This is a floating closed javascript menu.
Menu


State Shield

State Route 41

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

  1. Rte 41 Seg 1From Route 1 in Morro Bay to Route 46.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    Rtes 41 - 46 - 466In 1934, Route 41 was signed along the route from Cambria to Yosemite Park, via Paso Robles and Fresno. This routing ran along Santa Rosa Creek Road (which was LRN 33) and in 1964 became Route 46. At some point around 1970, it was rerouted onto the current Route 46.

    US Highway Shield Between Route 1 near Morro Bay and US 101 near Atascadero , post-1964 Route 41 was signed as US 466, and was LRN 125. Prior to 1959, it appears that US 466 ran along LRN 125 between Atascadero and Shandon (present-day Route 41). Around 1959, US 466 was rerouted to run co-signed with US 101 to Paso Robles, where it continued along post-1964 Route 46 as US 466 to Shandon (LRN 33). Shandon is currently where Route 46 meets Route 41. US 466 was signed as part of the initial signage of US highways in the mid-1930s. LRN 125 was defined in 1933.

    Between Paso Robles and Shandon, what is now Route 46 was signed as Route 41. It is unclear whether in 1959 LRN 125 between Atascadero and Shandon was resigned as Route 41 when US 466 was shifted to Paso Robles. It sure looks like it. This was part of the original 1934 signage of Route 41.
    (H/T: Tom Fearer (Max Rockatansky) and the crew at AARoads for helping to sort this oute of this out.)

    US Highway Shield Between Shandon and Cholame, the route was cosigned as Route 41/US 466, and was LRN 33. This was part of the original signage of US 466. This is now cosigned Route 41 / Route 46, and legislatively Route 46.

    Status Status

    PPNO 1105, Route 1/Route 41 IC, operational improvements (SB1)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $3.390M in construction funding in FY21-22 for PPNO 1105, Route 1/Route 41 IC, operational improvements (SB1).

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2020 meeting, adjusts the programmed allocation for PPNO 1105 Route 1/41 IC, operational improvements (SB1), moving the programmed funds from FY21-22 to FY22-23.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    A portion of this route in the city of Atascadero once ran along Business Route 101. Until 2003, eastbound Route 41 crossed US 101 and then turned left on El Camino Real/Business Route 101, then turned right on West Mall Road, and continued onto Capistrano Avenue. It then crossed under the railroad, turned right on Sycamore Road, turned left onto the stub of Curbaril Avenue, continued across a bridge which no longer exists, turned left on Rocky Canyon Road, and then turned right on the short portion of Creston Eureka Road and continued east on the existing main portion of Creston Eureka Road. The westbound routing was identical, in reverse. Since then, a new routing has been constructed. This routing includes a bridge across the Salinas River, the connecting road south of that bridge to the intersection of Route 41 and El Camino Real, and the connecting road north of that bridge to the intersection of the short portion of Creston Eureka Road and its main portion. This new section is two miles long, as compared with the old, circuitous, 3.5-mile routing.

    Rte 41 Complete StreetsIn September 2018, there was an update on the Complete Streets project in Atascadero. According to the report delivered by Public Works Director Nick DeBar, the state’s transportation agency, Caltrans, “is currently in the final design phase of the Route 41 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) project that will provide for pedestrian and [Americans with Disabilities Act] ADA improvements.” SHOPP is following a “complete streets” doctrine with emphasis on the safety of all users. That’s especially important, he adds, where the state-controlled roadway also serves as a defacto mainstreet for local communities. Ringing in at over $7 million, the councilmembers reflected that the improvements were a chance to get a great deal of work done by the state for the cost of a relatively minor maintenance agreement, although, it will cost streetside parking near some businesses. The ADA compliant sidewalk improvements alone total $2.6 million. The project, slated for implementation at the end of 2019 according to Caltrans, is broadly described as being oriented around “pedestrian safety and connectivity, including updating ADA ramps and constructing the missing links in the sidewalks along the corridor from El Camino Real to Portola Road.” The Route 41 SHOPP project will allow the City to implement components of the Route 41 Complete Streets Feasibility Study started in 2016. The preferred options included for planning at that time included looking at Atascadero Avenue as a bike corridor to divert that traffic from the already complex intersection and underpass for El Camino Real and US 101 and Route 41.
    (Source: Atascadero News, 9/28/2018)

    In May 2003, the CTC considered relinquishment of the segment from PM SLO 16.7 to PM SLO 16.9 in the City of Atascadero. This is likely an original or bypass segment.

    Realignment in Shandon

    Route 41 Shandon MapIn October 2011, Caltrans and the County of San Luis Obispo have exchanged responsibilities for routes in and near the community of Shandon. At the county's request, the state has transferred to the county a portion of West and East Centre Street that passes through the center of town. In exchange, the state now has responsibility for the portion of West Centre Street to the intersection of Route 46 and McMillan-Canyon Road (~ SLO 41.151 to SLO R42.139). This will allow the county to implement improvements planned for the Shandon area. In the September 2011 CTC meeting records, the following was noted: The County of San Luis Obispo on May 17, 2011 adopted a resolution requesting a transfer of Route 41 location from its existing easterly alignment along West Centre Street and through the Shandon Community to an intersection with Route 46 to the proposed new shorter westerly alignment along West Centre Street. A Route Transfer Report was approved on July 1, 2011. The Department completed a preliminary environmental review and determined that this project would not have a significant adverse impact on the environment. A Categorical Exemption (CE) was signed on September 27, 2010. The background noted:

    The purpose of this route adoption is to establish a new alignment for the portion of Route 41 that passes through the community of Shandon. The County of San Luis Obispo (County) requested a transfer of highway location to allow the County to better implement the Shandon Community Plan and achieve the plans’ goals to reduce interregional traffic through Shandon and to make roadway improvements that do not meet the Department’s State highway design standards. This transfer of alignment will allow existing Route 41 from Post Mile (PM) 41.2 to 43.8 to be relinquished to the County while maintaining the route concept and connectivity of Route 41 to Route 46. On February 27, 1960, the California Highway Commission adopted this portion of Route 41 as a State Highway. Route 41 traverses the counties of San Luis Obispo, Kings, Fresno, Madera and Mariposa beginning in the city of Morro Bay and terminating in Yosemite National Park. The limits of the proposed route transfer are entirely within the county of San Luis Obispo. The route is classified as a primary route, included in the Interregional Road System and has a Truck Advisory Designation. Route 41 within the project limits is a two-lane undivided conventional highway, functionally classified as rural major collector, with 10-foot lanes and a one-foot shoulder in the westbound direction and no shoulders in the eastbound direction. The current easterly alignment of Route 41, from the intersection at West Centre Street to Route 46, runs through the unincorporated community of Shandon. West Centre Street acts as the main street for Shandon and has posted speeds ranging from 55 miles per hour (mph) to 25 mph. There are no designated bike lanes or paths along the existing Route 41 roadway and the lack of paved shoulders requires bike traffic to ride with the flow of traffic on the roadway. Route 41 serves primarily through trips from the west starting at US 101, City of Atascadero, to points east including I-5, Bakersfield, Visalia and Fresno. Local traffic from farms and housing along the route also use this highway to travel to and from the community of Shandon to the city of Atascadero. The proposed new alignment (Route Adoption) begins at the intersection of Route 41 and West Centre Street (PM R41.2) and runs westerly along West Centre Street (formerly known as McMillian Canyon Road) terminating at its junction with Route 46 (PM R42.2). This route is a rural two-lane undivided conventional highway with 11-foot-wide lanes and one-foot-wide shoulders. Posted speeds range from 55 mph to 45 mph prior to horizontal curves. Both the existing and proposed alignments are comparable in geometric cross section and pavement condition. The new westerly alignment of Route 41 provides a more direct connection to Route 46 and is about a mile in length. The existing easterly alignment of Route 41, from the intersection with West Centre Street (PM 41.2) through the Shandon community to just west of the intersection of Route 41 with Route 46 (PM 43.8), would be transferred to the County and is 2.65 miles in length.

    Naming Naming

    Edward Gardner LewisThis segment is officially designated the "E.G. Lewis Highway" (~ SLO 0.000 to SLO R42.139). Edward Gardner Lewis was born in Connecticut in 1869. He purchased the Atascadero Rancho and moved west in 1912. In this role, he became solely responsible for the planning, design, and construction of much of the 40 square mile Atascadero Colony, now known as the City of Atascadero. Mr. Lewis built a printing plant, an all-under-one roof shopping center, schools, a hospital providing full medical coverage for all his employees, paved the state highway, El Camino Real, on its 10 mile stretch through the City of Atascadero, and planted thousands of acres of orchards. He also purchased a three mile strip of land along the Pacific Coast 17 miles west of Atascadero and saw the need for a road from Atascadero to the beach so that the residents of Atascadero would have a direct route to the coast for recreation. This road, Morro Road, is now Route 41. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 76, Chapter 47, in 1994.
    (Image source: Wikipedia)

    Patricia and Robert NimmoThe portion of Route 41 between Creston Road and El Camino Real (map) in San Luis Obispo County (~ SLO 15.953 to SLO 28.1) is named the "Robert and Pat Nimmo Memorial Highway". It was named in honor of Robert and Pat Nimmo. Robert Nimmo was born in Balboa, California in 1922 to a pioneer ranching family. He married Patricia Anne Stone in 1950, and together they had three children, Mary, Augusta, and Kathleen. Robert Nimmo enrolled at the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo in 1940 and later joined the Cal Poly Rodeo Team. He served from 1943 through 1946 as a pilot in the United States Army Air Corps, and from 1950 through 1952 as Company Commander, 161st Ordnance Company. His crew was later assigned to the 448th Bombardment Group, 8th United States Air Force, flying missions over France and Germany during the landing at Normandy on June 6, 1944. He also worked with the California State Military Department in various military assignments from 1955 through 1970. He became a member the California National Guard at Camp San Luis Obispo, later earned the position of commanding officer of San Luis Obispo's 161 Ordnance Depot Company, and later became installation commander at Camp San Luis. He retired with the rank of colonel and in 1964 graduated from the United States Army Command and General Staff College. He was appointed in 1970 by Governor Ronald Reagan to serve as United States property and fiscal officer for the State of California from 1970 through 1972. He served as a California State Assembly Member from 1972 through 1976, representing the counties of Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara, and as a California State Senator from 1976 through 1980, representing the counties of Monterey, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and Santa Cruz. Legislation authored by Robert Nimmo included the development of facilities at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, improvements to schools in the Atascadero Unified School District, conservation efforts devoted to Morro Bay State Park, and the protection of Moonstone Beach. He served on the Assembly Agriculture, Energy and Diminishing Materials, Resources and Land Use, Elections and Reapportionment, Employment and Public Employees, Natural Resources and Conservation, Water, and Retirement Committees, as well as the Senate Rules Finance, Agriculture, Local Government, Water Resources, and Revenue and Taxation Committees. He was appointed by President Ronald Reagan as the Adminstrator of Veteran's Affairs; and served on the Atascadero city council from 1990 to 1994 and as Mayor of Atascadero from 1992 through 1994. Robert Nimmo died on November 7, 2005. As for Patricia Nimmo, she established Nimmo Realty Corp. in Atascadero and worked as a real estate broker for more than 40 years. Patricia Nimmo was a wonderfully energetic participant in the Republican Women's Federation, the Atascadero Chamber of Commerce, and St. William's Church in Atascadero. Patricia Nimmo was the victim of a tragic car accident while walking with her husband near Route 41. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 122, Resolution Chapter 94, on 7/23/2008.
    (Image Source: Atascadero News)

    Historically, this segment is supposedly part of the "Sierra to the Sea" Highway, although other records indicate that name belongs to Route 198.

    Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.4] From Route 1 near Morro Bay to Route 101 near Atascadero.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.3] From Morro Bay to Route 101 near Atascadero. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  2. Rte 41 Seg 2From Route 46 to Route 99 in Fresno.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "Route 46 to Route 99 near Fresno." In 1992, Chapter 1243 changed this to "in Fresno".

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 41 was signed along the route from Cambria to Yosemite Park, via Paso Robles and Fresno. Between the US 466 (now Route 46) divergence near Cholame to US 99 (LRN 4), the route was part of LRN 125, defined in 1933.

    Route 41 originally took a swing southeast of Kettleman City on 25th Avenue and had a couple doglegs south to reach the Kettleman Plains. This routing seemingly lasted until the renumbering in 1964. The Kettlemans are essentially packed up loam soil, common in the West Valley; seismic activity was the likely culprit in their formation; there's little bedrock to get in the way of activities such as scraping chunks off the top to place highway alignments or even drilling down to the oil underneath the upper layers. Originally it would have been cheaper just to follow the topology as it existed; when interregional traffic on Route 41 and other area routes started to increase, it became necessary to do whatever cut & fill was necessary to effect an efficient and faster routing. The coming of I-5 in the mid-late 60's likely was prominent among those factors that brought about the various realignments; the Division of Highways figured that the new freeway would bring additional traffic to the intersecting routes (particularly Route 41), so upgrades were in order. The original alignment can be seen here on this 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Kings County. The following is a summary of the changes in the route from a post by Max Rockatansky on AARoads:
    (Source: Tom Fearer (Max Rockatansky). and Scott Parker on AAroads, April 2017; as well as this thread)

    The original alignment is kind of odd with various 90 degree turns and a weird loop through the Kettelman Hills. Started out on Elm Avenue at Camden Fresno County which carried Route 41 south of the city of Fresno. Camden is one of the San Joaquin Valley towns that really isn't an inhabited place anymore. Supposedly Camden had a post office for a couple years in the early 20th century but today there is nothing but a gas station and a couple abandoned houses. Route 41 ran south on Elm to Excelsior Avenue along the Kings County Line before making right turn to run west. The original alignment on Excelsior runs under the modern Route 41 expressway. Route 41 cut of Excelsior southward again on 19th Avenue at a place called Hub. Supposedly Hub is named after some bar that carries an identical name and for reason it is considered a "place" even back on the 1935 Kings County Map. There was a railroad through Hub in the 1930s which might lend explanation to why it exists as it could have been a railroad siding. About a half mile south of Hub 19th Ave ends at the modern Route 41 expressway, it appears the northbound lanes were the original alignment south to Lemoore. It appears that Hub was bypassed by 1965 as the change in alignment can be seen from 1964 to 1965 on the state highway maps. Modern Route 41 continues as expressway on the alignment of what was 19th Avenue until Hanford/Armona Road (Old Route 198) where it swings west to bypass Lemoore. 19�th Avenue still exists within Lemoore and has a really obvious cut-off stub. Lemoore was likely bypassed by the Route 41 expressway in 1967 as a stub bow of the highway can be seen on the state highway map that wasn't present in 1966. South of Lemoore the modern expressway ends and Route 41 merges back in with the alignment of 19th Avenue. Both Route 41 and Route 198 would have taken an western right hand turn at Jackson Avenue. Route 41 dropped off of Route 198 at 20th Avenue where it took a left turn to head south again. Oddly this 90 degree turn wasn't bypassed until the early 1970s and the change can be seen from the 1970 State Highway Map to 1975. Continuing south on Route 41 the original alignment used to run directly through Stratford and continued straight on 20th Avenue. Original Route 41 then took a right to turn west on Laurel Avenue. Route 41 continued west into downtown Stratford where the southbound/northbound lanes bisected the town square on one-way Main Street before converging again. At the town limits of Stratford Main Street becomes Laurel Avenue and Route 41 continued west. Stratford was bypassed by the modern Route 41 alignment in what appears to be 1957 as a difference can be seen on the state highway map from 1956. Originally Route 41 continued west past the modern highway alignment over the Kings River. Route 41 then took another sudden southward turn left on 22nd Avenue. Route 41 originally ran south to what is still the current southwesterly alignment to Kettleman City. The bypass for Laurel Avenue and 22nd Avenue was opened between 1942 and 1944. Route 41 from 22nd Avenue through Kettleman City is essentially the same as it always been. Kettleman City was settled in 1929 near the site of a ferry after Tulare Lake had largely dried out. The big draw was the oil fields up in the Kettelman Hills. Despite the name Kettleman City isn't an incorporated place and is an infamous speed trap for Route 41. Originally Route 41 continued south on 25th Avenue here instead of directly straight towards I-5. There isn't much to see the way of the old alignment of Route 41 as the roadway on 25th was apparently upgraded during the construction of I-5. Later construction of the California Aqueduct led to the original alignment getting cut-off in the Kettelman Hills. Route 41 would have followed 25th Avenue along side the California Aqueduct. Beyond that looking east in the low lying farm land was all once Tulare Lake which was once the largest fresh water lake west of the Great Lakes. Apparently Tulare Lake was measured at 570 square miles in 1849 to a high or 690 square miles in 1879. Tulare Lake was fed by the Kings, Kaweah, Tule, and Kern River basins which were largely engineered for irrigation or flood control. A portion of modern Route 41 actually was within in the high crest of the lake. The last major flood of Tulare Lake was back in 1938 and it largely has remained farm land ever since. The last state highway map to show Tulare Lake was in 1922 where it can be seen directly south of Stratford. Modern Route 41 basically is a direct southwest shot through the Kettelman Hills whereas the original alignment crossed the location of the California Aquaduct and curved through the terrain. Most of the original alignment is inaccessible save for a small strip at the gate of the Aquaduct. Apparently the original alignment of Route 41 still appears as "Old State Highway" on modern maps and can be easily seen from Google. The original alignment appears to have always been dirt/gravel and was replaced in 1960. Even the new alignment Route 41 uses today through the Kettleman Hills doesn't appear to have been paved along with the Kettleman Plain until 1962. Directly south of the Kettelman Hills, Route 41 rejoined the more or less current alignment approaching Route 33. Looking north that the original alignment of Route 41 may be seen following the power lines to the Waste Management dump site. South from this point to Route 46 the alignment of Route 41 is largely the same as it always has been sans for one difference. For whatever reason in this valley the original alignment was replaced with a new road directly to east of the old one. The original Route 41 has been ground down by a grading machine in the somewhat recent past and has evidence of stray strips of asphalt. the old alignment actually crosses a gas station parking lot and even Route 33 before it merges back in with the modern highway.
    (Source: AARoads Discussion, April 2017)

    In Fresno in 1938, Route 41 entered from the South along Elm Avenue and C Street to Fresno St., along Fresno St. to Broadway, and then N to Stanislaus St, heading E to Blackstone Ave and then out of town to Yosemite.
    (Source: 1938 Map posted on FB by Joel Windmiller)

    Status Status

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following NEW Long Lead Roadway Preservation item of interest: 06-Kings-41 PM 0.0/15.5 PPNO 6988 Proj ID 0619000004 EA 0Y170. Route 41 near Kettleman City, from Kern County line to 0.5 mile south of Route 5. Rehabilitate pavement, construct rumble strips, and rehabilitate sign structures and drainage systems. Note: Complexity and duration of
    environmental permitting due to presence of biological and cultural resources. Programmed in FY24-25, with construction scheduled to start in January 2025. Total project cost is $24,490K, with $18,530K being capital (const and right of way) and $5,960K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.). Only the allocation of $1,400K for the PA&ED phase is allocated.
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In March 2018, the CTC approved $3,231,000 in SHOPP funding for Kings 06-Kin-41 8.1/R48.3 On Route 41 In and near Kettleman City and Lemoore, from Route 33 to the Fresno County line at various locations. Outcome/Output: Improve safety by constructing shoulder and centerline rumble strips to reduce the number and severity of collisions.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, March 2018 Agenda Item 2.5f)

    Bernard Drive Roundabout - 06-Kin-41 16.6/16.9

    Bernard Drive Roundabout - 06-Kin-41 16.6/16.9In December 2019, the CTC had on its agenda the following SHOPP amendment: 06-Kin-41 16.6/16.9 PPNO 7031. Proj ID 0619000078. EA 0X950. Route 41 Near Kettleman City, from 0.1 mile south to 0.2 mile north of Bernard Drive. Construct roundabout. (Additional $1,700,000 from local contribution). Total Cost: $14,400K. Begin Const: 3/29/2024.
    (Source: December 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1a) Item 22)

    In December 2019, the CTC authorized the following pre-construction allocation: 06-Kin-41 16.6/16.9. PPNO 7031 Proj ID 0619000078 EA 0X950. Route 41 Near Kettleman City, from 0.1 mile south to 0.2 mile north of Bernard Drive. Construct roundabout. (Additional $1,700,000 from local contribution). (Concurrent amendment under SHOPP Amendment 18H-013; December 2019.) PA&ED $1,700,000
    (Source: December 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) #15)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Collision Reduction item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 06-Kings-41 PM 16.6/16.9 PPNO 7031 Proj ID 0619000078 EA 0X950. Route 41 near Kettleman City, from 0.1 mile south to 0.2 mile north of Bernard Drive. Construct roundabout. (Additional $1,700,000 from local contribution). Programmed in FY23-24, with construction scheduled to start in March 2024. Total project cost is $14,400K, with $6,600K being capital (const and right of way) and $7,800K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.),
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In March 2016. it was reported that Kings County had a 20-year wish list totaling approximately $1.2 billion to transition a number of highways to four lanes: Route 43 from Selma to Corcoran; Route 41 from Kettleman City (~ KIN 17.905) to Lemoore (~ KIN R40.037) and Route 198 from Naval Air Station Lemoore to I-5. However, Kings County is only expected to get $3.5 million from the State Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP) designed for capacity increasing projects in the 2013-2014 period.
    (Source: Andy3175 @ AAroad, March 2016; HartfordSentinal, 9/7/2013).

    Kings River Bridge Replacement 06-KIN-41 30/6/33.0

    Kings River Bridge Replacement 06-KIN-41 30/6/33.0The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 6873. 06-Kings-41 30.6/33.0. Route 41 In and near Stratford, from 22nd Street to Laurel Avenue at the Kings River Bridge No. 45-0007. Replace 73 year old bridge due to extensive superstructure and substructure distress and susceptibility to liquefaction. Begin Con: 5/11/2022. Total Project Cost: $33,294.

    In December 2019, the CTC had the following SHOPP amendment on its agenda: 06-Kin-41 30.6/33.0 PPNO 6873 Proj ID 0616000208 EA 0V110. In and near Stratford, from 22nd Street to Laurel Avenue at the Kings River Bridge No. 45-0007. Replace 73 year old bridge due to extensive superstructure and substructure distress and susceptibility to liquefaction. Total Cost: $33,294K $28,120K. Note: Decrease in construction capital and construction support is due to a value analysis study identifying an alternative detour that would avoid constructing and removing a temporary detour. Increase in R/W capital is due to a change in structure design impacting environmental mitigation and biological bank credits for Swaison's Hawk.
    (Source: December 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1d) Item 26)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Bridge Preservation item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 06-Kings-41 PM 30.6/33.0 PPNO 6873 Proj ID 0616000208 EA 0V110. Route 41 in and near Stratford, from 22nd Street to Laurel Avenue at the Kings River Bridge No. 45-0007. Replace 73-year old bridge due to extensive superstructure and substructure distress and susceptibility to liquefaction. Programmed in FY21-22, with construction scheduled to start in March 2022. Total project cost is $28,120K, with $18,620K being capital (const and right of way) and $9,500K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.), However, $4,100K for the Construction Support and $18,500K for the Construction Phases has not been authorized.
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In November 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Kings County that will construct left turn lanes in both the northbound and southbound directions on Route 41 near the city of Lemoore (~ KIN R40.961). The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. Total estimated project cost is $2,753,000 for capital and support. The project will require construction activities in the habitat of the Tipton kangaroo rat and the San Joaquin kit fox, both of which are state and federally listed threatened and endangered species. The project contains mitigation measures to reduce impacts to these species to a less than significant level.

    In January 2012, the CTC approved $10.1 million for a project on Route 41 near Lemoore that will raise the roadway profile, widen shoulders and repave the 5.2 lane-miles worth of the roadway between Hanford-Armona Road and Grangeville Boulevard (~ KIN R42.142 to KIN R44.149). The project will improve ride quality and reduce the potential for flooding.

    Excelsior Expressway

    Excelsior Expressway 06-Fre-041 0.0/7.1The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to restore funding for PPNO 6705, 06-Fre-041 0.0/7.1, Near the city of Fresno, from the Kings County line to Elkhorn Avenue. Widen from 2-lane to 4-lane expressway. This project would eliminate the last two-lane segment of Route 41 between the City of Fresno and Route 198 in the City of Lemoore, a distance of over thirty miles. The project will also improve the regional movement of freight and goods, and local farmto market travel. The project would relieve congestion, separate oncoming traffic with a divided median, and breakup traffic queues by providing major passing opportunities. Route 41 is an Interregional High Emphasis Focus Route corridor essential to the economic development of the San Joaquin Valley. It is consistent with the Transportation Concept Report, the Interregional Transportation Strategic Plan, and the Fresno County Regional Transportation Plan. A four-lane expressway would increase caacity and bring the level of service (LOS) from "D" to "B" during the 20-year design period, which would improve traffic safety and maintain route consistency. Also, portions of the highway in the project limits lie within the 100-year flood-plain. This project will improve cross drainage in order to minimize flooding. The STIP appears to restore $2,000K in R/W funding for FY18-19.

    Fresno noted, is its planning document: This project will close a gap and upgrade approximately six miles of two-lane conventional highway to a divided four-lane expressway from the Kings County line to Elkhorn Avenue. Route 41 is an Interregional High Emphasis Focus Route corridor and is in the Caltrans’ Interregional Transportation Strategic Plan, part of the National Network of truck routes, and included in the Caltrans Highway Freight Network. The project is anticipated to cost $62 million.Caltrans has proposed programming the preconstruction phases of this project in the ITIP in 2018/19 as a restored project that was deleted during the 2016 STIP cycle and requested Fresno COG partner with a contribution from the RTIP. Caltrans will provide $8 million for PS&E and right of way with ITIP and Fresno COG will provide $2 million in RTIP for ROW. The combination of RTIP and ITIP funds will produce a shovel ready project in 2023. The region has also agreed to reserve $4 million in future county shares for when Caltrans programs construction in the ITIP.
    (Source: Fresno COG, December 2017)

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which included $2,000K in programmed funding for PPNO 6705 "Excelsior Expressway (RIP)". It also included PPNO 6705, Excelsior Expressway (IIP, in the Interregional portion of the STIP with no change in programming: $8,000K in prior year funding.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In March 2020, the CTC amended the following project into the 2018 SHOPP: 06-Fre-41 R1.8/R2.2 PPNO 7040 ProjID 0619000229 EA 1A290 Route 41 near Camden, from 0.2 mi S to 0.2 mi N of Mount Whitney Ave. Construct roundabout. Total cost: $13,750K. BC 11/27/2023. Construction and R/W acquisition not yet programmed. The CTC also approved the following financial allocation: 06-Fre-41 PM R1.8/R2.2. PPNO 7040. ProjID 0619000229. EA 1A290. On Route 41 near Camden, from 0.2 mile south to 0.2 mile north of Mount Whitney Avenue. Construct roundabout. (Concurrent Amendment under SHOPP Amendment 18H-015; March 2020.) Financial allocation: PA&ED $1,200,000. As this project was amended into the SHOPP in March, it was no surprise that it was carried over into the 2020 SHOPP.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1a) Item #22, 2.5b.(2a) #14; May 2020 SHOPP)

    In January 2019, the CTC added the following into the SHOPP: 06-Fre-41 M6.0/R20.1 PPNO 6962. Proj ID 0618000194 Route 41 Near Easton, from Elkhorn Avenue to North Avenue. Construct rumble strips. Begin Construction: 1/19/2021 Total est. cost: $2,930,000. The CTC also approved the following support allocation: 06-Fre-41 M6.0/R20. PPNO 6962. Proj ID 0618000194. Route 41 Near Easton, from Elkhorn Avenue to North Avenue. Construct rumble strips. Concurrent amendment under SHOPP Amendment 18H-007; January 2019. Allocation: PA&ED $400,000. This project was also carried over into the 2020 SHOPP. Est. construction start is January 2021.
    (Source: January 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a(1) Item 13; January2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) Item 16)

    In March 2020, the CTC amended the following project into the 2018 SHOPP: 06-Fre-41 M5.7/R7.1 PPNO 7042 ProjID 0619000230 EA 1A300 Route 41 near Wildflower from 0.3 mi S to 1 mi N of East Elkhorn Ave. Construct roundabout. Total cost: $13,600K. BC 11/27/2023. Construction and R/W acquisition not yet programmed. The CTC also approved the following financial allocation: 06-Fre-41 PM M5.7/R7.1. PPNO 7042. ProjID 0619000230. EA 1A300. Route 41 near Wildflower, from 0.3 mile south to 1.0 mile north of East Elkhorn Avenue. Construct roundabout. (Concurrent Amendment under SHOPP Amendment 18H-015; March 2020.) Financial allocation: PA&ED $1,200,000. As this project was amended into the SHOPP in March, it was no surprise that it was carried over into the 2020 SHOPP.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1a) #23, 2.5b.(2a) #15; May 2020 SHOPP)

    Naming Naming

    Historically, this segment is supposedly part of the "Sierra to the Sea" Highway, although other records indicate that name belongs to Route 198.

    James Dean Memorial JunctionThe Route 41/Route 46 junction near Cholame (~ SLO 43.888) is named the "James Dean Memorial Junction". James Byron Dean was one of the most admired movie stars of all time and an icon of American culture. He was born on February 8, 1931, in Marion, Indiana; and later moved to California and attended Santa Monica City College and the University of California at Los Angeles. He is best known for his roles in "East of Eden," "Rebel Without a Cause," and "Giant," and also appeared on television shows and in a Broadway play. As a successful actor, he attained cult status in little more than a year's time, personifying the restless American youth of the mid-1950s. He was tragically killed on September 30, 1955, in an automobile crash on Route 46 in San Luis Obispo County while traveling in his automobile on the way to a racing event. Just two hours before the fatal crash, Dean was pulled over for speeding on Route 99 outside of Bakersfield. Retired officer Otie Hunter clocked Dean's car at 70 miles an hour. Dean told the officer he had bought the car just a few days before and was headed to the Monterey area to compete in a car race. He was given a warning. Around 9:00 PM, it was reported that James Dean had been killed in a car wreck. This interchange, which is near where he was killed, is still regularly visited by his fans. Dean's family, friends, and lawmakers lobbied for the designation, and on September 30, 2005 (50 years to the day he died), the state of California posted signs renaming the intersection where he crashed his silver Porsche, the James Dean Memorial Junction. Dean's close cousin, Marcus Winslow, accepted an official resolution and placed a rose at the accident scene. "On September 30,1955, at approximately 5:45 p.m. only a few feet from where we're standing here, Jimmy's life came to an abrupt and sorrowful end," said Winslow. Private donations paid for the two $400 signs, with the hope that the signs will serve as a safety reminder to drivers. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 52, Chapter 107, on August 15, 2002.
    (Image sources: Reddit, History Channel)

    Dep Sheriff Allen Thomas SharraThe portion of Route 41 between Lincoln Avenue (KIN 32.420) and Lansing Avenue (KIN 33.590) is named the Kings County Deputy Sheriff Allen Thomas Sharra Memorial Highway. Named in memory of Deputy Sheriff Allen Thomas Sharra, who was born in March 1968 in Pittsburgh, PA. Upon graduating from high school, Allen joined the United States Navy, where he served as an avionics mechanic until August 1995, when he was honorable discharged; after his discharge Allen continued to serve the country as a sergeant in the National Guard. While serving in the United States Navy, Allen was stationed at Naval Air Station Lemoore in California and attended West Hills College Lemoore from 1991 to 1994, majoring in Administration of Justice. In 1993, Allen became a reserve police officer for the City of Huron and attended the Tulare-Kings Counties Basic Peace Officer Academy at College of the Sequoias in 1998 and graduated in December 1998. Upon graduation from the police academy, Allen was hired by the County of Kings in April 1999 as a deputy sheriff, where he was assigned to headquarters patrol out of the City of Hanford, California. Deputy Sheriff Allen Thomas Sharra was killed in an automobile accident on December 27, 1999 in the line of duty when his patrol car ran off a roadway and into a ditch; an Explorer scout who was on a ride along with Deputy Sharra at the time was able to radio for help, but Deputy Sharra was pronounced dead at the scene. Deputy Sharra was responding to assist another officer who had located a stolen car in a cotton field; the farm road that Deputy Sharra was driving down made a sudden 90-degree turn without any warning signs; the cruiser left the roadway and struck an embankment; the Explorer scout was injured in the accident and transported to a local hospital in stable condition. Deputy Sharra had served in law enforcement for nine years. Named by ACR 38, Res. Chapter 106, Statutes of 2019 on 07/08/19
    (Image sources: Hanford Sentinel, OfficerDown Memorial Page)

    The portion of Rout 41 between Elkhorn Avenue and Jensen Ave located in the City of Fresno (~ FRE M6.088 to FRE R21.109) is officially named the "Donald E. DeMers Highway". This segment was named in honor of Donald E. DeMers, who served as the first and only Executive Director of the Fresno County Transportation Authority. Mr. Donald E. DeMers graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of North Dakota in 1966, with a bachelor's degree in Political Science; he earned a master's degree in Political Science and Public Administration from the University of North Dakota in 1971. During his tenure at the Fresno County Transportation Authority, Donald E. DeMers led the effort to construct freeways on Route 41, Route 180, and Route 168. Fresno County was one of the first counties statewide to become a self-help county, taxing itself to augment road construction throughout the county; Mr. DeMers led the county's representation on a committee that was formed of fellow self-help counties called the Self-Help Counties coalition throughout his time with the Fresno County Transportation Authority. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 37, Resolution Chapter 138, on 9/8/2006.

    The portion of Route 41 from the intersection with Elkhorn Avenue to the intersection with Ventura Avenue (~ FRE M6.088 to FRE R23.242) and from the intersection with Herndon Avenue to the Madera County Line (~FRE R30.468 to MAD 0.000) is named the "Yosemite Freeway". Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Chapter 85, 1997.

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.4] From Route 46 near Cholame to Route 33.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.3] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. Constructed to freeway standards from 3 mi S of Route 99 to Route 99.


  3. Rte 41 Seg 3From Route 99 in Fresno to Yosemite National Park.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(c) Route 99 near Fresno to Route 180. (d) Route 180 to Yosemite National Park.". In 1986, Chapter 928 combined these segments into "(c) Route 99 in Fresno to Yosemite National Park."

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 41 was signed along the route from Cambria to Yosemite Park, via Paso Robles and Fresno.This segment was was LRN 125, defined in 1933.

    Before the current routing was established, Route 41 entered via Elm Avenue, then followed C Street to Fresno Street, where it ran with Route 180 multiplexed northeast to Broadway (US 99), then Route 41 continued north with US 99 to Stanislaus Street, and then north on Stanislaus to Blackstone Avenue.

    Tom Fearer (Max Rockatansky) did some more investigation into the historical routing of Route 41 in Fresno on the Old CA 180 and CA 41 surface alignments in Fresno post in Gribblenation, and came to the following conclusions (his post has detailed maps):

    • 1934 Southbound:
      • Blackstone Avenue
      • Stanislaus Street
      • Broadway Street on a brief multiplex of US 99
      • Fresno Street on a multiplex with Route 180
      • C Street splitting south from Route 180
      • Elm Avenue
    • 1956:
      • Route 41 was split onto the same Stanislaus Street/Tuolumne one-way configuration as Route 180.
      • Route 41 was also split between Blackstone Avenue and Abby Street from downtown north just a small ways past Olive Avenue.
      • Blackstone Avenue carried southbound traffic while Abby Street carried northbound.
    • 1957:
      • Route 41 was extended south on Broadway Street away from Fresno Street to Ventura Street. Route 41 utilized Ventura Street to reach C Street and Elm Avenue. This configuration lasted only a year as in 1958, Route 41 was moved to O Street for Southbound traffic and P Street for northbound which multiplexed CA 180 to Ventura Street.
    • Route 41 continued to use Ventura Street to reach C Street until the highway was ultimately upgraded to a freeway in the late 1970s and 1980s.

    The original crossing of the San Joaquin River on what would become Route 41 was the 1889 Lanes Bridge. The original Lanes Bridge was located about a mile up river north of the 1941 bridge roughly where Lanes Road ends today at the San Joaquin River. The original Lanes Bridge was first called the Yosemite Bridge but soon became known as the Lanes Bridge due Lanes Station which was a general store in close proximity which opened in 1894. In 1917 the original Lanes Bridge had a partial collapse but was quickly repaired. By 1934 the original Lanes Bridge had become part of Route 41 but was considered obsolete even for the standards of the time. The original 1934 alignment of Route 41 used modern Friant Road and Lanes Road to cross the San Joaquin River via the original Lanes Bridge. The original Lanes Bridge was heavily damaged in a 1937 flood along the San Joaquin River but was once again repaired. It wasn't until the summer of 1940 when an overloaded truck crashed through the road deck of that the use of the original Lanes Bridge ended. Route 41 traffic was temporarily rerouted to Friant over the 1906 North Fort Bridge until the 1941 Lanes Bridge was opened. The original alignment of Route 41 was routed along what is now a long abandoned alignment of Abby Street in the River Park neighborhood of northern Fresno (near the annexed community of Pinedale). Abby Street once crossed over what is now the Route 41 freeway to Friant Road. Route 41 followed an older alignment of Friant Road which has been repurposed as part of the Lewis E. Eaton Trail along a ridge above the San Joaquin River northward to Rice Road. Route 41 followed Rice Road to Lanes Road which approached the 1889 Lanes Bridge on the south band of the San Joaquin River.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog: 1889 Lanes Bridge Location (Old California State Route 41), 4/17/2019)

    According to Tom Fearer, from Coarsegold the route of LRN 125 originally took the following route towards Sugar Pine:
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog, "Old California State Route 41 on Road 425C, Road 425B, and Road 425A/Old Yosemite Road", 7/28/2020)

    • Road 425C in Deadwood Gulch over modern Route 41 to Road 425B.
    • Road 425B atop Deadwood Hill downhill to Road 426.
    • Road 426 into Oakhurst over modern Route 41 to Road 425A.
    • Road 425A and Old Yosemite Road.

    The 1935 Division of Highways Map of Madera County shows Route 41/LRN 125 bypassing Road 425A/Old Yosemite Road in favor of it's current alignment north of Oakhurst.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog, "Old California State Route 41 on Road 425C, Road 425B, and Road 425A/Old Yosemite Road", 7/28/2020)

    It appears that Route 41 had a different routing in 1935 near Oakhurst: On the 1935 Map of Madera County, the current crossing crossing of the Fresno River west of the confluence with China Creek is instead east of the confluence crossing on what are now Road 425B and Road 426 in Oakhurst. Route 41 can be seen traversing southbound from Oakhurst on Road 425B towards Coarsegold on the 1935 Madera County Map.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog: Old California State Route 41 on Road 425B, 2/2/2018)

    Status Status

    CalTrans is in the midst of a number of projects to upgrade Route 41 in Fresno and the Fresno vicinity. Fresno has long had a deficit of freeways. This changed in 1986 when the electorate in Fresno County voted to raise their sales tax by .5% for twenty years to fund road improvements. At the time of the measure, Freeway Route 41 went only as far north as Bullard Avenue. The first project was to build the freeway to Woodward Park, just shy of the San Joaquin River (and the county line). In 1997, the Route 41 freeway was extended as far south as North Avenue. The plans are to have it expressway grade from there to Conejo or Mendocino Avenues (near Caruthers).

    According to Joe Rouse in May 2001:

    I traveled the 41 freeway from Jensen Ave. (~ FRE R21.113) north into Madera County. The new freeway extends quite a ways south of Jensen but I didn't have time to travel it. There are still Route 41 shields on Route 99 between Jensen and the interchange with the Route 41 freeway. Prior to the completion of the Route 41 freeway south of Route 99, Jensen Ave. was designated as Route 41 between Route 99 and Elm Ave.

    The extension north into Madera County starts on the west side of the old highway. Parts of the old road remain there, including the San Joaquin River bridge. The new freeway is 4 lanes but the new bridges across the river look like they are built to accommodate 3 lanes in each direction. The old road continues north, parallel to the new freeway, up to a large interchange that looks out of place since it is in an area with very little development..only the Valley Children's Hospital, is out there. However, this interchange has signals and ramp metering. Future development is apparently being planned. Just north of there the freeway becomes a super-2 and runs east of the old alignment, which has been renamed and signed as Business Route 41. The super-2 rejoins the old alignment at Avenue 12.

    2007 CMIA. The following project on Route 41 in Fresno County was submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding: expansion of the route to eight lanes from Divisadero to Shields ($95M) (~ FRE R23.704 to FRE R26.466). Not recommended for funding.

    In July 2010, the California Transportation Commission approved the last bit of funding for the Route 41/Route 168/Route 180 interchange project (~ FRE R24.507), which will build a system of new ramps with overpasses to separate streams of traffic that now merge and diverge in an often chaotic scene. Two other project on Route 41 also are getting under way. One adds a new lane to the outside between Herndon and Bullard avenues to better accommodate entering and exiting traffic. The other involves installing ramp meters at four sites between Ashlan and Bullard avenues.

    In November 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Fresno County that will construct new braided ramps between Route 41 and Route 168 in the city of Fresno (~ FRE R24.522). The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $55,000,000 for capital and support. The project will mitigate potential impacts to noise to a less than significant level by building soundwalls at four locations.

    In August 2011, it was reported that Caltrans completed installation of three ramp-metering systems: one at McKinley Avenue (~ FRE R25.28), and the other two at Shields Avenue (~ FRE R26.466). The average daily traffic volume on Route 41 at each of these locations is about 125,000 vehicles. The $2.5 million project was financed entirely by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act).

    Shaw Avenue Widening (06-Fre-41, PM R27.6/R28.6)

    Shaw Avenue Widening (06-Fre-41, PM R27.6/R28.6)The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 6879. 06-Fresno-41 R27.6/R28.3. On Route 41 Near Fresno, from the northbound Ashlan Avenue onramp to the northbound Shaw Avenue offramp. Construct northbound auxiliary lane and add an additional lane to the Shaw Avenue offramp. Begin Con: 2/18/2022. Total Project Cost: $22,957K.

    In June 2018, the City of Fresno posted that they will be widening the northbound off-ramp of Route 41 at Shaw Avenue to provide an improved travel way for motorists beginning Monday, June 4 through Thursday, September 13, 2018. There will be intermittent lane closures on the northbound off-ramp and on eastbound Shaw Avenue.
    (Source: City of Fresno Facebook Page, 6/1/2018)

    In January 2020, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project located on Route 41 in the City of Fresno, Fresno County that proposes to construct a northbound auxiliary lane.  The proposed project will also widen the Shaw Avenue northbound off-ramp and construct a sound wall along the Shaw Avenue off-ramp. This project addresses the increase in traffic congestion and rear-end collisions at this project location. This project would improve traffic operations on mainline Route 41 and the northbound Route 41 off-ramp to Shaw Avenue. The estimated total cost of the proposed project is $23.1
    million and is fully funded. The project is currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for an estimated total of $23.0 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in 2021-22. The CTC also approved the following pre-construction allocation: 06-Fre-41 R27.6/R28.3. PPNO 6879. ProjID 0617000103. EA 0W170. Route 41 near Fresno, from the northbound Ashlan Avenue onramp to the northbound Shaw Avenue  offramp. Construct northbound auxiliary lane and add an additional lane to the Shaw Avenue offramp.  (Concurrent consideration of funding under  Resolution E-20-05; January 2020.) PS&E $2,400,000 R/W Sup $150,000
    (Source: January 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1), 2.5b.(2a) #16)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Mobility item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 06-Fresno-41 PM R27.6/R28.3 PPNO 6879 Proj ID 0617000103 EA 0W170. Route 41 Near Fresno, from the northbound Ashlan Avenue onramp to the northbound Shaw Avenue offramp. Construct northbound auxiliary lane and add an additional lane to the Shaw Avenue offramp. Programmed in FY21-22, with construction scheduled to start in April 2022. Total project cost is $22,957K, with $14,707K being capital (const and right of way) and $8,250K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.),
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    [TCRP 95]Improvement of the Friant Road Interchange (~ FRE R31.718) in Fresno, including addition of an auxiliar lane and operational improvements, is TCRP Project #95. The project is to improve the operation of northbound Route 41 from Herndon Avenue to Friant Road. The project is to construct a median lane from El Paso Avenue to Friant Road, construct an auxiliary lane from Herndon Avenue to Friant Road, construct a second auxiliary lane from El Paso Avenue to Friant Road, and widen Friant Road to accommodate the two auxiliary lanes. Due to a reduction in cost for Right-of-Way, in February 2006 the CTC considered redistribution of $424,000 in TCRP funds to ongoing work in Plans, Specifications, and Estimates (PS&E). PS&E was completed in August 2006, and expenditures were lower than originally estimated. The $230,000 surplus is needed for Construction due to increased cost in asphalt concrete and structural concrete. The project is being constructed in two segments. The first segment, funded with $9,376,000 from the State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP), will be completed in December 2006. Construction of the second segment will be funded with $8,300,000 in TCRP funds. Estimated completion is in FY 2010/2011. The mitigated negative environmental impact declaration was recieved in July 2007.

    In September 2005, the CTC considered a proposal to relinquish the segement of former Route 41 (bypassed by the freeway construction) from 0.1 mile south of the Perrin Road Undercrossing to the San Joaquin River Bridge, consisting of superseded highway right of way. (~ FRE 33.085)

    In January 2015, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will seismically retrofit the Route 41 San Joaquin River Bridge (~ FRE 033.37) near Herndon and upgrade the railings on both this bridge and the San Joaquin River Overflow Bridge (~ MAD 000.08). The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $6,029,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    Madera 41 South Expressway (06-Mad-41, PM 1.15/7.6)

    Madera 41 S Expwy (06-Mad-41 1.15/7.6)2007 CMIA. The following project on Route 41 in Madera County was submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding: widening Route 41 between Ave 11 and Ave 12 (including an Ave 12 interchange) ($44.8M requested) (~ MAD 2.278 to MAD 3.226) . Not recommended for funding.

    In May 2020, the CTC approved a new public road connection for the following project for which a Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) has been completed: Route 41 in Madera County. Construct a four-lane divided expressway in Madera County. (PPNO 0R040) (06-Mad-41, PM 1.15/7.6) The project is located in Madera County and proposes to improve 6.1 miles of Route 41 from 0.8 mile south of the Avenue 11 undercrossing to 1.4 miles north of Avenue 15. The purpose of the proposed project is to address the increased traffic associated with existing and planned development along Route 41 to and from Fresno and Madera Counties. It also would relieve congestion and improve traffic flow as well as identify a route for future transportation projects. The project is funded through local funds originating with Madera County for a total of $126,000,000. Construction is estimated to begin Fiscal Year 2022-2023.
    (Source: May 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.2c.(7))

    Coursegold Passing Lanes (MAD 11.7/13.6)

    Rte 41 Passing Lanes near MaderaIn December 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct passing lanes, outside shoulders, a median barrier, and rumble strips on a portion of Route 41 near Madera (MAD 11.7/13.6). The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $22,148,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funds, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program.

    In March 2015, the CTC amended the funding allocation for the Madera 41 Passing Lane. Near Coarsegold, from 0.3 mile north of Road 208 to 2.2 miles north of Road 208 (~ MAD 11.698 to MAD 13.598). Construct passing lane. CON ENG: $0 $2,577,000 CONST$11,047,000 $8,470,000.

    In September 2007, the CTC approved a project near Coarsegold (~ MAD 28.068) for future consideration of funding. This project in Merced County will make improvements to a 198 acre parcel to be used for current and future mitigation near Coarsegold. The project is fully funded in the District 6 Minor Program.

    In June 2020, the CTC approved the following CONST allocation for a locally-administered LPP (Formulaic/Competitive) project: $5,000,000. 06-Mad-41 35.4/36.2. PPNO 06-6968 ProjID 0618000047 EA 0X410. Oakhurst Midtown Connector. Oakhurst in north-central Madera County. Construct a new, two-lane road connecting Route 41 with Indian Springs Road. The new road will include a bridge over Nelder Creek approximately 365 feet in length. The project also includes new intersection construction at Route 41 and Midtown Connector, including installation of a traffic signal and widening of SR 41 from two to four travel lanes for 1,742 feet. The project includes intersection improvements at Road 27 (High School Road) and Indian Springs Road, including installation of a threeway signal and two left-turn lanes on Road 427.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5s.(2b) #2)

    General Route 41

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #287: Rehabilitation, repair, and/or reconstruction of deficient two-lane roads that connect to I-5, Route 180, Route 41 and Route 99 throughout Fresno County. See also HPP #3798. $2,800,000.
    • High Priority Project #3798: Rehabilitation, repair, and/or reconstruction of deficient two-lane roads that connect to I-5, Route 180, Route 41 and Route 99 throughout Fresno County. This seems to be supplemental funding for HPP #287. $1,500,000.

    Naming Naming

    The portion of Route 41 from the intersection with Elkhorn Avenue to the intersection with Ventura Avenue (~ FRE M6.088 to FRE R23.242) and from the intersection with Herndon Avenue to the Medera County Line (~FRE R30.468 to MAD 0.000) is named the "Yosemite Freeway". Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Chapter 85, 1997.

    Dwight D EisenhowerThe segment of Route 41 from Golden State Boulevard to Bullard Avenue (~ FRE R22.195 to FRE R29.448) in the County of Fresno is officially named the "Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Freeway". Dwight Eisenhower was the 34th President of the United States, and is believed to be the driving force behind the interstate system. He died in 1969. For more information, see President Eisenhower's official biography or visit the Eisenhower Library. Originally, this segment was from Ventura Avenue to Herndon Avenue, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 42, Chapter 141, in 1971. It was redesignated to be from Golden State Boulevard to Bullard Avenue by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 45, Resolution Chapter 1, on February 1, 2016.
    (Image source: Wikipedia)

    Joe LevyThe portion of Route 41 from Bullard Avenue to Herndon Avenue in the County of Fresno (~ FRE R29.448 to FRE R30.468) is officially named the "Joe Levy Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Joe Levy, a prominent Fresno businessman and civic leader, whose commitment to the Fresno area created an enduring legacy of community and humanitarian service. His contributions include championing women’s professional advancement and active involvement in local organizations such as the Boy Scouts of America, the American Red Cross, the Fresno Arts Council, and the Fresno Area Chamber of Commerce. Levy was born in January 1932, in Fresno, and died in February 2014. Levy graduated from Fresno High School in 1950, and he attended the University of Southern California, Marshall School of Business, where he graduated in 1954. Levy began his career with Gottschalks as an Assistant Merchandise Manager in 1956, became a Merchandise Manager in 1960, and became Executive Vice President in 1972. He was named CEO and Chairman in 1982, and was the third generation of the Gottschalk family to hold a top executive post. Levy returned to Fresno and began his career with Gottschalks, Gottschalks had one store in downtown Fresno. Under his watch, he helped the independent store expand across Central California and the West Coast, growing to about 80 stores and 29 specialty stores in six western states. Under Levy’s guidance and personal involvement, the company became renowned for its outstanding community service and steadfast commitment to customer service and high business ethics. Levy strongly supported civic participation among Gottschalk employees to support an array of local organizations and programs, including, but not limited to, the annual “Coats for Kids” campaign. Levy’s list of leadership positions and accolades is lengthy. He won the Leon S. Peters Award in 1989, the top honor for service to the community recognized by the Fresno Chamber of Commerce. A former president of the Fresno Chamber of Commerce, he was active in the Downtown Association of Fresno, the Boys Club of Fresno County, the Fresno Arts Museum, the Fresno Metropolitan Museum, and the Craig School of Business at Fresno State. He received other awards including the City of Hope’s Spirit of Life Award and the Fresno Advertising Federation Foundation’s J.U. Berry Lifetime Achievement Award. He was inducted into the Clovis Hall of Fame and in 1990 was voted third in the Fresno Bee’s Top 10 Guiding Forces in Fresno with the headline “Joe Levy loves sales but reveres highways.” Leadership positions he held include serving on the Board of Trustees during the founding of the University of California, Merced, the Business Advisor Council for the Craig School of Business at Fresno State, the Executive Committee for the Fresno Business Council, as a board member for the Fresno Economic Development Corporation, a board member for the San Joaquin Political Academy, a cofounder and sustaining sponsor of the annual Central California Women’s Conference, a Trustee and Secretary of Community Hospitals of Central California, a leader in successfully obtaining “All-American City” designation for Fresno in 1967, a board member of the National Retail Federation, a board member of the Fresno County Transportation Authority, and as past president of the Fresno Host Lions Club. Levy dedicated his life to serving the community as the notable head of Gottschalks and continued his commitment to the community upon being appointed by Governor George Deukmejian to the California Transportation Commission. He served on the California Transportation Commission from March 9, 1983, to February 1, 1991, and was its Chairman in 1986. With his constant vision for the future, Joe Levy was a driving force for successfully securing funding for the expanding freeway system in Fresno and he aided in the development of Route 168 and Route 180 that serve as integral transportation lines in Fresno County. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 45, Resolution Chapter 1, on February 1, 2016.
    (Image sources: Twitter, Fresno Bee)

    David G. GravesThe portion of Route 41 from Herndon Avenue in the City of Fresno to Avenue 10 in Madera County (~FRE R30.468 to MAD 1.353) is named the "Deputy David G. Graves Memorial Freeway". It was named in memory of Deputy David G. Graves of the Fresno County Sheriff's Office, who was killed on November 5, 1982, while in performance of his duties to the citizens he was sworn to protect. Deputy Graves was a native of Fresno, and a graduate of Hoover High School and Fresno City College. Before entering law enforcement, Deputy Graves worked as a general contractor and operated his own construction business. Deputy Graves joined the Fresno County Sheriff's Office in 1979, having served as a volunteer in the Sheriff's Search and Rescue Unit for two years prior to becoming a deputy, and was assigned to the patrol division. Deputy Graves was a dedicated officer who served his community and loved his profession. On November 5, 1982, Deputy Graves was on routine patrol on Shaw Avenue in Fresno west of Route 99 in a marked patrol vehicle when his vehicle was struck by a pickup truck driven by an intoxicated 28-year-old Clovis man that had run a stop sign, with the collision resulting in severe head injuries to Deputy Graves that led to his death prior to arrival at the Valley Medical Center. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 61, Resolution Chapter 90, on 9/1/2009.
    (Image source: Officer Down Memorial Page)

    Southern Yosemite HighwayThe portion of this route from the Fresno county line (MAD 0.000 to MPA 4.918) to Yosemite National Park is named the "Southern Yosemite Highway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 27, Chapter 69, in 1989. It was named by location.
    (Image source: Sierra News Online)

    Buffalo Soldiers Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 41 from PM MPA 1.841 at the Mariposa-Madera county line to PM MPA 4.918 at the entrance to Yosemite National Park, is named the "Buffalo Soldiers Memorial Highway". In 1866, the United States Congress created six segregated regiments that were ultimately consolidated into four African American regiments: the 9th and 10th Cavalry and the 24th and 25th Infantry. African American army regiments that had been dispatched westward fought in the Indian Wars and these soldiers were eventually given the name Buffalo Soldiers by the Cheyenne and other Plains Indians. Although historians have recorded the service of these Buffalo Soldiers on the western frontier, their service in some national parks has been nearly forgotten. The United States Army served as the official administrator of Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks between 1891 and 1913. In that capacity, it helped create a model for park management as we know it today. Buffalo Soldiers were among the first park rangers and back country rangers patrolling parts of the west. Approximately 500 Buffalo Soldiers, mainly from the 24th Infantry and 9th Cavalry, served in Yosemite National Park and Sequoia National Park. Their duties ranged from evicting poachers and timber thieves to extinguishing forest fires. They also oversaw the construction of roads, trails, and other infrastructure. Commanding officers of the United States Army became acting military superintendents for these national parks with two troops of cavalry assigned to each park. Each troop was made up of approximately 60 men. The presence of these troops invigorated the local economy and the soldiers acting as official stewards of park lands brought a sense of law and order to the mountain wilderness. Among their many accomplishments, the troops assigned to Yosemite National Park oversaw the building of an arboretum near the south fork of the Merced River in 1904. One scholar considered the area to contain the first marked nature trail in the United States’ national park system. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 174, Res. Chapter 134, Statutes of 2016, on August 23, 2016.
    (Image sources; Trail Posse, AsAm News)

    In local usage, this segment is called "Wawona Road".

    Historically, this segment is supposedly part of the "Sierra to the Sea" Highway, although other records indicate that name belongs to Route 198.

    Named Structures Named Structures

    The Route 41 Lincoln Avenue overcrossing (Bridge 42-0144, PM FRE R017.10) is called the "Richard Allen Flores Memorial Bridge". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 102, Chapter 170 in 1998. Richard Allen Flores lost his life in a construction accident on January 13, 1998, while working on the Lincoln Avenue overcrossing bridge, which bears his memorial.

    Rosa ParksThe Route 41/Route 99 interchange near PM FRE R021.79 in downtown Fresno is named the "Rosa Parks Interchange". Rosa Parks (born February 4, 1913, in Tuskegee, Alabama) is considered the "Mother of the Modern Day Civil Rights Movement". This fame started when she was arrested on December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. Her arrest was the impetus for a boycott of Montgomery buses, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and joined by approximately 42,000 African Americans for 381 days. On November 13, 1956, the United States Supreme Court ruled that Montgomery's segregation law was unconstitutional, and on December 20, 1956, Montgomery officials were ordered to desegregate buses. Rosa Parks refusal to surrender her seat in compliance with Montgomery's segregation law inspired the civil rights movement, which has resulted in the breakdown of numerous legal barriers and the lessening of profound discrimination against African Americans in this country. Her courage and conviction laid the foundation for equal rights for all Americans and for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Rosa Parks was the first woman to join the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP, and was an active volunteer for the Montgomery Voters League. She cofounded the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development in 1987 with Elaine Easton Steele to motivate and direct youth to achieve their highest potential through the "Pathways to Freedom" program. She is the recipient of many awards including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, the highest honor Congress can bestow upon a civilian, and the first International Freedom Conductor Award from the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 3, Chaptered 7/16/2003, Chapter 98.
    (Image source: The Negro Woman in History Blog)

    Rose Ann VuichThe Route 41/Route 180 interchange near PM FRE R024.50 is named the "Rose Ann Vuich Interchange". Rose Ann Vuich was the state senator that secured the funding for completion of Route 41 and Route 180. Rose Ann Vuich was elected to the Senate in 1976 to represent the 15th Senate District, comprised of Tulare and Kings Counties, approximately half of Fresno County, and a portion of Kern County. She was born in January 1927, in Cutler, California, and wa sa lifetime resident of Tulare County. Not many initially took notice when she ran for a vacant state Senate seat in 1976, as the area voted Republican in most elections. However, she scored one of the biggest upsets in the state that year when she narrowly defeated Ernest Mobley, a 10 year Republican Assemblyman, in the general election. Vuich quickly became popular in her district for her unassuming manner and her political independence. She broke with her party on agricultural and law enforcement issues on several occasions. Her Democratic colleagues tolerated that because of the conservative constituency she represented. However, she was willing to stand up to conservatives, angering popular Republican Governor George Deukmejian in 1989 when she voted against confirming his chosen appointee for state Treasurer when the post became vacant. Rose Ann Vuich was the first woman elected to the California Senate; and served with distinction on the Senate Transportation Committee, the Senate Rural Caucus, and as chair of the Senate Select Committee on Rural Issues. Her role in transportation and rural issues led her to being an active supporter of the construction of the Fresno County portions of Route 41, the southern gateway to Yosemite National Park, and Route 180, the gateway to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. Studies to construct both freeways began in 1955 and construction of the first portion of Route 41 began in 1970. In 1976, the funding for the completion of those freeways was uncertain; and as a Senator, Rose Ann Vuich championed "constructing the road that leads to nowhere to the road that leads to somewhere". Additionally, Rose Ann Vuich used her leadership skills to secure funding for the completion of the construction of Route 41 and Route 180; and the routes were reopened to traffic on September 20, 1982. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Chapter 85, in 1997.
    (Image source: Gribblenation; Find a Grave)

    The Lanes Bridge, Bridge 41-0040, SAN JOAQUIN RIVER OVERFLOW, MAD PM 000.08, is unlike the bridges around it, as it dates back to 1941. The original Lanes Bridge was completed in 1889 and was a steel truss design. The original Lanes Bridge was located about a mile up river north of the 1941 bridge roughly where Lanes Road ends today at the San Joaquin River. The original Lanes Bridge was first called the Yosemite Bridge but soon became known as the Lanes Bridge due to Lanes Station, which was a general store in close proximity which opened in 1894. In 1917 the original Lanes Bridge had a partial collapse but was quickly repaired. By 1934 the original Lanes Bridge had become part of Route 41 but was considered obsolete even for the standards of the time. The original 1934 alignment of Route 41 used modern Friant Road and Lanes Road to cross the San Joaquin River via the original Lanes Bridge. The original Lanes Bridge was heavily damaged in a 1937 flood along the San Joaquin River but was once again repaired. It wasn't until the summer of 1940 when an overloaded truck crashed through the road deck of that the use of the original Lanes Bridge ended. Route 41 traffic was temporarily rerouted to Friant over the 1906 North Fort Bridge until the 1941 Lanes Bridge was opened. The design of the 1941 Lanes Bridge is traditional Art Deco concrete design which was a common bridge design by the California Division of Highways prior to the mid-20th Century. There is a good article, with pictures, on the Gribblenation Blog.
    (Source: Gribblenation - Lanes Bridge, CaltransBridge Log)

    Kristopher C TurnerThe Route 41 Fresno River overcrossing (Bridge 42-4122) is called Kristopher's Crossing. It was named in memory of 9 year old Kristopher Charles Turner, a third grader at Oakhurst Elementary School. Kristopher was reported missing on May 23, 2004, and his murdered body was discovered later that day inside a concrete culvert under a bridge that crosses the Fresno River, Department of Transportation Bridge 4122. Renaming the bridge under which Kristopher's body was found Kristopher's Crossing "reflects the boy's crossing over to a better place". Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 65, Resolution Chapter 82, on 7/11/2006. (Note: This really appears to be bridge 42-0022, MAD PM 035.30)
    (Image source: Find a Grave)

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.4] From Route 49 near Oakhurst to Yosemite National Park.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.3] From Route 99 near Fresno to Route 180; and from Route 180 to Yosemite National Park. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Fresno 41 R19.91 R21.11
Fresno 41 R22.50 R23.08
Fresno 41 R23.25 R30.70
Fresno 41 R30.70 R31.68

Exit Information Exit Information

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Interregional Route Interregional Route

[SHC 164.12] Between Route 1 and Yosemite National Park.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 41:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that become LRN 41 was first defined in 1905 by Chapter 598, which authorized "...locating, surveying, and constructing a public highway from the General Grant National Park in Fresno County, thence E-ly into Kings Canyon..."

In 1909, Chapter 223 stated "The highway now completely located and surveyed, and partially completed ... from the General Grant National Park to the floor of the Kings River Canyon is hereby made a state highway..."

In 1919, the Third Bond Issue provided funding for the Kings River Canyon State Road. In 1933, the route was extended from [LRN 4] near Fresno to General Grant National Park, and from [LRN 4] near Fresno to [LRN 5] near Tracy. By 1935, when the route was codified, the definition was:

  1. [LRN 5] near Tracy to [LRN 4] near Fresno
  2. [LRN 4] near Fresno to General Grant National Park
  3. General Grant National Park to Kings River Canyon

Legislation approved in 1963 would have changed "General Grant National Park" to the "General Grant Grove Section", but that change was overtaken by the 1963 renumbering by Chapter 385.

Signage along this route was as follows:

  1. From LRN 5 near Tracy to LRN 4 near Fresno.

    This was signed as Route 33 between Tracy and Los Banos and between the vicinity of Santa Rita Park and 2 mi NE of Mendota. It was signed as Route 180 from 2 mi NE of Mendota into Fresno. The Route 33 portion was defined in 1933; the Route 180 portion was defined in 1919.

    Since 1964, some portions of this segment were deleted. The portion between Route 152 and I-5 (originally part of CA 33) was deleted in 1970, when former Route 207 (LRN 121) was resigned as Route 33 from Route 152 to I-5. The deleted portion was Ingomar Grade and Henry Miller Road. Additionally, the portion between I-205 in Tracy and I-5 was deleted from the state highway system in 1976.

  2. From LRN 4 near Fresno to General Grant National Park.

    This was signed as Route 180. "General Grant National Park" is General Grant Grove in Sequoia National Park. This was defined in 1933.

  3. From General Grant National Park to Kings River Canyon.

    This was signed as Route 180. This was defined in 1905.


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 40 Forward Arrow Route 42

© 1996-2020 Daniel P. Faigin.
Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.