 1062).
    • 1967: Deleted: segment north of Route 227 (Chapter 1584)

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.2] From Route 101 at Las Cruces to Route 246 near Lompoc; and from Route 227 south of Oceano to Route 101 near Pismo Beach.

    National Trails National Trails

    De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.


  4. Rte 1 Seg 4From Route 101 in San Luis Obispo to Route 280 south of San Francisco along the coast via Cambria, San Simeon, and Santa Cruz.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    The original definition of this segment in 1963 (Chap. 385) was "San Luis Obispo to Route 280 south of San Francisco along the coast via Cambria, San Simeon and Santa Cruz." In 1968, this was clarified by Chap. 282. to note that the route was from Route 101 in San Luis Obispo.

    According to Scott Presnel, at one time there was supposed to be a freeway bypass of Route 1 from Cuesta College (W of SLO) to US 101 in San Luis Obispo; however the city of San Luis Obispo voted to delete the freeway bypass and with Caltrans it became a thing of a past. This is also mentioned on a District 5 Fact Sheet for the route, where planning Segment 7 of the route has the note: " Evaluate bypass/relinquishment of segments 7 and 8A (alternate route from Route 101 to Cuesta College)." Segment 7 runs from the US 101 Ramps at Santa Rosa Street (SLO PM 16.77) in San Luis Obispo to City Limits at Highland Drive (SLO PM 17.80). The planning report where this is mentioned appears to not be online; there appears to be no cooberation of the deletion (or the adoption, for that matter).
    (Source: ACSCMapCollector @ AARoads, 7/13/2016)

    At the end of December 1962, the SLO Telegram-Tribune noted the following about highway construction in the SLO area:
    (Source: SLO Tribune, 12/28/2018)

    • On Route 1, completion of 12 miles of improved two-lane highway between Cayucos and Cambria, built to modern standards, eliminated another dangerous highway that had been subjected to increasingly heavy traffic particularly by tourists to this scenic area. Approximately $1,800,000 was required to finance this project.
    • In late 1962, construction began on a two-lane relocation of Route 1 to bypass the town of Cambria to the south. The project begins 1.5 miles south and ends 1/2 mile south of San Simeon Creek north of Cambria. Completion of this $1,300,000 project is expected in September 1963.
    • Construction of the 6.5 miles, $2,000,000 freeway, between Morro Bay and Cayucos, is now approximately 65 per cent complete and is expected to be open to traffic by April 1963, eliminating another significant bottleneck on this well traveled route.

    There were once plans to reroute this segment in Carmel across a new freeway in Hatton Canyon. This section was for a realignment of Route 1 from Carmel Valley Road to the Pacific Grove Interchange of Route 1 and Route 68. The Hatton Canyon is a scenic and environmentally sensitive area, comprised of undeveloped land that includes one of the few genetically pure Monterey Pine forests left in the world, significant coastal habitat and recreation areas, as well as diverse wildlife. Although originally planned for a freeway alignment, the Department of Transportation determined that a freeway bypass in the Hatton Canyon was not currently viable. As a result, AB 434 (Chapter 136, 7/31/2002) rescinded the route adoption, dated January 9, 1956, for the realignment of Route 1 in Hatton Canyon near the City of Carmel-by-the-Sea; furthermore, it nullified the freeway agreement, dated April 8, 1997, related to that realignment. The property located in Hatton Canyon was declared to be surplus state property located within the coastal zone, as defined in Section 30103 of the Public Resources Code, and the Department of Transportation was directed sell its ownership interest in the Hatton Canyon for the purpose of creating or adding to a state park.

    Until the early 1980s, Route 1 entered Castroville from the south via Route 156 eastbound (the current freeway), then exited at the diamond interchange for Merritt Street and continued northwest via Merritt. However, by the mid-1980s, the current Castroville bypass was constructed; as a consequence, the portion of freeway on Route 1 between Merritt Street and the bypass became an extension of Route 156, and Merritt Street became part of Route 183.

    Back in the 1960's, Caltrans proposed creating a freeway bypass of Route 1 along the Mission Street corridor. The Santa Cruz City Council endorsed a proposal which would have paralleled Mission Street to the north, cutting through some neighborhoods along the entire route. The nearby residents appealed this decision all the way to the California Transportation Commission, which sided with the residents and chose their alternative of an alignment on the northern outskirts of town through the recently-opened University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC). This is what is legislatively Route 100. However, UCSC strongly objected to this new alignment, and eventually the entire bypass issue was dropped. Early UCSC planners wanted to re-route Route 1 up through Pogonip, across the future campus and down through Wilder Ranch to meet up with the coast road west of town.
    (Source: Santa Cruz Streets, h/t Aaroads; SantaCruz Sentinel, 2/11/2019)

    There were once plans for a bypass of Pacifica and Half-Moon Bay. This was quashed by 1982 jointly by Adriana Gianturco, the largely anti-freeway head of Caltrans at the time and the then-nascent California Coastal Commission. Essentially all adopted freeways along Route 1 were deleted between 1976 and 1982; existing facilities were "grandfathered" in. The later Devil's Slide tunnel bypass was simply to keep Route 1 open between Pacifica and Half Moon; the original cliffside route was considered too unstable to maintain.
    (Source: Scott Parker (Sparker) at AARoads, 8/12/2016)

    The Devil's Slide area of Route 1 closed due to slides for 2 years in 1995 and had a 6 month closure in 2006 due to an eroding road deck. Eventually Route 1 was realigned through the Tom Lantos Tunnels which were under construction from 2005 to 2013 (see below for all the status reports during the construction). Both tunnels are about 4,000 in length and carry on direction of highway travel. In 2014 the former grade of Route 1 was converted to the 1.3 mile Devil's Slide Trail which has dual trailheads at both ends of the Tom Lantos Tunnels.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blogs: California State Route 1 Tom Lantos Tunnels/Old California State Route 1 Devil's Slide, 2/13/2019)

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield The portion of this segment from San Simeon to Carmel was added to the state highway system in 1919 as the first segment of LRN 56. It was extended southward to Cambria in 1921 (Chapter 837). It was extended further southward to San Luis Obispo in 1931 (Chapter 82). It was also extended northerly (again as LRN 56) to San Francisco in 1933 (Chapter 767).

    Big Sur

    LRN 56 between Carmel and San Simeon first appears on the 1920 State Highway Map as an unbuilt highway. In 1921 the Legislature extended LRN 56 to Cambria which is reflected on the 1922 State Highway Map. The Division of Highways assumed control of the existing road between Cambria and San Simeon while a section of LRN 56 near Ragged Point north to the Monterey County line appears under construction. In 1924 a section of LRN 56 south of Big Sur appears under construction. By 1928 work on LRN 56 north from Ragged Point continued into Monterey County approaching Gorda. In 1931 LRN 56 was extended south to San Luis Obispo which is reflective on the 1932 State Highway Map. A third construction segment south out of Carmel to Point Sur also appears on the 1932 State Highway Map. By 1934 Route 1 was applied to LRN 56. LRN 56 appears completed on the State Highway Map aside from a segment in the middle which crossed by Lopez Point. On June 27th, 1937 Route 1 opened entirely through Big Sur and was known as the Roosevelt Highway. The surface of Route 1 in Big Sur when it opened was oiled earth aside from the segment north of the community of Big Sur.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog, California State Route 1 in Big Sur, August 2018)

    The original alignment of Route 1 was through San Simeon on SLO-San Simeon Road. Route 1 was moved off of SLO-San Simeon Road to the modern alignment running past Hearst Castle Road between 1943 and 1960. The Arroyo del Puerto Bridge on SLO-San Simeon Road dates back to 1916 and was part of the original LRN 56/Route 1 alignment. Route 1 originally ran through San Simeon on Main Street. Route 1 would have met Route 41 at Santa Rosa Creek Road until the highway was renumbered to the south in 1964 and replaced by Route 46.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog, California State Route 1 in Big Sur, August 2018)

    Tom Fearer, in the Gribblenation Blog "California State Route 1; the Cabrillo Highway through Big Sur and the Monterey Peninsula", has a detailed history of the routing from Monterey through Big Sur to Carmel. This is excerpted from there: A trail from Monterey southward to El Rancho Sur between the Little Sur and Big Sur River existed as early 1853. This trail was declared a public road by Monterey County in 1855. By 1870 the trail had been improved to a wagon road as far south as Bixby Creek. By 1886 the trail south to the vicinity of Sycamore Canyon at W.B. Post's Ranch had been improved enough to allow wagon travel. Today much of this old wagon road exists as Coast Road from the Bixby Creek Bridge south to Andrew Molera State Park. After an 1894 trip, Dr. John Roberts petitioned the state legislature to build a roadway between Carmel and San Simeon. The crux of the argument for a coastal roadway was that it help national defense during World War I. In 1919 the State Legislature approved $1,500,000 dollar bond to build LRN 56 from Carmel south to San Simeon. LRN 56 between Carmel and San Simeon first appears on the 1920 Division of Highways Map as an unbuilt highway. In 1921 the Legislature extended LRN 56 south to Cambria. The Division of Highways assumed control of the existing road between Cambria and San Simeon while a section of LRN 56 near Ragged Point north to the Monterey County line appear as under construction. The March 1926 California Highways and Public Works Guide cites that the Division of Highways assumed control of the existing highway from Carmel south to the Big Sur River. By 1928 work on the highway was approaching Gorda. The December 1931 California Highways and Public Works Guide details the construction of the Garrapata Creek and Granite Creek Bridges. The Garrapata Creek Bridge is cited to have opened in November of 1931 and the Granite Creek Bridge was anticipated to open in early 1932. In 1931, LRN 56 was extended south to San Luis Obispo, and a construction segment south out of Carmel to Point Sur appears on the 1932 State Highway Map. The dedication ceremony for the opening the Bixby Creek Bridge was held on November 28, 1932. In 1933 LRN 56 was extended south to LRN 2 (US 101) near Las Cruces and north to Ferndale to LRN 1 (also US 101). Subsequently LRN 56 was routed through the Monterey Peninsula on what had been a previously locally maintained highway. LRN 56 appears completed in Big Sur on the 1934 Division of Highways Map aside from a segment near Lopez Point. On June 27th, 1937 Route 1 opened entirely through Big Sur and as the Carmel-San Simeon Highway.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog "California State Route 1; the Cabrillo Highway through Big Sur and the Monterey Peninsula")

    In 1934, this segment was signed as part of signed Route 1 (Jct. US 101 at Las Cruces, via Cambria, Santa Cruz, San Francisco, Pt. Reyes, and Westport to US 101 at Fortuna). In fact, the October 1934 California Highways and Public Works Guide cites that the very first Sign State Route Shield was installed as part of Route 1 in Carmel.

    It appears that Old Cremy Road was the original routing through the town of Harmony (apx 001 SLO 44.057).
    (Ref: DTComposer at AAroads)

    Carmel and Monterey

    Within Carmel the original alignment of Route 1/LRN 56 was along the same corridor the modern highway takes north near Hatton Canyon from Carmel Valley Road (County Sign Route G16) north to Carpenter Street. From Carpenter Street the initial route of Route 1/LRN 56 continued north atop the same right-of-way the modern freeway uses to Munras Avenue. Route 1/LRN 56 north continued into downtown Monterey onto Abrego Street. Within downtown Monterey the original route of Route 1/LRN 56 followed Abrego Street and turned on Del Monte Avenue. Route 1/LRN 56 originally continued north on Del Monte Avenue through Seaside onward towards Marina. Within Marina Route 1/LRN 56 originally followed Del Monte Boulevard. North of Marina ROute 1/LRN 56 followed Lapis Road towards Neponset and Salinas River. Originally Route 1 crossed the 1914 Neponset Truss Bridge next to the Southern Pacific Monterey Branch. Originally Route 1/LRN 56 northbound entered Castroville via Preston Road where it turned left at Merritt Street. Route 1/LRN 56 appears shifted onto Fremont Street from Munras Avenue in downtown Monterey through Seaside on the 1942 Division of Highways Map.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog "California State Route 1; the Cabrillo Highway through Big Sur and the Monterey Peninsula")

    The portion of the route in the Monterey area originally ran along Munras and North Fremont in Monterey (apx. 001 MON R77.531), Fremont in Seaside, merging at the N end of Seaside into Del Monte Ave. Del Monte ran along the current freeway routing through Fort Ord into Marina, where it ran along the current Del Monte Ave.

    Originally Route 1/LRN 56 northbound entered Castroville via Preston Road where it turned left at Merritt Street. Route 156/LRN 22 westbound entered Castroville by way of an at-grade crossing of the Southern Pacific Railroad from Castroville Boulevard onto Salinas Street. Route 156/LRN 22 made a right had turn on Merritt Street and met Route 1/LRN 56 at Preston Road. Route 183/LRN 118 northbound entered Castroville on Merritt Street and terminated at Route 156/LRN 22 at Salinas Street. Former Route 1 on Preston Road juts west of Merritt Street and crosses Tembladera Slough on a bridge with an unknown build date. Former Route 1 on Preston Road continues west to the present split in the Route 1/Route 156 freeways.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog: Historic Highway Alignments in Castroville (CA 1, CA 156 and CA 183))

    Watsonville to San Francisco

    In Watsonville (apx 001 SCR R1.403), Main Street and Salinas Road were the original Route 1 routings before the freeway bypass and new bridge over the Pajaro were built.

    Freedom Boulevard between Aptos (apx. 001 SCR 9.969) and Freedom (apx 001 SCR R3.756) was the original Route 1 before the current bypass (originally a surface road, now freeway) was proposed.

    Modern Route 1 follows the coastline south passing Bean Hollow State Beach. The original alignment of Route 1 continued south on Stage Road to Pescadero and used Pescadero Creek Road (apx 001SM 13.567) in addition to Bean Hollow Road to meet the modern highway. The original alignment from Half Moon Bay south to Bean Hollow State Beach appears to have been replaced by the modern alignment sometime between 1940 to 1942.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog: November Bay Area Trip Part 7; California State Route 1 from I–280 south to CA 17, 11/2017)

    South of Half Moon Bay Route 1 approaches Purisima Creek and Route 84 at San Gregorio Road (apx 001 SM 18.189). The original alignment of Route 1 was more inland along Verde Road and Stage Road which can be seen above on the 1935 San Mateo County Map.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog: November Bay Area Trip Part 7; California State Route 1 from I–280 south to CA 17, 11/2017)

    Main Street in Half Moon Bay (apx 001 SM 28.743) is old Route 1; this was supplanted in the early 1960s by the Half Moon Bay Bypass.

    The original alignment of Route 1 in 1934 prior to the Devil's Slide between Montara (apx SM 001 36.629) and Pacifica was over Pedro Mountain Road. The exact alignment Route 1 took through Montara is unclear, but the alignment over Pedro Mountain Road and Higgins Way are very apparent on the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of San Mateo County. The Devil's Slide is the second alignment of Route 1 between Pacifica and Montara in San Mateo County while the Tom Lantos Tunnels are the third alignment. The Devil's Slide refers to a promontory region between Pacifica and Half Moon Bay which is part of the Montara Mountain sub-range of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Devil's Slide in particular has natural slopes approaching 50% in places which makes the area particularly landslide prone. Most historic transportation access prior to the 20th Century sought to avoid Devil's Slide and it wasn't until 1905 when the Ocean Shore Railway started building a line through area. In 1935 construction of a new alignment of Route 1 began at Devil's Slide and was completed by 1936. The Devil's Slide section of Route 1 was one of the historically most infamous along the entire highway with the first major closure coming in 1940 due to a rock slide. The Devil's Slide area of Route 1 closed due to slides for 2 years in 1995 and had a 6 month closure in 2006 due to an eroding road deck. Eventually Route 1 was realigned through the Tom Lantos Tunnels which were under construction from 2005 to 2013 (see below for all the status reports during the construction). Both tunnels are about 4,000 in length and carry on direction of highway travel. In 2014 the former grade of Route 1 was converted to the 1.3 mile Devil's Slide Trail which has dual trailheads at both ends of the Tom Lantos Tunnels.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blogs: November Bay Area Trip Part 7; California State Route 1 from I–280 south to CA 17, 11/2017;CaliforniaState Route 1 Tom Lantos Tunnels/Old California State Route 1 Devil's Slide, 2/13/2019)

    By 1957, Route 1 ran northward up the coast through an unincorporated group of communities that later incorporated as Pacifica (apx SM R42.571). The highway then entered Daly City near the coast, and ran northward along the bottom of the high cliff next to the beach west of the Palisades section of Daly City. At what is now the abandoned Thornton Beach area, Route 1 sharply veered eastward and crossed what was then Skyline Blvd (Pre-1964 Route 5, later Route 35). Route 1 then ran eastward through the Westlake part of Daly City on a wide divided road that was then known as Alemany Blvd. Route 1 proceeded eastward on Alemany Blvd in Daly City until it reached Junipero Serra Blvd. The highway then turned northward at a 90° angle at Junipero Serra Blvd. Route 1 entered San Francisco as Juniepro Serra Blvd, as it does today. Later Alemany Blvd. (which ended at Junipero Serra in Daly City just south of the San Francisco border, and restarted about ¼ mile north inside of San Francisco and proceded eastward) was renamed as John Daly Blvd. The name of Knowles Road in Daly City (which was a continuation of Alemany in Daly City, beginning at the Alemany/Junipero Serra junction) was also changed to the John Daly Blvd., which essentailly fused two streets that continued into each other, anyway. The earthquake of 1957 destroyed the cliffside portion of Route 1 in Daly City and so that year it was rerouted fom the Daly City-Pacifica border from staying along the coast to instead proceeding northwest at the border and joining present-day Route 35 near the current Route 1/ Route 35 interchange. Route 1 then came to run northward to the east of the Palisades section of Daly City and no longer to the west of this district. In the 1960's there was a sign on Route 1 (when divers were headed South) near the Route 35 interchange indicating that Santa Cruz was 70 miles away (down Route 1). Also Skyline Drive never joined or intersected with either of these routes at its northern dead end. Skyline Drive was always a dead end there. Two maps (here and here) show a distinct route W of Skyline between Edgemar and Thornton, but there appears to be no present day street in that position.

    001 at ThorntonAccording to CHPW, the original rerouting of Route 1 from Edgemar (apx 001 SM R45.112) to Skyline Boulevard (035 SM R28.678, 001 SM R46.648) was completed by 1960; it was constructed after traffic engineers felt the Thornton-Edgemar route would be too congested as Daly City grew, and after 17 major closures between 1950 and 1957 (the worst being a 120 day closure). However, the original interchange with Skyline and Route 1 was a trumpet; this was modified when the Route 1 freeway was extended to I-280, to bypass Thornton Beach and the Westlake district of Daly City completly. At the time, Route 5 (now Skyline Boulevard/Route 35) was expressway in the portions that became co-signed with Route 1 (from Pacifica north to John Daly Boulevard, which was then Alemany Boulevard) until I-280 was finished. The route from Edgemar to Skyline Boulevard was originally adopted on November 17, 1952; LRN 55 between Alemany (John Daly) and the Edgemar area was completed in December 1954, and the contract for construction of the Route 1 freeway was awarded on May 3, 1957 to the McCammon, Wunderlich, and Wunderlich Company of Palo Alto.

    Parts of the route between Thornton Beach and Santa Cruz were recycled in the 1920's and 1930's from the abandoned r/w of the Ocean Shore Railroad. At least one book on the Ocean Shore was published that can shed some light on the process. The portion along the cliffs in Daly City (abandoned after the 1957 earthquake, and therefore logically shown on the 1955 map) was directly on the railroad alignment, as were some other pre-freeway portions of the road in Pacifica, Montara-Half Moon Bay, and Scott Creek-Santa Cruz. The southern part of the Devils Slide segment is on the railroad alignment, but overall the RR took a lower-altitude line across the slide than the present highway. For details, see: Jack R. Wagner, "The Last Whistle"; 1974, Howell-North Books, Berkeley, CA.

    References indicate that a in 1957 the area near Mussel Rock marked the epicenter the Daly City Earthquake, measuring 5.3, which resulted in ground shaking and landsliding above the coastal bluffs in the Westlake Palisades area with an estimated $1 million damage. A picture from the archives of the 1957 Daly City Earthquake clearly shows a highway or road starting at what is now John Daly Boulevard, heading south on the steep cliff along the water's edge. Today there is nothing left of the road on the hillside—neither a lip or ledge. This is because Route 1 was rerouted after the earthquake. The section of Alemany Blvd west of the interchange was later reopend for a few years from the old Route 1/Route 35 interchange heading straight west to the ocean and Thornton State Beach was built there where this road met the ocean. The road was not reopened soouthward from this State Beach where Route 1 had previously run northward rom Pacifica south of this beach. After a few years, the road to this Beach from the interchange became unstable, and the road was closed once again, and now all that is left of this connection to the Beach is a tiny stub of road heading west from the Route 1/Route 35 interchange approximately 1 block long leading to a fenced off dead end. A portion of the pre-1957 alignment is still accessible; it is used as a vista point now and some of it leads off into a cliff into nowhere. It is accessible near the Edgemar neighborhood (the exits for Manor Drive and Monterey Road). The portion between Westline Drive and Thornton Beach is now covered by Mussel Rock Park and Northridge Park; a portion still remains (albeit closed off almost always) west of Route 35/John Daly at Thornton State Beach as an access road (usually fenced off with "ROAD CLOSED" sign) into the beach. An old grass median is visible; it is a two lane road that does not seem to be well-maintained at all (due to lack of usage). A small finger of the road is visible from John Daly Boulevard, as what looks to be a continuation of the road behind a fence with a Road Closed sign. Skyline Boulevard just north of the I-280 exists as a four-lane expressway for a short stretch. Where the two sides merge, the grade for the southbound side continues north for a few feet, paved, and is actually a part of the paved hiking trail to its side.

    Status Status

    San Luis Obispo to Monterey

    Note: This is broken into multiple small segments to simplify placing of news regarding significant storm and other damage along the Big Sur portion of Route 1 along the central coast.

    Big Sur General

    Big Sur Highway 1 Sustainable Transportation Demand Management Plan

    In November 2019, it was reported that Caltrans is working on a Big Sur Highway 1 Sustainable Transportation Demand Management Plan, available online at www.sustainablehighway1.com. The Plan's goal is to “preserve the rugged and scenic nature of the Big Sur experience for all people through balanced, adaptive management strategies that encourage the use of transit and active transportation to enhance the travel experience and support sustainable corridor access.” The concern, according to the website, is that “private automobile use along the highway is increasingly unsustainable — reducing the quality of the visitor experience, creating operational concerns and degrading the natural, human, and historical attributes of the highway.” The Caltrans plan aims to “address issues associated with the Highway 1 corridor, including limited off-highway parking, visitors walking along the highway, increased travel times, identifying potential electric-vehicle charging stations and other operational concerns,” according to the website. As discussed a meeting held Oct. 29 in Cambria, subsequently repeated in Carmel Valley the next day and at the Big Sur Multi-Agency Advisory Committee meeting on Nov. 1, some of the proposed solutions to those issues include:

    • Getting people out of their cars and onto public transit, such as an interlocking system of shuttle routes. There’s a public-transit gap between Nepenthe and San Simeon.
    • Creating more viewpoints and pullouts and/or formalizing the dirt or gravel-topped ones that are already there. Imagine what a difference a handy pullout or parking area could make the next time you’re stuck in standstill traffic because a tourist wanted a selfie at Bixby Bridge, or you’re trapped behin a 30-foot motor home that’s doing a brisk 15 mph.
    • Encouraging the use of electric cars by installing more charging stations along the way.
    • Managing attendance and parking availability at popular sites such as Point Lobos, McWay Falls and Garrapata Beach, perhaps with a reservation system.
    • Locating visitor information hubs at key locations, such as Carmel, Big Sur and Hearst Castle. Those could be formalized park-and-ride transit stops that provide restrooms, interpretive information and information about appropriate behavior along the corridor. Information could also be provided to places where people already ask for details, such as service stations and restaurants.
    • Providing additional restrooms along the route, and telling visitors where they are, to help prevent health hazard conditions that happen all too often now.
    • Encouraging active transportation, from bikes to hiking, encouraging shared use of paved shoulders on the road and creating shared-use paths separate from the highway.

    Some have suggested that the Big Sur stretch of Route 1 become a toll road, but current California laws don’t support establishing new toll roads. Even if they did, drivers must have a “free parallel option” to the toll route. There is no such option on the Cambria-to-Carmel section of Highway 1, the oceanfront route to Big Sur and beyond.
    (Source: San Luis Obispo Tribune, 11/5/2019)

    San Luis Obispo to Cambria

    PPNO 1105, Route 1/Route 41 IC, operational improvements (SB1)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $3.390M in construction funding in FY21-22 for PPNO 1105, Route 1/Route 41 IC, operational improvements (SB1).

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2020 meeting, adjusts the programmed allocation for PPNO 1105 Route 1/41 IC, operational improvements (SB1), moving the programmed funds from FY21-22 to FY22-23.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    Old Creek Bridge (SLO 24.5)

    Rte 1 Old Creek BridgeThe following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 0072A. 05-San Luis Obispo-1 24.5. Route 1 Near Morro Bay, at Old Creek Bridge No. 05-49-0070R. Replace bridge. Begin Con: 11/13/2020. Total Project Cost: $10,049K.

    In June 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project: 05-SLO-1, PM 24.46 Old Creek Bridge Project: Replace existing bridge on Route 1 in San Luis Obispo County. (MND) (PPNO 0072A) (SHOPP). This project is located along Route 1 near Cayucos in San Luis Obispo County. The project proposes to either widen and retrofit, or replace the existing northbound Old Creek Bridge (No. 49-0070R). The project also proposes to address the seismic deficiencies of the bridge by retrofitting the existing structure or replacing the bridge with a new structure and improve bicycle access across the bridge. This proposed project is estimated to cost a total of $10.1 million. The project is fully funded and is currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for approximately $10.1 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). The project is estimated to begin construction in FY 19-20. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, June 2018 Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    In May 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP Amendment: 05-SLO-1 34.5 PPNO 0072A. ProjID 0515000098. Near Morro Bay, at Old Creek Bridge No. 05-49-0070R. Replace bridge. Increase const. support to $2,702K, const. capital to $10,836K; total est. to $17,487K. Note: Construction capital increase is due to change in traffic handling requiring complex stage handling, increase in item cost estimates to reflect current market pricing, and construction of a work platform above the creek to accommodate permit that does not allows for water diversion previously assumed.
    (Source: CTC Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Amend Item 50)

    Toro Creek Bridge (SLO 32.6)

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 0072. 05-San Luis Obispo-1 32.6. Route 1 In Morro Bay, at Toro Creek Bridge. Replace bridge. Begin Con: 2/4/2021. Total Project Cost: $12,505K.

    In August 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed: Route 1 in San Luis Obispo County (05-SLO-1, PM 32.6). Replace existing bridge on Route 1 in the city of Morro Bay. (PPNO 0072) This project is located on Route 1 in the city of Morro Bay, San Luis Obispo County. The project proposes to replace the existing northbound bridge (No. 49-0068R) at Toro Creek. This project proposes to address the existing geometric and seismic deficiencies by replacing the existing bridge and associated adjacent roadway with standard bridge rails and standard shoulder widths which are currently non-standard. The proposed project is estimated to cost $12.5 million. The proposed project is currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for approximately $12.5 which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in funding Fiscal Year 2019-20. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
    (Source: August 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    In May 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP Amendment: 05-SLO-1 32.6. PPNO 0072. ProjID 0515000097. In Morro Bay, at Toro Creek Bridge No. 49-0068R. Replace bridge. Increase const. cap. to $8,249K. Total est. $15,554K. Note: Construction capital increase is due to change in constructability of bridge replacement, an identified increase to the size of piling and casings, and miscellaneous items previously not identified.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Agenda Item 2.1c.(1) Amend Item 49)

    There are plans to make some roadway improvements near Cambria that include passing and left turn lanes. The project is fully funded in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The total estimated project cost, support and capital, is $4,389,000. It is estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2008-09. The CTC received the report of a negative mitiaged EIR in December 2007. [Based on the map, apx 001 SLO 43.127)

    Cambria to Ragged Point

    In Fall 2012, in an attempt to extend the life of the pavement, Caltrans applied a $2.1 million chip-seal coating. In last fall’s chip-sealing, the Caltrans contractor used larger aggregate rocks than had been applied previously on that roadway. They were selected for durability, for as the “chips” degrade over time, larger ones could last longer. As opposed to repaving, chip-sealing was significantly less expensive; full repaving would cost $7 million to $8 million. As soon as the chip-sealing was complete, however, bicyclists and others began to complain that the surface was rough. Rocks kicked up by vehicles pelted cyclists and chipped vehicle paint and windshields. Caltrans has swept loose rocks from the surface, rolled the pavement in a test area between Cambria (apx 001 SLO 48.883) and San Simeon (apx 001 SLO 53.017) and hired the U.C. Davis Pavement Research Center to come up with the best way to fix the problem. Results are due in May 2013. The agency does expect the aggregate to smooth out over time as the rocks settle and wear down, but that doesn't help the summer bicycle season.
    (Source: The Cambrian, 4/14/13)

    Some portions of this road are being funding for emergency repair near San Simeon due to the fact that the current roadway is likely to be lost in the Winter 2002 storms. In the segment from PM 65.4 to 66.5 in SLO, ocean surf has eroded a 20-foot high bluff to within 2 feet of the edge of the pavement (this is 1.6 mi N of Piedras Blancas Lighthouse Road). In the same area (PM 64.1 to 64.7, 0.3 mi N of Piedras Blancas Lighthouse Road), the surf has eroded a 25 foot high bluff to within 10 feet of the edge of the pavement. [CTC Agenda, August 2002].

    Peidras Blancas Lighthouse Road to Arroyo de la Cruz Bridge (001 SLO R64.0 to R67.1)

    [San Simeon]There are plans to realign the route near San Simeon. In December 2008, the CTC reviewed a draft EIR regarding the realingment, but had no comments other than a need to identify a funding source. The project would realign a portion of Route 1 from just north of Piedras Blancas Lighthouse to the Arroyo de la Cruz Bridge near San Simeon. The project is not currently funding, but is included in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) Long Lead Projects list consistent with Commission Resolution G-13. This resolution requires the Department to notify the Commission when project development work begins on SHOPP projects that are not currently programmed. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $43,270,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. There are currently two alternatives:

    • Alternative 1 - No Build.
    • Alternative 2 - This alternative realigns inland this portion of Route 1 approximately 1400 feet north of the Piedras Blancas Lighthouse driveway and re-connects with the existing roadway just prior to the Arroyo de la Cruz Bridge.

    Point Peidras BlancasIn November 2010, the CTC received a proposal to realign the adopted route for Route 1 from 0.3 miles north of Point Piedras Blancas to Arroyo De La Cruz Creek and redesignate it to Conventional Highway. Specifically, the proposal is to realign Route 1 from one-third of a mile north of Point Piedras Blancas to Arroyo de la Cruz Creek, north of San Simeon, in San Luis Obispo County to provide protection of the highway from coastal bluff erosion. The coastal bluff undulates to and away from the current alignment of Route 1. In 2005, the bluff was as close as 19 feet from the highway centerline at PM 65.4, reaching the southbound shoulder of the highway at two locations. This new alignment was designed to closely follow the expected 100-year shoreline and minimize environmental impacts. The project area is located in a rural part of northern San Luis Obispo County, which closely follows the shoreline between Cambria and Carmel. Route 1 is designated a rural minor arterial and federal aid primary route. Route 1 from 0.6 miles north of San Simeon to Rio Road near Carmel is a California Legal Advisory Route. It serves both regional and interregional traffic and includes high levels of recreational traffic, bicycles, and limited commercial users. The section of Route 1 where the project is located is the only roadway access for emergencies to the north. Route 1 between San Luis Obispo City limits and the northern San Luis Obispo County line was designated a State Scenic Highway in 1999. The Federal Highway Administration declared this highway segment an All American Road in August 2003, the highest designation under the National Scenic Byways Program. This project is within the limits of a Freeway Agreement dated February 9, 1959. Only one connection point exists south of Arroyo del Oso within the project limits. No local roads exist within these project limits. From San Simeon to the Monterey County line, Route 1 is a two-lane conventional highway. The design speed on this highway, based on existing geometric features, is generally 43 mph or higher. The existing highway in the project area has 10 horizontal curves on rolling terrain. Lane widths vary from 10-12 feet and paved shoulders vary from 1-8 feet. Non-standard items include horizontal curve radii, vertical curve length, superelevation rates, vertical sight distance, lane width, side slopes, and shoulder width. The proposed highway realignment project will correct all these non-standard features although in some locations side slopes will be somewhat steeper than standard, to reduce wetland impacts. Caltrans proposed adopting the new alignment as a conventional highway, which is consistent with the District 5 2006 Transportation Concept Report and the Hearst agreement. This project is also included in the 2005 Regional Transportation Plan for San Luis Obispo County. The current capital cost estimate is $50.1 million. Construction of this project will be in two phases. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program for Right of Way capital and Construction capital in 2013-2014.

    In January 2015, the CTC authorized $20,755,000 for Route 1 in San Luis Obispo near San Simeon, from north of Piedras Blancas Lighthouse Road to Arroyo De La Cruz Bridge. The project will realign approximately 2.8 highway miles of Route 1 to a new location 475 feet inland away from eroding shore line and construct three bridges to maintain roadway structural integrity and improve highway safety and operation at this location.

    Piedras BlancasIn October 2017, it was reported that a State Parks plan for a scenic stretch of Route 1 near Piedras Blancas could one day bring a dilapidated motel and cafe back to life, along with a campground, cabins and coastal trail. State Parks has owned the Piedras Blancas Motel & Cafe property since 2007 (apx 001 SLO R67.12), when the Trust for Public Lands completed a grant-funded acquisition to prevent commercial development on the prime oceanfront land. The 1950s-era motel, gas station, gift shop, latté stop and informal rough-camping sites there have been closed since before that, with the motel shutting its doors around 2005. The first phase of the project will involve construction of a 3-mile section of the California Coastal Trail, while a second section of the trail would be added in the second phase. The motel and campground would be revamped in the second phase of the project, said Dan Falat, superintendent of State Parks San Luis Obispo Coast District, which extends from the Monterey County line to Montaña de Oro. The café already has been restored (at a cost of $180,000), according to information that Falat provided. The project would start just south of the shuttered motel about 17 miles north of downtown Cambria. The camping area would wrap around an existing house, which Falat said is currently occupied by a park ranger. The agency is in the process of acquiring from Caltrans land north of the motel property, between the old and new alignments of Route 1 north of Piedras Blancas, as mandated by the Hearst Ranch Conservation Easement.
    (Source: SLO Tribune, 10/14/2017)

    Ragged Point (SLO 72.721) to Nacimiento-Fergusson Road (MON 18.893)

    In October 2013, the CTC considered for future approval a funding a project in San Luis Obispo County that will construct a retaining wall and realign the highway to stabilize a portion of Route 1 near the community of Ragged Point (apx 001 SLO 72.926). The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $23,005,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    In February 2017, it was reported that heavy winter rains had resulted in rock and mud slides had shut down traffic in both directions south of the town of Gorda, at the Ragged Point Inn and on a stretch of the road between Salmon (001 MON 2.166) and Mud (approx 001 MON 6.537) creeks.
    (Source: Los Angeles Times, 2/23/2017)

    Mud Creek Slide Temporary Repairs (001 MON 6.537)

    Mud Creek SlideIn May 2017, another slide occurred in the vicinity of Mud Creek (001 MON 6.537). The slide is believed to have been caused by groundwater that has continued to percolate up and out of the mountains, months after the winter’s near-record rains. As the steep cliffs above the ocean became saturated, they collapsed under their own weight across the highway and into the ocean — where a peninsula of rock and mud has emerged. Specifically, a hillside near a small ravine known as Mud Creek collapsed, sloughing an estimated 1.5 million tons of rock and mud — about a million cubic yards — over the highway and into the ocean. The landslide was a third of a mile wide and 40 feet at its deepest. What once was a steep drop into the Pacific was now a broad, sloping bench extending almost 250 feet beyond the shoreline. By some estimates, the collapse had added 15 acres to the coast, a little more than 11 football fields including the end zones. The continued movement of the quarter-mile-long slide near the Monterey County community of Gorda has kept Caltrans engineers from taking stock of the situation and figuring out when — and if — the section of road that serves as the southern gateway to Big Sur can be repaired and re-opened.The Santa Lucia Mountains, extending from Cambria to Carmel, are particularly vulnerable to landslides. This coastal range reveals one of California’s defining tectonic features — the subduction of the Farallon Plate under the North American Plate — and the bedrock here, says Noah Finnegan, a geologist with UC Santa Cruz, has “a tortured history.” “They have been pervasively fractured and broken up,” he said. “They have a hard time holding a steep slope.” In such an environment, water and gravity are great levelers. The steep and narrow canyons of the coast are frequently scoured by debris flows, torrents of water skimming off topsoil and rocks at disastrous velocities. The formidable hillsides are subjected to deeper subsurface forces that come into play as groundwater shifts the frictional properties of the soil. Note: See also the naming of "Arlene's Slide" in the NAMING section for this segment.

    Independent experts say the solution may require constructing a sprawling bridge over the troublesome spot or a tunnel deep in the ground beneath it, a prospect that could take years and cost the state hundreds of millions of dollars. The best-case scenario for getting the road open would be putting in a stretch of asphalt, at least temporarily, on top of the slide once the area dries out come summer. That option, though, is contingent on soil tests to determine whether the mountainside is secure. Further, there are no easy alternative routes inland to serve as detours around the slide (On the Caltrans PostMile Tool, look at Route 1 PM MON 9.066). Pricier fixes include viaducts that bypass the problem areas as well as tunneling into and below a landslide. Many have called for such big-ticket repairs at Mud Creek for decades and some say it may finally be time. Some are likening the situation to Devil’s Slide in San Mateo County, where Caltrans went for years trying to clear the highway of wintertime debris before turning to two 4,200-feet long tunnels at a cost of more than $400 million. At Mud Creek, the million-plus tons of debris that fell from the mountain is actually the result of four previous slides, each earning names from the locals over the years. Last weekend, they came together as one in an avalanche unlike any since the early ’80s.
    (Source: SF Chronicle, 5/25/2017; LATimes, 5/26/2017)

    In June 2017, an interesting article triggered by the Mud Creek slide explored the difficulties that Route 1 in Big Sur has faced, and why the Mud Creek Slide is particularly difficult. The highway was built in the early 1930s, and the first recorded slide, closing a 20-mile stretch of road in 1935, happened even before the route was officially opened. Why are there so many slides? Three reasons, said landslide expert Kevin Schmidt of U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park. It is a melange of loose rocks. The topography is steep. And it’s exposed to fierce Pacific storms. Over the next half century, slides closed the road no fewer than 53 times, according to “A History of Road Closures Along Highway 1,” a 2001 Caltrans report. There have been at least a dozen slides since then, including 2017’s collapses. Until the 1950s, gates were in place at the northern and southern ends and regularly closed to tourist traffic during the winter. High-end development and the tourist economy (and local employment dependent thereupon) ended that. The slides in 2017 presented particular problems. Previously, Caltrans could correct slides by cutting and bulldozing debris from the tops of the slides and moving it to the bottoms, decreasing the angle of the slopes, so it’s less dangerous and more stable. A 1983 slide-repair project was the largest earth-moving operation in Caltrans history — and created massive, barren scars — while dumping great quantities of sediments into the ocean. But now the Big Sur coast is a protected marine sanctuary. That option is now out. Smaller slides can be addressed by options like walls, buttresses and drainage. Large slides are hard. There are basically three options. If the geology is appropriate, tunnel through the slide as was done at the Devil's Slide N of Santa Cruz. But that's expensive and takes a very long time. Make that very very, what with EIRs and the cost. The route can be moved inland — depending on geography — as is being done for the "Last Chance Grade" on US 101. But in this portion of the coast, the canyons and nature of the mountains make that equally expensive. Lastly, some way to stabilize the slide can be found, and you build the road on top of the slide (later reports indicated that this is the solution Caltrans is making).
    (Source: Mercury News, 6/3/2017)

    In August 2017, it was reported that Caltrans had decided how to address the Mud Creek Slide. Drivers on Route 1 will be going over — not around or through — the Mud Creek Slide when the coast route reopens. “The new roadway will be realigned across the landslide,” the agency said in a news release, adding that the highway will be “buttressed with a series of embankments, berms, rocks, netting, culverts and other stabilizing material.” The planned approach, Caltrans said, would allow the agency to rebuild the roadway more quickly and at a lower cost than other options such as “structures, a tunnel or major earthwork that places additional fill into the ocean.”
    (Source: sanluisobispo.com, 8/1/2017)

    Mud Creek Update 1In October 2017, the LA Times provided a detailed discussion on the work to stabilize the Mud Creek Slide and reconstruct the roadway. There are three main steps. (1) Two 25-foot-tall embankments, built at the base of the slide’s steepest slope, will protect the highway from avalanches; (2) the proposed highway replacement is about a quarter-mile long, with a 45 mph speed limit; and (3) there will be a breakwater-like feature, called a revetment, that will absorb the concussion of waves from ocean swells and limit the danger of erosion. Upon completion, this barrier will be 1,400 feet long. This approach is dealing with the estimated 5 million cubic yards of rock and mud sloughed off this mountain; the volume would by one estimate fill the Rose Bowl seven times. Work on reconstruction began within days of the mountain’s failure with reconnaissance. Five months later, Mud Creek is a closely watched parcel of California real estate. Microwave units, like traffic cops’ radar guns, survey the mountain every three minutes, and lasers shoot light on tetrahedral prisms mounted on 19 boulders, registering the smallest shift. Geologists and on-site personnel study PET-scan-like images of the slide, colored green to yellow to red, low risk to high risk. If something moves, the call goes out. Geologists mapped not only material that slid into the sea, but also the vertical slope where that material once resided, and engineers plotted the new road. Because there wasn’t room to go around the slide, and because a tunnel would be too long, requiring nearly two miles in order to find stable ground for its entrances and exits, the best option was to go over the slide. As they sketched the plan, they secured the site. After carving a network of roads and terraces on top of the slide, they dug a catch basin at the base of the vertical slope, where boulders — calving from above — could land without bounding into the crews below. Sixteen shipping containers, each holding three K-rails, were brought in as an additional defense. To fight ocean erosion, they began building the twin breakwaters, technically known as revetments, on the slide’s northern and southern flanks, and behind each revetment they plan to build up layers of soil and fabric to keep pressure on the hillside just below the path of the road. For now, the road is a sinuous line on paper: two 12-foot lanes and two 4-foot shoulders with three gradual turns, tuned to 45 mph. There is talk of adding a turnout with signage explaining the nature of the slide. The California Department of Transportation, manager of the $40-million project, hopes to see traffic flowing by the end of next summer.
    (Source: Los Angeles Times, 11/9/2017)

    In March 2018, it was reported that the reconstruction of Route 1 was on track to reopen sometime in summer 2018. The following are areas where progress has been made:
    (Source: San Luis Obispo Tribune, 3/10/2018)

    • The Road. In January, workers had cleared a makeshift dirt-and-gravel road that connected the paved highway at either end of the slide. Portions of that road near the north end are now buried under rock and debris. That's by design. A piece of equipment called a “spider” is working on the hillside above the roadway, helping to dislodge loose material that then descends onto the road. That debris will be either trucked away or used for fill elsewhere on the site. The spider is also installing anchors that will be used to hold protective netting when the project is complete; this netting provides falling rocks with something to fall against, and they collect at the bottom of the net. Surveyors are also working to find the proper elevation and location for the actual highway when it’s installed.
    • The Pipe. The waters from Mud Creek -- one of the triggers of the slides -- flow beneath the surface of the mountain.Their presence is clearly marked a canyon cleft in the hillside far above Route 1. The creek descends and eventually passes between a pair of smaller hillsides just above the road. A huge pipe has been installed to carry water from the creek down to the ocean during rainy periods. The pipe measures about 54 inches in diameter, and a portion of it can be seen protruding from the surface right beside the temporary road. Another section is visible just above ground farther down the hillside.
    • The Baskets. A short distance above the pipe, on the south side of the Mud Creek ravine, an earthen platform called a “basket” is being created. A new access road leads to the platform, which is enclosed by a tall wire fence. It’s being built in front of a catchment area, which is designed to collect rocks and debris that continue to fall from the mountainside. The basket itself serves two purposes: (1) it shields the road from the debris that accumulates there; and (2) it provides a platform from which heavy equipment can reach down into the catchment area and clear out that debris. A second basket will be installed on the north side of the ravine.
    • The Rock Wall. At the seashore a rock seawall is being constructed; as of March, it was between 75 and 80 percent complete. The wall rises 36 feet above sea level — or 10 feet higher than originally planned. The additional height was required because the site was being hit by “more wave activity” than initially predicted. Augie Wilhite of John Madonna Construction estimated that 165,000 tons of rock had been placed in the embankment as of the writing of the source article, with another 30,000 to 40,000 still to come. At 1,000 tons a day, that leaves 30 or 40 more days before that portion of the project is complete. Workers are placing the rocks atop a layer of GT-110, a thick and sturdy material that Hilton calls “filter fabric,” which keeps the rocks separate from the dirt underneath them. The rocks are being brought to the site at a rate of 46 to 50 truckloads a day from Cambria and Porterville.

    In May 2018, it was reported that Caltrans has announced a new target of mid-September to reopen Route 1 at Mud Creek. Road construction crews have been working to create a new, ¼-mile roadway over the Mud Creek slide. Caltrans says it will be buttressed with a series of embankments, berms, rocks, netting, culverts and other stabilizing material. Another update will be issued in July, and even after the reopening, lane closures and road work could continue.
    (Source: KSBY, 4/30/2018)

    In June 2018, the reopening date for the Mud Creek Slide was updated to the end of July. Caltrans says favorable weather, longer days and increased productivity by the contractor are allowing them to open the roadway sooner than previously estimated. Crews are reconstructing a 1/4-mile highway over the landslide. Caltrans says it will be buttressed with a series of embankments, berms, rocks, netting, culverts, and other stabilizing material.
    (Source: KSBY, 6/12/2018)

    Mud Creek Slide area - July 2018On July 20, 2018, Route 1 up the Big Sur Coast reopened from Cambria to Carmel. A public ribbon cutting was held at 11 a.m. on July 20 at the Ragged Point Inn to celebrate the complete of roadwork at the Mud Creek Slide, which has been closed for more than a year.
    (Source: Sacramento Bee, 7/3/2018)

    The work on the Mud Creek Slide was summarized as follows in the LA Times: "Unable to excavate the route of the old highway, the engineers and geologists had decided instead to build the new highway over the slide itself. It was a novel approach: After the 1983 slide, debris was shoveled into the ocean, a strategy that changed the landscape and was criticized for being too intrusive. The new road at Mud Creek, the engineers realized, needed to be protected from the mountain above and the ocean below. Drawing upon data from satellites, radar, drilling samples and computer models, they came up with a plan that was conceptually simple but challenging to execute. A catch-basin hundreds of feet above the road was cleared and lined with retaining walls that would catch debris falling from the mountain. A long breakwater, known as a revetment, was constructed along the base of the slide to dispel the force of the waves and minimize erosion." In Big Sur, news of the opening was celebrated at Nepenthe and at Ventana resort. Hotels and restaurants have already begun putting out “We are hiring” signs. The Times noted that, although most drivers will simply speed past on the new road, Caltrans has placed a small wooden bench on the shoulder of the southbound lanes, just south of the slide. From here, 14 months of engineering design and construction can be appreciated at a glance. Carved into the bench beneath the Caltrans logo and the initials for John Madonna Construction is the phrase, “Thx John, Mark, Augie & Co.” It is a nod to the primary construction managers on site and a reminder of the efforts to control the ever-changing geology of the California coast.
    (Source: LA Times, 7/19/2018)

    Gorda Realignment (05-Mon-1 8.7/9.1)

    In June 2020, the CTC amended the following project into the SHOPP, which appears to be the permanent resolution of the Mud Creek Slide: 05-Mon-1 8.7/9.1. PPNO 2850 ProjID 0518000106 EA 1K020. On Route 1 near Gorda, from north of White Creek Bridge to 2.0 miles south of Los Burros Road. Realign highway, replace temporary safety features with permanent safety devices, and install erosion control measures. PA&ED: 752K; PS&E $1,046K; R/W Sup $26K; Con Sup $838K; R/W Cap $4K; Const Cap $2,176K; Total $4,842K. BC: 6/22/2023.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(5a) #3)

    In June 2020, the CTC approved the following support allocation for this project: 05-Mon-1 8.7/9.1 PPNO 2850 ProjID 0518000106 EA 1K020. Route 1 near Gorda, from north of White Creek Bridge to 2.0 miles south of Los Burros Road. Realign highway, replace temporary safety features with  permanent safety devices, and install erosion control measures. Allocation: PA&ED $752,000
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) #29)

    Mill Creek Bridge Area Stabilization

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP as a "Long Lead Project" in March 2018: PPNO 3030. 05-Monterey-1 18.5/18.7. Route 1 Near Lucia, north of Mill Creek Bridge. Stabilize highway segment caused by erosion. Note: Environmental Permits may require more than standard storm water treatment BMPs. This would affect cost, project foot print, possible R/W needs, and additional area for environmental review. * PA&ED phase(s) is authorized. Begin Con: 6/1/2025. Total Project Cost: $19,211K.

    Nacimiento-Fergusson Road (MON 18.893) to Lucia (MON 23.108)

    Limekiln Creek Bridge

    In October 2015, the CTC approved the following SHOPP funding: 5-Mon-1 20.9/21.3 Route 1 Near Lucia from 0.1 mile south to 0.2 mile north of Limekiln Creek Bridge No. 44-0058. Replace bridge. PAED: 12/02/2021 R/W: 03/05/2025 RTL: 04/03/2025 CCA: 12/12/2028 Costs: $704K (R/W); $64,644K (C). Completion: FY24/25 Supporting costs: PA & ED $3,500K; PS & E $0; RW Sup $416K; Con Sup $13,865K; Total $17.781K

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP as a "Long Lead Project" in March 2018: PPNO 2524. 05-Monterey-1 20.9/21.3. Route 1 Near Lucia from 0.1 mile south to 0.2 mile north of Limekiln Creek Bridge No. 44-0058. Replace bridge. Note: Potential R/W concerns relating to a State Park and complexity and duration of environmental studies. * PA&ED phase(s) is authorized. No construction date. Total Project Cost: $83,129K.

    In June 2019, the CTC approved the following long lead project amendment: 05-Mon-1 20.9/21.3 PPNO 2524 ProjID 0514000004. Route 1 Near Lucia, from 0.1 mile south to 0.2 mile north of Limekiln Creek Bridge No. 44-0058. Replace bridge. Note: Delay project delivery is due to postponement of PA&ED completion to FY 23-24 to allow for additional alternatives analysis. Increase in PS&E amount was erroneously not reported before. Updated total cost: $92,727K. Updated const est. FY27-28.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Long Lead Amendment Item 3)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Long Lead Bridge Preservation item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 05-Monterey-1 PM 20.9/21.3 PPNO 2524 Proj ID 0514000004 EA 1F510. Route 1 near Lucia, from 0.1 mile south to 0.2 mile north of Limekiln Creek Bridge No. 44-0058. Replace bridge. Note: Potential R/W concerns relating to a State Park and complexity and duration of environmental studies. Programmed in FY24-25, with construction scheduled to start in August 2025. Total project cost is $92,727K, with $65,348K being capital (const and right of way) and $27,379K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.). Only the PA&ED phase allocation of $3,500K is approved.
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    Another two projects are taking place at the site of Pitkins Curve and Rain Rocks, along the southern coast of Big Sur near Lucia (approx MON 21.509). Pitkins Bridge and Rain Rocks Rock Shed perch atop the shifting scree of greywacke within the narrowest construction jobsite ever visited. Steel netting is draped over the rockface to contain ceaseless falling rocks. The netting was initially draped with helicopter assistance, then climbers fasten it tightly in place. The rock shed will allow for cars and bicyclists to safely travel this passage and the bridge will connect the rock shed to the northern roadbed. More information and pictures here.

    In July 2017, it was reported that Caltrans has reopened Route 1 at Paul’s Slide (apx 001 MON 21.841), meaning 35 miles of roadway is now open to the public between the massive Mud Creek slide in the south and the downed bridge to the north, though access remains only via Nacimiento-Fergusson Road. Now that Route 1 is open around the clock at Paul’s Slide, the roadway will be under one-way reverse traffic control with flaggers on site, giving Caltrans the opportunity to continue repairing the road and watch for any new movement. Big waterfalls remain from all the rain this past winter, which makes it possible for problems to arise, said Susana Cruz, a Caltrans spokeswoman. One-way control was reported to still be in place as of March 2018.
    (Source: Mercury News, 7/19/2017; SanLuis Obispo Tribune, 3/10/2018)

    Lucia (MON 23.108) to Gamboa Point (MON 26.243)

    No updates.

    Gamboa Point (MON 26.243) to Slates Hot Springs (MON 32.624)

    In August 2019, the following project was amended into the 2018 SHOPP: 05-Mon-1 27.5/27.7. PPNO 2853. Proj ID 0518000105. EA 1K010. Route 1 Near Lucia, from 0.6 mile to 0.8 mile south of Big Creek Bridge. Construct tieback wall, restore roadway and drainage facilities, and install permanent erosion control measures. PA&ED: $1,049K. PS&E $1,607K. R/W Sup: $359K. Con Sup: $2,092K. R/W Cap: $163K. Const Cap: $6,925K. Total: $12,195K. Begin Const: 12/1/2022. (Concurrent COS allocation under Resolution FP-19-14.)
    (Source: August 2019 CTC Agenda/Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Item 30)

    Slates Hot Springs (MON 32.624) to Grimes Canyon (MON 41.614)

    No updates.

    Grimes Canyon (MON 41.614) to Big Sur (MON 48.648)

    In June 2020, the CTC approved the following support project in this area: 05-Mon-1 44.5 PPNO 3018 ProjID 0519000154 EA 1M460. Route 1 near Big Sur, at 1.0 mile south of Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge. Construct retaining wall to stabilize slope, widen shoulder, repair pavement drainage, and install erosion control. Allocation: PS&E $1,896,000; R/W Sup $291,000.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) #30)

    Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge (approx MON 46.669)

    In February 2017, it was reported that the Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge (approx MON 46.669) has multiple cracks in one of its support columns and and has been closed to traffic since Feb. 15. Caltrans announced after a bridge inspection on Tuesday that the structure is beyond repair. The closure means travelers can no longer make the complete road-trip along California's scenic Route 1. Motorists may now only travel south on Route 1 from Carmel to just south of Palo Colorado in Monterey County and north from Cambria to Ragged Point in San Luis Obispo County. "The soil and slide material coming away from the base of the column created this movement of the bridge," explained Caltrans spokesperson Jim Shivers. "The bridge moved something like six to seven inches over the past week or so. We can see some cracks on the structure itself. I can't really state in what direction it may be moving. We know the structure as a whole is moving and we know this has caused the bridge to become uneven in some places."No updates.
    (Source: SF Gate, 2/23/2017)

    In March 2017, cracked and collapsing Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge was demolished. Crews will take a 23-foot-wide crane — already on-site — and drop a 6,000-pound wrecking ball onto the bridge. Also employed have been blow torches and the hoe ram, among other things. Since its construction, the entire infrastructure has shifted several feet and received fractures to two of its three columns. When the bridge collapses into the canyon after the demolition, its pieces will either be broken up and hauled away or reused for the new bridge. The preliminary design for the bridge has been completed along with getting the permits and approvals from different agencies including the Central Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board and California Department of Fish and Wildlife. The cost, including demolition and construction, will total about $21 million, and building the span will be handled by Golden State Bridge out of Benicia. It is expected to be ready by mid- to late September. The 60-foot steel girders have been ordered, will be delivered by truck and assembled on site to construct the 320-foot span. The future single-span bridge will be made of steel instead of concrete and will not incorporate the column supports its predecessor did. In late March, a steep and narrow half-mile footpath — for local residents, school children and service workers — opened from sunrise to sunset, linking both sides of Big Sur’s divide. Access is available only to authorized people through State Parks-issued waivers and passes. Cyclists are prohibited from using the trail. Meanwhile, local businesses are frustrated that Caltrans has ruled out a temporary pedestrian suspension bridge. “Caltrans seems insensitive to the financial and personal disaster south of the Pfeiffer Bridge,” said Gregory Hawthorne, owner of Big Sur’s Hawthorne Gallery and a partner in Post Ranch Inn. “There is available space for a pedestrian suspension bridge. This would help facilitate the construction of the new bridge by allowing workers to move from one side to the other. This would also accommodate a gurney for the injured, food for families and businesses could be moved by wagon or wheel barrel. Children could walk to a waiting school bus.” A temporary bridge could also link tourists to hotels, restaurants and galleries, he said.
    (Source: SLO Tribune, 3/10/2017; MercuryNews, 3/20/2017; Mercury News, 3/28/2017)

    In June 2017, it was reported that on July 1, a steep half-mile trail across Pfeiffer Canyon — connecting the two segments of Big Sur severed by the downed Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge — will open to everyone. For months, access to the trail has been restricted to local residents and workers. Once on the other side of the canyon, a shuttle will provide transit to Big Sur destinations. (Or you can walk along Route 1.) The half-mile “Community Bypass Trail” starts at Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park, closed for nearly a year due to last summer’s Soberanes Fire and last winter’s fierce winter storms. Visitors access the trail by parking at Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park. Visitors can also take a shuttle to Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park from Andrew Molera State Park. This is how it works: You park at Andrew Molera State Park and the so-called “North Shuttle” delivers you to the Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park store. The “South Shuttle” will drop you off at sites along Route 1.
    (Source: Mercury News, 6/26/2017)

    In July 2017, it was reported that by the end of July, the girders that will support the 310-foot, single-span bridge across Pfeiffer Canyon will be delivered, assembled, then launched via rollers, from one abutment to the other, bringing the construction project closer to its September completion date. The “engineering feat” of launching steel girders across Pfeiffer Canyon will be a very slow, methodical process that leaves no room for error and will be handled by contractor Golden State Bridge of Benicia. Once the girders are in position and anchored, concrete can be poured into forms that will create the bridge deck for the Route 1 roadway that will complete the link from north to south, except about 35 miles south at the massive Mud Creek slide. The new Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge replaces a span that was nearly 50 years old. The old bridge was supported by columns that started to fail in February after heavy winter storms caused slides up and down the Central Coast including in the canyon below the bridge. The bridge was ultimately demolished in March as Caltrans engineers, designers and planners moved forward with a replacement strategy. The transportation agency decided on a $24 million plan to build a single-span, steel girder structure without the columns that made the previous configuration vulnerable to landslides. A portion of the center column of the former structure still protrudes from the ground below the construction site where the earth continues to be a bit active. Currently, it’s holding back the slide material. But on either side of the canyon, huge abutments stand at the ready to anchor the girders and provide part of the platform of what will eventually be the finished roadway. The abutments are the most important part of this engineering feat because they will provide the foundation and support for the entire bridge. Bore holes, 4 feet in diameter, were drilled 100 feet into the mountain to bedrock far below, and reinforced with rebar and concrete. Contractors work atop temporary launch towers 320 feet above the canyon floor, building and positioning the rollers that will be used to launch the steel girders once they have been delivered and assembled on the north side of the construction site. On 8/25/2017, crews began the process of launching steel girders for the new Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge, which officials now said may not be open until October.
    (Source: Mercury News, 7/20/2017; MercuryNews, 8/23/2017)

    In mid-October 2017, it was reported that the Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge was about to reopen. As of the beginning of October, all that remained was some bridge and guard rail work on the bridge itself. Caltrans was paving the roadway the first weekend in October, which will be followed by lane striping. Among the other work yet to be done is trenching to improve drainage on the existing roadway and grinding down the road as it approaches the bridge to make for a smooth transition. Crews will also have to remove the large machinery currently in place as part of construction work. “We did seven years of work in about seven months,” a Caltrans spokesman said. “It’s pretty remarkable what work has been done here, it’s really amazing.”
    (Source: Monterey Herald, 10/3/2017)

    In June 2018, it was reported that this project was honored in the 11th annual America’s Transportation Awards. Sponsored by AASHTO, Socrata, AAA and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the 11th annual America’s Transportation Awards competition recognizes transportation projects in three categories: Quality of Life/Community Development, Best Use of Technology and Innovation and Operations Excellence. California DOT (Caltrans) won in the large category (projects costing more than $200 million) for its Route 91 Corridor Improvement project, and in the Best Use of Technology and Innovation category for Caltrans' Route 1/Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge Replacement. Caltrans also won and award in the medium Operations Excellence category for the Route 191 Realignment Project: Taming the Curves.
    (Source: For Construction Pros, 6/13/2018)

    Big Sur (MON 48.648) to Carmel Highlands (MON 69.677)

    Hurricane Point Widening

    In December 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project, located north of Big Sur in Monterey County (Hurricane Point to Rocky Creek, 05-Mon-1, PM 58.3/59.8), that proposes to widen shoulders and upgrade guardrails on Route 1. The proposed project also includes work on catch slopes, reinforced slopes, and culverts. The project is fully funded and programmed in the 2016 SHOPP for an estimated total of $8.2 million, which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in November 2018. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 SHOPP.

    In May 2018, it was reported that Caltrans is hoping to widen sections of Route 1 near Hurricane Point in Big Sur to make the road safer for drivers. The focus is on a 1.5 mile section stretching from Rocky Creek past Bixby Bridge and south to Hurricane Point. The plan is to widen travel lanes from 10.5 feet to 12 feet and increase the average paved shoulder widths from two feet to four feet. The plan is to use existing embankments where possible and when needed build retaining walls on the west side of the road to shore up those embankments. Crews may also cut into the slope on the east side of the pavement and if acquire additional property if it is necessary. The project is part of a proactive plan to make the area safer. The project is about a year out and on is scheduled to go before the California Coastal Commission. The construction work would impact pullouts along the highway, potentially inhibiting coastal access. Caltrans has agreed to give $100,000 to California Coastal Trail improvements in the area to offset potential impacts. The project, which would extend from mile marker 57.5 to 60.6, stretches between 1,200 acres of land owned by the U.S. Forest Service and is known as the Brazil Ranch. The Federal Government bought the ranch in 2002 and it has upland trails above the project site. The project also include new guard rails, repaving, a new culvert in one spot and replacement of another culvert.
    (Source: KSBW Channel 8, 5/10/2018)

    In March 2012, it was reported that, along the northern Big Sur coast, about a 1/2 hour south of Carmel, work is being done at the Rocky Creek Bridge (MON 60.13). CalTrans is stabilizing the roadway, widening the shoulders, upgrading guardrails, and installing a retaining wall. Judging by the multiple scaffolds, it appears that the bridge, built in 1932, is undergoing a multi-point inspection.
    (Source: The Coast Road, 3/25/2012)

    Carmel Highlands (MON 69.677) to Monterey (MON R79.307)

    In December 2016, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Monterey County that will improve the roadway and construct a climbing lane on Route 1 near the city of Carmel-by-the-Sea, between Route 1/Rio Road to Carmel Valley Road (05-Mon-1, PM 72.3/72.9). The project is programmed in the 2016 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $3,600,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 State Transportation Improvement Program.

    In March 2017, the CTC allocated $3M from the budget for construction funding for a locally administered project on Route 1 near Carmel-by-the-Sea, on Route 1 from Rio Road to Carmel Valley Road (05-Mon-1 72.3/75.2). Construct additional climbing lane, modify intersection, and enhance turn movements.

    Del Ray Oaks Sign. From the KRCA article.In June 2017, it was reported that contractors mispelled two replacement highway signs. The mispelling could cost Californians on the Central Coast thousands of dollars, Caltrans said. A new sign along Route 1 in Monterey County, near Sand City, tells drivers that the exit for Seaside and Del "Ray" Oaks is coming up in 1 1/4 miles (apx. MON R78.057). Caltrans officials did not notice the misspelling of Del Rey Oaks until the day after the sign was installed in mid-June. Another new sign at the exit itself was also misspelled as "Del Ray Oaks." Fixing the spelling errors will be pricey. Changing the "a" to an "e" will costs several hundred dollars, Caltrans spokesperson Susanna Cruz said. To entirely replace the signs, it could cost thousands of dollars. The misspelled signs will remain up until a solution is decided on, Caltrans said.
    (Source: KRCA, 6/26/2017)

    Monterey (MON R79.307) to Montara (Devil's Slide) (SM R38.522), including Santa Cruz

    Surf! Bus Rapid Transit.

    In December 2019, it was reported that preliminary engineering and environmental review work has begun on the $40 million Route 1 busway project planned for the Monterey branch line rail corridor between Monterey and Marina. Dubbed “Surf! Bus Rapid Transit,” the joint project of Monterey Salinas Transit and the Transportation Agency for Monterey County kicked off its pre-construction work late last month with MST-hired consultant Kimley-Horn. Completion of the preliminary work is slated for 2021. The project calls for constructing a 12-foot-wide reversible busway with shoulders along a six-mile section of the TAMC-owned rail line right of way parallel to Route 1 from the Contra Costa Street intersection in Sand City/Seaside (approx MON R79.631) to Del Monte Boulevard and Palm Avenue in Marina (approx MON R85.44), allowing buses to operate in both directions. Buses would generally run southbound toward Monterey during the peak morning hours and northbound toward Marina during the peak evening hours in an effort to cut down on commuter traffic congestion on the highway. The project would include key transportation connections along the route including to the future Marina-Salinas multi-modal corridor and near CSU Monterey Bay. It would feature amenities such as seamless pedestrian and bicycle connections, bus stops with ocean and surf themes, and real-time electronic bus operating time displays. In December, the TAMC board is considered dedicating up to $1.45 million in Measure X funds for the preliminary work, as well as agreeing to sign on as a joint applicant with MST for a state Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program grant. The project already has $15 million in allocated Measure X funding, and TAMC and MST are expected to seek about $25 million in state grant funding to cover the remainder of the project’s total capital cost.
    (Source: Monterey Herald, 12/3/2019)

    In December 2017, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Monterey along Route 1 on Jensen Road and Hilltop Road (05-Mon-1-PM 99.9/T101.1), consisting of collateral facilities. The County, by Cooperative Agreement dated January 6, 2009, agreed to waive the 90-day notice requirement and accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $16,944,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near the city of Santa Cruz, from Pajaro River Bridge (001 MON R101.98) to North Aptos Underpass (001 SCR 10.01), that will rehabilitate 39 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality and prevent further deterioration of the road surface.

    In August 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of the portion of Route 1 right of way in the County of Santa Cruz, at Harkins Slough Road (apx 001 SCR R2.255), consisting of a bridge wingwall built and maintained by the County within State Right of Way.

    Salinas Road Interchange

    Salinas Road InterchangeIn 2007, the CTC recommended funding of the following projects from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA): 2-lane expressway, Salinas Rd interchange in Monterey County (001MON T101.039) ($37,061K requested and recommended) and auxiliary lanes

    With respect to the Salinas Road interchange: In October 2008 the CTC recieved the MND regarding its construction on Route 1 between Jensen Road to Trafton Road and convert a two-lane highway to a two-lane expressway. The project is programmed through construction with $9.945 million in Regional Improvement Program, $1.510 million in Interregional Improvement Program, and $37.061 million in Corridor Mobility Improvement Account funds. The total estimated project cost is $48.5 million. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2008-09. A mitigated negative environmental impact declaraction was received. The project will involve construction activities resulting in permanent wetlands loss and visual impacts that will be mitigated to less than significant levels. However, construction was delayed due to the California Budget Crisis in 2008-2009. Construction was to have begun in late 2009 to convert Salinas Road into a three-lane span over Route 1, add traffic signals and remove the dangerous left turn drivers must now make at this intersection. This is delayed.

    Highway 1 Corridor Investment Program: San Andreas/Larkin Valley Road to Morrissey Blvd (SCR R7.692 to SCR 15.805)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, authorized $2,936,000 for High Priority Project #719: Route 1 improvements between Soquel and Morrissey Blvd, including merge lanes and the La Fonda overpass near Santa Cruz.

    In 2007, the CTC recommended funding of the following projects from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA): Soquel Ave. (apx 001 SCR 14.844) to Morrissey (~ 001 SCR 15.805) in Santa Cruz County ($16,190K requested and recommended). They did not recommend funding auxiliary lanes from 41st Ave to Soquel Ave. in Santa Cruz County ($17,973K requested) or from Park Ave to Bay/Porter in Santa Cruz County ($21,389K requested). In May 2008, the project was amended to delete Morrissey Ave from the scope. In June 2008, the funding was adjusted.

    101 Santa CruzIn October 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Santa Cruz County that will construct auxiliary lanes on Route 1 from just west of Soquel Avenue to just east of Morrissey Boulevard, replace the La Fonda Avenue Overcrossing, and construct roadway improvements. The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes Federal Demonstration funds, Regional Surface Transportation Program funds, and local funds. Total estimated project cost is $22,058,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the concurrent project baseline amendment. The amendment will modify the project by eliminating the proposed improvements at the Morrissey Boulevard Interchange.

    In May 2010, the CTC approved amend the CMIA baseline agreement for the Highway 1 Soquel to Morrissey Auxiliary Lanes project (PPNO 6500) in Santa Cruz to revise the project schedule. The start of the Design (PS&E) phase was delayed more than a year because (1) the baseline schedule indicated that the Design phase would start nine months before the end of the Environmental (PA&ED) phase. This is inconsistent with Public Resources Code Section 21150, which requires the environmental document and Future Consideration of Funding to be approved prior to the Design phase allocation. (2( Proposed retaining walls were moved to accommodate the ultimate width of the highway, which will include high occupancy vehicle lanes. This necessitated additional environmental technical studies based on the new project footprint, which caused a delay of nearly four months. The Design phase started on October 15, 2009 upon approval of Future Consideration of Funding and the Design phase allocation. Subsequent milestones have been delayed as a result of the Design phase delay. Completion is now estimated for November 2013, with closeout ending in December 2014.

    In August 2011, it was reported that federal transportation officials have raised questions about the controversial $503 million project's lack of progress. In face, the Federal Highway Administration has not only threatened to pull the plug on the project, it told the county's Regional Transportation Commission it could seek payback of $5.5 million. That's the federal government's share of a $12 million environmental impact report that's dragged on for eight years. In order to keep the project alive, the regional transportation commission voted to pursue a smaller, $30 million project: adding exit lanes between 41st Avenue and Soquel Drive and a bike-and-pedestrian bridge over Route 1 near Chanticleer Avenue. The hope is that this would be the first of several segments that together complete the original vision. By pursuing smaller pieces under the umbrella of a single environmental study, the RTC hopes to appease the Federal Highway Administration and move forward incrementally as funds become available. The original plan would add high-occupancy vehicle lanes along a nine-mile length of Route 1 between Soquel Drive and San Andreas Road. It would add auxiliary lanes between exits, as well as three new bike and pedestrian bridges over the freeway.

    Rte 1 Corridor Investment PgmIn January 2019, it was reported that the Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission announced the final Tier I & II Environmental Impact Report and Environmental Assessment has been completed and approved for the "Highway 1 Corridor Investment Program." Additionally, the California Transportation Commission (CTC) approved for future consideration of funding 5-SCr-1, R7.24/16.13 Santa Cruz Route 1 Project. These appear to be the same programs, as the CTC describes the project as ilocated on Route 1 in the city of Santa Cruz in Santa Cruz County. The project proposes to add High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes, pedestrian and bicycle overcrossings, and reconstruct interchanges. The proposed project involves a Tier I component from the San Andreas-Larkin Valley Road interchange to the Morrissey Boulevard interchange and a Tier II component from 41st Avenue to Soquel Avenue/Drive. The purpose of this project proposes to reduce congestion, improve safety, promote alternative transportation modes and encourage carpooling and ridesharing. The Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission’s Regional Transportation Plan proposes this project for the Senate Bill 1 Solutions for Congested Corridors Program Cycle 2 funds. The total cost of this proposed Tier II is estimated to be approximately $36.4 million. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2021-22. The Santa Cruz RTC says the same thing: The Highway 1 Corridor Investment Program is a planning and funding program focused on the section of Route 1 between San Andreas/Larkin Valley Road (SCR R7.692) and Morrissey Boulevard (~SCR 15.805). The nearly 9-mile long project is looking to ease congestion, improve safety, encourage carpooling and ridesharing, and "promote the use of alternative transportation modes as means to increase transportation system capacity," according to the 644-page FEIR report.
    (Source: KSBW, 1/4/2019; January2019 CTC Minutes Agenda Item 2.2c.(6))

    According to a press release by SCCRTC, "For environmental analysis, the Highway 1 Corridor Investment Program was divided into two components – Tier I (planning-level) and Tier II (project-level). Tier I evaluates the overall planning-level concept for the future of the Highway 1 corridor between Santa Cruz and Aptos while Tier II evaluates specific projects in the program. The Tier I planning concept for the corridor would be built over time through a series of smaller, incremental Tier II projects." Those first two projects include adding an extra lane on both sides of Route 1 between Soquel Avenue and 41st Avenue, and a bicycle and pedestrian overcrossing at Chanticleer Avenue. According to the report, the lanes will be 12-feet wide and will expand the four-lane 1.4 mile stretch of highway into a six-lane highway. Route 1 project program manager Sarah Christensen said, "This is a big milestone because now it enables other projects to move forward in the project level environmental review." The price tag for the Tier II portion of the project is estimated at $34.8 million. In a best-case scenario, construction could start on the Tier II project in 2020, with a completion date of 2021.
    (Source: KSBW, 1/4/2019; TierI and Tier II Final Environmental Impact Report/ Environmental Assessment with a Finding of No Significant Impact)

    The recommended Tier 1 alternative, the Tier I Corridor HOV Lane Alternative, would expand the existing four-lane highway to a six-lane facility by adding one HOV lane in each direction next to the median and auxiliary lanes on the outside in each direction. Expanding the highway from four lanes to six lanes would be achieved by building the new lane in the existing freeway median and widening the freeway footprint in those locations where the median is not wide enough to fit the new lane. The Tier I Corridor HOV Lane Alternative would modify or reconstruct all nine interchanges within the project limits to improve merging operations and ramp geometry. The Bay Avenue/Porter Street and 41st Avenue interchanges would be modified to operate as one interchange, with a frontage road to connect the two halves of the interchange. Where feasible, design deficiencies on existing ramps would be corrected. Ramp metering and HOV bypass lanes and mixed-flow lanes would be added to Route 1 on-ramps within the project limits; on-ramp transit stops would also be provided. The Tier I Corridor HOV Lane Alternative would include auxiliary lanes between Freedom Boulevard and Bay Avenue/Porter Street and between 41st Avenue and Soquel Avenue/Drive. Transportation Operations System infrastructure, such as changeable message signs, highway advisory radio, microwave detection systems, and vehicle detection systems, would also be provided under the Tier I Corridor TSM Alternative. One difference between the Tier I Corridor HOV Alternative and the Tier I Corridor TSM Alternative is that the Tier I Corridor HOV Alternative would not construct a northbound auxiliary lane between State Park Drive and Park Avenue.

    Bridge structures and the Capitola Avenue overcrossing would be modified or replaced to accommodate the proposed HOV lanes. New and widened highway crossing structures would include shoulder and sidewalk facilities to accommodate pedestrians and bicycles. The Tier I Corridor HOV Lane Alternative would include three new pedestrian/bicycle overcrossings over Route 1 at Mar Vista Drive, Chanticleer Avenue, and Trevethan Avenue. The proposed interchange improvement would also enhance pedestrian and bicycle facilities along local roadways within the interchange areas.

    The two existing Santa Cruz Branch Line Railroad bridges over Route 1 in Aptos would be replaced with longer bridges at the same elevation, and the highway profile would be lowered to achieve standard vertical clearance under the bridge to make room for the HOV and auxiliary lanes and to minimize environmental impacts. These bridges would include improvements to pedestrian and bicycle facilities. The existing Route 1 bridge over Aptos Creek, located between the two railroad bridges, has two traffic lanes in each direction and would be widened on the outside, northbound and southbound, to accommodate the HOV and auxiliary lanes.

    Tier 1 alternatives not recommended were:

    • The Tier I Corridor TSM Alternative proposes to add auxiliary lanes along the highway between major interchange pairs from Morrissey Boulevard to Freedom Boulevard, provide ramp metering, construct HOV bypass lanes and mixed-flow lanes on on-ramps, and improve nonstandard geometric elements at various ramps. The Tier I Corridor TSM Alternative also would include Transportation Operations System electronic equipment as described for the Tier I Corridor HOV Lane Alternative. In addition, the Tier I Corridor TSM Alternative would reconstruct the north and south Aptos railroad bridges and lower Route 1 in Aptos to achieve standard vertical clearance; reconstruct the State Park Drive, Capitola Avenue, and 41st Avenue overcrossings; widen the Aptos Creek Bridge; and construct three new pedestrian/ bicycle overcrossings over Route 1 at Mar Vista Drive, Chanticleer Avenue, and Trevethan Avenue. All of the aforementioned reconstructed bridges would include improvements to pedestrian and bicycle facilities. The Tier I Corridor TSM Alternative shares many features with the Tier I Corridor HOV Lane Alternative, the major exceptions being HOV lanes would not be constructed along the mainline and, of the nine interchanges within the project limits, only the Soquel Drive/Soquel Avenue interchange would be reconfigured.

    In the short term, the recommended approach was the Tier II Auxiliary Lane Alternative, which would add an auxiliary lane to both the northbound and southbound sides of Route 1 between the 41st Avenue and Soquel Avenue/Drive interchanges. In addition, an Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant pedestrian and bicycle overcrossing would be constructed at Chanticleer Avenue. The total roadway widening would be approximately 1.4 miles along Route 1. The auxiliary lanes included in this alternative are transportation system management features that will help improve operations in the near-term. The new auxiliary lanes would be 12 feet wide. In the southbound direction, the width needed for the new lane would be added in the median, and the median barrier would be shifted approximately 5 feet toward the northbound side of the freeway to make room for the new lane and a standard 10-foot wide shoulder. Where the new southbound lane meets the existing ramps, outside shoulder widening would occur to achieve standard 10-foot wide shoulders. In the northbound direction, the project proposes to pave a 10-foot-wide median shoulder and widen to the outside to add the 12-foot wide auxiliary lane and a new 10-foot wide shoulder.

    The pedestrian/bicycle overcrossing constructed at Chanticleer Avenue would connect to a new 360-foot long by 6-foot wide sidewalk on Chanticleer Avenue on the south side of Route 1. The sidewalk, located along the south side of Soquel Drive, would be separated from the street by a 4-foot wide park strip.

    Retaining walls would be constructed as part of the roadway widening along Route 1, with a total of four separate walls: three on the north side of the roadway and one on the south side. One of the retaining walls would start after the 41st Avenue on-ramp and extend approximately 150 feet; two other retaining walls on the northbound side would be 375 and 408 feet. On the southbound side, a 350-foot-long wall would be constructed along the highway mainline and Soquel Avenue, over the Rodeo Creek Gulch culvert.

    In January 2019, the CTC approved the following funding for a locally-administered STIP project on the state highway system: $3,320,000 Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission (SCCRTC) / Santa Cruz 05-SCR-1 13.6/14. Route 1 41st Avenue to Soquel Avenue Auxiliary Lanes. Near the city of Santa Cruz and Capitola, from 41st Avenue to Soquel Avenue. Construct auxiliary lanes and construct bicycle/pedestrian overcrossing near Chanticleer Avenue. Concurrent Consideration of Funding under Resolution E-19-14; January 2019.
    (Source: January 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5c.(2) Item 2)

    In October 2019, it was reported that the Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission held a community meeting regarding the Route 1 Auxiliary Lanes and Chanticleer Bicycle/Pedestrian Overcrossing project, which extends from 41st Avenue to Soquel Drive. The project aims to improve traffic on Route 1 and to improve bicycle and pedestrian access on Chanticleer Avenue in Santa Cruz. The estimated cost of the project is more than $34.2 million and is expected to start in 2022, depending on funding. At the meeting, the RTC sought community input on the design of the Chanticleer Overcrossing, with one option being a blue wave theme and the other showing marine life. Following the meeting, the commission sent out a survey to gather more input on the aesthetics..
    (Source: Santa Cruz Sentinal, 10/24/2019)

    In June 2020, the CTC approved amending the Formulaic Program of Projects in the Local Partnership Program (LPP) to program $302,000 for Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission to fund environmental for the Route 1 - Freedom Blvd. to State Park Dr. Auxiliary Lanes and Bus on Shoulders project, for Fiscal Year 2020-21. The project will construct auxiliary lanes, modify shoulders, construct soundwalls and retaining walls, bridge improvements, and construct bike and pedestrian facilities. The project will improve traffic flow, increase safety, improve travel times and reliability and improve pedestrian and bike accessibility.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 4.21)

    In June 2020, the CTC approved amending the Local Partnership Formulaic Program – Advance Program of Projects to program $888,000 for Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission to fund environmental for the Route 1-Freedom to State Auxiliary Lanes and Bus on Shoulders project in Fiscal Year 2020-21. The project will construct auxiliary lanes, modify shoulders, construct soundwalls and retaining walls, bridge improvements, and construct bike and pedestrian facilities. The project will improve traffic flow, increase safety, improve travel times and reliability, and improve pedestrian and bike accessibility.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 4.23)

    Route 1 - State Park to Bay/Porter Auxiliary Lanes Project (PPNO 0073C) (05-SCR-1 10.4/13.3)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $1.83M in Advance Project Development Element (APDE) funding for PPNO 0073C Rt 1, State Park-Bay/Porter, aux lanes. These lanes would run from State Park Drive to Bay Ave/Porter St. (~ SCR 10.541 to SCR 13.343). The project area includes a total of approximately 2.5 miles of auxiliary lanes on Route 1 between the respective interchanges to be evaluated and constructed as a single project. The project will include the reconstruction of the Capitola Avenue overcrossing to accommodate the auxiliary lanes and long term vision of the Highway 1 Corridor. The specific project will construct northbound and southbound auxiliary lanes between the State Park Drive and Park Avenue Interchanges and between Park Ave and Bay/Porter Interchanges on Route 1, with retaining walls, sound walls, new drainage facilities and rehabilitate freeway sections as needed and pavement overlay. The project also includes the reconstruction of the Capitola Avenue Overcrossing to accommodate the future vision of the Highway 1 Corridor and to provide a wider sidewalk, continuation of bike lanes, and bridge lighting.
    (Source: 2018 RTIP)

    In August 2019, the CTC approved the following allocation: 05-SCR-1 10.4/13.3 PPNO 0073C Proj ID 0518000116 EA 0C733. Route 1 - State Park to Bay/Porter Auxiliary Lanes. Near Capitola and Aptos, Route 1 from State Park Drive to Bay/Porter Interchanges. Construct auxiliary lanes between interchanges. Includes reconstruction of the Capitola Avenue overcrossing to accommodate new lanes on Route 1. (APDE). PA&ED $1,830,000
    (Source: August 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5c.(2) #2)

    In October 2019, it was reported that the Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission held a community meeting regarding the Route 1 Auxiliary Lanes and Capitola Avenue Overcrossing project that extends from the State Park Drive exit (~ SCR 10.538) to the Bay Avenue/Porter Street exit (~ SCR 13.348). The project aims to improve traffic on Route 1 by adding auxiliary lanes from one on-ramp to the next off-ramp, and to improve bicycle and pedestrian travel routes on Capitola Avenue. The project is estimated to cost about $83.2 million and is planned to start construction in 2024 — if enough funds are available. About $72.3 million funds are still needed, according to the RTC. The RTC is expected to start a draft environmental impact report/environmental assessment in the fall or winter 2020.
    (Source: Santa Cruz Sentinal, 10/24/2019)

    The 2020 STIP, approved in March 2020, retains the programmed allocation of $1,830K.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In June 2020, the CTC noticed a 2020 STIP amendment at the request of the Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission (SCCRTC) to delete the Mar Vista Bike/Pedestrian Overcrossing (PPNO1968) project and reprogram the scope and funds to Route 1 - State Park to Bay/Porter Auxiliary Lanes project (PPNO 0073C), in Santa Cruz County. The resolution background material noted that the Mar Vista Bike/Pedestrian project was originally programmed in the 2006 STIP. The project was a component of the larger Route 1 Corridor - High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and Traffic System Management (TSM) Alternative project. The project level environmental review for the Mar Vista Bike/Pedestrian Overcrossing (Mar Vista) project was delayed until after the program level tier 1 environmental document was completed for the corridor, at the request of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). It noted that project is currently programmed with $6,779,000 in Regional Improvement Program (RIP) funds with construction programmed in Fiscal Year  2022-23. With respect to the State Route 1 - State Park to Bay/Porter Auxiliary Lanes (Bay Porter) project, it was  first programmed in the 2018 STIP as an advance project development project; Bay Porter has local funds and RIP funds programmed to the environmental phase. The environmental review for the Mar Vista project revealed costs that exceeded the available funding. In an effort to address the increased cost, a strategy was developed to combine the Mar Vista project with the Bay Porter project since they are in the same area. Combining the two projects, which are on similar schedules, will create cost efficiencies by streamlining the environmental studies and construction of the improvements. The combining of the projects would also lower the cost and save time, compared to stand alone projects, while eliminating the duplication of efforts and studies in the same areas and additional construction contracts and administration. The project cost for the Mar Vista, as a stand-alone project, exceeds its current funding. Whereas combining it with Bay Porter, can bring additional benefits and make a combined Bay Porter/Mar Vista more competitive for various grant programs as a multi-modal project that includes bus, bike, pedestrian and highway elements. The proposed programming strategy is to delete the Mar Vista project, reprogram all funds to the Bay Porter project and update Bay Porter project scope to include the bike and pedestrian overcrossing. The Bay Porter project cost is currently estimated at $73,000,000 but the project is not fully funded. The combined project is estimated to be $88,955,000 with the construction phase unfunded. SCCRTC is currently looking at ways to find the additional funding to fully fund the project. The amendment was approved at the August 2020 CTC meeting.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1b.(2); August 2020 CTC Meeting, Agenda Item 2.1a.(4))

    PPNO 1968: Rt 1 Mar Vista Bike/Pedestrian Overcrossing (PM SCR 10.9)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to adjust the allocation for PPNO 1968, Rt 1 Mar Vista bike/ped overcrossing, at PM SCR 10.9 in Aptos, at Mar Vista Drive. Construct a new bicycle and pedestrian accessible structure over Route 1 and McGregor Drive (frontage road). The 2018 STIP changes the funding from $6.114M to $6.779M, and delays the project to FY19-20 and FY20-21.

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2020 meeting, retains the programmed funding but shifts the project even later: $1,850K slipped to FY21-22 and $4,929K slipped to FY22-23..
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In June 2020, the CTC amended the 2020 STIP at the request of the Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission (SCCRTC) to delete the Mar Vista Bike/Pedestrian Overcrossing (PPNO1968) project and reprogram the scope and funds to Route 1 - State Park to Bay/Porter Auxiliary Lanes project (PPNO 0073C), in Santa Cruz County. The resolution background material noted that the Mar Vista Bike/Pedestrian project was originally programmed in the 2006 STIP. The project was a component of the larger Route 1 Corridor - High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and Traffic System Management (TSM) Alternative project. The project level environmental review for the Mar Vista Bike/Pedestrian Overcrossing (Mar Vista) project was delayed until after the program level tier 1 environmental document was completed for the corridor, at the request of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). It noted that project is currently programmed with $6,779,000 in Regional Improvement Program (RIP) funds with construction programmed in Fiscal Year  2022-23. With respect to the State Route 1 - State Park to Bay/Porter Auxiliary Lanes (Bay Porter) project, it was  first programmed in the 2018 STIP as an advance project development project; Bay Porter has local funds and RIP funds programmed to the environmental phase. The environmental review for the Mar Vista project revealed costs that exceeded the available funding. In an effort to address the increased cost, a strategy was developed to combine the Mar Vista project with the Bay Porter project since they are in the same area. Combining the two projects, which are on similar schedules, will create cost efficiencies by streamlining the environmental studies and construction of the improvements. The combining of the projects would also lower the cost and save time, compared to stand alone projects, while eliminating the duplication of efforts and studies in the same areas and additional construction contracts and administration. The project cost for the Mar Vista, as a stand-alone project, exceeds its current funding. Whereas combining it with Bay Porter, can bring additional benefits and make a combined Bay Porter/Mar Vista more competitive for various grant programs as a multi-modal project that includes bus, bike, pedestrian and highway elements. The proposed programming strategy is to delete the Mar Vista project, reprogram all funds to the Bay Porter project and update Bay Porter project scope to include the bike and pedestrian overcrossing. The Bay Porter project cost is currently estimated at $73,000,000 but the project is not fully funded. The combined project is estimated to be $88,955,000 with the construction phase unfunded. SCCRTC is currently looking at ways to find the additional funding to fully fund the project.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1b.(2))

    PPNO 0073A: 41st to Soquel, Auxiliary Lanes, Bike/Pedestrian bridge (SCR 13.6/14.9)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to adjust the allocation for PPNO 0073A, Rt 1, 41st-Soquel, aux lanes, bike/ped bridge, from $2.25M to $6M. This project, at SCR 13.6/14.9, near the city of Santa Cruz and Capitola, from 41st Avenue to Soquel Avenue will construct auxiliary lanes and construct bicycle/pedestrian overcrossing near Chanticleer Avenue.

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2020 meeting, adjusts the programmed allocation as follows:
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    PPNO Project Prior 20-21 21-22 22-23 23-24 24-25
    0073A (SCCRTC) Rt 1, 41 st-Soquel, aux lanes, bike/ped bridge (16S-16) 3,320K 0 1,921K 0 0
    0073A (SCCRTC) Rt 1, 41 st-Soquel, aux lanes, bike/ped bridge (16S-16) 0 0 -1,921K 0 0 0
    0073A (Caltrans) 41 St-Soquel, aux lns, bus on shoulder, bike/ped bridge (SB1) 0 0 6,835K 0 0 0

    Southbound Route 17 Connector Realignment (05-SCR-01 16.7/17.0, 05-SCR-17 0.0/0.3)

    In August 2016, the CTC authorized funding for a project on Route 1, in and near Santa Cruz (05-SCR-01 16.7/17.0), from 0.1 mile south of Route 1/Route 17 Separation to 0.4 mile south of Pasatiempo Overcrossing; also on Route 17 (PM 0.0/0.3). Realign southbound Route 17 connector to southbound Route 1. $658K for right of way acquisition, and $5,811K for construction. The project (PPNO 2636) was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018.

    In October 2018, the CTC approved an allocation of $8,508,000 for the State Highway Operation Protection Program (SHOPP) Collision Reduction Safety Improvement project (PPNO 2422) on Route 17, in Santa Cruz County. This project proposes to improve safety of Route 17 (southbound) in Santa Cruz County from the southbound exit ramp to Route 1 to the entrance ramp from Pasatiempo Drive. Due to the higher than average collision rate, the project proposes to construct a retaining wall and widen the outside shoulder to 10 feet to improve stopping sight distance. This section of Route 17 is experiencing a pattern of roadway departure collisions, often when the pavement is wet. This existing ROute 17 (southbound) has a one (1) to 4-foot outside shoulders with limited stopping sight distance, because of the hillside cut slope between SCL 0.2 and SCL 0.5. This project will widen the outside shoulder to 10 feet; widening the outside shoulder will improve the stopping sight distance to 500 feet for a design speed of 55 mph. The project was programmed in the 2016 SHOPP for a construction allocation in Fiscal Year 2017-18; which is from July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018. If the Department does not obtain an allocation during this programmed fiscal year, a time extension for the Construction allocation is required to keep the project programming active. On June 28, 2018, the Commission approved a four-month time extension for this project that will expire on October 31, 2018. Storm damage in Fiscal Year 2016-17 caused a major slope failure within the limits of the project. While current best practice is to obtain geotechnical investigations early in the Project Approval and Environmental Document (PA&ED) phase, the storm damage priorities delayed that work. As this is a collision reduction project, the Department determined that it was best that the project move forward with the preliminary geotechnical information, and follow up with the more detailed geotechnical investigations during during Plans, Specifications and Estimate (PS&E) phase. Ultimately, the storm damage work delayed the geotechnical drilling until late in the PS&E phase.
    (Source: October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.5d.(2))

    In August 2020, the CTC received notice of the following delegated allocation: $7,913,000. 05-SCr-1 16.7/17.0. PPNO 05-2636 ProjID 0516000020 EA 1H060. Route 1 In and near Santa Cruz, from 0.1 mile south of Route 1/Route 17 Separation to 0.4 mile south of Pasatiempo Overcrossing; also on Route 17 (PM 0.0/0.3). Outcome/Output: Improve safety by realigning connector ramp, constructing concrete barrier, and adding high visibility striping on southbound Route 17  connector to southbound Route 1. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions.
    (Source: August 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5f.(3) #5)

    PPNO 4658: Rt 1/9 Intersection Modifications (SCR 17.5/17.7)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to increase the allocation for PPNO 4658, Rt 1/9 Intersection modifications, from $329K to $2.853M. This project, on Route 1 from SCR 17.5/17.7 and Route 9 from SCR 0.0/0.2, is in the city of Santa Cruz, at the junction of Route 1 and Route 9. Construct turn lanes and bike lanes.

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2020 meeting, retains the 2018 STIP programming.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In August 2020, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project is located in Santa Cruz County on Route 1 (05-SCr-1, PM 17.5/17.7) and Route 9 (05-SCr-9, PM 0.0/0.2) in the City of Santa Cruz. The project proposes to construct turn lanes and bike lanes. This project is fully funded and is currently programmed in the 2020 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for a total of $11,846,000 which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support) with Regional Improvement Program funds, federal and local dollars.
    (Source: August 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item  2.2c.(1))

    In October 2011, the CTC approved $1.3 million to construct ¾ mile of concrete median barrier between Route 9 (apx 001 SCR 17.576) and High Street (apx 001 SCR 18.054) in the City of Santa Cruz.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $185,000 in SHOPP funding to stabilize and repair slope and install Rock Slope Protection at one location damaged by heavy rainfall near Pescadero, 0.4 mile south of Pescadero Creek Road (apx 001 SM 13.174).

    Devils Slide (001 SM R38.522/SM R39.369)

    The Devil’s Slide story goes back to the late 1800s when travel between Pacifica and Montara just north of Half Moon Bay was a challenging, if not treacherous, journey over San Pedro Mountain. In 1905 a railroad and tunnel seemed like a good answer to the transportation dilemma. Tracks were laid starting north and south in anticipation of connecting San Francisco to Santa Cruz, but the 1906 earthquake caused damage and delays that would alter the plan. By the 1920s improved roads made trucking goods so much more competitive that the northern rail tunnel was closed.

    The rocks of Devils Slide have defined life on the coast since 1937, when the "Sea-Level Boulevard" was built on the former railroad bed. The construction of Route 1 in 1937 promised a safer route for all vehicles traveling this thread, drawing more tourists and development to coastal communities. But Mother Nature did not yield readily to progress. A one-mile stretch of Route 1 happened to be cut into a layer of sedimentary rock folded over 900-foot granite cliffs by tectonic movement. Trapped underground water weakens the sedimentary rock above while crashing waves and vigorous tides erode the bottom of the slip, facilitating Devil’s Slide’s millions-year natural journey into the Pacific. From 1940 forward, Route 1 was plagued by closures as though Mother Nature was determined to shrug off the road on her back with rain-driven rock falls and slides. By the 1960s constant costly repairs to the Devil’s Slide section of Route 1 finally forced Caltrans to scream “uncle.” Their solution was a controversial six-lane freeway bypass over Montara Mountain. The debate raged on for three decades as Devil’s Slide continued its temperamental protests with recurring closures. All that keeps the road in place, clinging precariously to the cliffs, are giant bolts and cables. Nine times, Route 1 at Devils Slide has closed.
    (Source for the above: Monterey Herald, 6/8/2016)

    In September 2004, Senate Bill 792 required the Department of Transportation to sell and transfer certain property under its control in the County of San Mateo as surplus state property to the Department of Parks and Recreation for state park purposes. This bill was in response to San Mateo County Measure T (1996), which proclaimed that the construction of a surface bypass in this area would seriously damage the watersheds, wildlife habitats, and parks of Montara and San Pedro Mountains, and directing the amendment of their local coastal program to provide for a tunnel alternative to such a bypass. After Caltrans determined that a freeway bypass over Montara Mountain ("Devils Slide") is not currently viable, the property located in the existing Martini Creek Devil's Slide bypass right-of-way for the realignment of Route 1 from the northern boundary of the town of Montara (State Parcel Number 39874) to past the alignment summit over Montara Mountain (State Parcel Number 39873 and a large portion of State Parcel Number 39872), hereinafter "the Martini Creek Bypass Alignment," became surplus state property located within the coastal zone. This bill relinquishes the property, in order to add it to the McNee Ranch Acquisition area of Montara State Beach. Surprisingly, this transfer removes the last hurdle for the state Department of Transportation, which has been trying since the late 1950s to create a bypass for slide-prone Highway 1 between Pacifica and Montara. Caltrans officials hope to begin work in January 2005 on a pair of 4,000-foot tunnels that will speed drivers under San Pedro Mountain, completing the project by 2010. San Mateo County approved the $270 million project in May, but the tunnel was held up when the state Coastal Commission filed an appeal in July, pending transfer of the surplus Caltrans property near the tunnel to the state Parks Department.

    Devils SlideIn 2006, it was reported that there are plans for a $270 million project to build a tunnel for Route 1 between Pacifica and Montara. In 2006, it was shut for four months, sending commuters on long detours and threatening coastal businesses. A closing in 1995 lasted nearly six months. The plan is to replace the highway with a tunnel. For more information, see this article. According to the article, the realization of the Devil's Slide tunnel would culminate a saga that began with environmentalists and residents battling a planned six-lane highway between San Francisco and San Luis Obispo in the 1960s and led to them convincing the state's giant transportation department to build the twin-bore tube through Montara Mountain. According to the Half Moon Bay Review in 2006, the construction bids for the tunnel came in over $32 million over the original Caltrans estimate. Caltrans had first pegged the price of the tunnel at $240 million, estimating construction time at about five years. The low bid, presented by Kiewit Pacific, came in at $272.4 million with construction expected to take 1,500 calendar days. A second bid - made by a joint venture of construction companies Shea, Traylor and Atkinson - came in nearly $50 million more than Kiewit's and asked for an additional year to complete the work. After the contact is ready, preparation work may begin in spring 2007 to provide the site with adequate drainage and better stability. The proposed 4,200-foot-long twin tunnels will bypass the Devil's Slide section of Highway 1 by an inland route through Montara Mountain. The boring for the tunnel began in September 2007. The twin tunnels will connect to a graceful and lofty set of bridges spanning a scenic canyon. The $322 million project will be ready for traffic by late 2010. The tunnels, four-fifths of a mile long, will be built in stable rock far from the cliffs that are sliding into the sea. The bridge construction spares precious wetlands. The long-haunted stretch of old Route 1 will be turned into a 1.2-mile recreation area, while the new road will be a reliable thoroughfare. The tunnels at Devils Slide are estimated to be completed in 2011, and the final cost will be about $325 million.
    (Image source: Denman Real Estate Group)

    In June 2010, it was reported that good progress was being made on the tunnel. The buildings and the bridges are finished, and the tunnel diggers are expected to bust through the north end of the mountain by Fall 2010. Each of the roughly 4,200-foot bores - 30 feet wide and 24 feet high—is about 90% of the way through the mountain. The contractor, Kiewit Pacific, is using the New Austrian Tunneling Method, which involves analyzing the kind of soil that's being excavated and using different types of machinery to get through it. The main diggers are the road header, which features a long arm with a pair of 2½-foot-wide spinning wheels—covered with carbide-tipped spikes—and an excavator workers refer to as the T. rex. The road header is used on harder soils and rocks. It bites into the earth and gnaws it into smaller pieces. A series of rotating metal plates moves what's left onto a conveyor belt that lifts the muck into a truck that carries it to a disposal site on the side of the mountain, just outside the south portal. The smaller T. rex works similarly, but on softer soils. Once the hole is extended, workers secure it by installing arched metal ribs and coat the tunnel walls with sprayed concrete, applied by a remote-controlled robot. The thickness varies from 4 to 14 inches, depending on the stability of the soil. Next, a bright yellow sheet of plastic waterproofing material is installed to protect the tunnel. Two layers of reinforcing steel bars come next, and then the whole thing is smothered in a thicker, smoother layer of concrete, using an overhead gantry that straddles the tunnels and slides on rails. Although it's known as the final coat, enamel panels and a brighter paint job will be applied before the tunnel is opened to traffic. By Fall 2011, the finished tunnel should open to traffic. This will be California's first highway tunnel built since 1964, when the third bore of the East Bay's Caldecott Tunnel (Route 24) opened.
    (Source: San Francisco Chronicle, 6/19/10)

    In October 2010, it was reported that the Devil's Slide tunnel had broken through near Pacifica. This was about a month ahead of schedule. When the break-through happened, there was a ceremony on the north side of San Pedro mountain, where workers excavating the northbound bore of the Devil's Slide tunnel smashed through a sprayed concrete coating, opening a small hole through the mountain slope. They then enlarged that hole to about 8 by 8 feet and emerged to greet a crowd of dignitaries and other invited guests gathered atop the Devil's Slide bridges.

    In January 2011, it was reported that all excavation was completed.

    In July 2011, the completion date was pushed back to late 2012. That is more than a year later than the general contractor estimated when it started construction on the $342 million project in 2007. The variability of the rock and convergence - or movement of the soil - has delayed the project. Crews have had to do more reinforcement work than called for in the original plans as well. Although crews completed excavation in January, digging continued to complete the bottom portion of the bore. Every time they run into a new kind of rock, they have to dismantle the equipment.

    In February 2012, it was reported that concrete roadways into the tunnel have been completed. The concrete roadways under construction inside the bores are a little more than 21 feet wide and sit between two emergency walkways. Workers are putting 5 inches of concrete atop a 1-inch layer of asphalt that sits atop another 5 inches of concrete placed atop a crushed-rock base. Each tunnel will accommodate a single lane of traffic, 12 feet wide, with an 8-foot shoulder on the right and a 2-foot shoulder on the left. The 8-foot shoulder will serve double duty as a place for stalled cars to pull off the road as well as for bicyclists to pedal through the tunnel. Most bike riders, however, will probably choose to pedal along the current stretch of highway, which will become a bike trail and park offering spectacular cliff-top views of the Pacific Ocean. The remaining work on the tunnel includes installation of 32 jet-powered fans - 16 in each bore - to provide ventilation, enamel-covered curved panels that will line the walls, electrical systems and a water line, as well as completing landscaping outside the portals and finishing touches to the fake rock walls at the entrances. The northbound tunnel will open first to allow crews to build safe connections to Route 1. Southbound traffic will follow a week or two later. Once the tunnels are open, crews will build parking lots on both sides.

    In November 2012, it was reported that the opening of the tunnels had been delayed until early 2013. The extension is related to safety and electronics testing, including the ventilation system and cameras monitoring activity inside the tunnel. Once those are complete, Caltrans must finish the road connections between Route 1 and the tunnels.

    Devil's SlideIn late March 2013, the Devil's Slide tunnels opened. The opening of a tunnel, and not a 4.5-mile freeway bypass to the east, is the result of a remarkable grass-roots coalition of environmentalists and Coastside residents who rose up to oppose the agency's plans for an inland route. The four-lane bypass would have cut McNee Ranch State Park in half and, activists feared, opened the coast to more aggressive development. Devils Slide -- less than a quarter-mile of steep, crumbling rock between Pacifica and Montara -- has tormented travelers since the late 19th century. The promontory forms the western flank of San Pedro Mountain, rising abruptly from the Pacific Ocean to a height of about 1,000 feet. Its presence sealed off the coast from the sort of development that occurred in Pacifica and Daly City during the mid-20th century. In 1937, Caltrans carved a 5.9-mile extension of Route 1 into the cliffs, just down the slope from a more primitive road built in 1879. It suffered its first major closure the following year. Fatal accidents, with cars plunging into the rocks at surf's edge, became a regular occurrence. By the 1960s, state and county officials were eyeing a bypass of four to six lanes that would run east of San Pedro Mountain. The road was tied to a bold idea for development on the sparsely populated coast. But the plan collided with the burgeoning environmental movement. The Sierra Club and others sued to block the project in 1972, sparking an epic legal and political fight that reached a climax in 1996 when county voters overwhelmingly approved a ballot measure in favor of a tunnel. The twin tunnels are each 30 feet wide and 4,200 feet long, making them the second-longest in California behind the Wawona Tunnel in Yosemite National Park. The excavation involved removing about 11.4 million cubic feet of rock from inside San Pedro Mountain. Each tunnel is equipped with sensors that monitor heat as well as nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide levels. The tunnels are monitored by cameras 24 hours a day. Tunnel operators can override motorists' car stereos to communicate during emergencies. There are 16 powerful jet fans affixed to the ceiling of each tunnel to provide ventilation in the event of a fire or other incident. The southern entrances to the tunnels are covered in a fake rock surface, created by a man who worked on Disneyland's Indiana Jones ride, that is designed to blend into surroundings.
    (Source/Image Source: San Jose Mercury News, 3/25/13)

    In July 2013, information was provided on the fate of the former Route 1 roadbed bypassed by the tunnels. The county will operate the Devils Slide Trail, which will run 1.3 miles between parking lots Caltrans has constructed near the northern and southern portals to a pair of bypass tunnels that opened in March. The county's plan calls for the trail to be about 24 feet wide, with two 6-foot bicycle lanes to the east and a 12-foot walking path closer to the cliff's edge. The county envisions building two scenic overlooks, each with coin-operated spotting scopes and benches, as well as restrooms and drinking fountains. The trail will be fenced on either side, mostly with 3-foot concrete barriers known as K-rails, according to the plan. The county may paint the barriers an earth tone to blend in with the scenery. The overlooks will be surrounded by metal guardrails strung with cables. The county has budgeted nearly $2 million to prepare the trail. The work will begin after the county takes over the roadway in August 2013. The work includes "microsurfacing" the pavement, or coating it with a polymer to create a smoother surface, which will benefit bicyclists. It also includes signs, trail striping and some cyclone fencing to shield peregrine falcons that have been nesting on the southern end of Devils Slide.
    (Source: San Jose Mercury News, 7/24/13)

    In February 2014, it was reported that rallies had started against a proposed Caltrans project in Pacifica. The project -- which Caltrans says would seek to reduce environmental impacts -- would widen Route 1 from Sharp Park Golf Course to Rockaway Beach from four to six lanes. The goal is to ease traffic congestion during peak hours. The project would require land acquisition, including several businesses.

    In March 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Mateo County that will widen a portion of Route 1 from four lanes to six lanes in the city of Pacifica. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $53,250,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funds, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15.

    In August 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of San Mateo on Route 1 in the Devil’s Slide area, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

    In October 2019, the CTC amended the following project into the 2018 SHOPP: 04-SM-1 39.0. PPNO 2031K. Proj ID 0420000001. EA 1AA00. Route 1 Near Pacifica, at the Thomas Lantos (Devil's Slide) Tunnels. Install emergency power system. Total Cost: $3,700K. It also approved the following emergency allocation: 04-SM-1 39.0. PPNO 2031K Proj ID 0420000001 EA 1AA00. On Route 1 Near Pacifica, at the Thomas Lantos (Devil's Slide) Tunnels. On March 12, 2019, the single power source to the city of Pacifica and surrounding area, including the Tom Lantos Tunnel, was interrupted due to an electrical outage at the PG&E Pacifica substation. The power loss affected the tunnels for more than nine hours and a detour was needed due to the battery backup system at the tunnels only has an endurance of about forty-five minutes. This project will install a backup electrical generator system, strengthened foundation, electrical conduit trenching, and a fuel system with filtration, moisture separation, and self-circulation pumps. $12,500,000
    (Source: October 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Item 16; Agenda Item 2.5f.(1) #13)

    North of Devil's Slide (001 SM R39.369 to I-280 near Daly City (001 SM R47.747))

    San Pedro Creek Bridge

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, authorized $2,500,000 for High Priority Project #51: Route 1 San Pedro Creek Bridge replacement in Pacifica (001 SM 40.83). San Pedro Creek is currently flood-prone, and the bridge needs to be replaced in order to provide 100-year storm capacity.

    In October 2013, the CTC received a MND for future consideration of funding regarding a project located on Route 1 from post mile 40.6 to 40.8 spanning San Pedro Creek in San Mateo County. The project will replace the existing bridge with a 63-foot wide by 140-foot long structure consisting of two 12-foot lanes, two 8-foot wide shoulders and a 12-foot wide separated pedestrian/Class I bicycle path. The project also includes rebuilding a 990-foot long section of roadway at the southern end of the bridge, and a 570-foot long section of roadway at the northern end of the bridge as well as the widening of San Pedro Creek to provide the capacity needed to accommodate 100-year flood flows under the bridge.

    In September 2016, it was reported that plans to widen Route 1 in Pacifica (apx 001 SM R42.588) have run into a new legal roadblock with a federal judge’s ruling that Caltrans gave misleading information to federal officials about the project’s impact on two imperiled species, the California red-legged frog and the San Francisco garter snake. Caltrans had assured the federal government that it had agreed to protect 5.14 nearby acres of the creatures’ habitat from development — without mentioning that the parcel had been already protected from development by a 1996 agreement between Pacifica and the California Coastal Commission, said U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria of San Francisco. The judge ordered the state agency to begin a new consultation process with federal wildlife officials on the highway project’s likely impact on the two species. Caltrans has proposed widening 1.3 miles of the Pacific Coast Highway (Route 1) from four to six lanes to relieve congestion on the route that runs through the San Mateo County community. Formally approved in 2013, the project is budgeted at $52 million. Its future is uncertain, however. Caltrans officials have indicated the project is “on the shelf,” with no funding yet approved, and may never be built. The judge said Caltrans has acknowledged that the construction would destroy 6.61 acres of habitat for the red-legged frog and garter snake and would displace the creatures from an additional 2.95 acres during construction. To compensate, the state agency told federal officials it would preserve 5.14 acres of habitat owned by the city of Pacifica and improve conditions on another 5.46 acres to make the land more attractive to the two species.
    (Source: SFGate, 9/6/2016)

    Naming Naming

    This segment is officially named "Cabrillo Highway" in SHC 635. It was named by Assembly Bill 1769, Chapter 569, in 1959.

    Historically, this segment was named the "San Simeon Highway". This is because the segment starts at San Simeon, the home of Hearst Castle.

    Charles I Walter DedicationThe segment of Rout 1from Kansas Avenue (001 SLO 20.890) to Canet Road (001 SLO 25.580) in the County of San Luis Obispo is named the "Charles I. Walter Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Charles I. Walter, who was born and raised on his parents’ large dairy ranch, which was located near the former United States Army Camp San Luis Obispo and where parts of the California Polytechnic State University now exist. Walter’s father immigrated from Switzerland and purchased the first 5,000 acres of his property in the County of San Luis Obispo to run a dairy ranch in the late 1880s, and later purchased an additional 3,000 acres adjacent to the ranch. In 1923, Charles “Carlos” Walter passed away, leaving his wife, Mary, and his five children to take care of each other and the ranch, and in 1941, during World War II, the United States Government took over the ranch by eminent domain. It was at this time that two of Charles Walter’s children, Charles I. Walter and his brother, Elmer Walter, started the Walter Brothers Construction Company, which specialized in the operation of heavy equipment and road construction. After World War II, most of the ranch that was not still used by the United States Army was given to Cuesta College and the California Polytechnic State University, and a portion of the property is still called the Walter Ranch. From that time, until his death in 1978, Charles I. Walter played a significant role in the construction of over 200 miles of freeway and expressway in the State of California, and most particularly, portions of Route 1 in the County of San Luis Obispo. Charles I. Walter was very involved in helping the San Luis Obispo County Historical Society, the Special Olympics, and other endeavors and was very generous with his time and resources throughout the county when needed. As a county native and design professional, Charles I. Walter was involved for over 45 years with the physical environment of the County of San Luis Obispo, as well as with its documentation and the celebration of the county’s history. The five-mile portion of Route 1 that was named runs through the old Walter family ranch. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 88, Resolution Chapter 140, 9/7/2017.
    (Image Source: Tweet from Jordan Cunningham, 2/14/2018)

    Arlene's SlideThe mud slide just S of the main body of the larger Mud Creek slide has been named Arlene's Slide by Caltrans (approx 001 MON 8.956). This is in honor of flagger Arleen Guzzie. It was Guzzie that noticed a hairline crack in the asphalt near where she was parking her truck to control busy Route 1 traffic along the Big Sur coast. Each day, the crack widened. And grew longer. She watched as a pretty orange nasturtium flower slowly crept, oddly, down the ridge. Guzzie told her supervisors: The land is sinking. Now that 300-foot-wide failing flank of mountain bears her name — Arleen’s Slide — forever etched into official Caltrans maps and Big Sur’s history books. For years, as the steep Santa Lucia Mountains crumble toward the ocean, a warm and gracious Guzzie has stood between frustrated drivers and deadly boulders. Arleen’s Slide — along with the much larger Mud Creek slide — have shut down the dangerous stretch of Route 1 for at least a year. At the edge of almost every major pile of detritus along the route, she’s been there — cautiously waving drivers through, or telling them they can go no further.
    (Source: Mercury News, 6/25/2017)

    Sen. Henry MellolThe portion of Route 1 from the Pajaro River (001 MON R101.98) to Struve Road (001 MON 98.35), including the new Salinas Road overcrossing, in the County of Monterey, is named the "Senator Henry J. Mello Highway". It was named in honor of State Senator Henry J. Mello, who was born and raised in Watsonville, was the son of Portuguese immigrant parents, and attended Watsonville High School in Watsonville and Hartnell College in Salinas. In the 1940s, Henry Mello helped start the Mello Packing Company, a family apple business, and became involved in public service as a member of the California Agricultural Advisory Board. Henry Mello was elected as a Santa Cruz County supervisor in 1966, to the Assembly in 1976, and to the Senate in 1980, and represented the Counties of Santa Cruz and San Benito, as well as parts of the Counties of Monterey and Santa Clara in the Legislature until 1996. Henry Mello quickly rose to leadership positions by his appointment to the Senate Rules Committee and his election as Majority Whip and later as Majority Leader, and authored 726 bills, of which 456 were signed into law, with 120 of those bills focused on senior issues. Henry Mello was proud of his creation of the California Senior Legislature and authorship of legislation dealing with Alzheimers, including bills on respite care, adult day health care, and prevention of senior abuse. Henry Mello was known by his colleagues as a tough negotiator and for his dedication to his district and constituents. After leaving the Senate, Henry Mello worked with the Department of Transportation to prioritize the construction of one of the most important projects within the state highway system, an overpass to improve traffic safety on the dangerous intersection of Route 1 and Salinas Road. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 67, Resolution Chapter 141, on September 2, 2014.
    (Image Source: Tweet from Jason Hoppin, 7/24/2015; Official Photo)

    Officer John PedroThe portion of Route 1 between 0.1 mile north of the Green Valley Road (001 SCR R2.349) and 0.1 mile north of the Pajaro River bridge (001 MON R102.08) is named the "CHP Officer John Pedro Memorial Freeway." It was named in memory of CHP Officer John Pedro (1965-2002) from Watsonville, California. John Pedro served in the United States in the Army Reserves from 1987 to 1997, and served in the Air Force Reserves from 1991 to the time of his death. He played in the band for the Air Force. He joined the California Highway Patrol on July 31, 1989, as a cadet and graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy on December 21, 1989. After he graduated from the Academy, John Pedro was assigned to the San Jose area, and he was transferred in 1992 to the Redwood City area, in 1993 back to San Jose area, and in 1994 to the Santa Cruz area. On June 3, 2002, John Pedro was killed, while on duty, in a traffic collision. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 67, July 16, 2004, Chapter 118.
    (Image Source: Flikr - Navymailman 4/3/2011; Officer Down Memorial Page: John Pedro)

    Officer A. Donald HooverThe portion of Route 1 from the Park Avenue Undercrossing (001 SCR 12.09) to Branciforte Avenue Overcrossing (001 SCR 16.43) in the County of Santa Cruz is named the "CHP Officer A. Donald Hoover Memorial Highway." It was named in memory of Officer A. Donald Hoover, who was born on January 1, 1903, in Wichita, Kansas, to John and Pearl Hoover. Officer Hoover was an eight-year veteran of the CHP, and served in the County of Santa Cruz. Officer Hoover was killed on August 31, 1934, while traveling on the Santa Cruz-Watsonville Highway, on a stretch known to locals as “Slaughterhouse Curve,” when his motorcycle collided with an automobile, traveling in the opposite direction, that began turning onto a side road in front of him. The impact of the collision caused Officer Hoover to lose and never regain consciousness. Officer Hoover’s dedication and service will be remembered throughout the CHP and law enforcement community for years, as the loss was not just to family, friends, and coworkers, but to the entire community and the state that Officer Hoover served.Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.
    (Image Source: Santa Cruz Patch, 8/21/2013; Calif. Assn. of Hwy. Patrolmen: Donald Hoover)

    Patricia ScullyThe portion of Route 1 between Route 84 (San Gregorio Road) at 001SM 18.189 and Verde Road/Lobitos Creek Road at 001 SM 22.662, is named the "Ranger Patricia M. Scully Memorial Highway". Named in memory of California Parks and Recreation Service Ranger Patricia M. Scully, who was born in April 1951, in Sacramento, California, to Patrick and Eileen Scully. She was raised on a poultry ranch owned by the Scully family in Rio Linda, California. Ranger Scully graduated from Rio Linda High School in June of 1969. She attended American River College for two years where she played on the field hockey team with her sister Mary, and then transferred to California State University, Sacramento, where she received her bachelor of arts degree in social science and anthropology (archaeology) in January 1974. She was an outstanding student and received scholarships and awards of merit for her academic achievements. At the time of her untimely death, Ranger Scully was working on a master of science degree in anthropology and environmental resources at California State University, Sacramento, and had completed all coursework and lacked only a thesis. Ranger Scully joined the California Parks and Recreation Service in 1974, now named the Department of Parks and Recreation. In late 1974, she graduated from the Parks and Recreation Academy (the Mott Training Center in Asilomar) after six weeks of training. She was one of two women among the 38 cadets in academy class 18. Her first assignment after graduation was to the Big Basin State Park where she received additional (interpretative) training. Ranger Scully’s last assignment was as a State Park Ranger 1 at the Pescadero State Park in Half Moon Bay on the San Mateo coast. When not working, she worked on a historical survey of Ano Nuevo State Beach. She was dedicated to the preservation of the environment and the education of the park visitor. She was a nine-year veteran of the Department of Parks and Recreation at the time of her death. While on patrol at San Mateo Coast State Beaches, Half Moon Bay, Ranger Scully was killed by a drunk driver on May 6, 1976. She became the second female law enforcement officer to be killed in California. This segment was named to recognize Ranger Scully’s years of dedicated service to the Department of Parks and Recreation and to raise awareness about the service risks present to all peace officers, including rangers with the Department of Parks and Recreation. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 102, Resolution Chapter 120, on September 10, 2012.
    (Image Sources: Half Moon Bay Review, 10/3/2013; OfficerDown Memorial Page: Patricia Scully)

    A portion of Route 1 midway between Pacifica and Montara in San Mateo County (001 SM R38.544 to 001 SM R39.37) is named the "Devil's Slide". The origin of name is not confirmed but believed to come from the practice of prohibition days gangsters using the once-deserted area to dispose of their enemies into the sea at this precipitous location. However, San Mateo County historian Barbara VanderWerf, who has written two books on the area, asserts in Montara Mountain that "Originally, Devil's Slide meant only the promontory and its inland ridge. In the 1880s, travellers in horse-drawn wagons on the Half Moon Bay-Colma Road, which ran along the top of the ocean bluffs, paused to note the chute-like ridge ending in the massive rock dome. They thought it looked fit for a Devil's Slide and named it so." To avoid the slides, there will soon be a tunnel here.

    Tom LantosRoute 1 adjacent to and including the future Devil's Slide Tunnels in San Mateo County (001 SM R38.544 to 001 SM R39.37) is named the "Tom Lantos Tunnels at Devil's Slide". This segment was named in memory of Representative Tom Lantos, a member of the United States House of Representatives between 1981 and 2008. Tom Lantos was born in Budapest, Hungary, on February 1, 1928, and was 16 years old when Nazi Germany occupied his native country. Tom Lantos was a member of the anti-Nazi underground movement and later was part of the anti-Communist student movement, and is the only Holocaust survivor to ever serve in the United States Congress. An American by choice, Tom Lantos received a B.A. and M.A. in economics from the University of Washington and a Ph. D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. For three decades prior to being elected to the Congress, Tom Lantos was a professor of economics at San Francisco State University, an international affairs analyst for public television, and a consultant to a number of Bay Area businesses, and served in senior advisory roles to members of the United States Senate. As a member of the House of Representatives, Tom Lantos worked diligently to address quality of life issues in Bay Area communities, with a strong record on environmental protection and efforts to reform the nation's energy policy. As a former professor and chairman of the Millbrae Board of Education, Tom Lantos has also been a consistent supporter of public education. Tom Lantos led a major investigation of waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and has been a leader in congressional oversight of federal programs. As Chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, Tom Lantos has been a strong voice for responsible international involvement and an advocate for participation in international organizations, with an emphasis on human rights, having also founded the Congressional Human Rights Caucus and served as its cochairman. Tom Lantos obtained one hundred fifty million dollars ($150,000,000) in federal funds for construction of a bypass of the hazardous coastal State Highway Route 1 at Devil's Slide and led the bipartisan congressional effort urging the President to declare the area eligible for federal disaster assistance, resulting in San Mateo County being eligible for FEMA's Public Assistance Program that provides 75 percent reimbursement for repair or replacement of disaster-damaged public facilities. In April 2007, Tom Lantos successfully pushed for expedited federal small business loans to private, for-profit coastal area businesses that have lost significant clientele due to the closure of Route 1, and he was a staunch advocate of the tunnel project option for the Devil's Slide Bypass, which prevented the construction of a destructive and environmentally damaging highway bypass over Montara Mountain, which was the plan initially proposed by the Department of Transportation and supported by many people. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 71, Resolution Chapter 85, on 7/10/2008.
    (Image Source: Wikipedia)

    Louis J PapanThe portion of Route 1 in San Mateo County from the interchange at Skyline Boulevard (001 SM R46.752) to the southern city limits of the City of Pacifica (001 SM 40.744) is officially named the "Louis J. Papan Highway". Louis J. Papan was first elected to the Daly City City Council in November 1970. In November 1972, he was elected to the California State Assembly, and was reelected seven times, serving in the California State Assembly until 1986. He was again elected to the Assembly in 1996, and was reelected twice, serving as the Dean of the Assembly until 2002. In the Assembly, Assemblyman Papan was critical in securing funding for the purchase of Linda Mar Beach and the Pacifica Pier in the City of Pacifica; and authored legislation necessary to create CalTrain to serve commuters in San Mateo County. Together with his wife, he founded John's Closet, a nonprofit organization that to date has helped provide new clothes for over 7,000 low-income children in San Mateo County. He has also worked as a tireless and successful advocate for the development and improvement of all modes of transportation in California; as well as fighting for the needs of disabled children, and the funding for special education, child abuse programs. He oversaw the restoration of the Historic Capitol Building, has served as Chair of the Assembly Committees on Rules and on Banking and Finance. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 234, Chapter 176, September 16, 2002. Note: When Papan left office, he didn't want any accolades -- so other than the naming resolution, he was "roasted" by the legislature. Assemblywoman Sarah Reyes, D-Fresno said: "It gives me great pain to stand here and say something nice about Lou Papan. All I can tell you is I've been down Highway 1, particularly this stretch, and there is a lot of traffic and a lot of noise, which is kind of like Lou Papan, and a lot of curves and a lot of twists and turns, which is kind of like listening to Lou Papan". A mock analysis of the bill prepared by the staff of the Assembly Appropriations Committee warned that it would cost $250,000 a year to replace the signs that would be stolen and cause an additional $300,000 in increased traffic costs as people flocked to the sign to vandalize it. Assemblyman Joe Canciamilla, D-Pittsburg, who authored the resolution, which passed the Assembly 77-0, said, "We have resisted efforts that have been undertaken by certain parties to make sure this is the one stretch of California speedway without a posted speed limit." The is a reference to just one of the things for which Papan gained notoriety -- his fast driving. He earned the nickname "Leadfoot Lou" in the 1970s when he received several speeding tickets while driving between Sacramento and his Peninsula district, where he was coming home every night to be with his critically ill son, John, and his wife, Irene, who suffered for decades with a number of serious ailments, including lupus and cancer. And so, the tribute stands...
    (Image and Anecdotes Source: SF Gate, 8/22/2002)

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Bridge 44-053 (MON 32.25), the Lime Creek Bridge in Monterey County, is named the "Harvey Robert Huss Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1975. On February 11, 1973, Harvey “Bobby” Huss, District 5 Maintenance Worker, was battling his way through mud slides on Route 1 near Big Sur to rescue a motorist trapped by the slides. A large culvert at Lafler Canyon plugged up and the water ran over the road and washed it out. Regrettably, the individual who reported the slide did not report that the roadway was gone. When Mr. Huss came around the corner, the road wasn't there, and he fell 300-foot into the canyon below. It was almost a year before his body was recovered. Mr. Huss was posthumously awarded the Medal of Valor, California's highest civilian award for heroism. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 59, Resolution Chapter 33, in 1974.

    Thomas M. SandersThe bridge at Burns Creek in the Big Sur area of Monterey County (001 MON 034.24) is officially dedicated to the memory of Thomas M. Sanders. On June 11, 1991, Thomas Sanders, District 5 Maintenance Supervisor, was helping CHP direct traffic near the Little Big Sur Bridge in Monterey County while a tow truck was recovering a car that had gone over the cliff. A driver, under the influence of drugs, crashed into a truck that had slowed down due to the recovery efforts. After exchanging information with the driver, she got back into her car and drove towards the controlled lane closure. She ignored the closure and continued driving through a series of cones, narrowly missing a CHP Officer. The officer attempted to pull her over, but she continued up the highway, drifting onto the shoulder striking Mr. Sanders. She then collided with the guard rail and careened across the two lanes coming to a stop. She tried to leave again, but was stopped by bystanders who took her keys. Mr. Sanders was rushed to the hospital, but succumbed to his injuries that evening. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 48, Chapter 107, in 1997.
    (Image source: Caltrans HQ Facebook post)

    Business Routes Business Routes

    • In Monterey: Munras Street and North Fremont Blvd.
    • In Seaside: Fremont Blvd.
    • In Marina: Del Monte Ave.
    • Cayucos
    • Cambria: Windsor Boulevard and Main Street

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 101 near San Luis Obispo to San Simeon; the northern limits of Carmel to the west city limits of Santa Cruz; the Higgins-Purisima Road to Route 280 south of San Francisco. Constructed as freeway for 5 miles near Morro Bay, from Route 68 to Route 156, from south of Watsonville to Santa Cruz, and from Pacifica to Route 280. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959 (Chapter 1062).

    • 1959: Added to the Freeway and Expressway system (Chapter 1062).
    • 1971: Deleted the segment from San Mateo-Santa Cruz County line to Higgins-Purisima Road (Chapter 1247)
    • 1972: Deleted the segment from Santa Cruz to the county line (Chapter 812).
    • 1992: Changed the second segment to the N limits of Carmel (previous wording: "from Carmel to the W limits of Santa Cruz"). This was changed to exclude the Hatton Canyon Alignment by AB 434, Chapter 136, on 7/31/2002.

    National Trails National Trails

    De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.2] From Route 101 near San Luis Obispo to Route 35 near Daly City.

    Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    San Luis Obispo 1 28.56 28.89
    San Luis Obispo 1 30.01 30.24
    Monterey 1 74.91 R84.60
    Santa Cruz 1 R0.00 R1.59
    Santa Cruz 1 R1.74 R3.37
    Santa Cruz 1 R3.37 R3.52
    Santa Cruz 1 7.83 9.68
    Santa Cruz 1 10.22 11.18
    Santa Cruz 1 11.88 13.32
    Santa Cruz 1 13.39 14.98
    Santa Cruz 1 15.09 17.41

  5. Rte 1 Seg 5Route 280 near the south boundary of the City and County of San Francisco to Route 101 near the approach to the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    The original definition of this section in 1963 was "A connection from Route 280 to Route 82 near the south boundary of the City and County of San Francisco." In 1968, Chap. 282 changed the routing, moving a routing of Route 1 from Route 280 to Route 82 was transferred to Route 280. This portion of the routing was part of the "Southern Freeway", and was the LRN 225 portion of I-280. As a result, the definition was changed to "Route 280 near the south boundary of the City and County of San Francisco to Route 480 in San Francisco."

    In 1991, Chap. 493 reflected the deletion of Route 480, changing the end of the segment to "Route 101 near the approach to the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco."

    Shortly N of this portion, there appears to have been an alternate routing where Route 1 would have diverged from 19th Avenue, ran slightly to the East, moving to meet the Crosstown Freeway, and then continuing North to the Golden Gate approach. It appears that this routing was, at one time, planned for freeway construction as the "Park Presidio Freeway" and "Junipero Serra Freeway". It appears to have been part of a 1955 traffic plan, which was later deleted as freeway.

    There are still remnants of this planning in the segment of Route 1 between 19th Ave. and I-280 Interchange, built in the early 1950s. It is hypothesized that this quasi-freeway section was to have been part of the extension of the Junipero Serra Freeway to Golden Gate Park, and of the Park Presidio Freeway going to the Golden Gate Bridge and eventually to Novato. There are two interchanges on this small stub of freeway, Brotherhood Way and Alemany Boulevard. This segment appears to have been planned to be I-280.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield This segment was first defined as part of LRN 56 in 1933.


    In 1934, this segment was signed as part of signed Route 1 (Jct. US 101 at Las Cruces, via Cambria, Santa Cruz, San Francisco, Pt. Reyes, and Westport to US 101 at Fortuna).

    In 1938, before construction of the tunnel through the Presedio, there was a different routing N of Golden Gate Park. This routing ran E along Fulton to Van Ness, where it joined the US 101 routing N along Van Ness and Lombard and Richardson into the Presedio and to the Golden Gate.

    In 1958, it was reported in CHPW that, as a portion of the future Golden Gate Freeway, design is underway for a 1.3-mile-long project on Route 1 extending between the Park Presidio Freeway and the Marina approach to the Golden Gate Bridge. This project would have widened the present freeway to eight lanes and revise the interchange at the junction of US 101 and Route 1.

    Status Status

    There appear to be some plans to make a portion of this route an underground tollway. The San Francisco Chronicle published an article on 2/18/2001 where it indicated that transportation planners "said the city should look into building "supercorridor" roads under Van Ness Avenue, 19th Avenue, and Fell and Oak streets." The suggested 19th Avenue tunnel would run five miles, from Junipero Serra Boulevard (apx 001 SF R0.675) through Golden Gate Park and up to Lake Street (apx 001 SF 5.877), with exits at Brotherhood Way, Ocean Avenue, Quintara Street, Lincoln Way and Geary Boulevard. The Van Ness tunnel would run almost two miles, from about Fell to Lombard Street, with exits at Broadway and Geary Boulevard. Along Oak and Fell, the planners suggest an underground road running more than half a mile from Laguna to Divisadero streets. However, the roads would would violate the long-standing general plan for San Francisco, which calls for no new highway capacity.

    Naming Naming

    Officially named "Cabrillo Highway" per SHC 635.

    Route 1 and Rout 101 from Lake Street (at Route 1) in San Francisco to Waldo Point (Jct Route 1/US 101, north end of Sausalito) across the Golden Gate Bridge is named the "Golden Gate Bridge Freeway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 11, Chapter 39 in 1954. This was originally planned to run along 19th Street in San Francisco.

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Douglas MacArthurTunnel 34-016, at Park Presidio Blvd in San Francisco through the Presidio of San Francisco between Lake Street and Golden Gate Bridge is named the "General Douglas MacArthur Tunnel". The tunnel was constructed from 1938-1940 as part of the "Funston Avenue Approach" to the Golden Gate Bridge. It opened, with the rest of the Funston Approach, on April 22, 1940. It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 86, Chapter 94 in 1986. Douglas MacArthur (1880-1964) was a brilliant and controversial five-star U.S. Army General. Strongly dedicated to country and duty, and gifted with superior command ability, MacArthur's military service included important command assignments in the both World Wars and the Korean War. During World War One, MacArthur commanded the 42nd "Rainbow" Division of the Allied Expeditionary Force in France. After the War, MacArthur was superintendant of West Point from 1919-1922. In January of 1930 he was promoted to full General, 4 stars and named the U.S. Army's Chief of Staff. MacArthur retired from the Army in 1937, one year after the President of the Phillipines, Manuel Quezon, appointed him Field Marshall of the Phillipine Army. In 1941 MacArthur was recalled to active duty as the U.S. prepared to enter World War Two. By 1942 MacArthur was Supreme Allied Commander of the Southwest Pacific theater. In January of 1945, MacArthur was promoted to the rank of five star General. On September 2, 1945 on board the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, MacArthur accepted Japan's unconditional surrender. In June 1950, with the beginning of the Korean War, MacArthur was appointed the Supreme United Nations commander. However, on April 11, 1951 he was relieved of his command by President Truman. This tunnel had been previously unofficially named as the "Presidio Tunnel", as it passes through the Presidio.
    (Information on General MacArthur from http://members.tripod.com/~DARTO/macarthur/macarthur.html; Image source: Biography.Com)

    Double Fine Zones Double Fine Zones

    Route 1 between Junipero Serra Boulevard and Lake Street in the City and County of San Francisco, per Senate Bill 1419, Chapter 121, July 10, 2008.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 280 to the San Francisco county line.

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.2] From Route 35 in San Francisco to Route 101 near the approach to the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco.

    Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    San Mateo 1 R43.21 R45.12
    San Mateo 1 R45.28 R45.50
    San Mateo 1 R46.42 R48.56

  6. Rte 1 Seg 6From Route 101 near the southerly end of Marin Peninsula to Route 101 near Leggett via the coast route through Jenner and Westport.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    The 1963 definition of this segment was "Route 101 near the southerly end of Marin Peninsula to Route 101 near Fernbridge via the coast route through Jenner, Westport, and Ferndale." In 1984, Chapter 489 transferred the portion from Rockport to Route 101 near Fernbridge to Route 211. The portion from Rockport to Route 101 near Leggett was transferred from former Route 208, truncating the end to " Route 101 near Leggett via the coast route through Jenner and Westport."

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield The portion of this segment from San Francisco to the Marin-Sonoma County Line was added to LRN 56 as part of the 1933 extension of the legislative route. Also added in 1933 was the portion from Jenner to Westport. In 1951, LRN 56 was extended southward to the Marin-Sonoma County Line and northward to US 101 near Leggett by Chapter 1588.

    N of Gualala, Google Maps shows Iverson Road / Ten Mile Cutoff Road as "Old State Highway", connecting to Riverside Drive and turning back W to Route 1 in Point Arena. Although this is a plausable routing, it is not seemingly borne out by the State Highway Maps: the current routing seems to show from 1930 on; there is no road near Point Arena in the 1928 map.

    Rte 1 Lost Coast Xfered to Rte 211In 1934, most of segment (including the portion later transferred to Route 211, but excluding the portion that was Route 208) was signed as part of signed Route 1 (Jct. US 101 at Las Cruces, via Cambria, Santa Cruz, San Francisco, Pt. Reyes, and Westport to US 101 at Fortuna). Fernbridge is slightly N of Fortuna, confirming that the current Route 211 portion was original part of signed Route 1. The portion from Route 211 near Rockport to Leggett was briefly Route 208 post-1964; this segment was not assigned a number in 1934.

    LRN 56 (Sign Route 1, eventual Route 211) was extended north to Ferndale to LRN 1 (US 101) in 1933.  Prior to 1933 the legislative description of LRN 56 had it's north terminus in Carmel and south terminus in San Luis Obispo. Tom Fearer notes that close examination of the map displayed in the August 1934 CHPW shows Route 1/LRN 56 as a functionally existing highway from Westport north to Fortuna.  He also notes that the 1934 Division of Highways State Map shows State maintenance of Route 1/LRN 56 from Mendocino north to Fort Bragg.  It also shows from Fort Bragg northward the implied route to Upper Mattole, and from Upper Mattole the implied through highway through the Lost Coast to Ferndale. Tom also examined the 1935 Goshua Highway Map of California, which shows Route 1/LRN 56 ending at Westport and the road continuing north to Kenny on Usal Road.  From Kenny the highway to Thorn Junction appears to have followed Briceland Road to Thorn Junction.  From Thorn Junction to Ettersburg the highway follows Ettersburg Road.  From Ettersburg to Honey Dew the through highway follows Wilder Ridge Road.  From Honey Dew the through route in the Lost Coast follows Mattole Road to Ferndale and the north segment of Route 1/LRN 56.  The 1935 Goshua Map doesn't offer any evidence that Route 1 was signed by the California State Automobile Association in the Lost Coast. Tom notes that the first Division of Highways Map to display a rough planned general alignment of Route 1/LRN 56 in the Lost Coast was the 1953 edition.
    (Source: Tom Fearer, Gribblenation Blog, "Paper Highways; California State Route 1 through the Lost Coast")

    In 1956, a spur of LRN 56 was added to connect Route 1 to US 101 at Leggett. Per the May/June 1958 CHPW, the Westport-Leggett spur of LRN 56 was ultimately signed as part of Route 1 and was part of Federal Aid Secondary Rte 504.  Mendocino County is said to have pushed during the fall of 1955 to have the planned Westport-Leggett Spur of LRN 56 added Federal Aid Secondary system.  The article goes onto cite that part of the 1951 legislation that added the Westport-Leggett Spur of LRN 56 was that the State would not have to maintain the roadway until it was brought up to Division of Highways standards.  Maintenance of the Westport-Leggett Spur of LRN 56 began on July 1, 1957.
    (Source: Tom Fearer, Gribblenation Blog, "Paper Highways; California State Route 1 through the Lost Coast")

    In the 1964 Renumbering, the spur to Leggett was renumbered to Route 208 (although it was not signed as such). In 1984, Route 208 was officially transferred to Route 1, and the "lost coast" was transferred to Route 211.

    Status Status

    San Francisco Bay to Jenner

    Muir Beach to Stinson Beach Reconstruction

    There are plans to reconstruct and stabilize the roadway just above Slide Ranch (apx 001 MRN 8.082), between Stinson Beach (apx 001 MRN 12.6) and Muir Beach (apx 001 MRN 6.462). Proposed is a 523-foot-long, 20-foot-high but mostly buried retaining wall anchored by metal piles sunk 15 feet into the downslope hillside, with just 8 feet of the wall exposed at the top that would reveal only natural wood lagging. A 5- to 8-foot-wide bench area would be provided at the bottom of the retaining wall to allow for construction and wall maintenance. The project at milepost 7.7 near Slide Ranch includes replacement of drainage inlets and culverts, addition of a metal pipe drain, installation of a metal beam guard rail, and installation of cable railing along the retaining wall. The roadbed would be reconstructed and resurfaced in the areas where slope failure has caused extensive cracking and buckling of the roadway. The project site is bordered on the upslope by Mount Tamalpais State Park, and on the downslope by the Golden Gate National Recreational Area. The downslope would be planted after completion of the six-month project, scheduled to begin in April 2012. The plan follows completion in 2007 of a four-month, $25 million road reconstruction project that closed a stretch of road north of Slide Ranch to Panoramic Highway. A similar project also shut the road in 2005.
    (Source: "Highway 1 repair plan near Stinson outlined", The Oakland Tribune, 5/31/10)

    In August 2016, the CTC approved $1,100,000 in funding to repair the roadway near Stinson Beach, at 2.2 miles north of Panoramic Highway. During March 2016 storm events, a washout began along the roadway slope adjacent to Bolinas Lagoon, part of a National Marine Sanctuary. Later wave action in May caused the slope washout to expand and is now undermining the southbound lane. Slope armoring can not be environmentally cleared without a protracted schedule. Shifting the roadway away from the slope is acceptable to the resource agencies as a temporary repair. Permanent restoration repairs will require follow-up programming. This project will pave and allow shifting of the traffic lanes away from the damaged slope to minimize traffic impacts.
    (Source: CTC August 2016, 2.5f(1))

    Stinson and Muir Beach DetoursIn October 2017, it was reported that Caltrans planned to reopen storm-damaged Route 1 between Muir Beach and Stinson Beach by December — if the weather cooperates. Winter 2016-2017's record rains caused significant problems on the coastal highway. Caltrans officials said there were 17 storm-related work sites in Marin, most of those on Route 1. The work has an estimated cost of more than $75 million. A section of Route 1 in Muir Beach opened in early May after being closed since January after parts of the road washed away and down a hillside. San Rafael-based Maggiora & Ghilotti Inc. got the contract to rebuild those two sections of the highway in Muir Beach. At one of the spots the roadway washed out and slid down an embankment, its painted lanes still visible. The repairs required construction of a retaining wall that is supported by 50-foot-long steel piles. A series of shafts were drilled into the ground along the length of the wall. The steel beams were then placed into the shafts and backfilled with concrete. Timber lagging was installed between the steel beams to create the wall, which is then backfilled with soils or aggregate. The final step was repaving the road. In all, 69 piles were placed to support the roadway in two locations. But another key section of Route 1 to the north, between Muir Beach and Stinson Beach, where the highway has dipped, cracked and slipped, was still closed as of October. The reopening date was initially pegged at early September, then October, and now December is the new target. To get to Stinson Beach while the segment was closed, drivers needed to use a detour on Panoramic Highway, which extends the trip about 13 miles. This involved taking the Panoramic Highway to Frank Valley/Lower Muir Woods Road (which caused problems as local and tourist traffic mix, slowing traffic). Making matters worse was the condition of Frank Valley Road, which itself was compromised because of previous slides. Parts of it were reduced to one lane for more than a decade. Other work is also set to start on Route 1. That construction will include shoring up retaining walls at several locations. Even once it opens, Caltrans plans to keep signs up with traffic warnings that encourage people to use the Panoramic detour so Route 1 does not get backed up, county officials said.
    (Source: Marin I-J, 3/16/2017; MarinI-J, 10/3/2017)

    In January 2018, it was reported that Route 1 between Muir Beach and Stinson Beach should be reopening. However, it will still be controlled: Caltrans is warning drivers should anticipate lengthy delays because there are still six active projects along the section. In those areas, traffic is reduced to one lane. That means there will be flaggers and signalized traffic lights, along with stepped-up construction zone enforcement throughout the entire corridor. The majority of the remaining projects — including shoring up retaining walls at several locations — will be complete by June 2018.
    (Source: Marin I-J, 1/3/2018)

    Lagunitas Bridge (04-Mrn-1, PM 28.4/28.6)

    Pt Reyes BridgeIn March 2015, it was reported that the 86-year-old bridge that leading to Point Reyes Station (apx 001 MRN 28.488) will be demolished and replaced in what will be at least a seven-year process involving public input, lengthy environmental review and years of construction that will necessitate a temporary one-lane bridge across Lagunitas Creek. The first real bridge to cross Lagunitas Creek at the site was built in 1875. Before then, ranchers ran cattle on the east side of Tomales Bay, but there was no Point Reyes Station. Ferries carried people across the water until the train station arrived and a town sprung up, spurring a wooden bridge and, soon after, Levee Road. In 1925 the county secured a $2.5 million bond to modernize Sir Francis Drake Boulevard—widening, realigning and paving the dirt road—because of the rise of automobiles, and to help ranch operations. The Green Bridge, a 152-foot steel truss bridge built in 1929, was the culmination of that project. Now, Caltrans says the steel bridge is deteriorating and vulnerable to an earthquake. Retrofitting, the agency says, would reduce the bridge’s already deficient weight capacity. Caltrans has proposed four conceptual alternatives to replace the Green Bridge that could be modified based on comments. The agency also still needs to prepare a geotechnical report and a full-blown traffic study. The ideas for a new bridge include two versions of a steel truss bridge, one of which looks similar to the current bridge, as well as a concrete bridge and a suspension cable bridge. The first alternative, a short version of a steel truss bridge, is similar in style to the current bridge. It comes with 101-foot long steel trusses on each side, which curve in a gentle arc as they cross the length of the bridge. Each truss, at its apex, would be about 12 feet tall. Alternative two is a long version of a steel truss bridge: the trusses are 150 feet, and there is a roof bracing across the top, imposing a 15-foot clearance on vehicles. The steel trusses bear some resemblance to the current bridge, but visually, it’s a lot of metal. The third alternative is a pre-cast concrete girder bridge. It could be built quickly (2 years), but the bridge deck would be two feet higher than the current bridge, resulting in a larger “footprint” and impacting nearby properties. Alternative four is a suspension cable bridge, with two concrete, monolith-like towers at each end connecting the cables. Environmental planners are unsure whether the concrete bridge or the short steel truss bridge could be permitted, given their potential environmental impacts. Regardless of which alternative is chosen, a new bridge will meet modern design standards: two 12-foot lanes, four-foot shoulders on each side, six-foot sidewalks and wheelchair-accessible ramps at the sidewalks. A draft environmental impact report should arrive in 2016. The new bridge will be wider due to bigger lanes, shoulders and sidewalks. Caltrans says that construction—which will cost $5.8 million, funded by a highway program—could easily last two or three years. During that time, Caltrans has proposed a temporary one-lane bridge on the animal clinic side of the Green Bridge, controlled by a traffic signal on each end.
    (Source: Point Reyes Light, 3/26/2015)

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 0756K. 04-Marin-1 28.5. On Route 1 Near Point Reyes Station, at Lagunitas Creek Bridge No. 27-0023. Replace bridge. Begin Con: 2/8/2021. Total Project Cost: $28,339K.

    In July 2018, it was reported that Caltrans has unveiled its final design plans to tear down and replace the Green Bridge to ensure that the critical gateway to Point Reyes Station can withstand an earthquake. It’s a project the agency says will cost $8 million and take a year to complete, including a complete closure for up to three weeks. The agency’s final environmental impact report addressed the persistent call from community members to reconsider retrofitting the bridge, but maintained that a replacement is necessary. Caltrans first discounted the retrofit in its draft of the environmental impact report, released in summary 2017, citing a three-year timeframe and greater environmental impacts and arguing that it would be a less safe structure. Because a retrofit was not an evaluated alternative in the draft, Caltrans could not go that route without re-writing an entirely new environmental report. To appease residents, the agency has since issued a variety of supplemental documents that justify why structural engineers decided a retrofit would be inadequate. Of the five design alternatives and a no-build option Caltrans did consider, the agency has selected a three-span, concrete bridge design with the shorter of two proposed timelines as its preferred alternative. Including five-foot-wide shoulders, the bridge will have a roadway that’s 32 feet—six feet wider than the existing structure—as well as one six-foot sidewalk. The bridge does not have a truss, or the metal frame that’s currently painted green, and therefore will not be as tall. As the narrowest of the designs, it will have the “least distraction of views toward the creek and of Point Reyes Station” and will “not detract from community character,” the report states. During a three-week period scheduled for September 2021, the bridge will close while construction crews work around the clock to remove the existing bridge and install the new one. Traffic will be detoured south-to-north through Olema, along Platform Bridge Road and Point Reyes-Petaluma Road—a nine-mile route. The alternative timeline for some of the other designs was three years, with no closures. Caltrans first introduced the project in 2015, after engineers determined that the 90-year-old structure does not meet current standards for earthquake resistance. At that time, many locals immediately clamored for a retrofit rather than a replacement, largely concerned about the strain that a long construction project would put on the town. Despite some additions from Caltrans, such as a shorter timeline option, many residents have continued to fight tooth and nail against the proposed rebuild since the draft E.I.R. formally discounted a retrofit last summer. The majority of commenters opposed the project during a comment period on that document at that time.
    (Source: Point Reyes Light, 7/11/2018)

    In August 2018 the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) has been completed: Route 1 in Marin County (04-Mrn-1, PM 28.4/28.6). Replace existing bridge on Route 1 near Point Reyes in Marin County. (PPNO 0756K) This project is located on Route 1, south of Point Reyes, in Marin County. The project proposes to replace the Lagunitas Creek Bridge (No. 27-0023), that crosses the Lagunitas Creek, north of the intersection of Route 1 and Sir Francis Drake Boulevard. The project proposes to meet current safety and seismic design standards while providing a safe and stable seismic crossing over Lagunitas Creek. The proposed project is estimated to cost $28.3 million. The project is currently programmed in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) for approximately $28.3 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of -Way (capital and support). The project is estimated to begin construction in 2021. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 SHOPP.
    (Source: August CTC Agenda Item 2.2c.(13))

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Bridge Preservation item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 04-Marin-1 PM 28.5 PPNO 0756K Proj ID 0413000350 EA 0G642. Route 1 near Point Reyes Station, at Lagunitas Creek Bridge No. 27-0023. Replace bridge. Programmed in FY20-21, with construction scheduled to start in late February 2021. Total project cost is $28,339K, with $18,052K being capital (const and right of way) and $10,287K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In June 2020, the CTC approved the following SHOPP amendment for this project: 04-Mrn-1 28.5. PPNO 0756K ProjID 0413000350 EA 0G642. On Route 1 near Point Reyes Station, at Lagunitas Creek Bridge No. 27-0023. Replace bridge. Allocation changes: Con Sup $2,500K $2,625K; Const Cap $11,552K $14,350K; Total $28,339K $31,262K. A lawsuit filed against the project has encountered court delays due to COVID-19, delaying the environmental approval. Increase in construction capital is due to structural design change, use of ultra-high performance concrete, need for cast-in-drilled-hole concrete piling, and to fulfill permit requirement for 10-year plant establishment period. Additional construction support is required for coordination and oversight of the plant establishment period.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(5d) #7)

    Estero Americano Bridge Replacement Project

    Rte 1 Estero Americano BridgeIn October 2015, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the Estero Americano Bridge Replacement Project in Marin and Sonoma Counties, which will replace the existing bridge spanning Americano Creek on Route 1 near the town of Valley Ford (apx 001 MRN 50.47). The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $17,256,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016/17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. A copy of the ND has been provided to Commission staff.

    In August 2016, the CTC approved $14,737,000 for Marin 04-Mrn-1 50.1/50.5 Route 1 near Valley Ford, from 0.4 mile south to 0.2 mile north of Estero Americano Bridge No. 27-0028; also in Sonoma county (PM 0.0 to 0.2). Outcome/Output: Replace structurally deficient structure with new bridge and retaining walls using standard lane and shoulder widths. New bridge and approaches will be constructed at higher elevation to prevent over-topping and roadway flooding. Project also includes willow cutting harvesting, willow propagation and mitigation plantings, and plant establishment period maintenance.

    In August 2018, it was reported that the only thing that could stall the demise of the Estero Americano Bridge demise is the appearance of a California red-legged frog, the species made famous by Mark Twain. The Estero-Americano Bridge, built in 1925 along the border of Marin and Sonoma counties, has a bridge deck with a 2‐foot sag, is structurally deficient and is subject to periodic flooding from Americano Creek because it sits low in the landscape, according to Caltrans. The bridge will be replaced with a longer, concrete box girder bridge that will be poured on site. In August 2018, the bridge was closed while crews poured concrete on a section of bridge deck as they continued construction of the new Estero-Americano Bridge. The new bridge is being built with an improved height clearance as the old bridge was prone to flooding from the creek below. The project will cost $9.6 million and is expected to be finished by the end of the year — unless the red-legged frogs show up. The Estero Americano project site is about two miles upstream from where Americano Creek transitions into the Estero Americano near Valley Ford. The Estero Americano watershed covers 49 square miles and provides habitat for numerous fish and wildlife species. The Estero Americano has been categorized as a critical coastal area by the state of California. Estero Americano ultimately flows toward Bodega Bay and the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. The tricolored blackbird, a state species of special concern, is known to fly around the project area. The endangered Myrtle’s silverspot butterfly and the threatened red-legged frog are listed under the federal Endangered Species Act and also may be present. Red-legged frogs could force work to stop if they bound into the construction site. Barring any frog cameo, the project will remove the existing 146-foot-long, 25‐foot-wide bridge and replace it with a 266-foot-long, 40-foot-wide span. The new bridge will support a road consisting of 12-foot lanes in each direction and 6-foot shoulders. The span will be supported on either side by six piers on extensions built with piles. The bridge will be about 6 feet higher than the existing bridge and was designed to accommodate a 100-year flood event. It will also provide more space for wildlife passage beneath the road and result in an increase in the amount of riparian habitat along Americano Creek. The bridge will be constructed in two sections; the eventual northbound lane will be constructed first, to allow the existing bridge to be used for traffic with one‐way traffic control during further construction. Traffic will then be shifted onto the new bridge. One‐way traffic control will continue while the old bridge is demolished and the second half of the new bridge is completed. Temporary concrete rails will be placed on the edge of the new structure while the southbound side is constructed.
    (Source: Marin I-J, 8/15/2018)

    Gleason Beach Realignment

    In January 2015, the CTC received a notice of preparation for an EIR for a project in Sonoma County S of Jenner (PM 04-Son-1, PM 15.1/15.8, at Gleason Beach, S of Sonoma Coast State Park) that will realign a portion of Route 1, moving the roadway eastward away from the coast. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $36,870,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. There are three alternatives, in addition to the "No Build" alternative:

    • Alternative 19A – This alternative would remove the existing Scotty Creek culvert structure and propose beach visitor parking at Gleason Beach. The proposed highway alignment north of the proposed bridge touchdown would be to the east of the residences located north of Gleason Beach. South of the proposed bridge the highway would be aligned eastward a short distance from the existing highway.
    • Alternative 19B – This alternative would be similar to alternative 19A except the highway alignment south of the proposed bridge would be located farther east of the existing highway.
    • Alternative 20 – This alternative would be similar to Alternative 19A except that the proposed bridge and the highway south of the proposed bridge would be aligned approximately 150 feet east of the other alternatives.

    In October 2016, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project for which a Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) has been completed: Construct a new roadway on a new alignment east of existing alignment of a portion of Route 1 (04-Son-1, PM 15.1/15.7) near the town of Bodega Bay. This project in Sonoma County will realign a portion of Route 1 between the towns of Jenner and Bodega Bay. The project is programmed in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total programmed amount is $38,370,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The project is immediately south of Gleason Beach, and will move Route 1 several hundred feet inland. The alternative selected was Alternative 19A. This will construct a 3,700 foot roadway, with an approximately 900 foot bridge across Scotty Creek.

    Also in October 2016, the CTC amended the SHOPP related to this project as follows: 04-SON-1 15.1/15.8 | Route 1 Near Camet, 0.1 mile north of Del Sol Road. Realign roadway. Additional design support, construction support and construction capital is needed for the now identified preferred alternative and evolved scope associated with a new longer roadway bridge and pedestrian/bicycle bridge required by the California Coastal Commission permit process. Additional support costs are also required for extensive coordination with community and resource agencies to fulfil environmental commitment. Increase in R/W capital cost is needed for mitigations identified during environmental phase. These changes add $8,430,000 to the cost of the project. Allocation: $3MM $5MM (R/W), $21.8MM $24.3MM (C), Support (PA & ED $8MM / PS & E $1.8MM $5MM / RW Sup $500K / Con Sup $3.27MM $4MM). FY 17/18.

    In May 2018, it was reported that the California Coastal Commission had posted a public hearing on the project, at the behest of Caltrans, to allow “more time to address new information and community concerns in order to move the project forward.” The project would include a broad concrete bridge spanning Scotty Creek between Bodega Bay and Jenner. The 850-foot-long bridge is part of a three-quarter-mile realignment project meant to move Route 1 at Gleason Beach inland by 400 feet — Caltrans’ solution to the crumbling cliffside that undermines the roadway on its current route at the continent’s edge. But even after years of meetings and draft sketches of how the coastal highway might one day look, many in the region still are coming to terms with the scale of what’s proposed and its impact on the view and surrounding landscape. Public officials recognized the plan conflicts with land-use principles embedded in the California Coastal Act and Sonoma County’s own coastal land-use policies, which prioritize the coast’s scenic and visual qualities, among other protected resources. But Caltrans and Coastal Commission staffers say the proposal is the least environmentally damaging of 20 viable options for the site, where the landscape dips down to the creek at ocean level and crosses actively grazed ranchlands, wetland areas, Native American archaeological sites and a stream historically populated by endangered coho salmon and threatened steelhead trout. Caltrans hopes to begin construction next spring and finish the project in two years. State agencies proposed an extensive list of conditions and measures meant to offset interference with the view and ensure sensitive wildlife habitat and recreational attributes aren’t damaged. They include a $10 million mitigation package, negotiated with Sonoma County planning officials, that would result in a new 40- to 50-acre park and coastal trail segment, beach access improvements, stream and habitat restoration, and a dedicated bike/pedestrian bridge across Scotty Creek. It also includes cleaning up huge chunks of houses and concrete shed by the eroding cliff over the past two decades, as landowners frantically sought to stave off the inevitable loss of bluff-top homes that began falling into the ocean in 1998.
    (Source: Santa Rosa Press Democrat, 5/7/2018)

    In May 2019, it was reported that a stretch of southbound Route 1 on the Sonoma Coast at risk of failure from coastal erosion for two decades has finally been abandoned — the cracked and sagging western-most lane shut down for good in mid-May 2019. Abundant winter rainfall and regular wave action undercutting the deteriorating bluffs at Gleason Beach have finally made the affected lane too dangerous for traffic, triggering the emergency closure and switch to a single, shared lane for all travelers, Caltrans said. Caltrans is still working to finalize a long-term fix that involves moving a three-quarter-mile stretch of the roadway inland 400 feet so the cliff’s accelerating retreat no longer poses a problem for coastal travel. The project includes construction of an 850-foot- long bridge that would span the Scotty Creek flood plain, raising the highway above sensitive creek habitat and tribal heritage sites that otherwise might be disturbed. While Caltrans appeared poised to seek approval of its bypass plan from the California Coastal Commission a year ago, it now could be another full year before it is ready to do, though it also may be sooner, an agency spokeswoman said. Among the outstanding issues are continued negotiations related to land and right-of-way acquisitions needed to construct what would be the largest man-made structure on the Sonoma Coast. The section of coastline known as Gleason Bleach, located on the rise above Scotty Creek, midway between Bodega Bay and Jenner, is retreating at an average rate of 14 inches a year, one of the fastest rates of coastal erosion in California. The cliff side is littered with the debris of fallen homes, concrete armaments, pillars and other failed attempts to stabilize the bluffs and a number of homes that once afforded commanding ocean views — until the land gave way and structures began sliding into the sea about two decades ago. The geology in that spot is a major factor, along with the constant wave action, storm runoff and drainage from the cliff top. Traffic lights have been installed so that one-way traffic control can be maintained along a 1,200-foot section of the highway for the foreseeable future. Motorists can expect five- to 10-minute delays.
    (Source: Press-Democrat, 5/23/2019)

    In June 2019, the CTC deleted the following project from the SHOPP: 04-Son-1 15.1/15.8 PPNO 0748E ProjID 0400000129. Route 1 Near Camet, 0.1 mile north of Del Sol Road. Realign roadway. Delete project. The Coastal Development Permit (CDP) cannot be obtained prior to the time extension deadline of June 2019. The proposed conditions on the permit exceed the available project resources. Right of Way parcels also require additional acquisition time for condemnation. The project will be reprogrammed with updated cost and schedule in future years.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Scope Item 57)

    In August 2019, the CTC amended the following project into the SHOPP: 04-Son-1 15.1/15.7. PPNO 0748E Proj ID 0400000129 EA 0A020. Route 1 Near Carmet, from 0.1 mile to 0.7 mile north of Calle Del Sol. Realign roadway near Gleason Beach. PS&E $1,800K; R/W Sup $500K; Con Sup $5,000K; R/W Cap $15,398K; Const Cap $35,824K: TOTAL $58,522K Begin Const: 7/1/2021. (Concurrent R/W Cap allocation under Resolution FP-19-13.) (Concurrent COS allocation under Resolution FP-19-14.). Additionally, the CTC approved the following allocation: 04-Son-1 15.1/15.7. PPNO 0748E Proj ID 0400000129 EA 0A020. Route 1 Near Carmet, from 0.1 mile to 0.7 mile north of Calle Del Sol. Realign roadway near Gleason Beach. (Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-16-77; October 2016.) (Concurrent R/W Cap allocation under Resolution FP-19-13.) (Concurrent amendment under SHOPP Amendment 18H-011.) PS&E $1,800,000 R/W Sup $500,000. Lastly, at the same meeting, the CTC also approved $15,398,000 from the Budget Act of 2019, Budget Act Items 2660-302-0042 and 2660-302-0890 for Right of Way capital for this project. It was noted that this permanent restoration project is located at Gleason Beach between the coastal towns of Bodega Bay and Jenner along Route 1 in Sonoma County. There is significant sliding of the coastal slopes in the area. The project will realign existing Route 1 several hundred feet inland to maintain long-term connectivity and protect against further damage from coastal erosion. The project scope requires the Department acquire 8 parcels, including fee acquisitions, permanent easements, and temporary construction easements. Utility relocation coordination and environmental mitigation costs are also anticipated. The original Right of Way capital programming of $5,000,000 was based on the Right of Way capital estimate developed in 2017. Approximately 81 percent of that estimate was attributed to environmental mitigation and the need for a conservation easement, long-term endowment, and acquisition of mitigation parcels. The project design has since been refined and additional mitigation requirements have been identified. As a result, the total acquisition area has increased, and new utility conflicts must be addressed. The environmental mitigation estimate increased to account for visual impacts and public access to a new bridge. The current right of way capital estimate is $15,398,000; 84 percent of which is the environmental mitigation requirements.
    (Source: August 2019 CTC Agenda/Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Item 26; Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) #19; Agenda Item 2.5b.(3))

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Major Damage Restoration item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 04-Sonoma-1 PM 15.1/15.7 PPNO 0748E Proj ID 0400000129  EA 0A020. Route 1 near Carmet, from 0.1 mile to 0.7 mile north of Calle Del Sol. Realign roadway near Gleason Beach. Programmed in FY20-21, with construction scheduled to start in July 2021. Total project cost is $58,522K, with $51,222K being capital (const and right of way) and $7,300K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    Jenner (001 SON 21.241) to Manchester (001 MEN 20.647)

    Gualala Downtown Streetscape Improvements (MEN 0.6/1.0)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $575K of ADPE funding in PS&E funds in FY19-20 for PPNO 4579, Gualala Downtown Streetscape Improvements. This project, at MEN 0.6/1.0 in Mendocino County in Gualala from Center Street to the North Limit to Gualala (Men-1-0.6/1.0). The project proposes two 11' wide travel lanes, a 12' wide left-turn lane, 5' Class II bike lane (both sides) and 8' wide sidewalks (both sides) for most of the project. Sidewalk aprons will help to reduce conflict points of vehicles entering and leaving Route 1. Short-term solutions are still being developed, but the hope at this point is to build a new, adjacent lane inland to carry northbound traffic and convert the existing northbound lane for use by those traveling south, Caltrans representatives said. Engineers also are contemplating trying to stabilize the coastal edge by embedding up to 60 50-foot steel beams vertically into what had been the southbound lane.

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which increases the programmed funding for PPNO 4579 "Gualala Downtown Streetscape Improvs" by adding $900K in FY20-21.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    Fox Gulch Widening (01-Mendocino-1 PM 6.5/9.5)

    Fox Gulch Widening (01-Mendocino-1 PM 6.5/9.5)In June 2017, the CTC added the following to the SHOPP: 01-Men-1 6.5/9.5 On Route 1: Near Gualala, from 0.4 mile north of Havens Neck Drive to 0.5 mile south of Iverson Road. Widen shoulders and install edge-line rumble strips and guardrail. $433,000 (R/W) $519,000 (C) PA&ED: 01/11/2019 R/W: 02/15/2020 RTL: 03/01/2020 BC: 09/15/2020

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Collision Reduction item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 01-Mendocino-1 PM 6.5/9.5 PPNO 4630 Proj ID 0116000047 EA 0F710. Route 1 near Gualala, from 0.4 mile north of Havens Neck Drive to 0.5 mile south of Iverson Road. Widen shoulders and install edgeline rumble strips and guardrail. Programmed in FY20-21, with construction scheduled to start in October 2021. Total project cost is $4,907K, with $1,789K being capital (const and right of way) and $3,118K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    There are plans to realign this route near Point Arena (apx 001 MEN 15.028) in Mendocino County. This is between Schooner and Hearn Gulch, N of Iverson Point.

    Manchester (001 MEN 20.647) to Leggett (001 MEN 105.56), including Fort Bragg

    Elk Creek Bridge (01-Mendocino-1 PM 31.4)

    Elk Creek Bridge (01-Mendocino-1 PM 31.4)In June 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP scope amendment: 01-Men-1 31.4 PPNO 4588 ProjID 0113000125. Route 1 Near Fort Bragg, at Elk Creek Bridge No. 10-0120. Replace and upgrade bridge rails. A change in scope from bridge rail replacement to complete bridge replacement is necessary due to newly identified scour issues. This change results in increased construction capital and performance, and project delay to allow for more design time. Updated total cost $13,416K, and completion is pushed to FY21-22.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Scope Item 13)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Bridge Preservation item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 01-Mendocino-1 PM 31.4 PPNO 4588 Proj ID 0113000125 EA 0E110. Route 1 near Fort Bragg, at Elk Creek Bridge No. 10-0120. Replace bridge. Programmed in FY21-22, with construction scheduled to start at the end of August 2022. Total project cost is $13,416K, with $8,658K being capital (const and right of way) and $4,758K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In June 2011, the CTC approved $9 million in funding to replace the Greenwood Creek Bridge (001 MEN 33.63) on Route 1 near Elk in Mendocino County. The 56-year-old bridge is nearing the end of its service life and is in need of deck rehabilitation and rail replacement. Additionally,the creek’s channel has shifted over the years and has exposed one of the footings for the bridge. The new bridge will be wider and will include a 5-foot-wide walkway for pedestrians. Project completion is expected by fall 2014.

    Also near Elk (apx 001 MEN 34.129), in August 2011 the CTC approved $1.65 million to realign the road and fix damage from storms in the 2005-2006 winter. The road will be shifted to the east because of an unstable slope.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $1,650,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Elk, from 1.7 to 1.4 miles south of Navarro River Bridge (001 MEN 40.18), that will repair and realign roadway and reconstruct drainage facilities damaged by heavy rainfall.

    In May 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP Support Allocation: 01-Men-1 41.8/42.3. Route 1 Near Albion, from 1.5 miles north of Route 128 to 0.1 mile south of Navarro Ridge Road. Widen for standard shoulders and install rumble strips and guardrail. PPNO 4578. ProjID 0112000300. PS&E $385,000. R/W Sup $265,000.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) Item 4)

    In May 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP Support Allocation: 01-Men-1 42.3/42.5. Route 1Near Albion, at Navarro Ridge Road. Improve drainage, repair erosion, widen shoulders, and repair roadway. PPNO 4616. ProjID 0115000048. PS&E $480,000. R/W Sup $80,000.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) Item 5)

    Salmon Creek Bridge No. 10-0134 (1-Men-1 42.4/43.3)

    In December 2016, the CTC amended the SHOPP related to the following project: 1-Men-1 42.4/43.3 | Route 1 Near Albion, from 2.2 miles north of Route 128 Junction to 0.2 mile north of Salmon Creek Bridge No. 10-0134. Bridge replacement. Additional time is required to complete the project due to delays to the environmental studies and completion of the PA&ED milestone. Delays are a result of difficulty acquiring access to adjacent private property to complete studies, regulatory agencies requiring further studies of an endangered butterfly related to drought conditions, lead contamination present at the site and in groundwater and the need to define the contamination limits, and delays to on-going consultations with regulatory agencies on environmental impacts. These changes will move the schedule to FY 19/20.

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 4491, 01-Mendocino-1 42.4/43.3. On Route 1 Near Albion, from 2.2 miles north of Route 128 Junction to 0.2 mile north of Salmon Creek Bridge No. 10-0134. Bridge replacement. Begin Con: 3/1/2020. * Const, * Con Sup phase(s) are NOT authorized. Total Project Cost: $61,592K.

    In June 2019, the CTC approved the following scope amendment to the SHOPP: 01-Men-1 42.4/43.3 PPNO 4491 ProjID 0100000155. Route 1 Near Albion, from 2.2 miles north of Route 128 Junction to 0.2 mile north of Salmon Creek Bridge No. 10-0134. Bridge replacement. Completion delayed to FY21-22. Additional studies found that past bridge paint sandblast work has caused elevated levels of zinc and lead in the groundwater and adjacent properties. In coordination with the Department of Toxic Substance Control, more time is needed to develop a toxic waste removal plan. This has caused a delay to the project.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Scope Item 15)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Long Lead Bridge Preservation item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 01-Mendocino-1 PM 42.4/43.3 PPNO 4491 Proj ID 0100000155 EA 40140. Route 1 near Albion, from 2.2 miles north of Route 128 Junction to 0.2 mile north of Salmon Creek Bridge No. 10-0134. Bridge replacement. Note: Significant opposition to this project until the lead contamination issue is resolved. Extensive lead abatement is required for the disturbed area prior to resource agencies approving the environmental permits for this project. Programmed in FY29-30, with construction scheduled to start in February 2030. Total project cost is $61,592K, with $43,099K being capital (const and right of way) and $43,099K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.). Only PA&ED phase programming is authorized for $5,800K.
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    Albion River Bridge No. 10-0136 Replacement (01-Men-1 43.3/44.2)

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 4490. 01-Mendocino-1 43.3/44.2. On Route 1 Near Albion, from 3.0 miles north of Route 128 Junction to 0.2 mile north of Albion River Bridge No. 10-0136. Bridge replacement. Begin Con: 12/15/2020. * Const, * Con Sup phase(s) are NOT authorized. Total Project Cost: $78,945K.

    In June 2019, the CTC approved the following long lead project amendment to the SHOPP: 01-Men-1 43.3/44.2 PPNO 4490 ProjID 0100000154. Route 1 Near Albion, from 3.0 miles north of Route 128 Junction to 0.2 mile north of Albion River Bridge No. 10-0136. Bridge replacement. Note: Project delivery year is being moved from FY 19-20 to 22-23 making this a long lead project. The change is due to organized opposition and legal challenges by a land owner for Permits to Enter (PTE) needed to conduct environmental studies and geotechnical studies. PS&E Support, R/W support, construction support and construction capital costs are escalated to the year of delivery. Total cost est. now $93,908K.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Long Lead Amendment Item 1)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Bridge Preservation item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 01-Mendocino-1 PM 43.3/44.2 PPNO 4490 Proj ID 0100000154 EA 40110. Route 1 near Albion, from 3.0 miles north of Route 128 Junction to 0.2 mile north of Albion River Bridge No. 10-0136. Bridge replacement. Programmed in FY22-23, with construction scheduled to start in October 2023. Total project cost is $93,908K, with $73,421K being capital (const and right of way) and $20,487K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In September 2011, it was reported that construction was completed on a roundabout near Ft. Bragg (001 MEN MEN 59.247). The Fort Bragg roundabout is designed to help drivers on Simpson merge onto Route 1 without the potential traffic bottlenecks that a stoplight could create. It is located at Simpson Lane just south of Fort Bragg. The project cost $4.4 million project and will be completed in Fall 2011.

    There are currently plans to replace the Route 1 Noyo River bridge (the original Larsen Memorial Bridge) (001 MEN 60.23), at a cost of $31 million.

    In October 2018, the CTC amended the 2018 SHOPP to add the following project: 01-Men-1 R65.1/65.5. PPNO 4656. Project 0117000026. EA 0G600. Route 1 Near Fort Bragg, from north of Mill Creek Drive to north of Ward Avenue. Widen shoulders. Est. cost: $5,048,000. Est. const. begin: 9/15/2022. The CTC also approved the following allocation: $833,000. 01-Men-1 R65.1/65.5. Route 1 Near Fort Bragg, from north of Mill Creek Drive to north of Ward Avenue. Widen shoulders. PPNO 4656. Project 0117000026. EA 0G600.
    (Source: October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Item 16; Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) Item 2)

    In August 2017, the CTC approved the following addition to the SHOPP: 01-Men-1 71.2/71.4 Route 1: Near Fort Bragg, from 0.03 mile south to 0.07 mile north of Abalobadiah Creek. Curve improvement and shoulder widening. $263K (R/W) $1,991K (C) $2,941K (Support). PA&ED: 11/01/2018R/W: 02/15/2020RTL: 03/01/2020BC: 08/01/2020

    In August 2018, the CTC approved $19,700,000 in emergency SHOPP funding for Mendocino 01-Men-1 75.5/76.5: Route 1 Near Westport, from 0.6 mile to 1.4 miles north of Blue Slide Gulch. Heavy rainfall in March 2016 caused sudden movement in the Westport Landslide Complex, causing substantial settlement and cracking of the roadway. This project will reconstruct the roadway, repair drainage, install a geotechnical monitoring system, and install erosion control measures. The work is necessary to prevent further roadway deterioration and pavement loss and provide a safe alignment for the traveling public while providing time for a more permanent repair strategy. Supplemental work is necessary to construct solider pile ground anchor walls. There have been a series of allocations here:
    (Source: August 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.5f.(1) Item 3)

    • Initial G-11 Allocation 07/25/16: $5,500,000
    • Supplemental G-11 Allocation 06/25/18: $19,700,000
    • Revised Allocation: $25,200,000
    • (Additional $200,000 was allocated for right of way purposes.)

    In March 2017, the CTC approved $3,500,000 in emergency SHOPP funding to repair storm damage near Westport, from 0.3 mile south of Wages Creek Bridge to Soldier Point Sidehill Viaduct (01-Men-1 78.0/83.5). A series of storms starting January 7, 2017 has lead to coastal erosion and drainage failures at multiple locations. The magnitude and number of failures have overwhelmed Maintenance forces and the route continues to be under traffic control. A combination of coastal bluff erosion and failed culverts threatens the roadway at three locations. Coastal bluff erosion resulted in excessive roadway deformation and cracking at another location, and the bluff erosion to the edge of pavement at another results in a 200 foot drop to the ocean below. This project will accommodate immediate needs for traffic control and public safety and to allow for further assessment to develop final repair strategies. The project also allows for immediate repairs of failed drainage to limit additional damage. The project will remove slide debris, stabilize slopes, repair roadway surface, dewater and provide erosion control as necessary.

    In June 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct a fish passage project on Route 1 at Dunn Creek in Mendocino County (Bridge 10-0304, MEN 092.83). The project is necessary to comply with the California Department of Fish and Game Incidental Take Permit that was issued for the Ten Mile River Bridge Replacement project located on Route 1, PM 69.2/70.1. The Dunn Creek Fish Passage project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $3,552,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    In March 2017, the CTC approved $3,000,000 in emergency SHOPP funding to repair storm damage near Leggett, at 1.2 miles south of Route 101 (01-Men-1 104.4). Following a period of heavy rains starting January 7, 2017, a landslide resulted in complete closure of the roadway. The volume of slide material and continuing movement exceeds Maintenance staff ability to continue to safely control. The site is open to one-way traffic control. The project will provide traffic control, debris removal, place and maintain a debris flow barrier, regrade and stabilize the slope, repair drainage and the roadway surface, and provide erosion control. Geotechnical investigations are on-going to determine a final repair strategy.

    Naming Naming

    Route 1 and Route 211 from Mill Valley (Marin County) to Ferndale (Humboldt County) are named the "Shoreline Highway". This is because they go along the shoreline. The portion of the route between Rockport and Ferndale (Route 211) is not constructed. The road runs along the Pacific Shore. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 91, Chapter 239 in 1957.

    Jere MeloThe portion of Route 1 in the City of Fort Bragg, from Chestnut Street in the south (milepost marker 60.925) to Elm Street in the north (milepost marker 61.993) is named the "Jere Melo Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Jere Melo, who was born November 12, 1941, and grew up in Mount Shasta, California. Jere Melo spent two years on active duty with the United States Army, including a 13-month tour on the 38th parallel in Korea, in command of a Hawk Missile site. Jere Melo’s career in the timber industry spanned 45 years. He worked as a forester for the Union Lumber Company in Fort Bragg and as a contractor for Campbell Timberland Management, and dedicated his life to keeping the woods safe for timber workers and to protecting forestland from degradation by illegal trespassing, marijuana cultivation, dumping, and encampments. Jere Melo began his long and distinguished political career in 1992 when he was appointed to serve on the Fort Bragg Planning Commission. In 1996, he was elected to his first term on the Fort Bragg City Council. Jere served as Vice Mayor from 1998 to 2000, inclusive, and as Mayor from 2000 to 2004, inclusive. At the time of his death, Jere was in his 15th year and his fourth term of office as a city council member. He was very active in the League of California Cities, was the city chair for the Board of the Fort Bragg Fire Protection Authority, and for 13 years served on the Board of the Mendocino County Local Agency Formation Commission. In addition, he also had a very strong commitment to the local fishing industry serving on the Noyo Watershed Alliance, the Board of the Mendocino Coast Sports Foundation, and the Board of the Fort Bragg-Otsuchi, along with his wife. Jere Melo was murdered on August 27, 2011, at the age of 69, while patrolling for illegal marijuana growth on Hawthorne property in Fort Bragg. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.
    (Image Source: Anderson Valley Advertiser, 9/1/2011)

    Ricky Del FiorentinoThe portion of Route 1 between milepost marker 62.0 and milepost marker 65.0, adjacent to MacKerricher State Park in the County of Mendocino is officially designated the "Deputy Sheriff Ricky Del Fiorentino Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Deputy Sheriff Ricky Paul Del Fiorentino, was born in 1965 in Napa California. Del Fiorentino attended Napa High School, Class of 1983, the University of Oklahoma, and the Napa Valley College Police Academy. Deputy Sheriff Del Fiorentino began his law enforcement career with the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office, from 1988 to 1990, inclusive, then worked with the Fort Bragg Police Department as a Patrol Officer and Detective, from 1990 to 2000, inclusive, and finally returned to the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office as a Deputy Sheriff in 2000. Deputy Sheriff Del Fiorentino was a defensive tactics instructor, had been a member of the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office Special Weapons and Tactics team, and had been the president of the Coast Chapter of the Police Activities League.Deputy Sheriff Del Fiorentino was a very visible presence in the Fort Bragg community, and had also coached wrestling at the local high school. Deputy Sheriff Del Fiorentino was inducted into the Napa High School Hall of Fame in 1998, and won a Gold Medal in the 2003 California Police Olympics in both Greco-Roman and Freestyle wrestling. On March 19, 2014, Deputy Sheriff Del Fiorentino responded to a shooting in Cleone, a small community a few miles north of Fort Bragg in the County of Mendocino. Deputy Sheriff Del Fiorentino spotted the suspect vehicle stopped in the roadway in a residential area and was immediately ambushed by the suspect who fired numerous rifle rounds into Del Fiorentino’s patrol vehicle, killing him. Seconds later the suspect fired on a Fort Bragg Police Lieutenant who killed the suspect in the gun battle. Deputy Sheriff Del Fiorentino made the ultimate sacrifice in the service of the residents of the County of Mendocino and the State of California. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 159, Resolution Chapter 177, 9/11/2014.
    (Image sources: Waymarking; Lost Coast Outpost 3/21/2014)

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Bridge 10-130 over the Navarro River in Mendocino county (001 MEN 40.18) is named the "Armed Forces of Mendocino County Memorial Bridge". It was constructed in 1949, and was named by Senate Resolution 169 in 1949.

    Bridge 10-151, at Russian Gulch in Mendocino county (001 MEN 52.64), is named the "Frederick W. Panhorst Bridge". It was built in 1940, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 145 in 1974. Frederick Panhorst was a Caltrans employee responsible for the construction of the Alameda Creek Bridge. He is a former director of ASCE. In 1960, he received a California State Assembly Resolution of Commendation and California Highway Commission Resolution of Acknowledgement and Appreciation. He served as as an engineer with the Bridge Department of the California Division of Highways from 1927 to 1960. He has a collection of papers on file at the University of Illinois.

    Bridge 10-153, over Casper Creek in Mendocino county (001 MEN R54.71), is named the "Ray E. Ware Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1966, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 32 in 1973. Ray E. Ware served as Judge of the Ten Mile Justice Court from 1952 to 1971 and was a tireless advocate for an all weather highway system for California.

    Bridge 10-175, over Hare Creek in Mendocino county (001 MEN 59.67), is named the "Sgt. Emil Evenson Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1947, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 27, Chapter 44, in 1948. Sgt. Emil Evenson, a native of the Ft. Bragg area, was killed in action on the island of Attu in the Pacific during World War II.

    Bridge 10-176, at the Noyo River in Mendocino county (001 MEN 60.23, since replaced with bridge 10-298), is named the "Lieutenant Charles Larsen Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1948, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 27, Chapter 44, the same year. Lt. Charles Larsen was lost in the Pacific while flying a combat mission during World War II.

    Wesley ChesbroThe Pudding Creek Trestle in MacKerricher State Park (near Route 1 near Fort Bragg) (001 MEN 62.12) is named the "Wesley Chesbro Pudding Creek Trestle". The Pudding Creek Trestle is a pedestrian-equestrian-bicycle timber stringer bridge over Pudding Creek in MacKerricher State Park (near Route 1), adjacent to the City of Fort Bragg in Mendocino County. The trestle is 48 feet above sea level, with a total length of 515 feet and a deck width of 12 feet. It was built by the Union Lumber Company in 1915 as a logging railroad trestle. During the early years of the 20th century, the Union Lumber Company harvested timber from forests along Ten Mile River, and the Ten Mile Railroad was constructed to transport logs from those forests, and over Pudding Creek, to the Fort Bragg mill. For 32 years the Ten Mile Railroad existed as a working railroad, hauling logs and transporting workers. After World War II, logging trucks replaced the railroad, and the right-of-way, including the trestle, were converted for truck use in 1949. All use of the trestle ended in 1983, and the Department of Parks and Recreation acquired the unused logging road and nearby headlands in 1995. In 2001, Senator Wesley Chesbro requested a report on the structural condition of the trestle, and state engineers concluded that with some structural modifications it could be safely used by nonmotorized traffic, including pedestrians, bicyclists, and equestrians, to provide easy access from Fort Bragg to the beaches at MacKerricher State Park and to create the key link in one of the longest public trails along the California coast. Senator Chesbro thereupon committed to securing funding through the State Coastal Conservancy or from unallocated park bond funds and gathered department heads from affected state and federal agencies to form a working group to pursue the project. Thanks to Senator Chesbro’s leadership, the Budget Act of 2003 provided $235,000 in Proposition 40 funds for preliminary plans and working drawings to rehabilitate the trestle, in 2004, the trestle project was awarded $1,939,000 in Proposition 40 funds for construction, and in 2006, the project was awarded an additional $1,666,000 to complete the project. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 140, Resolution Chapter 151, on September 5, 2014.

    Bridge 10-161, at 10 Mile River in Mendocino county (001 MEN 69.65), is named the "Frank J. Hyman Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1954, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33 in 1973. Frank J. Hyman activated the Paul Bunyan Association and was instrumental in forming the Noyo Harbor Commission and the Fort Bragg Rural Fire District in the 1950's.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 101 near the southerly end of Marin Peninsula to the vicinity of Valley Ford; from Route 128 near the mouth of the Navarro River to Route 101 near Leggett. Added to the F&E system in 1959 (Chap. 1062).

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.2] From Route 101 near Marin City to Route 101 near Leggett.


Blue Star Memorial Highway Blue Star Memorial Highway

Route 1, from its junction with I-5 at Dana Point in Orange County to its junction with US 101 at Leggett in Mendocino County was designated as a Blue Star Memorial Highway. This designation was made by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 58, Chapter 108, July 29, 2003.

Exit Information Exit Information

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Interregional Route Interregional Route

[SHC 164.10] Entire route.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 1:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The basic routing for what became LRN 1 was first defined in the 1909 First Bond Act, as part of a route from San Francisco to Crescent City. It was extended to the Oregon Border by the 1919 Third Bond Act. Ground was broken for the route in August 1912; a picture of the groundbreaking may be found here.

By 1935, LRN 1 had been codified into the SHC as "from a point in Marin County opposite San Francisco to the Oregon State Line via Crescent City and the Smith River". It was a primary route in its entirety.

LRN 1 corresponds to present-day Route 101 (US 101) and Route 199 (US 199). It was signed as US 101 between the Golden Gate Bridge and the vicinity of Crescent City, and then as US 199 to the Oregon border. Portions of the original route are current Route 254, Route 271, and Route 283.


Acronyms and Explanations:


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