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State Shield

State Route 99

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

  1. US Highway Shield No current segment. Prior to 1964, US 99 ran from the Mexico Border to the current I-5/Route 99 split as US 99.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    U.S. 99 Southern SectionOn the southern end, the route ran from the Mexican border to the current start of Route 99 in Wheeler Ridge, along routings that approximated current Route 86, Route 60, I-10, and I-5.

    Calexico to Indio

    From Calexico, US 99 traveled north through El Centro and Brawley along roughly present-day Route 86 to Indio. The segment between Indio and El Centro was part of the 1916 LRN 26; the segment from EL Centro to the border at Calexico was a 1931 extension of LRN 26.

    Indio to San Bernardino

    From Indio to Beaumont, US 99 was cosigned with US 60 and US 70, and was part of the 1916 LRN 26 segment. This is present-day I-10.

    In 1947, CHPW reported that the segment through E Redlands had been converted into a four-lane divided limited-freeway.

    In Calimesa CA, the route ran along Roberts Blvd. This segment was drivable as recently as 2019, when construction of a housing development removed the ability to drive Roberts from Singleton.
    (Source: Brian Scott Anderson on FB, 9/30/2019)

    San Bernardino Routings

    The original LRNs in San Bernardino were equally convoluted according to Scott Parker (Sparker). The "spine" LRN through the region was LRN 43, which followed Sign Route 18 throughout the region; a number of long-distance LRNs terminated at this legislative route. LRN 26 was US 99 south of the 3rd Street/E Street intersection, following US 99 all the way to the Mexican border at Calexico. LRN 31, which carried US 66 over Cajon Pass to Barstow, and US 91 (which was not extended south of Barstow until 1947) northeast from there to Nevada, began at the junction of Mt. Vernon and 3rd Street and was the Mt. Vernon RR bridge and US 66 east from there. LRN 9 was US 66, and originally US 99, extending west from LRN 31 on 4th Street toward Pasadena. Signed Route 30/Highland Ave. was LRN 190, and North E Street and Kendall Ave. Business US 66 was LRN 191.

    Scott Parker (Sparker) noted in that discussion that this arrangement didn't last long; the bridge over the Santa Ana River connecting Colton Ave. in the south reaches of San Bernardino with Valley Blvd. in central Colton was completed circa 1931; LRN 26 and US 99 were rerouted west along that alignment. South E Street from the rerouted US 99/LRN 26 became a realigned but unsigned LRN 43. 3rd Street, still carrying Signed Route 18, became an eastern extension of LRN 9, which terminated at 3rd and E Street at LRN 43 (Signed Route 18 still turned north there). The entirety of Mt. Vernon north of Valley Blvd. in Colton was reassigned to LRN 31; it still carried Signed Route 18 south of 3rd Street until US 395 was commissioned in 1934 to join it. US 99/LRN 26 continued west from Colton on Valley Blvd. into Ontario, where it was renamed Holt Ave.

    Similar to 4th street west of Mt. Vernon, 3rd Street past the original Santa Fe depot (now used by Metrolink & Amtrak) east of the Mt. Vernon bridge features portions of the original segmented concrete pavement that once carried US 99 & Signed Route 18. The east-west Valley Blvd. alignment that eventually became US 99/LRN 26 was in place as a county facility at the time US 99 was routed through central San Bernardino, with its east end at or near Mt. Vernon Ave. in Colton. The delay involved with realigning US 99 was due to the difficulty experienced in constructing bridges over the Santa Ana River; the riverbed consists of deep layers of sand and silt lying in scooped-out sandstone with no supporting bedrock to speak of. Bridge construction over such a "waterway" required placing concrete caissons deep into the sand and waiting for them to settle before constructing bridge piers upwards from them -- then letting the whole assembly settle even more before extending a bridge deck over the piers. This method has continued to this day; the I-10, I-215, and Route 210 bridges over the Santa Ana River were deployed in a similar manner. The original US 99 E Street bridge was the only exception; it was a relatively light "trestle" structure sitting atop the silt layers; it was replaced by the present caisson-based structure in the mid-'60's, a few years after the original I-10 and I-15 (now I-215) bridges were built.
    (Source: Scott Parker (Sparker) @ AAroads, 7/7/2016)

    W of San Bernardino to Los Angeles

    Originally the routing of US 99 from Los Angeles to San Bernardino, circa 1926, was this: West on Colton Ave. (now Redlands Blvd.) to a broad curve west of Waterman that deposits the route on South E Street. It continued north on E Street to 3rd Street, where it turned west with south Sign Route 18 (NB Sign Route 18 continued north on E St.). That continued past the Santa Fe depot to Mt. Vernon, at the south end of the bridge over the Santa Fe tracks; US 99 turned north to cross the bridge (this was several years prior to the commissioning of US 395), while Sign Route 18 turned south onto Mt. Vernon toward Colton. At the north end of the bridge Mt. Vernon intersected 4th Street/US 66 West; US 99 turned west there as well, multiplexing with US 66 into Pasadena. At some point in time between 1926 and 1934 Business US 66 was established; from west to east it diverged from mainline US 66 at Mt. Vernon, crossing the bridge south with US 99 before turning east with both south US 99 and north Sign Route 18 on 3rd. Street. It turned north on E Street with Sign Route 18, continuing north to Highland, where Sign Route 30 crossed and Sign Route 18 turned right with it. Business US 66 continued north on E Street, which eventually turned NW and became Kendall Ave. US 66 east continued north on Mt. Vernon to Highland, where it turned northwest onto Cajon Blvd., the road up the south side of Cajon Pass, intersecting Business US 66/Kendall Ave. at a point about 5 miles north.
    (Source: Scott Parker (Sparker) @ AAroads, 7/7/2016)

    E of Pomona, US 99 was cosigned only with US 70 to Beaumont (US 60 continued along LRN 77 through Riverside, and thence to Beaumont). This was LRN 26. The portion between Pomona and Colton/San Bernardino was part of the 1931 extension of LRN 26; the portion from San Bernardino to Beaumont was part of the 1916 definition of LRN 26. This is present-day I-10.

    The portion between the downtown junction of US 99 with US 60/US 70 was originally LRN 26, although the surface route along Valley Blvd was LRN 77 by 1963. This is present-day I-10. The US signage is unclear and likely varied -- at points US 99 being along Ramona (esp. after construction of the freeway), at points running along Valley Blvd. (The extension of LRN 26 from Colton to the eastern limits of Los Angeles along Garvey/Holt was added in 1931; the extension along Ramona Blvd was added in 1933; the alternate routing along Valley Blvd was added as a non-contiguous extension of LRN 77 in 1935).

    Originally, US 99 then ran into Eagle Rock and Colorado, where it ran concurrent with US 66 as far as San Bernardino (LRN 9), where it joined cosigned US 60/US 70. One map shows US 99 running along the old Route 118 (approx. I-210) routing along the foothills. This was the former LRN 9 routing, so this does make sense. This former LRN 9 routing was gone by 1929.

    Los Angeles to Wheeler Ridge

    There is evidence the route ran along the Aliso Street Viaduct in downtown Los Angeles.

    Near downtown, until the construction of the Pasadena Freeway, it ran from cosigned US 60/US 70 along Ramona Blvd to San Fernando Road. Once the first segments of the Pasadena (Arroyo Seco Parkway) and San Bernardino (Ramona Parkway) Freeways were constructed in the early 1940s, US 99 was rerouted to run down the Route 11 (LRN 165, defined in 1933) to cosigned US 66/US 101, and then E to US 60/US 70 (along LRN 2 to LRN 26). Once the Santa Ana Freeway was constructed, US 99 was again resigned to run E directly from the Route 11/US 66 junction to the San Bernardino Freeway (this segment was LRN 4). This is present-day I-5 to the I-10 junction.

    In July 2016, it was reported that the area where the Riverside Bridge, Figueroa, and San Fernando meet will soon have a unique feature that sets it apart from the rest of the city: a traffic roundabout. Scheduled to be completed by the end of the year, it's set to be the city’s first. This intersection is the former intersection of US 99 (San Fernando Road, replaced by I-5 next to San Fernando Road), US 66 (Figueroa from Pasadena). The roundabout will measure 100 feet wide and will direct traffic in four directions without using traditional traffic signals. (There will be "flashing lights" at four designated pedestrian crossings around the circle.) The center will be landscaped and feature a granite statue. Medians will line the streets that intersect at the traffic circle. It will link to the under-construction Riverside Bridge (expected to be completed in late 2017) and eventually share the intersection with park space marking the approximate confluence of the Arroyo Seco and the LA River.
    (Source: Curbed LA, 7/11/2016)

    Scott Parker provided some additional history of the routing in Los Angeles on AARoads:
    (Source: Sparker on AARoads "Re: US 66 1935 alignment via Eagle Rock + pre-1936 via Royal Oaks Ave in Monrovia?", 5/17/2019 and 5/17/2019)

    LRN 26, the Ramona Parkway, was only a projected line on the map [between 1926 and 1934]; LRN 77 used Valley Blvd. to the L.A. city limits near Eastern Avenue, but state maintenance ceased at that boundary. But ACSC, after it was decided to reroute US 99 off US 66 between San Bernardino and Pasadena circa 1929, signed Valley Blvd. as US 99 to the multi-street intersection of Valley, Mission, and Main Streets; opting to continue west on Main St. to Ave. 20, then turning north until that street crossed Broadway and became San Fernando Road -- which, of course, headed out of town via the San Fernando Valley and the Grapevine. But Ave. 20 was a narrow city street; the Division of Highways assumed maintenance of Daly St. as part of LRN 4 a few blocks east, which itself segued onto Avenue 26 at Pasadena Ave. (then LRN 165); Avenue 26 then merged onto San Fernando Road near the SP Taylor Yard facility north of Arroyo Seco. That whole section, opened about 1931, became signed US 99. When the Ramona Parkway was completed at the end of 1934, Daly St. was extended south via a bridge over the SP tracks to Marengo St., which it used as the access point to the eastbound Ramona Parkway near Soto St. -- at which point US 99 entered the eastbound parkway, also signed as US 60. From 1935 to 1953 both US highways diverged from the parkway at Garvey Street at the west side of Alhambra; Garvey (LRN 26) continued east to Covina, where it segued into Holt Ave. for the climb over Kellogg Hill, descending into Pomona. In 1953 the parkway, by then configured as a full freeway, was opened to Rosemead Ave. near El Monte; with US 70 added by that time, US 60 & US 99 were rerouted over the new facility. Once the eastern extension through El Monte was opened around 1958, it was relabeled the San Bernardino Freeway -- with the portions east of Pomona receiving I-10 signage by late 1958, and the rest of the freeway into L.A. getting such signage by the end of '59, when the freeway was fully completed from L.A. out to US 91 & US 395 in Colton (along with the original I-15 iteration). Upon opening, the I-10 freeway took most of the through truck traffic off US 66 to the north -- a situation that persisted until 2002, when the I-/CA 210 combination was completed east to I-15 in Fontana, with I-10 receiving a bit of relief as a result -- and even more when 210 was built out to I-215 five years later.

    Once the Figueroa Tunnels were competed by 1935 and the adjoining L.A. River bridge were completed a couple of years later -- including the left exit onto Figueroa that comprised the connection to the "old road" as well as an access point for the Avenue 26 portion of US 99, it was decided that all the area's trunk highways, including US 99, would be routed to a central point -- that being the corner of Sunset and Figueroa, immediately northwest of downtown L.A. At that time the L.A. Civic Center was being expanded northward; the Division of Highways acceded to city wishes to ensure that as much through traffic as possible passed through the city center. Signage was removed from the remainder of Avenue 26 south of Figueroa as well as Daly and Marengo Streets; US 99 was rerouted along with US 66 and Route 11 down to Sunset & Figueroa, where US 66 turned west with NB US 101 toward Hollywood, Route 11 continued south through downtown toward San Pedro, and US 99 turned east on Sunset, seguing onto Macy to Mission Ave. There US 99 turned south for a block (US 101 continued east on Macy to Pleasant Ave., where it turned south), along with US 60, which had its western terminus at the corner of Macy & Mission, and then turned east on the Ramona Parkway toward Alhambra and Monterey Park. That routing persisted until after WW II, when the Aliso Street extension and the nascent Santa Ana Freeway were built -- the former segueing into the Hollywood Freeway, with the 4-level Interchange opening in '53 -- at which time the state route center shifted onto freeways from surface facilities.

    By 1939, US 99 ran cosigned with US 6 from downtown Los Angeles (LRN 4, defined in 1909) to Santa Clarita. Before the freeway was constructed, it ran along San Fernando Road. After the freeway was constructed, it ran along the freeway portion (LRN 161 defined in 1933), bypassing San Fernando Road (which was signed as Business US 99). This is present-day I-5.

    From Santa Clarita to the current terminus of Route 99 in Wheeler Ridge, US 99 continued N along present-day I-5 (and the predecessor roads, such as "The Old Road" and the Ridge Route. Before 1964, this was signed as US 99 N from the junction with (pre-1964) Route 7 (also known as US 6). This was LRN 4, defined in 1909. It entered Los Angeles along San Fernando Road, (along what was then Route 7) and headed east at Fletcher (in Glendale). For a portion of this, it ran concurrent with US 6.

    Naming Naming

    Ramona FreewayThe segment of US 99 that opened in 1943 from US 101 to US 395 (now I-215), originally signed as US 60 / US 70 / US 99) was named the "Ramona Freeway". Ramona was the central character in the Helen Hunt Jackson novel Ramona, which was a seminal novel in the early 20th century in creating the romance of California.
    (Image source: Forgotten Highway)

    National Trails National Trails

    Midland Trail Sign The portion of this route that was part of US 6 (i.e., from Route 110 to Route 14) was part of the "Midland Trail.

    National Park to Park Highway Sign The portion of this route N of Los Angeles that was originally part of US 99 (i.e., from Route 10 to Route 99) was part of the "National Parks to Park Highway".

    US 99 appears to have been part of the "Jefferson Davis Highway". This was an attempt to commemorate the "Lost Cause" or "Southern Cause" narrative of the Civil War. Along US 99, a monument was located near Lebec. This is discussed in more detail on the Trails and Roads page.

  2. Rte 99 Seg 1From Route 5 south of Bakersfield to Route 50 in Sacramento.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this was segment (a) and ran from "Route 5 south of Bakersfield to Route 80 in Sacramento."

    In 1981, Chapter 292 changed "Route 80" to "Route 50", reflecting the renumbering of routes in Sacramento (i.e., I-80 moved to a new alignment that had been I-880; the old I-80 alignment became Route 51 and US 50 (FAI 305), but was signed Business Route 80).

    At one point, segments of Route 99 were also signed as "Temporary I-5". Scott Parker (Sparker) at AAroads provided some history of this signage on 7/16/2016:

    Between 1972 and 1981, Route 99 also carried "Temporary I-5" shields. These were smaller (24×24) shields, generally posted on Route 99 reassurance assemblies below the Route 99 shield. From top to bottom these assemblies read: (DIRECTION)/(California) Route 99/ (TEMPORARY)/I-5.

    Northbound: Temporary I-5 signage began at the I-5 Route 4/Charter Way exit in Stockton, extending east on Charter Way (old US 50 and, east of the Route 4 divergence, unsigned Route 26) to Route 99, then north on Route 99 to (then) I-80 (now Business Route 80 and US 50). After I-5 was completed southward into Sacramento by 1976, "temporary" signage ceased and "TO I-5" appeared on the interchange's BGS (as it does today) in order to direct traffic to the new I-5 alignment. Prior to that time, "Temporary I-5 signage followed the I-80 freeway to northbound Route 113 near Davis, which also received signage as "Temporary I-5" (this was also the routing of the former US 99W). It followed the old US 99W alignment, turning west onto (then) Route 16 at Woodland and following it to a point west of town where US 99W had historically turned north. It then followed the old US 99W routing, which was gradually being bypassed by I-5 construction. The entire Sacramento to Redding portion of I-5 was completed by 1976, at which time the "Temporary I-5" signage was removed from I-80 west of the I-5 junction as well as to the north.

    Southbound: Before 1976, Temporary I-5 signage began near Woodland, using Route 113 south to I-80 and I-80 east to Route 99 at the present Business Route 80/US 50/Route 99 interchange southeast of downtown Sacramento. Southbound Route 99 BGS signage on EB I-80 had "Temporary I-5" signage attached in order to expedite through traffic heading for the continuation of I-5 at Stockton. Post-1976, the southbound I-5 ramp to eastbound I-80/south Route 99 was also marked as "Temporary I-5"; while it's unclear whether east I-80 itself ever received temporary I-5 reassurance signage, the ramp to south Route 99 was definitely also signed "Temporary I-5". Southbound Route 99/Temporary I-5 signage mirrored northbound; Temporary I-5 exited at Charter Way and continued west to the newly-constructed I-5 alignment. I-5 itself was built as far north as Hammer Lane in the north reaches of Stockton by 1974; northbound I-5 traffic was instructed to exit at Charter Way; the stub end of I-5 was signed as "Local Traffic Only" (the southbound stub end of I-5 in Sacramento, extending down to Pocket Road, was likewise signed). The final section of I-5 between Stockton and Sacramento was completed in early 1981, at which time the temporary signage along Route 99 and its approach routes was removed.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield This route was part of the original US highway plan in 1926, and was signed as US 99 from the signage of US highways in 1928 (the original route ran as far S as El Centro -- see below for information on the routing S of the I–5/Rte 99 junction). Currently, there is a movement to have this cosigned as historic Highway 99. Such signage is authorized by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 19, Chapter 73, approved in 1993. This resolution requests the Department of Transportation, upon application by an interested local agency or private group, to identify any section of former U.S. Highway 99 that is still a publicly maintained highway but is not designated as having formerly been U.S. Highway 99 and to designate that section as "historic U.S. Highway 99."

    The business routes off of Route 99 are portions of the original routing of US 99. This was LRN 4, defined in 1909 into Sacramento; it was cosigned with US 50 from Manteca (present day junction with Route 120) into Sacramento.

    Note: Tom Fearer on the Gribblenation Blog has a good exploration of the history of the route from the I-5/Route 99 split to Route 245.

    Through Bakersfield, the route originally ran along present-day Union Avenue and Golden State Avenue. Portions of this are now present-day Route 204. In 1962, Route 99 was shifted westward to its current routing (at which point, it appears the old routing became part of LRN 141).

    Bakersfield Rt 99 1928-33 from Kern Cty Hst Society via the CalifornianAs part of the research for the book "Highway 99: The History of California’s Main Street," the routings in the Bakersfield area were investigated. Historical society volunteer Fatima Bugharin began looking into the history of Route 99 nearly a year and a half ago. What she found surprised even longtime Bakersfield residents. They were surprised to learn that Route 99 through Bakersfield once ran along 18th Street, Chester Avenue and Roberts Lane in Oildale. In particular, hadn't known that 18th Street was part of that statewide artery for some six years. Specifically, as Route 99 headed north on Union (Avenue) the highway took a left on 18th Street. This is because parts of Union Avenue were still unpaved, and Golden State Avenue wasn't ready. The clock tower was in the middle of 17th and Chester. 19th Street had the trolley. So 18th was the chosen route.
    (Source: Bakersfield Californian, 6/11/2018)

    Route 99 in Famoso (~ KER 44.531)

    In Famoso, California (~ KER 44.531), the alignment of LRN 4 was plotted through Famoso via Famoso-Porterville Highway and C Street when it was established in 1910 when the 1909 First State Highway Bond Act was approved. The early alignment of LRN 4 required north/south traffic to cross the Southern Pacific Main Freight Line twice in Famoso. During the era of the Auto Trail, the alignment of LRN 4 through Famoso carried numerous highway designations including National-Park-to-Park Highway, Inland Route, and the National Roosevelt Midland Trail. By the mid-1930s, traffic on US 99/LRN 4 and US 466/LRN 33 was already heavy. Removal of at-grade railroad overpasses were highly desired and generally were a priority for the Division of Highways on US 99/LRN 4 in San Joaquin Valley during the 1930s. The first reference to a recommendation of a new "railroad subway" in Famoso appears in the October 1935 CHPW guide. US 99/US 466/LRN 4 is shown to be aligned over a new subway overpass onto a bypass route of Famoso on the 1938 Division of Highways State Map. The shift of US 99/US 466/LRN 4 onto the new bypass route extended the southern terminus of Route 65 within Famoso to the end of C Street. The bypass route of Famoso used by US 99/US 466/LRN 4 essentially was built on the same grade Route 99 on the Golden State Freeway occupies today.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog "Former US Route 99,US Route 466, and California State Route 65 through Famoso")

    Route 99 in Tipton and Tulare (~ TUL 18.995 to TUL 29.202)

    Note: Information in this subsection was derived from the Gribblenation Blog (Tom Fearer): "Old US Route 99 through Tipton, Tulare, and Tagus Ranch")

    The original alignment of LRN 4 (circa 1924) from Tipton through Tulare was as follows:
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog, "Old US Route 99 through Tipton, Tulare, and Tagus Ranch", August 2020)

    • Burnett Road in Tipton north to Road 164.
    • Road 164 west over the Southern Pacific Railroad to Road 112.
    • Road 112 north to Bardsley Avenue in Tulare.
    • Bardsley Avenue east over the Southern Pacific Railroad to K Street.
    • K Street north into downtown Tulare to Inyo Avenue.

    The original alignment of LRN 4 was not routed through Tagus Ranch en route north to Goshen but rather Visalia.  LRN 4 utilized the following route from downtown Tulare to reach the City of Visalia:
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog, "Old US Route 99 through Tipton, Tulare, and Tagus Ranch", August 2020)

    • Inyo Avenue east to M Street.
    • North on M Street to Tulare Avenue.
    • Tulare Avenue east to Mooney Boulevard.
    • Mooney Boulevard north into Visalia.

    By 1924, LRN 4 was aligned through Tagus Ranch directly to Goshen, along the following routing:
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog, "Old US Route 99 through Tipton, Tulare, and Tagus Ranch", August 2020)

    • Inyo Avenue west from K Street to J Street.
    • J Street north to Tagus Ranch following eastern flank of the Southern Pacific Railroad.
    • From Tagus Ranch a road following the eastern flank of the Southern Pacific Railroad to Camp Drive in Goshen.

    In 1932, LRN 4 (now US 99) was aligned to the east side of the SP RR tracks from Tipton to Tulare using the following route:
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog, "Old US Route 99 through Tipton, Tulare, and Tagus Ranch", August 2020)

    • Burnett Road north to what is now the southbound lanes of the Golden State Freeway.
    • The present southbound lanes of the Golden State Freeway to K Street.
    • K Street north to Inyo Avenue in downtown Tulare.

    The September/October 1958 California Highways & Public Works cites the Tulare Bypass route of US 99/LRN 4 as fully opening in 1954.  The Tulare Bypass is cited to have been the first full freeway grade completed in Division of Highways District 6. In 1959, it was noted that 13.3 miles of US 99/LRN 4 originating in Pixley by way of Tipton to Tulare Airport was funded for an expressway to freeway conversion in the 1960-61 State Highway Budget.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog, "Old US Route 99 through Tipton, Tulare, and Tagus Ranch", August 2020)

    Route 99 in Visalia

    Note: US 99 was never actually routed through Visalia and ended up bypassing the City in favor of a direct route from Goshen southeast to Tulare.  US 99 within San Joaquin Valley was aligned over LRN 4, which was added to the State Highway System as part of the 1909 First State Highway Bond Act.  LRN 4 for a time was aligned through Visalia via Mineral King Avenue, Main Street, and Mooney Boulevard.  This early alignment of LRN 4 through Visalia can be seen on the 1924 Division of Highways State Map. The initial alignment of US 99 was planned to simply follow LRN 4 from Sacramento south to Los Angeles.  The existing routing of LRN 4 by the start 1926 would have taken US 99 through Visalia. However, by 1926, LRN 4 was realigned out of Visalia onto a more direct route between Goshen and Tulare during 1926.  LRN 4 was realigned over what is now Camp Drive in Goshen southwest via a Southern Pacific frontage road east of the rails to I Street in Tulare.  While Visalia was (and is) the Tulare County Seat the new alignment of LRN 4 was far more efficient in terms of getting traffic directly to/from Sacramento and Los Angeles.  Mineral King Road was retained in the State Highway System as part of LRN 10, which would later become Route 198 during 1934.  The final version of the US Route System was approved during November of 1926.  This first official version of the US Route System had US 99 following LRN 4 from Sacramento and Los Angeles which in turn bypassed Visalia. 
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog (Tom Fearer) "US Route 99 to Visalia?... ")

    On AARoads, Scott Parker noted that local lore is that LRN 4, normally paralleling the old SP main line through the Valley, originally took the Visalia "detour" not only to serve that town, the largest between Bakersfield and Fresno, but also because the right of way straddling the RR tracks between Tulare and Goshen was owned by Tagus Ranch, which was reluctant to grant an easement for the highway through its land (and was politically well-connected enough to mount that resistance).  Eventually an agreement was reached and the highway constructed -- although an old US 99 landmark pre-freeway was the Tagus Ranch "farm store", a sort of "farmers' market" a couple of miles north of Tulare.  
    (Source: Scott Parker (SParker) on AARoads, "Re: The original planned route of US 99 through Visalia", 4/29/2020)

    Route 99 in Goshen and Traver

    Unless noted otherwise, information in this subsection is derived from the Gribblenation Blog (Tom Fearer), "Old US Route 99 in Goshen, Traver, and the Warlow Rest Area"

    The original alignment of LRN 4 south through Traver and Goshen, circa 1924, was as follows:
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog, "Old US Route 99 in Goshen, Traver, and the Warlow Rest Area", August 2020)

    • A western Southern Pacific frontage road roughly located where the northbound lanes of the Golden State Freeway are today from the Fresno County Line at the Kings River to Traver.
    • 6th Street through Traver.
    • A western Southern Pacific frontage road roughly located where the northbound lanes of the Golden State Freeway are today to a railroad crossing near what is now Road 68 to Camp Drive.
    • Camp Drive through Goshen to the present location of the westbound lanes of the CA 198 freeway at what was known at the time as Visalia Highway.  Visalia Highway as of 1915 was also part of LRN 10 east of Goshen to Visalia.  LRN 10 was extended east from Visalia to Sequoia National Park as part of the 1919 Third State Highway Bond Act.
    • Visalia Highway east to Main Street in Visalia. 

    By 1926, LRN 4 (US 99) was using a new alignment between Goshen to Tulare along an eastern Southern Pacific frontage road to J Street. The relocation of US 99/LRN 4 from Plaza Garage north through Goshen was announced in January 1932. US 99/LRN 4 was relocated west of Goshen around 1933/1934 to grade separations over the Southern Pacific Railroad Main Freight Line and Visalia Spur.  The new alignment of US 99/LRN 4 would later be incorporated into the Golden State Freeway. The 1915 Kingsburg Bridge over the Kings River was incorporated circa 1939 into a modernized four lane expressway alignment of US 99/LRN 4.  The expressway project at the Kings River was completed in Spring 1940; the 1915 Kingsburg Bridge was the last two lane structure on US 99/LRN 4 between Sacramento and Los Angeles.  US 99/LRN 4 was upgraded to freeway standards from Traver 5.7 miles north to the Kings River during 1957.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog, "Old US Route 99 in Goshen, Traver, and the Warlow Rest Area", August 2020)

    In Traver, California (~ 099 TUL 48.666), there appears to be an "Old State Route 99" between Avenue 360 and Avenue 368. This was bypassed, apparently, because a diamond interchange for Merritt Drive (and freeway upgrade) could not be done right next to the Southern Pacific line.
    (Thanks to Chris Sampang for this information)

    Route 99 in Fresno

    Before the establishment of the Golden State Blvd. bypass of downtown Fresno, Route 99 took a routing of (from the south) Railroad Avenue (~ 099 FRE 17.284), Church Street, Hazel St. (possibly E Street), Cherry Avenue, and Broadway into town, and then north to Railroad Avenue (now Motel Drive/Business Route 99) via H Street. Broadway is now cut off by Grizzly Stadium.
    (Source: 1938 Map posted on FB by Joel Windmiller)

    In Fresno, conversion of the highway to expressway and thence to freeway required moving of a historic church. Specifically, an 8,000-square-foot brick church was moved 300 yards in one piece to make way for Route 99. This happened in Fresno in 1947, when the German Cross Church (all 1,800 tons of it, complete with colonnade, bell tower and stained-glass windows) was moved using railroad rails and steel rollers to make way for the D Street freeway, as it was known then. The new freeway bypassed the old highway alignment, which used surface streets such as Broadway, H Street and Motel Drive through town. It replaced D Street, which explains why there’s no longer a street by that name on Fresno’s map. The January/February 1948 issue of CHPW has a fascinating article on the moving of the church.
    (Source: CHPW Jan/Feb 1948; FresnoBee 11/19/2017)

    Click on image to see the full historical analysis of 99 in FresnoTom Fearer has attempted to retrace the routing history of US 99 through Fresno. He has more details on his Gribblenation Blog entry, including some good maps (a downsized copy of one is illustrated to the right; click on the image to go to the full webpage):
    (Source: Provided by Tom Fearer  in September 2017)

    • In 1926 the original US 99 northbound alignment entered the city of Fresno on Railroad Avenue. North from Railroad Avenue US 99 utilized the following to traverse the city of Fresno: Cherry Avenue, Broadway Street, Divisadero Street, H Street, Belmont Avenue, and modern Golden State Boulevard.
    • Sometime between 1930 to 1934. US 99 traffic was shifted off Railroad Avenue onto Church Avenue and Hazel to create a wider approach over the railroad tracks on Cherry Avenue.
    • By 1948, US 99 traffic was shifted off of Railroad Avenue completely onto G Street, which may have been a renaming of Hazel.
    • By 1950, US 99 traffic was shifted off of Cherry Avenue and extended northward on G Street. US 99 utilized a new rail crossing to reach Broadway Street in downtown Fresno. The approximate location of the railroad crossing is located where the modern Route 41 freeway now crosses the rails into downtown Fresno.
    • By 1958, the downtown Fresno section of the US 99 was completed. Traffic flowed onto the US 99 freeway from what is now Golden State Boulevard in south Fresno.
    • By 1964, US 99 is shifted onto a new freeway segment off of Golden State Boulevard in south Fresno onto the complete modern alignment of Route 99.

    Tom Fearer has a history of the routing of US 99 through Herndon in his blog entry Old US Route 99 through Herndon, CA.

    Within Madera the implied route of LRN 4/US 99 was over Gateway Drive. In 1933 US 99/LRN 4 was joined in Madera by LRN 126 (Route 145).  LRN 126 was aligned through Madera northbound on Madera Avenue where it joined US 99/LRN 4 at Gateway Drive.  US 99/LRN 4 and LRN 126 multiplexed north on Gateway Drive where the latter split eastward on Yosemite Avenue. Around 1958, the freeway bypass around downtown Madera was constructed. The surface alignment of US 99/LRN 4 on Gateway Drive at that time was a heavy bottleneck point, especially during holiday weekends; it was also the last remaining segment of two-lane US 99/LRN 4 with in Division of Highways District 6. By the start of 1959, the Madera Bypass was opened; Route 145/LRN 126 remained on Gateway Drive between Madera Avenue and Yosemite Avenue.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog, "Old US Route 99 through Madera on Gateway Drive", August 2020)

    The first segment of freeway to be constructed in the San Joaquin Valley was originally part of Route 99 in Fresno. Construction of the so-called Fresno-Calwa Freeway, a short section of freeway just south of town, began just after the end of World War II. It survives as a section of Golden State Boulevard, stretching roughly from Church Avenue to Ventura Avenue. It comes complete with offramps and overpasses, although it’s not a part of the current Route 99 alignment.
    (Source: Fresno Bee, 11/19/2017)

    The Last Mammoth Orange

    An June 2012 article in the Los Angeles Times provided an update on the "Mammoth Orange" stand that used to be a fixture on US 99 in Chowchilla (~ 099 MAD 3.361). As of June 2012, the onetime attraction sat in the Chowchilla storage yard. There's still a key in its cash register and a soda fountain that might work. But spider webs drape the ice bin, bird droppings paint the floor and the orange dimple paint is peeling. However, the Chowchilla City Council was in the process of deciding between competing bids for ownership of the stand. The orange had originally been on a two-lane road in Chowchilla but was moved to the side of US 99 near Route 152 in 1954, a year before the first McDonald's opened. Its final owners were Doris and Jim Stiggins of Chowchilla, who bought the stand in 1981. A $40-million Caltrans project at Fairmead (~ 099 MAD 22.648) had widened the highway, closed the exit and put the Stigginses out of business in 2007. The orange, which was on the California Register of Historical Resources and a candidate for the National Register of Historic Places, was then moved into storage. In 2008, Chowchilla's redevelopment agency bought the 10-foot orange for $5,000, planning to restore it to mint condition and move it near the original site as part of a museum. That never happened, and as of 2012, two individuals were competing for the orange. One was an individual who wanted to restore the shell and set up an orange juice stand next to their antique windmill and cotton-hauling trailer planted with petunias. The other was the Chowchilla District Historical Society. The eventual winner was not in the article.
    (Los Angeles Times, 6/3/2012)

    In February 2018, there was an update that Mammoth Orange. It is now outside a fossil museum in central California where the community is making plans to restore it. It closed about 10 years ago. The city of Chowchilla bought the old stand with the idea of restoring what was a local landmark, but that never happened. The San Joaquin Valley Paleontology Foundation stepped in six years ago (around 2012, the date of the article above) and moved it to the Fossil Discovery Center of Madera County. The center now wants to restore the Mammoth Orange, because of the play on words. The first tusk of a mammoth was found at the Fairmead landfill in 1993 and since then, 15,000 fossils have been found. The museum was built seven years ago to house and display the collection. The 10-foot-tall structure was built about 1952 of aluminum, stucco and wood and painted bright orange. In addition to hamburgers, the stand sold signature orange milkshakes. The first orange-shaped stand opened in Tracy in the 1920s when air conditioning in automobiles did not exist and people would stop for a cool drink. By the 1950s, dozens of the stands dotted the highways of California, especially along Route 99. But freeways and air conditioning technology emerged and by the 1990s, the Mammoth Orange near Chowchilla was thought to be the last one still in business. Until now, a lack of funds have hampered restoration hopes, but the foundation is teaming up with the Rotary clubs of Madera and Chowchilla to restore it.
    (Source: Fresno Bee, 2/25/2018)

    The Palm and the Pine (~ MAD 5.752)

    Just south of Avenue 11 in Madera County on Route 99 (~ MAD 5.752), is a tribute to the division between Northern and Southern California: The Palm and the Pine. But their symbolism cannot be mistaken. The pine tree is north, representing Northern California. The palm tree is south, representing Southern California. It was established many years ago that the geographic center of the state is in North Fork to the east of Route 99 in Madera County. But to see North Fork, you’ll need to get off the highway and head toward the mountains. The center of the state that most of the public will likely view is right along Route 99. To be more exact, you’ll find it between the north and southbound lanes in the median south of the city of Madera. The pine and palm trees represent a symbolic separation between Southern California and Northern California. It’s believed the original trees were planted in the 1920s to represent the midpoint of the state between the Mexico and Oregon borders. In the 1980s, the state’s transportation planning agency CalTrans rolled out plans to bring the highway up to new standards. These plans called for the destruction of the trees. There was a public outcry, CalTrans redrew the plans, and the trees remained. That is until 2005 when a storm toppled the pine tree. It was replaced in 2007. The median is under control of CalTrans and it appears the palm and the pine will remain there under the care of the transportation agency for years to come.
    (Source: Steve Newvine, Merced County Events, No Date)

    Chowchilla Interchange with Route 152 (~ MAD 22.727)

    The Chowchilla Interchange is one the four original "over/under" RR crossings (one direction goes under the tracks on the original 2-lane underpass while the other direction, added later, bridges over the tracks) that Route 99 inherited from US 99 at the time the shields were swapped in mid-'66. Some of the concerns are the curvatures of the crossings. As of 2020, there appear to be no current projects to replace the Chowchilla crossings. If that were to be done, it's likely both the NB underpass and SB bridge would be replaced because of the sharp curve coming off the bridge and then passing under the NB Route 99 to WB Route 152 left-hand ramp. Since not only the SB mainline curvature but that of the ramp is problematic, the interchange and RR crossing may be done as one project. When they overlaid the Route 152 interchange over the original intersection circa 1958 or so, the state speed limit was still 55 -- so curvature such as that wouldn't have been uncommon. When that project was let (likely 1955-56) I-5 was still planned as using US 99 in the Valley -- and that section of the road would have been substandard even with the original more "lax" I-standards of the time. Note that while the Interstate-grade freeway is in Merced County,the Chowchilla bypass and the Route 152 interchange are in Madera County. This means that any improvements might have to cross Caltrans District lines. The Merced County (District 10) improvements were expedited because it was the last section of Route 99 from its southern terminus to Sacramento that hadn't been upgraded to a full freeway -- and Interstate standards have been applied on all upgrades (with the exception of some low bridge clearances between Goshen and Kingsburg) since the Turlock bypass in 1973. On the other hand, District 6's priorities with Route 99 are the section between the Fresno county line (San Joaquin River crossing) and the city of Madera; the section from Madera to just south of Route 152 was itself upgraded over the last 10 years. But the Route 152 junction and the adjacent Chowchilla bypass is among the oldest full-freeway sections of Route 99 (Atwater and Manteca are the others of similar vintage) north of Fresno; an immediage upgrade is not plans. Other district projects, such as the extension of the Route 180 freeway/expressway east of Fresno as well as what seems to be a never-ending expansion project through Kingsburg and Selma are taking priority. Complicating D6/Route 99 issues: the adjacent High Speed Rail project, which has affected Route 99 from Fowler north to Madera.
    (Source: AARoads discussion, "Re: CA 99", starting 1/2/2020)

    US 99 originally deviated from the present Route 99 routing at French Camp Road, running along French Camp Road to El Dorado Street. This is now part of County Sign Route J9. Mariposa Road wasn't added as part of LRN 4 until 1928. Post 1928 the French Camp Road alignment of US 99 was discontinued and the route spun off into E/W segments (which possibly actually was signed in 1929) from Stockton to Manteca until US 50 was extended to the Bay Area.

    Chris Sampang has also attempted to reconstruct the history of Route 99 in the Sacramento area:

    • 1926. US 99 established, following what appears to be Stockton Boulevard into town, Broadway to 16th Street, 16th north to L Street, and L/M Streets west out of town co-signed with US 40. In Davis, US 99 and US 40 entered via current Olive Drive, Richards Boulevard (going under the railroad tracks on the Richards Subway), First Street, B Street, and Russell Boulevard, splitting at the current Route 113/Russell Boulevard junction. From there, US 99 continued north up on Route 113 to Main Street in Woodland, then west on Main Street to County Road 98, and County Road 98 north to current County Road 99W near the town of Yolo. However, a different routing may have existed in Sacramento in 1926, where US 99 met up with US 50 near the current Folsom Boulevard/Business Route 80 (hidden Route 51) interchange and continued west into town on M Street.
    • 1933 (perhaps July 1932).Sacramento in 1933 (snarfed from Robert Droz's site courtesy the wayback machine) US 99E and US 99W are established; the map to the right shows the routings. US 99W north and US 40 westbound followed the older M Street routing out of town. US 99E began at the junction of L Street (US 40 west of 16th; US 50 east of 16th) and followed US 40 eastbound north on 16th Street to cross the American River (eventually continuing up (former) Route 256, current Route 65, Route 70, Route 20, and Route 99 to Red Bluff). Note: the Auburn Boulevard name was being applied to the northernmost portion of 12th Street (Auburn Boulevard now begins slightly north of North Sacramento), and Stockton Boulevard north of 5th Avenue (now Broadway), as well as Alhambra Boulevard and US 50 west into downtown via L Street may have been part of the routing of US 99 at the time.
    • 1934. State signed routes established; a portion of US 99W in Woodland (from East Street west to Road 98) is now co-signed with Route 16. Meanwhile, as work on the M Street Bridge's replacement begins, US 99W and US 40 are temporarily routed on the I Street Bridge with Route 16. It is unknown if Route 16 was co-signed with US 99 on L Street with US 50. Also in 1934, the first portion of the existing 16th Street Bridge was constructed across the American River; this is now the southbound bridge for the North Sacramento Freeway (originally US 40/99E, now Route 160). Additionally, Alternate US 99 is resigned over US 99W from Manteca to Stockton and US 99E from Sacramento to Red Bluff.
    • 1935. Tower Bridge (replacement for the older M Street Bridge) is built; US 99W and US 40 are diverted off of the I Street Bridge.
    • 1942. As seen here, by 1942, US 99 was most definitely not routed on Stockton Boulevard north of 5th Avenue (now Broadway), but rather followed 5th, Sacramento Boulevard (this portion is also now part of Broadway) and Broadway west to 16th Street. Also, Route 24 had been extended from Woodland to Sacramento (into Oakland) by this time; a portion of US 99 and US 50 (from 16th Street east to Freeport Boulevard) was co-signed with Route 24. The US 99E/W split now began at the junction of 16th Street and N Street, as L Street was removed from the state system in favor of M Street (which was now US 50/Route 16). US 99W and US 40 were likely co-signed with Route 16 down N, 9th, and M Streets west to the junction of 5th and M, where Route 16 was joined by Route 24 and continued up 5th and I to the I Street Bridge.
    • Also in 1942: An older section of Del Paso Boulevard was bypassed due to flooding issues from the nearby American River and Natomas East Main Drainage Canal/Steelhead Creek (the road level is low because of two railroad bridges overhead at the junction of Del Paso and Railroad); this section runs from Northgate Boulevard north to about Globe Avenue (site of a Sac RT light rail station). The Natomas Viaduct was built; this includes part of the current Del Paso Boulevard Y interchange and some of the current freeway lanes of the North Sacramento Freeway.
    • Mid-1940s. US 40 bypass of Davis built; as a consequence, only US 99W now enters Davis on the Olive-Richards-First-B-Russell routing under the railroad tracks.
    • 1953. US 40A is established on the routing of Route 24 from Reno Junction to Woodland; however, unlike Route 24, US 40A is routed to bypass Sacramento by a co-signage on US 99W between Main Street in Woodland and Russell Boulevard in Davis (on what is now Route 113). Between Marysville and Yuba City, US 40A is co-signed with Route 20 and US 99E.
    • 1955: US 40A/US 99W bypass of downtown Davis built, bisecting lands owned by the University of California; the downtown Davis routing of US 99W is decomissioned, as well as the Pedrick Road/Road 98/Russell Boulevard portion of US 40A on what is now locally termed "Cactus Corner". Both US 40A and US 99W in the area are former segments of US 40. US 40A now begins within US 99W's route, at the junction of the US 40 and US 99W Davis bypasses. Also, US 99E was moved out of downtown Sacramento in favor of a routing through Midtown on 29th and 30th Streets, co-signed with US 50 from Broadway north to Folsom Boulevard, as a result of construction of the Elvas Freeway (now the Capitol City Freeway, hidden Route 51/signed Business Route 80) bridge over the American River. Thus, the North Sacramento Freeway from Arden Way southwest, as well as 12th/F and 16th Streets, were all no longer part of US 99E (and became solely US 40).
    • 1963. Major changes to several routes in downtown Sacramento, as a response to freeway construction and the adjustment of several streets to become one-way thoroughfares. First, US 50 no longer enters downtown Sacramento (also negating the need for Bypass US 50 on 14th Avenue and Power Inn Road. Instead of entering downtown via US 99W's routing on Broadway and 15th/16th, US 50 is now routed up 29th and 30th, before meeting up with Folsom Boulevard (Route 16) and continuing eastbound. Also, US 50 and US 99 no longer use Stockton Boulevard and the portion of Broadway east of 29th Street, instead being placed on the South Sacramento Freeway from Broadway south (US 50 remained signed on the South Sacramento Freeway until the early 1970s). US 99W retains its co-signage with Route 24 at Broadway and 16th, but runs by its lonesome on 15th and 16th and on most of Broadway. M Street had been renamed Capitol Avenue in the 1950s (although according to one local, Capitol Avenue had been a colloquial name for the whole street as early as the 1940s, and West Capitol Avenue had been present in West Sacramento on US 99W/US 40 before the name change in Sacramento.) US 99W and US 40 (as well as Route 16) no longer reached Capitol Avenue via 9th Street, but via 7th and 6th. Instead of just using 5th Street to reach I Street, Route 16 now used the couplet of 3rd and 5th, both converted to one-way. West Capitol Avenue was no longer part of US 99W/US 40, as the West Sacramento Freeway (an early signed portion of I-80) and decomissioned Route 275 now supplanted it. US 40 now ran by its lonesome across the American River (rather than with US 99E), 12th Street being added to this route as a one-way coupling.

      With the construction of the North Sacramento Freeway, former US 40/99E (Del Paso Boulevard, El Camino Avenue, and Auburn Boulevard) were reverted to local jurisdiction. For US 99E itself, it followed the constructed portion of the 29/30 Freeway and the Roseville Freeway across the American River through North Sacramento, and then followed the Roseville Freeway northeast with US 40 (and I-80). Route 24 no longer continued to Woodland and Marysville (via Route 16, US 40A, and Route 20), but rather continued north to Marysville more directly via Jiboom Street, Garden Highway, El Centro Road, and US 99E. Also, the Yolo Causeway underwent a complete tear-down and reconstruction to accomodate traffic for I-80.

    • Between 1963 and 1964. N Street, which had been a part of the US 40, Route 16, US 99W, and US 50 routings, becomes a one-way street, necessitating all signed highways headed east-west to now use the couplet of P and Q Streets.
    • 1964. The Great Renumbering. As a result, US 99E and 99W (plus US 40) are officially decomissioned, but not immediately de-signed (unlike US 40A). Route 24 is removed northeast of Antioch, with Route 160 replacing it into downtown Sacramento; US 99W between Broadway and P Street is replaced by Route 160 as well (plus former US 99E/then-current US 40 on the North Sacramento Freeway and on 12th/16th Streets). US 99W and US 40 west between Sacramento and Davis are removed officially in favor of Interstate 80; US 99W north of Davis (as well as US 40A) is replaced with Route 113 and I-5, with the co-signed portion in Woodland becoming solely Route 16. US 50 is officially dedesignated south of the under-construction Oak Park Interchange, though also not immediately de-signed. Route 70 is established as a replacement for Route 24 between Sacramento and Marysville and US 40A between Marysville and Reno Junction; with the elimination of US 99E and 99W, (State) Route 99 now follows the old Route 24 routing with Route 70 north out of town, then split off 10 miles north on a new routing to Tudor, meeting up with Route 113 (former US 40A); Route 99 now continues north to Yuba City via old US 40A, and then to Chico via old US 99E.
    • 1967. The Pioneer Bridge is completed for I-80 (now Business Route 80/US 50/I-305), and while US 99W is still signed on the portion of the West Sacramento Freeway from the Tower Bridge west, this is now officially hidden Route 275. US 99W and 99E are still signed (with US 99W signage continuing west to Davis and north to Woodland, then intermittently along the I-5 corridor to Red Bluff). Former US 99W/US 40 in West Sacramento (West Capitol Avenue) had been designated BR US 40 in the early sixties, as well as former US 99E/US 40 in North Sacramento via Del Paso Boulevard, El Camino Avenue, and Auburn Boulevard. Former US 99/50 on Broadway (to the now-defunct State Fair site) south via Stockton Boulevard to Florin is now Business US 50. As a result of US 99W's vestigal signage, Route 16 is co-signed with US 99W between P Street and Capitol Avenue; Route 160 may have been co-signed with US 99W between 16th Street and P Street, and probably with US 40 between there and current Business I-80. The 29/30 Freeway (now Business I-80/hidden Route 51) was co-signed for US 99E and I-80 (with a small portion co-signed with US 50 from Folsom Boulevard south to Broadway). Route 99 was routed on former Route 24 via Broadway and 3rd/5th to I Street (Route 16) as the WX and West Side (I-5) freeway reroutings of Route 99 through downtown were not completed. The Oak Park interchange was scheduled to be finished by 1968; Interstate 5 construction on the riverfront had not begun. As for (State) Route 99, it began co-signed with Route 70 at the Jiboom Street/I Street (Route 16) junction, which may explain the old Route 99/70/16 Marysville green sign still (2003) present, sans Route 16 shield, on Capitol Avenue (former US 99W/US 40) near 3rd Street.
    • Late 1960s. While (State) Route 99 is established south of Sacramento, US 50 continues its co-signage to Stockton.
    • 1969. Stockton Boulevard from P Street south is now designated as Business US 50 (this was the possible 1933 routing of US 99 and 50).
    • Early 1970s. Route 70 signage into downtown removed; a few straggler signs still remain at the junction of I and 4th Streets (2003).
    • 1980. I-5 construction either in progress or completed in Sacramento; as a result, Route 99 and Route 70 are now moved off of the Jiboom/Garden/El Centro routing south of the area near Sacramento International Airport, and co-signed on I-5 into downtown. Also, Route 99 is now no longer signed for "Los Angeles", but rather "Fresno", with I-5 now being labeled as the primary route for Los Angeles (it had been signed for South Sacramento for a few years). With the completion of the Oak Park Interchange (current junction of US 50, Business I-80, hidden I-305, hidden Route 51, and Route 99), Route 16 is de-designated from Old Town to Perkins (creating an implied multiplex with I-5 and I-80), and with the completion of the El Dorado Freeway, US 50 is removed from Folsom Boulevard and Capitol Avenue; around this time, US 50 is completely removed south/west of Sacramento, orphaning Business US 50. (Both Business US 40 routes are probably gone as well.) Route 99 no longer uses surface streets, but now follows I-80 west to I-5 north to the Route 70/99 split near the airport.
    • 1982. Due to the de-designation of the downtown bypass as I-880 (and the commissioning of Business Route 80 due to the substandard former US 99E/40 29/30 and North Sacramento freeways), Route 99 is now co-signed with US 50 and Business Route 80 on the WX Freeway portion of former I-80 (and secretly co-routed with Interstate 305); no changes on the actual route occur however.
    • 1984. Route 16 is de-designated between Woodland and Sacramento, taking the I Street Bridge (the temporary routing of US 40 and 99W in 1934) out of the state system. As a result, the implied co-routing of Route 16 with I-5 now extends to the entire portion of the signed Route 99/I-5 co-signage. Also, US 50/99 shields are finally removed from Stockton Boulevard.
    • Late 1980s. Route 65 freeway bypass of Roseville constructed. While the corridor through Roseville via Washington Boulevard was given to Route 256, it remained signed Route 65 into the early 1990s; this routing was US 99E from the 1930s to the mid 1960s.
    • 1994. Route 256, a former routing of Route 65 and US 99E in Roseville, was deleted. While the eventual freeway version of it (a west routing past town) was new alignment, the corridor followed Washington Boulevard, which was former Route 65 and 99E.
    • 1996. Business Route 80 officially named "Capitol City Freeway", in an attempt to reduce usage of colloquial names (WX Freeway, 29/30 Freeway). Except for the Pioneer Bridge, all of the Capitol City route has been a part of Route 99 at one time or another: West Sacramento Freeway (I-80 bypass (former I-880) east to then-Route 275): US 99W from 1954 to 1968, WX Freeway (Interstate 5 to Oak Park Interchange): 1968- present 29/30 Freeway, North Sacramento Freeway, and Roseville Freeway (Oak Park Interchange north to Roseville): US 99E from 1962 to 1967 Also, that year, Route 275, the portion of the West Sacramento Freeway between Jefferson Boulevard and the Tower Bridge (originally constructed in 1954 as US 40/99W) was decommissioned.
    • 2000. Route 99 is now no longer acknowledged on trailblazers from the 99/5 split near the Sacramento International Airport southeast to the Oak Park Interchange (as seen by personal experience and noted on Andy Field's site); but many interchange signs showing the co-routing are present (known examples are at the I Street and Richards Boulevard junctions off of I-5, I-5's junction with the WX Freeway, and the Oak Park Interchange - most strikingly the accurate "Route 99 TO I-5 I-80" gantry on the WX Freeway right before the Oak Park Interchange), and some of the Route 99 shields in those areas have recently been replaced with newer specimens. Also, Route 70's co-signage with Route 99 south to I-5 is taken down for good; this southern portion of the route was never official but was probably originally designated by CalTrans to directly replace the 1960-1964 portion of Route 24.

    Nathan Edgars looked at traffic counts, and came up with the following:

    • 1964: Route 16: I Street Bridge, down 3rd-5th and over Broadway to Route 160, then a break until the split from US 50

      Route 80: Tower Bridge, over Capitol/N to 29th-30th, then a break to Broadway at 29th-30th and up 29th-30th

      Route 99: from the south to Broadway, then west on Broadway, then a break to the east end of the I Street Bridge and up Jibboom Street

    • By 1966: Another piece of Route 99 added along P and Q Streets between Route 160 and Route 16. The changes to Route 80 are unclear.
    • By 1968: Route 80 moved to the new route, with the west part becoming Route 275

      Route 16 cut back to I-5 at the east end of the I Street Bridge

      Route 99 removed from P and Q Streets and instead routed back west on Broadway, replacing Route 16, but only to Route 275, where it broke until Jibboom Street

    • By 1970: Route 99 removed from Jibboom Street etc.

    The Gribblenation Blog, "Highways in and around Old Sacramento; US 40, US 99W, CA 16, CA 24, CA 70, CA 99, CA 275, and more" provides a detailed history of the various highways (US 40, US 99, Route 16, Route 24, Route 70, Route 99, Route 275, Route 51, I-5, and I-80 in the Old Sac area.

    Route 99 S of Sacramento (South Sacramento Freeway) has several cut-outs for bus stops. These were installed for Sacramento Transit's bus service in the 1960s; the bus-usage signs were removed in the early 1990s (and the current Sacramento transit system, Sacramento Reigonal Transit, only has one daily line on the South Sacramento Freeway).

    SignThere are still times when Caltrans still missigns the route as US 99. An example from October 2009 involves a sign replacement project on eastbound US 50 on the W/X Freeway portion, as illustrated to the right. As of December 2009, this sign has already been corrected.

    Status Status

    I-5/Route 99 Split to Northern End of Bakersfield

    In May 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Negative Declaration (ND) has been completed: Route 99 in Kern County. Lower roadway profile on a portion Route 99 near the community of Wheeler Ridge. (PPNO 6876) (06-Ker-99, PM L0.0/0.6). This project is located at the I-5/Route 99 separation near Wheeler Ridge in Kern County. The project proposes to improve the vertical clearance of the I-5/SR 99 Separation Bridge No. 50-0240R. The proposed project aims to accomplish targets of the California Sustainable Freight Plan and improve major freight and truck mobility by addressing the current vertical clearance restriction at the existing crossings. The project proposes to lower northbound and southbound Route 99 to achieve standard vertical clearance established in the California Highway Design Manual. The proposed project is estimated to cost $11.4 million. This project is fully funded and is currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for $11.4 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in FY 2018-19. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, May 2018 Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    In August 2016, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project on Route 99 (06-Ker-99, PM 10.5/20.5) in Kern County that will rehabilitate a ten-mile portion of the existing outside southbound lane of Route 99 near Bakersfield. The project is programmed in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total programmed amount is $28,973,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    In May 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Negative Declaration (ND) has been completed: Route 99 in Kern County. Construct roadway improvements on Route 99 in and near the city of Bakersfield. (PPNO 6681) (06-Ker-99, PM 10.4/21.2). This project is located on Route 99 through Bakersfield and a portion of an unincorporated area of Kern County. The project proposes to rehabilitate pavement and improve vertical clearance at two overcrossings. The project proposes to replace and lower the roadbed at the Panama Lane and White Lane overcrossings. The existing vertical clearance at the existing crossings does not meet the minimum standard required by the California Highway Design Manual. The project proposes to address this clearance requirement by lowering the vertical profile of the existing highway at the overcrossing structures. The proposed project is estimated to cost $54.7 million. This project is not fully funded and is currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for $53.2 million. Construction is estimated to begin in FY 2020-21. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, May 2018 Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    Route 99 Widening - Route 119 (~ KER 17.474) to Wilson Road (~ KER 22.082)

    In November 2010, the CTC approved amending the STIP to program a new project: Route 99 from Route 119 to Wilson Road project (PPNO 6268). The project will widen the freeway from 6 lanes to 8 lanes between Route 119 and Wilson Road.

    In March 2011, the CTC received notice of a prospoal to amend the 2010 STIP to reduce the programming for KCOG’s Planning, Programming and Monitoring (PPNO 6L03), and revise the funding plans for the Route 99 from Route 119 to Wilson Road project (PPNO 6268).

    In October 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen Route 99 from six lanes to eight lanes in Bakersfield from Route 119 to Wilson Road. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program for Project Development only. The total estimated cost is $45,200,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funding construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to the San Joaquin kit fox, a federally listed endangered species, will be mitigated through a combination of measures including training sessions for construction crews, wildlife crossings, and other kit fox avoidance practices. As a result, an MND was completed for this project.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Corridor. Section 1304 adds Route 99 to the list of high priority corridors (#54): The California Farm-to-Market Corridor, California State Route 99 from south of Bakersfield to Sacramento, California.

    Hosking Avenue Interchange (~ KER 18.58)

    [Hosking Interchange]In July 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct a new interchange and public road connection at Hosking Avenue, just N of Taft Highway, on Route 99 in the city of Bakersfield. The project is funded with local developer funding. However, the project is being considered for both state and federal funding if they become available. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $27,329,000. Specifically, the City of Bakersfield, in cooperation with Caltrans is proposing to replace the existing Hosking Avenue overcrossing with a new interchange and create a new public road access to Route 99 at Hosking Avenue. The construction of a new interchange at Hosking Avenue will improve the operations of the adjacent interchanges and arterial roads by providing existing traffic a new point of direct access to Route 99. This new interchange will also support planned development and growth in the southwest area of Bakersfield. The current interchange at Hosking Avenue is an existing 2-lane overcrossing located approximately 6 miles south of downtown City of Bakersfield, providing no Route 99 access. Through the project area, Route 99 is a 6-lane freeway. Three miles north of Hosking Avenue, Route 99 widens to an 8-lane freeway through the City center. The adjacent interchanges, Panama Lane to the north and Route 119 (Taft Highway) to the south, are major east-west arterials through Bakersfield. The proposed project includes the construction of a spread diamond interchange with two-loop on-ramps to Route 99 and replacing the existing 2-lane Hosking Avenue overcrossing with a new 6- lane structure. Upgrading the existing Hosking Avenue overcrossing to a 6-lane facility will be consistent with planned local improvements and will match the City's 6-lane major arterial standard cross section. Other City and developer-initiated projects both east and west of the interchange will widen Hosking Avenue concurrently with this proposed project. The new Hosking Avenue interchange will provide better access to Route 99 for residential development in the southwest quadrant of the interchange, currently under construction, and for the proposed large commercial development in the northeast quadrant. The southeast quadrant of the interchange is vacant and zoned for residential. Construction of the Hosking Avenue interchange will lessen future traffic demand at the adjacent interchanges and local arterial intersections. The 2035 traffic forecast for the Hosking interchange build alternative indicates that improvements of levels of service at Route 99 mainline and adjacent interchanges will be modest. It is assumed that the capacity freed by the Hosking interchange will be backfilled with the increased traffic demands due to growth in the area. Furthermore, traffic operations at the neighboring arterial intersections are expected to significantly improve.

    In August 2016, it was reported that when contractors finished a $1.4 million sign replacement project in late June 2016, they failed to change out one of those green-and-white exit advisory signs that indicate the number of exits in the city of Bakersfield. Motorists driving south through town get an up-to-date look at the state’s ninth largest city with a new sign that’s positioned north of the 7th Standard Road/Merle Haggard Drive exit (~ KER R30.539). It reads “Bakersfield / Next 12 Exits.” However, NB drivers saw “Bakersfield / Next 5 Exits.” Additionally, that sign was planted just north of the Panama Lane exit, well within the present-day city limits, which extend south past Taft Highway. State workers are moving the sign outside city limits during the September, and give it a yet-newer “exits” number — 13, because there are 13 exits from NB Route 99 in Bakersfield. Later in 2016, at a cost of around $1,000, it will be completely replaced. Caltrans will also move the “Bakersfield city limits” sign on NB Route 99 because it’s currently located near White Lane (~ KER 21.068) — also now inside city limits. Both signs were part of a state freeway sign renewal that began last year and updated 197 overhead signs on Route 99, Route 58 and Route 178 in city limits, and 48 ground-mounted signs throughout Kern County.
    (Source: Bakersfield.Com, 8/24/2016)

    Centennial Corridor / Beltway Improvements (~ KER 22.121 to KER 23.6)

    Rte 99 Belle Terrace BridgeIn April 2017, there was an update on the the Route 58 beltway improvements that connect to the Centennial Corridor. This project provides traffic improvements along Route 58, from Route 99 to Cottonwood Road, and adds a lane in either direction along Route 99 in the area between Wilson Road (~ KER 22.121) and Ming Avenue (~KER 22.617). The project is 60 percent complete; completion expected in early 2018. Work on the pump plant, which removes water that collects under the road, on northbound Route 99 near Ming Avenue continues. Falsework, or temporary support, for the new connector bridge for Route 99 to eastbound Route 58 is nearly complete. Crews will begin installing steel for the bridge stems and bottom frame in May 2017. Work to widen the bridges at P Street, the Bakersfield Corral Overhead (a railroad bridge), and Madison Street are also underway. Lastly, multiple retaining and sound walls are being constructed along Route 58 on both sides of the freeway. Walls and barrier rails are also under construction along the on- and off-ramps at Chester Avenue, H Street and Union Avenue.
    (Source: Bakersfield.Com, 4/20/2017)

    In March 2018, the CTC updated the following project in the SHOPP: 06-Ker-99 22.8/23.6 In Bakersfield, from 0.3 mile south of Belle Terrace Overcrossing to 0.1 mile north of Route 58, also on Route 58, Route 99 to 0.2 mile east of Route 99 (PM R52.3 to R52.5). Construct an auxiliary lane, reconstruct an Overcrossing and realign connector ramp. $30,960,000 in Construction Capital.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, March 2018, Agenda 2.1a(1))

    In February 2019, it was reported that demolition of the Belle Terrace Bridge was starting. This would result in access to Route 58 and to SB Route 99 at Real Road to permanently close on 2/21/2019. EB motorists would then need to access Route 58 by taking Stockdale Highway / Brundage Lane to the H Street Interchange. WB motorists would exit Route 58 at Chester Ave. SB motorists would access Route 99 at either California or Ming Ave.
    (Source: Caltrans District 6 FB Post, 2/15/2019)

    In May 2019, the CTC approved allocating an additional $3,300,000 for the previously approved SHOPP Operational Improvement project (PPNO 6891) on Route 99 and Route 58 in Kern County, to complete construction. The project will widen traffic lanes, add an auxiliary lane and improve signs on northbound (NB) Route 99 between Ming Avenue and Route 58. The project will also replace the Belle Terrace Overcrossing (OC) and reconstruct the NB Route 99/EB Route 58 connector. The project is designated as a Financial Contribution Only (FCO) and therefore is not eligible for G-12 authority. This project is located within a main freight corridor for California funded with various local funds, SB 1 funds, SHOPP funds and federal grants. Many of these projects are in various stages of construction. The overall cost of these projects is estimated to be over $1 billion dollars. In March 2018, the Commission allocated $30,960,000 in Construction Capital, and $0 in Construction Support. The City is funding the cost of Construction Support in the amount of $3,850,000. A cooperative agreement (Co-Op) between the Department and the City, designates the City as the construction implementation agency, responsible for contract administration and associated support cost. The Department, as a project sponsor, provides project oversight and funding for additional Construction Capital cost incurred during construction. The $30,960,000 allocation provided to the City is being invoiced and the Department is reimbursing for actual allowable costs incurred and paid to the contractor. In June 2018, the City augmented the allocated Construction Capital funds and awarded the project contract for $32,460,000. Construction began in October 2018; the contract status is currently active with 27 percent of the construction bid items completed. The project is expected to be completed by April 2020. Since the start of construction, the project has incurred a funding shortfall due to agreed-upon contract Change Orders (CO). The City has negotiated with the contractor, and they both agreed on the amount needed to pay for these COs, and the Department concurred. The total amount needed to pay for these COs is $3,500,000. Based on funding proportions and the terms of the Co-Op agreement , the City will provide $200,000 in local funds, and SHOPP funds will provide $3,300,000. As with the original allocation, the $3,300,000 allocation provided to the City is to be invoiced and the Department will reimburse for actual allowable costs incurred and paid to the contractor. The Department is requesting a supplemental fund amount of $3,300,000 in Construction Capital to complete the construction of this project. Since the City is funding the total cost of Construction Support, the Department is not requesting any Construction Support funds. When this supplemental request is approved, the Department and the City have agreed to amend the Co-Op, requiring that any future cost increases in construction will not come from SHOPP funds. A major portion of the construction cost increase is due to differing site conditions at the soil nail walls. Retaining Walls No. 6 and 62 were type-selected as soil nail walls based on their proximity to existing Wible Road, and the need for “top-down” construction. Field soil investigation prior to wall design, including multiple soil test borings, revealed the existence of layers of loose to medium dense sands. The geotechnical report did include measures to mitigate loose, caving sandy soil during construction. These measures included constructing a berm, using temporary shotcrete to stabilize the excavation, and using full length temporary casings. Furthermore, stability testing would be performed to determine the acceptable lift height of soil and exposure time during excavation. The wall design option as a soil nail wall type remained unchanged through the course of design and went through all the required design and constructability reviews before advertising the project contract. Using over 2,000 soil nails, the 24-foot-high retaining wall supports a 3,500 feet embankment consisting of loose, sandy soil. During construction, excavation at the soil nail wall location revealed a more dominant presence of loose, less competent soils than anticipated and field excavation activities were halted. The Construction Manager then collaborated with the Contractor and Geotechnical Engineer to develop a timely and cost-effective solution that involves “soil mixing” to stabilize the soil and preventing caving of over 56,000 linear feet of soil nail bores. Another significant portion of the construction cost increase is the result of the discovery of an AT&T abandoned conduit during field preparation to demolish the bridge. The conduit was discovered inside the bridge and was determined to contain asbestos. An earlier asbestos survey, that was conducted during the design phase, did not find any asbestos on the Belle Terrace Bridge. The asbestos conduit removal will require additional costs to be safely detached prior to bridge demolition, as contractors are required to adhere to special safety procedures when dealing with items containing asbestos. The cost associated with this operation is $550,000. The bridge demolition operation has been delayed to accommodate a change in the means and methods for demolition of the bridge and mitigation of the asbestos containing conduit. The remainder of the cost increase, $475,000 is due to the additional field work needed to excavate and remove “Unknown Buried Manmade Objects”; consisting of large, unearthed chunks of concrete rubble at the project site.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5e.(1))

    ☞ Note: For the improvements of the connection with Route 58 (Stockdale Highway, Centennial Corridor, Rosedale Highway), see Route 58 (~ KER 23.596)

    24th Street Improvements

    In April 2017, an update was provided on the 24th Street Improvement Project (~ KER 25.64). This project widens, realigns and restripes 24th Street from west of Route 99 to east of M Street; realigns and restripes 23rd from west of C Street to east of M Street to add a lane in each direction. It also includes improvements to the 24th Street/Route 99 interchange and the northbound Route 99 auxiliary lane; and widens the Oak Street/24th Street intersection. The design phase of this project is 65 percent complete; right-of-way acquisition is completed. The project designer is working to complete the sound wall construction plans. Sound walls for properties on the north side of 24th Street could begin in summer 2017. Demolition work is underway on the north side of 24th Street. Five houses have been removed; eight houses are scheduled for demolition in April. There were no bidders for the auction scheduled on April 4 for the five houses available for relocation on the south side of 24th Street. These properties will be advertised for demolition in April. The city plans to hold an auction on the house located at 2312 24th St. on April 27. The successful buyer will relocate the house from its current location to the new lot fronting Bay Street. Information can be found on Planet Bids and on the TRIP website.
    (Source: Bakersfield.Com, 4/20/2017)

    In July 2017, it was reported that the CTC has approved an $86 million increase to Caltrans' State Route 99 Rehabilitation Project for next fiscal year, to be used to improve part of 24th Street at Route 99, according to City Manager Alan Tandy's most recent weekly memo to the Bakersfield City Council. The City of Bakersfield and Caltrans were able to add the section of 24th Street — from the Kern River Bridge to Route 99 — into the rehab project. This so-called Segment 1 project involves widening 24th to four lanes in the westbound direction, expanding the Route 99 southbound loop on-ramp to two lanes and expanding the northbound Route 99 off-ramp, Tandy's memo says. Caltrans expects to bid out the rehab project in about a year and Segment 1 will be one of the first pieces of work done under it, the memo goes on to say.
    (Source: Bakersfield.Com 7/3/2017)

    Rosedale Highway Connection Improvements

    In June 2015, the CTC authorized $7,467,000 to widen the Southbound off ramp to Rosedale Highway to improve operational efficiency and safety during peak hours of travel on Route 99 in Kern County (06-Ker-99, 25.8/26.2).

    In April 2017, it was reported that the Rosedale Highway connection improvements were nearly complete. The southbound Route 99 auxiliary lane/Rosedale Highway off-ramp improvements were fully opened in mid-April 2017. Crews are expected to remain in the area for a few more weeks to complete detail work, such as arranging electrical lines and irrigation.
    (Source: Bakersfield.Com, 4/20/2017)

    In May 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Kern County that will correct the seismic deficiencies of four bridges on Route 99 and Route 178 in Kern County, including the Airport Drive Overcrossing (Bridge Number 50- 0266, ~KER 26.732) and the Golden State Avenue Separation (Bridge Numbers 50-0326 Right, 50-0326 Left, and 50-0326 Center, ~ KER 27.158). The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $10,139,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17.

    In April 2017, an update was provided on the Hageman Flyover. This project connects Hageman Road to Golden State Highway/Route 204 (~ KER 27.158) with roadway across Route 99. The Design Phase is 95 percent complete; but right-of-way acquisition has not started. Caltrans is finalizing draft plans. The city is working with San Joaquin Valley Railroad on a construction and maintenance agreement and a California Public Utilities Commission permit application. Right-of-way appraisals and acquisition will not begin until design has progressed to 100 percent.
    (Source: Bakersfield.Com, 4/20/2017)

    Beardsley Canal Project

    In November 2010, the CTC approved amending the STIP to program a new project: Route 99 from Route 204 (~ KER 27.158) to Beardsley Canal (~ KER R28.402) project (PPNO 6267). The project will widen the freeway from 6 lanes to 8 lanes between Route 204 and Beardsley Canal.

    In March 2011, the CTC received notice of a prospoal to amend the 2010 STIP to reduce the programming for KCOG’s Planning, Programming and Monitoring (PPNO 6L03), and revise the funding plans for the Route 99 from Route 204 to Beardsley Canal project (PPNO 6267).

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $88,179,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Bakersfield, between Beardsley Canal Bridge and Route 46, that will rehabilitate 62 lane miles of existing Portland Cement concrete pavement to improve safety and ride quality.

    In October 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen Route 99 from six lanes to eight lanes from Route 204 to Beardsley Canal Bridge. The project proposes to add a 12-foot lane and a 10-foot inside shoulder in each direction, separated by a concrete median barrier within the existing median.The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program for Project Development only. Total estimated project cost is $13,260,000. Depending on the availability of funding construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to the San Joaquin kit fox, a federally listed endangered species, will be mitigated through a combination of measures including training sessions for construction crews, limited speeds for construction vehicles and daily inspection of potential areas of entrapment. As a result, an MND was completed for this project. In October 2012, the CTC approved $11,300,000 in funding for this project.

    In May 2013, the CTC approved deallocation of $1,072,000 in Proposition 1B Route 99 bond funds from the North Bakersfield Widening project (PPNO 6267) in Kern County, thereby reducing the original construction capital allocation of $9,600,000 to $8,528,000, to reflect contract award savings

    TCRP 103TCRP Project #103 will improve the interchange at Seventh Standard Road, north of Bakersfield (~ KER R30.53). The goal of TCRP Project #103 is to alleviate congestion and eliminate safety hazards associated with existing geometrics and an at-grade railroad crossing by providing operational improvements and constructing interchange modifications. The scope of work includes improvements to the existing interchange on Route 99, an additional bridge over Route 99, ramp modifications, widening to four lanes, realignment of the 7th Street Road, signalization of ramp intersections, as well as an adjacent grade separation over the Union Pacific Railroad. The project schedule was updated due to the temporary suspension of the project until additional funding was identified for right of way acquisition. With the Public Utilities Commission and the Union Pacific Railroad providing alternate funding for both Right of Way and Construction phases, right of way acquisition is now nearing completion and construction is underway. In August 2007, the CTC amended the project schedule to indicate completion in FY08/09.

    Northern End of Bakersfield to Tulare

    In May 2014, the CTC vacated right of way in the city of Delano along Route 99 just north of Woollomes Avenue (~ KER 54.469), consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes. The City was given a 90-day notice of intent to vacate and did not protest such action.

    Tipton Bridge Replacement (06-Tul-99, PM 19.46)

    In March 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Negative Declaration (ND) has been completed: Route 99 in Tulare County. Replace existing bridge on Route 99 in the city of Tipton. (PPNO 6679) (06-Tul-99, PM 19.46). This project is located in the city of Tipton on Route 99 and Avenue 152 in the county of Tulare. The project proposes to replace the Tipton Bridge at the Avenue 152 overcrossing and mitigate the continued deterioration and the low vertical clearance of the existing bridge. The project is estimated to cost $11.5 million which is fully funded and programmed in the 2016 SHOPP, which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in 2020. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 SHOPP. The project was also included in the in March 2018: PPNO 6679. 06-Tulare-99 19.4: In Tipton, at Avenue 152 Overcrossing (No. 46-0191). Replace bridge. Begin Con: 8/3/2020. Total Project Cost: $11,455K.
    (Source: CTC Minutes, March 2018 Agenda Item 2.2c(1); final adopted 2018 SHOPP)

    In June 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP scope amendment: 06-Tul-99 19.4 PPNO 6679. ProjID 0614000005. In Tipton, at Avenue 152 Overcrossing (No. 46-0191) No. 46-0191. Replace bridge. Increase in construction capital is due to a change in the superstructure bridge design type and structure depth. The new strategy will allow for a greater vertical clearance of 16 feet, 10 inches rather than previously planned design of 15 feet, 7 inches clearance. Updated cost: $14,434K
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Scope Item 78)

    In June 2020, the CTC approved the following allocation for CONST and CON ENG: $11,520,000. 06-Tul-99 19.4. PPNO 06-6679. ProjID 0614000005. EA 0Q910. On Route 99 in Tipton, at Avenue 152 Overcrossing No. 46-0191. Outcome/Output: Replace bridge to address the deteriorated deck and exterior girder.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #18)

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $10,500,000 in SHOPP funding near the city of Tulare, from Avenue 152 (~ TUL 19.46) to Elk Bayou Bridge (~ TUL 25.005), that will rehabilitate 10.4 lane miles of pavement to improve safety and ride quality.

    PPNO 6369: Tulare 6-Lane N/S Widening -- Ave 200 to Prosperity Ave (TUL 25.4/30.5)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to also adjust PPNO 6369 Tulare 6-Lane N/S widening, Av 200-Prosperity Av (TUL 25.4/30.5), from $3M to $2.150M, with Environmental and Planning in FY20-21.

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, makes no adjustment to the programming on this project, with $2,150K programmed in FY20-21 for Environmental and Planning. It also included PPNO 6369, Tulare 6-Lane N/S widen, Av 200-Prosperity Av (IIP)(APDE), in the Interregional portion of the STIP with one change in programming: 2,000K in FY20-21 and the 6,000K in FY22-23 accelerated to 4,300K in FY21-22.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In March 2020, the CTC approved a resolution to amend the Route 99 Bond Program by including the Tulare City Widening Project and program the design component in Fiscal Year 2021-22 for a total of $2,070,000 in the Route 99 Program. The Tulare City Widening Project will widen a 5.1-mile segment of 4-lane freeway to 6-lane freeway on Route 99 from Avenue 200 to Prosperity Avenue.
    (Source: March CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 4.24)

    In August 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Tulare adjacent to Route 99 on South “K” Street (~ TUL 25.538), consisting of a frontage road and adjacent appurtenant drainage facilities.

    Commercial Avenue Interchange (06-Tul-99, PM 26.3/27.6)

    Rte 99 South Tulare InterchangeThe 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $9.5M in FY20-21 and FY21-22 to construct PPNO 6940, South Tulare Interchange, construct. This appears to be either a new interchange at Industrial Ave (~ TUL 27.094), upgrading Paige Ave (~ TUL 27.598), or another new interchange in that vicinity. The RTIP describes this as: In Tulare County near Tulare from 0.2 miles north of Airport Overcrossing to Paige Road Overcrossing; Construct new interchange.

    In October 2019, the CTC had on its agenda the following project for future consideration of funding: 06-Tul-99, PM 26.3/27.6 Route 99 (SR 99) in Tulare County. Construct a new interchange on Route 99 near the city of Tulare in Tulare County. (PPNO 6940). This project is located on SR 99 near the city of Tulare in Tulare County. The project proposes to construct a new interchange at Commercial Avenue. The proposed project would improve operational performance and relieve traffic congestion on local roads. The addition of bicycle and pedestrian features incorporate complete streets elements. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed for $4 million for PS&E, with a total of $5.5 million for Right-of-Way (capital and support). Assuming funding is available, construction is estimated to begin in 2023. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 STIP.
    (Source: October 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, adjusts the programming for PPNO 6940 to explicitly reference the interchange as "Commercial Avenue", and to adjust the funding programmed: from $4,000K to $6,000K in prior years, moving $5,500 from FY21-22 to FY20-21, and adding $7,400K in FY21-22.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In September 2020, it was reported that a $16-million federal grant will bring this long-gestating project to fruition as early as summer 2025. The project will extend Commercial Avenue over Route 99 to Laspina Street between the Paige Avenue and Avenue 200 interchanges in Tulare. Additional lanes will also be added to the highway between Commercial and Paige to alleviate congestion at the Paige exit. This interchange will ease congestion during Tulare's annual International Ag Expo and boost business along the busy goods-movement corridor that connects southern and northern California through the Central Valley.Construction is expected to begin in fall 2022 with an anticipated summer 2025 completion date.  The remainder of the $52-million project is being funded through state grants, local sales taxes, and private contributions from the International Agri-Center and the Faria family.
    (Source: Visalia Times Delta, 9/21/2020)

    Tulare to Fresno

    Tulare (~TUL 30.605) to Goshen (~ TUL 40.335) Widening

    In September 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to widen Route 99 from four to six lanes between Prosperity Avenue in Tulare (~TUL 30.605) and north of the North Goshen Overhead in Visalia (~ TUL 40.335), and construct roadway improvements on Route 99 in the city of Tulare. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program for Plans, Specifications and Estimate, and Right of way. The total estimated project cost is $114,800,000, capital and support. The begin construction date is unknown, pending funding availability.

    A project to construct a Tagus-Goshen 6-lane (Ave 264 (~ TUL 33.92) to Goshen) was submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account ($96,800K requested), but was not recommended for funding.

    Another project included in the December 2011 TIP update is a project to widen Route 99 from six to eight lanes from Avenue 264, near the former Tagus Ranch north to Caldwell Avenue (Ave 280, ~Caldwell Avenue), west of Visalia. Caltrans will commit $12.2 million to cover most of the construction and administrative costs. TCAG would provide matching funds totaling $8.3 million from state transportation funds allocated to the county. Construction would start in 2015.

    In January 2013, the CTC approved de-allocation of $1,273,000 in Proposition 1B State Route 99 (SR99) bond funds for the Tulare to Goshen 6-Lane North Segment project (PPNO 6400A) in Tulare County, thereby reducing the original Route 99 construction capital allocation of $40,000,000 to $38,727,000 to reflect contract award savings.

    In June 2015, the CTC approved $20,800,000 towards the Middle Segment (Caldwell) 6-Lane widening. This project is near Visalia, from 1.2 mile south of Avenue 280 to 0.9 mile south of West Visalia Overhead. It will widen the freeway from four to six lanes.

    In June 2015, it was reported that the CTC approved $20.8 million to widen Route 99 in the Visalia area from four lanes to six.
    (Source: Fresno Bee, 6/27/2015)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to combine PPNO 6400E Tagus 6-lane southbound widening and 6400F Tagus 6-lane northbound widening into a single PPNO 6400G Tagus 6-Lane N/S widening, Prosperity Av-Av 280 with a total allocation of $14.888M, with construction in FY20-21 (TUL 30.6/35.2).

    Alas, in October 2019, it was reported that inclusion in the STIP isn't enough if the project isn't ready. In a 2020 Draft Report, Caltrans announced plans to delete three projects: (1) a project to expand Route 99 from four to six lanes — three on each side — between Prosperity Avenue and Avenue 200, near the International Agri-Center; (2) a project to widen Route 99 to six lanes S of Madera, and a project to widen Route 46 E of the Cholame Y along the Antelope Grade. Money for the project comes from the state's Interregional Transportation Improvement Program, which includes a $2.6 billion fund to improve transportation and goods movement across the state. The fund is in part derived from Senate Bill 1, the state's controversial gas tax passed in 2017 and upheld in a failed ballot measure last year. The deletion of the funds naturally has local politicians upset beliving it to be a "bait and switch" regarding SB1. However, that isn't the case. SB1 specifically allocates portions of the revenue from the new transportation improvement fee to the State Transit Assistance Program and to the Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program. Specifically, it allocates two hundred seventy-five million dollars ($275,000,000) for the interregional share of the State Transportation Improvement Program. Recall, that this widening was in the 2018 STIP. One of the projects funded through the STIP is the Interregional Transportation Improvement Program (ITIP), which has the purpose to improve interregional mobility for people and goods across the State of California on highway and passenger rail corridors of strategic importance. At least 60 percent of that program must be programmed to projects outside urbanized areas on the Interregional Road System (IRRS) and for intercity passenger rail. Of this amount, at least 15 percent (9 percent of the ITIP) must be programmed for intercity passenger rail projects. But STIP capacity over the 2020 five-year FE period has decreased compared to the capacity in the 2018 five-year FE period, going from $3.3 billion in the 2018 FE to $2.6 billion in the 2020 FE. The decrease is primarily attributable to a high level of pre-existing STIP project commitments for allocated and programmed projects. The 2020 Fund Estimate provides $52,414,000 in new, additional ITIP funding, but $52,250,000 of that is immediately eaten up by previous projects that cost more than expected (in San Luis Obispo and Humboldt counties). That leaves $164,000 to hand out, which required deletion (or, more specifically, delay) of $32,494,00 in highway projects to make money available. Removing these three projects from the 2020 ITIP and saving money on another Route 99 project moves about $61 million to the column of “uncommitted 2020 ITIP programming capacity.” Those uncommitted funds, according to the draft plan, will be held in reserve “for priority rail projects and other priorities aligned with Executive Order N-19-19.” Note that this does not mean the project was deleted. State Transportation Secretary David Kim says the projects weren’t ready to proceed, and the funds can be reapplied for in two years. Additionally, other projects on those roads – for example, work on the Cholame "Y" at the Route 46 / Route 41 intersection, and widening of Route 99 at Tagus – are still being funded through the ITIP.
    (Sources: Visalia Times Delta, 10/9/2019; Streetsblog, 10/31/2019; ABC 30, 10/9/2019; LATimes 10/14/2019; Streetsblog, 10/11/2019; SLOTribune 10/8/2019; New Times, 10/10/2019)

    In December 2019, it was reported that, whew, the project wasn't deleted from the STIP after all. Specifically, Caltrans released its final 2020 Interregional Transportation Improvement Program (ITIP) on Dec. 15 issuing a complete reversal of its draft report in October that deprogrammed $32 million in highway projects including Route 99 in Tulare and Madera counties and Route 46 in Kern County. Valley lawmakers, local leaders, and transportation entities strongly opposed the plan from the beginning. The opposition from the Valley was so great, it forced the California Transportation Commission (CTC) to hold a third public hearing, one more than is required, in Fresno. In addition to comments received at three hearings in Modesto, Santa Ana and Fresno, Caltrans said almost all of the comments it received on the ITIP were focused on the deprogramming of projects to widen Route 99 from four to six lanes from Prosperity Avenue south to Avenue 200 through the city of Tulare and another Highway 99 improvement project in Madera and to improve safety along Route 46 in Kern County. The CTC will hold two hearings, one in Northern California on Jan. 30 in Sacramento and another in Southern California on Feb. 6 in Santa Ana, before making a final determination on the ITIP.
    (Source: Sun Gazette, 12/25/2019)

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, made no changes to the programming PPNO 6400C "Tulare-Goshen, Middle Segment-Caldwell (RIP), 6-lane (RW CCA 8-18)": It is closing out, $650K in the hole. The STIP does change the programming for PPNO 6400G "Tagus 6-Lane N/S widening, Prosperity Av-Av 280 (RIP)", decreasing the overall funding from $14,888K to $10,961, with programmed funding ending in FY20-21. It also included PPNO 6400G, Tagus 6-Lane N/S widening, Prosperity Av-Av 280 (IIP), in the Interregional portion of the STIP with two changes in programming: 11,325K in prior year funding changed to 8,816K, and 71,000K in FY20-21 changed to 64,836K.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In August 2020, the CTC approved the following financial allocation: $73,451,000. 06-Tul-99 PM 30.6/35.2. PPNO 06-6400G ProjID 0613000005 EA 36024. Tagus 6-Lane Widening (Combined). Route 99 Near the city of Tulare, from Prosperity Avenue to 1.2 mile south of Avenue 280. Widen from four to six lanes. Const $7,337,000; Con Eng $54,114,000.
    (August 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5c.(1) #3)

    In January 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Tulare County that will modify the existing interchange at Route 99 and Cartmill Avenue (~ TUL 31.837) in the city of Tulare. The CTC also approved $7,000,000 for construction capital for the exchange modification.

    PPNO 6421 Caldwell Interchange (~ TUL 36.43)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $15.5M for PPNO 6421 Caldwell Interchange, reconstruct. Near Visalia, at intersection of Route 99 and Caldwell Avenue (Avenue 280) (~ TUL 36.43); Reconstruct interchange.

    The 2020 STIP, approved by the CTC at the March 2020 meeting, changes the programming for this as follows:
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    PPNO Project Prior 20-21 21-22 22-23 23-24 24-25
    6421 Caldwell Interchange, reconstruct 4,000K 0 5,000K 6,000K 0 0
    6421 Caldwell Interchange, reconstruct -4,000K 0 -5,000K -6,000K 0
    6421 Caldwell Interchange, reconstruct 5,000K 0 0 4,600K 7,000K 0

    In June 2020, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way, consisting of 8 segments of collateral facilities, in the County of Tulare in the vicinity of Route 99 and Betty Drive (06-Tul-99-PM 40.3/41.0) under the terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated August 13, 2013.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.3c)

    Route 99 / Betty Drive in Goshen (~ TUL 40.782)

    TCRP Project #140 will add an overpass in the city of Goshen ( 06-Tul-99 39.6/41.3).

    In December 2011, the Tulare County Association of Governments (TCAG) updated its Regional Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). The TIP is submitted it to the California Department of Transportation and the California Transportation Commission by March 28 of each year in order for TIP's projects to be included in the state’s TIP funding. The update added a project to start in 2016 that would construct a loop freeway on-ramp to Route 99 at Betty Drive in Goshen. The on-ramp is intended to prevent traffic from backing up at the Betty Drive interchange by installing a loop that cars heading south on the freeway can drive into without stopping, eliminating the need for traffic to stop and turn left to access the on-ramp. Projects to widen Riggin Avenue in the area and to build an overpass above commercial railroad tracks at Betty Drive to reduce traffic congestion around the interchange are under way or complete. About $30 million in construction costs would be covered with money raised through Tulare County’s Measure R half-cent sales tax. Another $5 million in state funds would cover construction administration.

    In October 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will reconstruct the Betty Drive/Route 99 Interchange in Goshen. Betty Drive will become a through-road connecting to the realigned Riggin Avenue on the east side of the interchange and Avenue 308 on the west side.

    In December 2016, the CTC allocated the following funding: 06-Tul-99 39.6/41.3 | Route 99 Betty Drive Interchange Improvements. Near Goshen, on Route 99 at Betty Drive. Widen interchange and construct operational improvements. $5,000,000.

    In June 2018, it was reported that as of 6/22/2018, the new Betty Drive bridge was officially open to traffic. The old Betty Drive bridge will be demolished during nighttime closures the last week of June.
    (Source: Caltrans District 6 on Twitter)

    In November 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of 6-Tul-99-PM 40.6: right of way in the County of Tulare, at Avenue 308, consisting of a cul-de-sac.

    Goshen to Kingsberg Roadway Improvements/Widening (~ TUL 40.303 to ~ FRE R0.94)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #3132: Improvements/Widenening of Route 99 from Goshen to Kingsburg in Tulare County, California. See also HPP #3800. $6,560,000.
    • High Priority Project #3800: Improvements/Widenening of Route 99 from Goshen to Kingsburg in Tulare County, California. This seems to be supplemental funding to HPP #3132. $8,000,000.

    There are plans for roadway improvements near Kingsberg. The CTC, in January 2007, considered a resolution to approve for future consideration of funding a project on Route 99 in Tulare and Fresno Counties that will construct roadway improvements near Kingsburg. This project is not fully funded. The project is fully funded for Project Approval and Environmental Document (PA&ED) in the Interregional Improvement Program for $2,202,000. Full funding for the project is being proposed from the State Route 99 Infrastructure Bond Program. The total estimated project cost is $172,600,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The Fresno Bee reported that work was scheduled to begin in October 2010 at the southern end of the county on a project to widen the highway to six lanes between Kingsburg and Goshen, a stretch that varies between four and five lanes at present. The Kingsburg-to-Goshen segment also involves adding new lanes in the median, except at the Kings River crossing, where the highway will be moved slightly west and the southbound bridge replaced. Project manager Phillip Sanchez said sections of pavement also will be replaced on the northbound side, most of which already is three lanes.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved $500K for mitigation landscaping between Goshen and Kingsburg, from the Goshen Overhead to Route 201. In April 2012, the CTC adjusted this project. The current project limits are from 0.2 mile north of the North Goshen Overhead in Tulare County to 0.2 mile north of Route 201 in Fresno County. There is no need to landscape the southernmost 7 miles of the Goshen to Kingsburg project, and it is not possible to provide sufficient landscape mitigation for the Goshen to Kingsburg 6-Lane project within the current project limits. Therefore, the project was amended to move the southern project limit 7 miles to the north and extend the northern project limit 1.4 miles to the north. The revised project limits will be from 0.3 mile south of Merritt Drive in Tulare County to 0.7 mile north of Bethel Avenue in Fresno County.

    In March 2016, it was reported that a recently announced $754 million cut to the state transportation budget over the next five years has put in jeopardy the widening of Route 180 between Centerville and Minkler on the way to Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks, as well as the continued widening of Route 99 in Tulare County.
    (Source: Fresno Bee, 3/23/2016)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #287: Rehabilitation, repair, and/or reconstruction of deficient two-lane roads that connect to I-5, Route 180, Route 41 and Route 99 throughout Fresno County. See also HPP #3798. $2,800,000.
    • High Priority Project #3798: Rehabilitation, repair, and/or reconstruction of deficient two-lane roads that connect to I-5, Route 180, Route 41 and Route 99 throughout Fresno County. This seems to be supplemental funding for HPP #287. $1,500,000.

    TCRP Project #90 widened the freeway to six lanes from Kingsberg (~ FRE R0.94) to Selma (~ FRE 6.19) in Fresno County. Additional funding was up in July 2005. In December 2005, state transportation officials broke ground the $62-million 6-mile project. Field reports indicated it was completed by December 2008.

    South Fresno Interchanges (~ FRE PM 12.5 to PM 19.1. )

    Rte 99 So Fresno ProjectThe 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to advance $3,000K for PPNO 6288, South Fresno Interchanges, in FY18-19 for Environmental and Planning. According to the Fresno COG, the Measure C expenditure plan incorporates a series of five interchanges along Route 99, including North (~ FRE 17.251), Cedar (~ FRE 16.954), Central (~ FRE 15.843), Chestnut (~ FRE 15.507), and American Avenues (~ FRE 14.486) that potentially serve developing commercial interests and a proposed High Speed Rail Heavy Maintenance Station. These projects were designed as half interchanges allowing traffic to exit in one direction only. To get bet back on the freeway the traveler must find the corresponding on-ramp at the next interchange. Furthermore, the access and exit points are alternately connected to north/south, then east/west arterials, making it confusing to navigate. Caltrans no longer uses this ‘half interchange’ concept and has plans to replace the five half interchanges with three full interchanges. Since the interchanges are functionally related, Caltrans will have to consider the entire corridor when developing plans to remedy this situation. Caltrans, Fresno COG, and the Fresno County Transportation Authority are proposing to environmentally clear all three interchanges simultaneously, creating significant economies of scale. The plan will include three distinct construction phases which will be funded by a combination of Local Measure and Regional STIP funds. Fresno COG is proposing programming $3 million in Advanced Project Development Element (APDE) in FY 2018/19. Fresno COG has also programmed $3.7 million in Local Measure in 2017/18 and 2018/19 to facilitate the programmatic environmental impact report and preliminary design. We anticipate programming right-of-way and construction beginning in the 2020 STIP cycle.
    (Source: Fresno COG, December 2017)

    In March 2019, Caltrans announced that they will be holding a public information meeting/scoping session regarding the South Fresno Interchange Project. The project aims to completely revamp three interchanges on Route 99 at American Ave, Central Ave and North Ave. This project is in its earliest stages, so while construction isn't scheduled to start for at least 5 years, the project will have a huge impact on the businesses and residents in the area. Currently, there are ten preliminary alternatives being considered for the interchange locations. Generally, each alternative proposes to 1) reconstruct and widen the over-crossings, 2) construct new and/or reconstruct existing on and off-ramps, and 3) provide improvements to adjacent local roads and intersections. A preliminary project study report may be found here.
    (Source: Caltrans District 6 Facebook, 3/14/2019)

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which appeared to adjusted the programmed funding for PPNO 6288 and plan for expansion, by adding construction funding in FY23-24:

    PPNO Project Prior 20-21 21-22 22-23 23-24 24-25
    6288 South Fresno Interchange (APDE) 3,000K 0 0 0 0
    6288 South Fresno Interchange (APDE) -3,000K 0 0 0 0 0
    6288 South Fresno Interchange 3,000K 0 0 0 42,346K 0

    Fresno to Route 152 near Chowchilla

    Fresno HOV Lanes

    In June 2016, the CTC converted a project to fully funded: Route 99 PM 22.7/28.1 In the city of Fresno, from Belmont Avenue to Shaw Avenue . Install ramp meters and construct auxiliary lanes.

    In May 2017, the CTC authorized for future consieration of funding a project in Fresno County that proposes to install ramp metering and two mixed flow lanes, a High Occupancy Vehicle lane, and CHP enforcement pad on Route 99 between Olive Avenue on-ramp and Belmont Avenue off-ramp in the city of Fresno (06-Fre-99, PM 22.7/28.1). This project is programmed in the 2016 SHOPP for $9,624,000 in construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in October 2017. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    High Speed Rail Project - Fresno

    Rte 99 Fresno ShiftIn April 2012, it was reported that construction of California's High Speed Rail project will require relocating a two-mile stretch of Route 99 in west-central Fresno (~ FRE 23.814 to FRE 26.513). Between Ashlan and Clinton avenues, the six-lane freeway snuggles up against a Union Pacific Railroad yard on the east side, leaving no room to shoehorn the proposed high-speed rail line into its planned route. The rail authority's plans call for shoving the freeway westward by 100 feet or so -- onto property now occupied by a string of businesses. They include a pair of mini-storage companies, several motels, a mobile-home park, an RV dealership, a truck stop and an assisted-living facility. Three off-ramps on that stretch of the southbound highway -- Dakota, Shields and Princeton avenues -- also would be displaced.
    (Source: Fresno Bee, 4/18/2012)

    In August 2012, it was reported that the work to shift Route 99 in Fresno would not start until at least 2014. This was the conclusion after the California High-Speed Rail Authority voted in August 2012 to approve an agreement with Caltrans for moving the 2.5-mile stretch of the highway between Ashlan and Clinton avenues. The agreement, worth up to $226 million, calls for Caltrans to work as a contractor for the rail authority. The state highway agency will be responsible for design and construction to nudge the highway over by about 100 feet to accommodate new high-speed train tracks between the highway and the adjacent Union Pacific Railroad freight tracks. The rail authority board authorized a budget of $225,900,000 for the work, which includes acquiring property from businesses located in the project's path. Caltrans will be responsible for designing the project, which will displace a string of businesses that sit along the west side of the highway. A frontage road and three off-ramps will also be affected.
    (Source: Fresno Bee, 8/3/2012)

    In April 2017, it was reported that Clinton Ave overpass crossing southbound Route 99 was demolished in early April as part of construction clearing the way for the California High-Speed Rail project. The overpass will be rebuilt as part of the realignment of the highway for the rail project. According to the California Department of Transportation, the overpass will be closed for an estimated six months. Route 99 was closed overnight and rerouted as part of the demolition. More overnight closures are planned when the segment of the overpass crossing over northbound lanes of the highway are knocked down.
    (Source: Fresno Bee, 4/11/2017)

    In August 2018, it was reported that the NB Route 99 Clinton Ave onramp would reopen for traffic. At the same time, the SB Golden State Blvd onramp to Route 99 would close for 2 months.
    (Source: Caltrans News Release, 8/19/2018)

    In February 2019, it was reported that California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and the California High-Speed Rail Authority (Authority) held a ribbon-cutting ceremony on February 15 to mark the completion of work on the “State Route 99 Realignment for High-Speed Rail” project in the City of Fresno. The project shifted portions of the highway between Ashlan Avenue and Clinton Avenue 80 to 100 feet to the west to make room for the high-speed rail alignment. At $290 million, this project is the biggest in the history of District 6. Along with the relocation of the highway, three overcrossings were demolished and completely reconstructed to accommodate the height and width requirements of the high-speed train. The realignment is part of the high-speed rail corridor of projects within the Merced to Fresno project section. Several improvements were made to the corridor as well, including the addition of three through lanes and an auxiliary for each direction of travel. Also, three at-grade onramps were permanently closed to improve traffic flow and overall safety on the heavily-traveled thoroughfare.
    (Source: SCV News, 2/28/2019)

    North Fresno 6-Lane Project / Island Park 6-Plan Project

    In October 2009, the CTC adjusted the baseline agreement related to a project that will widen approximately 6.6 miles of Route 99 from four to six lanes from Ashlan Avenue in the city of Fresno (~FRE 26.513) to 0.6 mile north of Avenue 7 in Madera County (~ MAD R1.571). The Department proposed to amend the Island Park 6-Lane project baseline agreement to split the scope into two projects, the North Fresno 6-Lane project (PPNO 6274A) and the Island Park 6-Lane project (PPNO 6274), and to reflect changes to the financial plan. The split will permit Caltrans to deliver the North Fresno 6-Lane project two years early, and deliver the Island Park 6-Lane project on the original schedule as specified in the project baseline agreement. The Department has determined that a project split will allow early delivery of the southern 3.9 miles of the project, starting at the existing 6-lane freeway at Ashlan Avenue and continuing through the regionally significant Grantland Avenue interchange. The updated schedule shows the first part completing in 2014, and the second part completing in 2018. In May 2010, Caltrans put out a request for bid a project that would widen the freeway and bridges from 4 to 6 lanes in Fresno from 0.2 mile North of the Ashlan Avenue overcrossing to 0.1 mile North of the Grantland Avenue undercrossing. It was reported that the project would start construction in August 2010. Also in the pipeline were the widening of Route 99 to six lanes from Herndon Avenue north to Avenue 7 in southern Madera County, expected to begin in April 2012, and the Veterans Boulevard interchange, to start construction in August 2014.

    In August 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes from Grantland Avenue (~ FRE 30.399) to Avenue 7 (~ MAD R1.571) near the city of Herndon (FRE PM 30.3 to MAD PM 1.6). The project is programmed in the State Route 99 Bond Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. Total estimated project cost is $66,050,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the proposed project baseline agreement.

    In April 2012, the CTC approved broadening the scope of this project to increase the limits of the Island Park 6-Lane project to include landscaping of the North Fresno 6-Lane project. The revised project limits of the Island Park 6-Lane project will be from 0.2 mile north of Ashlan Avenue to 0.6 mile north of Avenue 7. The cost of the increased scope is included in a revised construction cost presented in April 2012.

    TCRP Project #88 will improve the Shaw Interchange (~ FRE 28.144) in northern Fresno.

    Veterans Blvd Interchange (06-FRE-99-PM 28.88/30.11)

    New connection at VeteransIn December 2013, the CTC approved a new public road connection to Route 99 at Veterans Boulevard in Fresno. In 1984, the City of Fresno first introduced the potential need for Veterans Boulevard to serve the local community along Route 99. Veterans Boulevard was to serve as a north-south “super” arterial for the planned developed land uses in north Fresno. The interchange would provide additional north-south access from Route 99 to connect the local community within the project area. This idea was refined in 1986 with a feasibility study conducted to analyze potential interchange/grade separation configurations, with the intention of determining the alternative best suited to the site and the proposed Veterans Boulevard. In 1991, a Project Initiation Document was completed, and in 1996, the official plan line for Veterans Boulevard was adopted.

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to include funding for PPNO 6289, Veterans Boulevard/State Route 99 Interchange Project/Veterans Boulevard Grade Separation Project, 06-FRE-99-PM 28.88/30.11. The STIP appears to allocate $14,616K in FY19-20, with the remainder coming from SB1 funding. The project proposes to construct a new interchange and railroad grade separation at the proposed Veterans Boulevard alignment on Route 99 between Herndon and Shaw Avenues with the following features:

    • The new interchange would be a Type L-9 partial cloverleaf with six on- and off-ramps connecting Route 99 and Veterans Boulevard.
    • Veterans Boulevard would be built as a six-lane super arterial from West Shaw Avenue in the south to Herndon Avenue to the north.
    • A new Veterans Boulevard overcrossing would span Route 99 with three northbound and three southbound lanes, a Class I bicycle lane/pedestrian trail on the west side of the structure and Class II bicycle lanes on both sides of the structure and bicycle lanes.
    • Veterans Boulevard would connect to Golden State Boulevard via a gradeseparated crossing and would cross over the Union Pacific Railroad.
    • Landscaping similar to adjacent interchanges would be provided.
    • Drainage basins would be built to retain water runoff from the project.

    Three alternatives are being considered for the project: two build alternatives and a No-Build Alternative. The preferred alternative is Alternative 4–Jug Handle. The alternative would include realignment of Golden State Boulevard curving to the west away from the Union Pacific Railroad tracks and Veterans Boulevard. Alternative 4 would be elevated to cross over both Golden State Boulevard and the railroad tracks.

    Both build alternatives include a Type L-9 partial cloverleaf interchange connection onto Route 99 at the same location. The primary difference between the two build alternatives involves the Veterans Boulevard layout and how it crosses Golden State Boulevard. In addition to the new interchange and local roadway improvements, a new grade separation is proposed for Veterans Boulevard crossing over the Union Pacific Railroad tracks. The build alternatives propose various designs for the Veterans Boulevard to Golden State Boulevard connection, including the railroad grade separation. Both build alternatives would include building Veterans Boulevard from Shaw Avenue to Herndon Avenue as a six-lane arterial roadway.

    Fresno, it its planning document, noted: Veterans Boulevard is our region’s #1 priority project. The project will be ready to list in 2018/19. This project will result in construction of a six-lane arterial roadway in northeast Fresno, a freeway interchange at Route 99, grade separations over the Union Pacific High Speed Rail line and Golden State Blvd. and improvements to the roadways surrounding the project. The project will be constructed in four phases with the requested STIP funding being associated with Phase III, which is the interchange over Route 99. The California High Speed Rail Commission will contribute $28 million to Phase II for grade separation over the Union Pacific and High Speed Rail tracks. The City of Fresno will contribute $27.2 million in local development fees associated with the Phase I and IV connections to major arterials Herndon Ave. and Shaw Ave. The region has contributed $34.4 million in local Measure funds and development impact fees to environmentally clear, design and acquire right-of-way for this $151 million project and will contribute another $45 million to the construction phase. We are requesting $14.616 million in STIP funds in 2019/20 to perfect the construction funding. We will also be requesting $1.8 million of the 2019/20 SB1 Local Partnership Program (LLP) apportionment.

    In January 2020, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) has been completed: Route 99 (SR 99) in Fresno County (06-Fre-99, PM 28.88/30.11). Construct a new interchange and separate the grade at Veterans Boulevard and Route 99 in Fresno County. (PPNO 6995). This project is located on Veterans Boulevard and the Route 99 Interchange in the City of Fresno in Fresno County. The purpose of the project is to construct a new interchange and railroad grade separation to provide access and improve circulation between and across Route 99. It addresses the need to support freight and goods movement, operations and mobility for current and future traffic demands. The project has been split into five phases. Some phases are complete, others are in construction. The estimated total cost of this project is $138.8 million and is fully funded from the State Transportation Improvement Program, Senate Bill 1, Local Measure funds, High Speed Rail program and Federal Grant funds, which include Construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). Construction for the next phases of this project is anticipated to begin in this Fiscal Year 2019-20 and 2020-21.
    (Source: January 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.2c.(5))

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which continued the programmed funding for PPNO 6289 "Rt 99/Veterans Blvd Interchange, Phase 3".
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 6857. 06-Madera-99 R7.0/R7.5. On Route 99 Near the city of Madera, at Cottonwood Creek Bridge No. 41-065R, No. 41-0065L and No. 41-0065S. Replace bridges to mitigate corrosion by chloride latent concrete. Begin Con: 3/2/2022. Total Project Cost: $36,437K.

    South Madera 6-Lane Project: Ave 7 to Ave 12

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, included PPNO 6297, South of Madera, Ave 7-Ave 12, 6-Lane widen (APDE), in the Interregional portion of the STIP with one change in programming: $3,000K in prior year funding (unchanged), and 9,000K in FY21-22 changed to 6,400K.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    At the March 2020 CTC meeting, the CTC approved a resolution to amend the Route 99 Bond Program by including the South Madera 6-Lane Project and program the design component in Fiscal Year 2021-22 for a total of $3,060,000 in the Route 99 Program. The proposed South Madera 6-Lane Project will widen a 5.8-mile section of 4-lane freeway to 6-lane freeway, starting 0.7 miles north from Avenue 7 and ending at Avenue 12 in Madera County.

    Avenue 12 Interchange Improvements - Madera (~ MAD R7.491)

    Avenue 12In December 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen Avenue 12 Interchange on Route 99 from two to four lanes, add an onramp to Route 99, and construct roadway improvements in the city of Madera. The project is programmed in the State Route 99 Bond Program and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes local funds. Total estimated project cost is $68,000,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement.

    In June 2012, the CTC amended the Route 99 Corridor Bond Program baseline agreement for the Avenue 12 Interchange project in Madera County to increase Right of Way Capital from $6,700,000 to $20,000,000, increase Right of Way Support from $500,000 to $2,000,000, increase Construction Support from $4,800,000 to $7,500,000, and revise the project limits. The project will reconstruct the Route 99/Avenue 12 Interchange in the city of Madera. The Right of Way Capital estimate has increased by $13,300,000, from $6,700,000 to $20,000,000. Detailed engineering has identified the need for full acquisition of three parcels that were originally anticipated to be partial acquisitions. The first parcel includes a gas station with mini mart, the second parcel includes a fast food restaurant, and the third parcel is a vacant commercial property. In order to provide sufficient vertical clearance over Route 99, the profile of Avenue 12 must be raised such that direct access to these businesses from Avenue 12 will be eliminated, thereby necessitating full acquisitions at an additional cost of $7,100,000. All 25 required parcels have current property appraisals, and nine parcels have been settled. The result of the appraisals and settlements to date is an increase of $3,700,000. In addition, potholing has revealed the need for additional utility relocations totaling $2,500,000. It is proposed to fund the Right of Way Capital cost increases from Madera County’s Regional Improvement Program (RIP) shares. The project limits were also revised: Specifically, the off-ramp merge and on-ramp diverge locations were revised during final design, which required a change in postmile limits. The beginning postmile has changed from R7.1 to R6.9, and the ending postmile has changed from R7.9 to R8.2. The revised project location is “from 0.6 mile south of Avenue 12 to 0.7 mile north of Avenue 12”. The project scope has not changed. In December 2012, the CTC approved allocating an additional $1,402,000 in Proposition 1B Route 99 Corridor Bond Program funds and amend the Route 99 Corridor Bond Program baseline agreement for the Avenue 12 Interchange project (PPNO 5346) in Madera County.

    Madera Widening - Ave 12 to Ave 17 (~ MAD R7.455 to MAD R14.202)

    99 Madera WideningIn December 2015, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Madera County that will widen a portion of 99 from four lanes to six lanes in the city of Madera. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program. The project is not fully funded. The total estimated cost is $48,150,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funds, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2018-19. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program.

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to add no additional funds to PPNO 5335, On Route 99, Madera, Ave 12-Ave 17, widen to 6 lanes. The allocation shows $1,585K for PS&E in FY19-20.

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 5335A. 06-Madera-99 R7.5/15.1. On Route 99. In and near Madera, from Avenue 12 Overcrossing to 0.9 mile north of Avenue 17 Overcrossing. Additonal $13M from other contribution for the construction of one new lane in each direction. Roadway rehabilitation. Begin Con: 11/1/2019. Total Project Cost: $62,000K.

    In October 2018, it was reported that approved a $69.7 million project to reconstruct drainage systems, upgrade guardrail and Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) elements, construct one new lane in each direction and improve 23.5 lane miles of Route 99 from the Avenue 12 Overcrossing to north of the Avenue 17 Overcrossing in the city of Madera in Madera County.
    (Source: Sierra Sun Times, October 2018)

    In October 2018, the CTC amended the Route 99 Bond Program to add the Madera 99 Widening Project from Avenue 12 to Avenue 17 in Madera County at a cost of $15,000,000 in Route 99 funds. The proposed Madera 99 Widening Project will construct a southbound and northbound lane in the median on Route 99 between Avenue 12 and Avenue 17 in Madera County. The CTC also approved the Route 99 Bond Program Project Baseline Agreement for the Madera 99 Widening Project from Avenue12 to Avenue 17 in Madera County. Lastly, it also approved an allocation of $14,970,000 for the State-Administered Proposition 1B Route 99 Madera 99 Widening project (PPNO 5335), in Madera County, on the State Highway System. The last action noted that the Department was ready to proceed with this project, and is requesting an allocation at this time. The allocation is contingent upon the approval of a budget revision by the Department of Finance. The allocation is divided into $13,720,000 for construction and $1,250,000 for construction engineering.
    (Source: October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 4.17, Agenda Item 4.18, Agenda Item 2.5g.(2))

    In July 2019, it was reported that construction was set to start on this segment in August 2019. The work will add a lane on the northbound side, as well as the southbound side, between Avenue 12 and Avenue 17. The work is set to happen at night to avoid commuters. It’s slated to end summer 2020. Multiple funds are being used to pay for this, with $66 million coming in from the SB1 gas tax. Also, nearly $5 million is being used from Measure T funds — a half-cent sales tax passed by Madera County voters in 2006. Other funding sources include the State Route 99 Bond and the Regional Improvement Program. Besides adding new lanes, the project will also upgrade the Almond Avenue on-ramp, construct 3,500 feet of drainage systems with 70 new drainage systems, construct five maintenance vehicle pullouts, and construct a 25,000 foot concrete barrier.
    (Source: KSEE 24, 7/19/2019)

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which continued the programmed close-out funding for PPNO 5335 "Madera, Av 12-Av 17, widen 6 lns (Rt99) (incr 10-18 vote)".
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In October 2019, it was reported that inclusion in the STIP isn't enough if the project isn't ready. In a 2020 Draft Report, Caltrans announced plans to delete three projects: (1) a project to expand Route 99 from four to six lanes — three on each side — between Prosperity Avenue and Avenue 200, near the International Agri-Center; (2) a project to widen Route 99 to six lanes S of Madera, and a project to widen Route 46 E of the Cholame Y along the Antelope Grade. Money for the project comes from the state's Interregional Transportation Improvement Program, which includes a $2.6 billion fund to improve transportation and goods movement across the state. The fund is in part derived from Senate Bill 1, the state's controversial gas tax passed in 2017 and upheld in a failed ballot measure last year. The deletion of the funds naturally has local politicians upset beliving it to be a "bait and switch" regarding SB1. However, that isn't the case. SB1 specifically allocates portions of the revenue from the new transportation improvement fee to the State Transit Assistance Program and to the Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program. Specifically, it allocates two hundred seventy-five million dollars ($275,000,000) for the interregional share of the State Transportation Improvement Program. Recall, that this widening was in the 2018 STIP. One of the projects funded through the STIP is the Interregional Transportation Improvement Program (ITIP), which has the purpose to improve interregional mobility for people and goods across the State of California on highway and passenger rail corridors of strategic importance. At least 60 percent of that program must be programmed to projects outside urbanized areas on the Interregional Road System (IRRS) and for intercity passenger rail. Of this amount, at least 15 percent (9 percent of the ITIP) must be programmed for intercity passenger rail projects. But STIP capacity over the 2020 five-year FE period has decreased compared to the capacity in the 2018 five-year FE period, going from $3.3 billion in the 2018 FE to $2.6 billion in the 2020 FE. The decrease is primarily attributable to a high level of pre-existing STIP project commitments for allocated and programmed projects. The 2020 Fund Estimate provides $52,414,000 in new, additional ITIP funding, but $52,250,000 of that is immediately eaten up by previous projects that cost more than expected (in San Luis Obispo and Humboldt counties). That leaves $164,000 to hand out, which required deletion (or, more specifically, delay) of $32,494,00 in highway projects to make money available. Removing these three projects from the 2020 ITIP and saving money on another Route 99 project moves about $61 million to the column of “uncommitted 2020 ITIP programming capacity.” Those uncommitted funds, according to the draft plan, will be held in reserve “for priority rail projects and other priorities aligned with Executive Order N-19-19.” Note that this does not mean the project was deleted. State Transportation Secretary David Kim says the projects weren’t ready to proceed, and the funds can be reapplied for in two years. Additionally, other projects on those roads – for example, work on the Cholame "Y" at the Route 46 / Route 41 intersection, and widening of Route 99 at Tagus – are still being funded through the ITIP.
    (Sources: Visalia Times Delta, 10/9/2019; Streetsblog, 10/31/2019; ABC 30, 10/9/2019; LATimes 10/14/2019; Streetsblog, 10/11/2019; SLOTribune 10/8/2019; New Times, 10/10/2019)

    In June 2008, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Madera, on Almond Avenue (~ MAD 9.379) easterly of South Gateway Drive, consisting of a reconstructed and relocated city street.

    In July 2011, the CTC approved funding for a project to repave four miles of Route 99 in both directions, from the South Madera Overcrossing (~MAD 9.568) to the Avenue 16 Overcrossing (~ MAD 12.785). Existing guardrails, signs, lights and drainage will also be upgraded as part of the project. Design work for the project is currently underway with construction set to begin in the fall. The entire project is expected to be complete by Spring 2013.

    Route 99 / Route 145 (~ MAD 10.241) and Gateway Drive Interchange(~ MAD 12.748) - Madera

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1830: Improve the Route 99/Route 145 interchange in the City of Madera, CA (~ MAD 10.84). $2,400,000.

    Rte 5 Madera InterchangesIn October 2008, the CTC received notice of a negative environmental impact declaration for construction of two interchanges near Madera. The project proposes to reconstruct the existing Route 99/Route 145 (~ MAD 10.241) and Route 99/Gateway Drive (~ MAD 12.748) interchanges within the City of Madera. The purpose of the project is to relieve congestion at the Route 99/Route 145 Interchange, to provide better access from Route 99 to the Madera Community Hospital on Almond Avenue and to provide an additional two-way crossing of Route 99 in South Madera. The project is needed to provide sufficient capacity for the interchanges to improve existing level of service deficiencies and to meet Year 2025 traffic projections, as well as to improve traffic safety by reducing the accident potential. The proposed modifications will improve both the current and predicted levels of service for both interchanges. Two alternatives were considered in the Initial Study. One alternative, the no build alternative, did not meet the project purpose and need since concerns regarding traffic congestion at the Route 99/Route 145 Interchange as well as access to Madera Community Hospital on Almond Avenue from Route 99 would remain unresolved. The second alternative, the preferred alternative includes:

    • Route 99/Gateway Drive Interchange — widening the existing over crossing to accommodate two lanes of traffic, creating new on and off ramps, and extending Gateway Drive to connect to Almond Avenue.
    • SR-99/SR 145 Interchange — widening of the overpass from two to six lanes. These modifications will decrease traffic congestion by providing additional through lanes across the bridge, as well as dedicated turn lanes for entrance to northbound Route 99.

    The cost estimate for both interchanges totals $18,037,000. According to Caltrans, in May 2005, the project was split into two projects for programming and construction. The Route 99/Gateway Drive Interchange Project was completed in 2006. The project costs totaled $8,138,000. Funding was provided through Regional Improvement Program Funds ($4,700,000) and Local Measure A Funds ($3,438,000). The Route 99/Route 145 Interchange Project, estimated to cost $9,899,000 is scheduled for construction in FY 2008/09 and is fully funded with Regional Improvement Program Funds ($6,400,000), Local Measure A Funds ($1,099,000) and Federal High Priority Projects Program Funds ($2,400,000).

    In February 2012, the CTC authorized funding a locally-administered STIP project on Route 99, in Madera County, 06N-Mad-99 10.7/11.2 Route 99/4th Street Interchange Improvements. In the city of Madera, on Fourth Street, from Sunset Avenue to Gateway Drive. $5,148,000 to widen Route 99 bridge to 6 lanes and widen ramps, widen Fourth Street to 4 lanes with median, and add traffic signals coordinated with interchange signals. The project will modify one bridge, install one new traffic signal, construct 0.6 new lane miles, and improve level of service from F to C.

    Ellis Street Overcrossing - Madera (~ MAD 13.093)

    Rte 5 Ellis St. OvercrossingIn May 2009, the CTC accepted the mitigated negative declaration for the Ellis Street Overcrossing Project. The project includes construction of an overcrossing on Route 99 between Avenue 17 and Cleveland Avenue in the City of Madera and a new roadway connecting Ellis Street on the east side of Route 99 with Avenue 16 on the west side of Route 99. The project will include a crossing over the freeway and railroad tracks to provide vehicular and pedestrian access to the residential and commercial areas east of the freeway and reduce the congestion at the Cleveland Avenue/Gateway Drive/County Club Drive intersection and at the Route 99/Cleveland Avenue Interchange. The project is estimated to cost $16,596,000 and is funded with STIP ($8,534,000), Proposition 1B Local Streets and Roads ($1,746,000) and Local ($6,316,000) funds. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2009/10.

    In 2007, it appeared there was construction ongoing on Route 99 from Fairmead/Berenda (~ MAD R18.637) to Route 152 (~ MAD 22.734), near Chowchillla.

    There are plans to construct a freeway near Fairmead (~ MAD 21.661).

    Route 152 near Chowchilla to Modesto

    In February 2012, the CTC authorized $1,605,000 in SHOPP funding for work near Chowchilla, from Avenue 24 (~ MAD 23.79) to Le Grand Road (~MER 6.696) to construct two single thrie beam median barriers along 4.4 centerline miles to reduce cross median collisions and improve traffic safety

    Chowchilla/Merced Area Widening: Chowchilla River (~ MAD 29.33) to Childs Avenue (~ MER 13.04)

    In July 2005, the CTC considered funding to convert 4-lane expressway to 6-lane freeway and construct interchange at Mission Avenue in Merced from Owens Creek Bridge to south of Childs Avenue.

    In July 2005, the CTC received a notice of EIR preparation for Route 99 in Madera County to realign and widen to six lane freeway near Merced (NOP). This project consists of two sections: the Plainsburg section (~ MER 3.379) and the Arboleda section (~ MER 6.316). In the Plainsburg section there are four alternatives in addition to the No Build Alternative; in the Arboleda section there are two alternatives in addition to the No-Build Alternative. The four build alternatives currently under consideration for the Plainsburg Section (Alternatives 1A, 1B, 2, and 3) would provide the following features using different alignments:

    • Construct a six-lane freeway on an eight-lane right-of-way.
    • Construct a diamond interchange at Sandy Mush/Plainsburg Avenue.
    • Construct an eastern frontage road resulting in alterations to Plainsburg Avenue.
    • Convert the existing southbound lanes into the proposed western frontage roads.
    • Realign a section of Sandy Mush Road to tie in to the proposed interchange.
    • Realign a section of Plainsburg Road to tie in to the proposed interchange.

    The two build alternatives currently under consideration for the Arboleda Section (Alternatives 4 and 5) would provide the following:

    • Alternative 4 — Construct an interchange at Arboleda Drive.
    • Alternative 5 — Construct an interchange at Le Grande Drive.

    In March 2006, the CTC approve for future consideration of funding a project in Merced County that will improve a 10.5 mile section of Route 99 from a four lane highway to a six lane expressway. The project is programmed in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The overall project is not fully funded. Project development and right of way, however, are fully funded in the Interregional Transportation Improvement Program and Traffic Congestion Relief Program for $35,787,000. The total estimated project cost is $270 million. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. The project is proposed in the State Route 99 Bond Program. The project runs from the Chowchilla River (~ MAD 29.33) to McHenry Road (~ MER R10.141), and includes interchanges at Arboleda Dr. and Plainsberg Rd.

    [TCRP 104-105]An Environmental Impact Report is in preparation for widening this route from 4 to 6 lanes, and to replace all existing bridges, in San Joaquin County [April 2002 CTC Agenda Item 2.2a.(1)]. This is likely TCRP Project #104, which will build 7 miles of new six-lane freeway from Buchanan Hollow Road (~ MER 4.483) to Healey Road (~MER R11.314) in Merced Country. There is also TCRP Project #105, which will build 2 miles of new six-lane freeway from the Madera County line to Buchanan Hollow Road in Merced County. However, these projects had their TCRP funds deallocated in September 2005 due to inactivity. In April 2007, the CTC considered amendments to projects #104 and #105. These amendments would build seven miles of new six-lane freeway south of Merced, Buchanan Hollow Road (~ MER 4.483) to Healey Road (~MER R11.314) in Merced County (#104) and build 4.5 miles of new six-lane freeway, Madera County line (MER 0.0) to Buchanan Hollow Road (~ MER 4.483) in Merced County (#105). Specifically, TCRP Project #104 will upgrade a four-lane expressway to a six-lane freeway with an interchange at Arboleda Road. The project will close at-grade median crossings and improve capacity on Route 99 and is programmed with $5,000,000 of TCRP funds for Plans, Specifications and Estimates (PS&E) and Right of Way (R/W) support and capital. Project Approval and Environmental Document (PA&ED) and Construction are programmed in the State Transportation Improvement Program for $144,900,000. TCRP Project #105 will upgrade Route 99 from a four-lane expressway to a six-lane freeway. This project is also funded with $5,000,000 from the TCRP for PS&E and R/W support. The project schedule and funding changed due to environmental issues that delayed the project. This delay escalated construction costs and delayed project delivery. These projects are now estimated for completion in FY 2012/2013.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved constructing the Arboleda Road Freeway near Merced, on Route 99 from Buchanan Hollow Road to Miles Creek overflow. Convert to 6-lane freeway and construct interchange at Arboleda Road. (TCRP #104).

    In December 2011, the CTC approved revision of the funding plan for the Arboleda Road Freeway project (PPNO 5414), which will widen 5.9 miles of Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes from Buchanan Hollow Road to Miles Creek Overflow (~ MER R10.834). The right of way support cost increased from $1,570,000 to $2,570,000, as the project experienced an unexpectedly high level of condemnation-related activity. Of 38 parcels, 27 required the initiation of condemnation activities. Negotiation and condemnation activities were protracted and consumed more support effort than was planned. The appraisal staff encountered several parcels with unexpectedly complicated appraisal questions requiring unique solutions. In addition, due to workload demand in the Department’s Stockton office, some of the appraisal and acquisition work was done by Fresno staff, which resulted in unanticipated travel costs. The right of way capital cost, on the other hand, decreased from $24,900,000 to $23,900,000, as the baseline agreement was based on a worst case estimate for potential right of way requirements. The final design of the preferred alternative resulted in a reduction of right of way requirements and lower costs. Of the 46 parcels that were originally anticipated, only 38 were acquired. Additionally, the schedule required revision. The End Design milestone was delayed by 17 months due to negotiations with the Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) regarding a permit required by Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. Several mitigation options and parcels were investigated before ACOE approved the permit. The End Right of Way milestone was delayed by 22 months due to condemnation of several parcels. In particular, one group of three parcels was highly contested by the owner and required 14 signatures. These parcels impacted the first stage of the project, so a workaround was not feasible. The design was re-evaluated to minimize impacts, and the parcels were re-appraised. These parcels alone account for more than a year of the delay. The Begin Construction and End Construction milestones are being delayed by 22 months as a direct result of the right of way delay described above. The Begin Closeout milestone is being delayed by 15 months because it is directly related to the End Construction milestone. The baseline schedule incorrectly showed closeout starting eight months after the End Construction milestone. Closeout will actually begin one month after the End Construction milestone, which explains why the delay is 15 months instead of 22 months. The End Closeout milestone is being delayed by 21 months, 15 months of which is a direct result of the Begin Closeout delay described above. The other six months of delay is caused by a mistake in the baseline schedule, which showed a duration of six months for closeout. Closeout requires a duration of 12 months. The updated schedule has the project completing construction in April 2015.

    In February 2012, it was reported that the Right of Way cost on TCRP Project #105 increased from $700,000 to $1,200,000. This project experienced an unexpectedly high level of condemnation-related activity. Of 11 parcels, ten required the initiation of condemnation activities. The parcel that did not require condemnation involved railroad negotiations, which took as much time to settle as the other parcels. Negotiation and condemnation activities were protracted and consumed more support effort than was planned. With the remaining parcels, it became necessary to obtain Resolutions of Necessity for all ten parcels. Condemnation suits were filed on five of the parcels. The appraisal staff encountered several parcels with unexpectedly complicated appraisal questions requiring unique solutions, and appraisal staff performed rework on several parcels as a result of required design changes. In addition, due to heavy workload demand in the Department’s Stockton office, the appraisals and acquisition work was performed by Fresno Right of Way staff, which resulted in unanticipated travel costs. On the other hand, the Right of Way capital cost has decreased from $6,477,000 to $5,977,000. In terms of schedule, the End Design milestone was delayed by ten months due to negotiations with the Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) regarding a permit required by Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. Several mitigation options and parcels were investigated before ACOE approved the permit. The End Right of Way milestone was delayed by eight months due to condemnation of several parcels as just described. As a result, the Begin Construction and End Construction milestones are being delayed by 17 months. Why 17? Ten months are a direct result of the End Design delay. The other seven months of delay are caused by the immediately adjacent and interrelated Arboleda Road Freeway project (PPNO 5414). The Arboleda Road Freeway project must begin eight months before the TCRP Project #105 project. The Arboleda Road Freeway project experienced several delays, which were described under Resolution R99-PA-1112-017 approved in December 2011 and resulted in an additional seven-month delay to this project. There were further delays inthe closeout, resulting in a new closeout date of August 2016.

    In Spring 2012, Caltrans put out for bid a project to reconstruct the freeway, interchanges, and bridges near Chowchilla from the Chowchilla River bridge (~ MAD 29.33) to Buchanan Hollow Road (~ MER 4.483). This is replacement and repair of one of the last nice expressway sections on Route 99. There are also a couple of sections of single-slab concrete visible near Buchanan Hollow Road where the expressway bends away from the tracks.

    In May 2013, the CTC approved deallocation of $500,000 in Proposition 1B Route 99 bond funds from the Sutter 99 Segment 2 project (PPNO 8361B) in Sutter County; $822,000 in Proposition 1B SR99 bond funds from the Goshen to Kingsburg 6-Lane project (PPNO 6480) in Tulare County; $529,000 in Proposition 1B SR99 bond funds from the Freeway Upgrade & Plainsburg Road I/C project (PPNO 5401) in Merced County; and $341,000 from the Arboleda Road Freeway project (PPNO 5414) in Merced County to reflect final expenditures. The Arboleda Road Freeway project will widen 5.9 miles of Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes from Buchanan Hollow Road to Miles Creek Overflow, and construct an interchange at Arboleda Road. The construction contract was awarded on April 6, 2012, with construction completion scheduled for March 2016. The Mission Avenue Interchange/Freeway project (PPNO 0528D), which is immediately north of the Arboleda Road Freeway project, widened Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes from Owens Creek Bridge to 0.3 mile south of Childs Avenue (~ MER 13.04), and constructed an interchange at Mission Avenue (~ MER R11.71). Construction was completed in April 2008. However, the newly widened freeway was not striped as a 6-lane freeway because it is only two miles long and it connects to a 4-lane freeway on both ends. With the completion of the Arboleda Road Freeway project and the adjacent Freeway Upgrade & Plainsburg Road I/C project (PPNO 5401), Route 99 will be six lanes from the Madera/Merced County line to 0.3 mile south of Childs Avenue, a distance of over 12 miles. Therefore, in October 2013 it was proposed to increase the limits of the Arboleda Road Freeway project to include restriping of the Mission Avenue Interchange/Freeway project.

    In March 2017, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Merced along Route 99 from 0.3 miles south of South Vista Avenue to 0.3 miles north of McHenry Road (10-Mer-99 PM 1.2/R10.5), consisting of superseded highway and collateral facilities. The County, by freeway agreement dated April 24, 2007 agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expires March 7, 2017.

    In April 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Merced along Route 99 from 0.1 miles south of McHenry Road (near Merced, ~MER R10.027) to Mission Avenue (~ MER R11.712), consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    In March 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Merced along Route 99 from Mission Avenue (~ MER R11.71) to Parsons Ave (~ MER R12.744), consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    In August 2015, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Merced at Mission Avenue (~ MER R11.71), consisting of a collateral facility inadvertently omitted from a previous relinquishment.

    TCRP #106 - Campus Parkway in Merced (~ MER R11.712) to Yosemite Ave

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1780: Construction of Campus Parkway from Route 99 to Yosemite Ave., Merced County. This related to TCRP #106.$400,000.
    • High Priority Project #3806: Construct eastern loop of Campus Parkway in Merced. $2,000,000.

    In July 2009, the CTC approved adjusting the funding for a TCRP #106, which will construct a new four-lane, limited access expressway (Campus Parkway) on the east side of the City of Merced from Route 99 to Yosemite Avenue. The work has been divided into three segments: [Segment 1] Route 99 to Childs Avenue; [Segment 2] Childs Avenue to 0.25 mile north of Route 140; [Segment 3] From 0.25 mile north of Route 140 to Yosemite Avenue.

    [TCRP 106]TCRP Project #106 will develop a new four-lane, limited access expressway from Mission Avenue to Yosemite Avenue on the east side of the city of Merced, to support the new University of California, Merced. In June 2006, the CTC considered TCRP Application Amendment to redistribute $4,486,000 from Construction to R/W for this project, as well as updating the project schedule and funding plan. The project is currently scheduled for completion in FY 2014.

    In April 2019, Merced County reported that the current phase of the Campus Parkway project, which will extend the expressway over Route 140, is nearly 65 percent complete and remains on schedule to be finished in the first quarter of 2020. This relates to the Atwater-Merced Expressway in that the Campus Parkway is part of a planned conceptual loop with the A-M Expressway that supports UC Merced. For a map of the loop system, see the discussion of the Atwater-Merced Expressway under Route 59.

    In February 2020, it was reported that local leaders held a ribbon-cutting for Segment II and a groundbreaking for Segment III of the Campus Parkway Project at the current end of Campus Parkway near Route 140 and the route to Yosemite National Park. The $30 million Segment II extends the four-lane expressway from East Childs Avenue to 1⁄4 mile past Route 140. The new segment includes a traffic signal at Campus Parkway and East Childs Avenue, a concrete structure crossing the BNSF railroad tracks and Route 140, and a traffic signal at the intersection of Route 140 and the “Campus Parkway Access” connector road. This portion of the Campus Parkway Project was completed ahead of schedule. Segment III is the largest portion of the project in terms of miles. It will extend the expressway north to Yosemite Avenue. This segment is expected to be complete by June 2023. Once Segment III is complete, Campus Parkway will extend 4.5 miles from East Mission Avenue to Yosemite Avenue. Segment I from Mission Avenue to East Childs Avenue was completed in 2009. Campus Parkway is part of the larger “Merced Loop System” that circles the City of Merced and connects surrounding communities. The Merced Loop System is designed to reduce congestion, improve connection to existing highways and stimulate economic development opportunities. Merced Mayor Mike Murphy praised the project, noting that the interchange at Route 99 is targeted for a major retail center, and that there’s land nearby suited for a new industrial park for the region. He said the already approved development plans are expected to bring 4,800 jobs to Merced, along with some $250 million in direct and indirect investment.
    (Source: Merced County Times, 2/6/2020)

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $24,991,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in the city of Merced, at Merced Overhead and 15th Street Undercrossing (~ MER 14.233), that will widen the 15th Street Undercrossing and replace East Merced Overhead to restore structure’s integrity.

    In January 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed: Route 99 (10-Mer-99, PM 20.1/24.3) in Merced County. Resurface and restore pavement on a portion of Route 99 in the city of Atwater. (PPNO 5431). The project is located on Route 99 in the city of Atwater, Merced County. The project proposes to resurface and restore the pavement on Route 99 and construct five retention basins. Also proposed in the project are deceleration lanes at the Applegate northbound and southbound off-ramps. The project is not fully funded and programmed in the 2016 SHOPP for an estimated total of $81.8 million, which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in 2020. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 SHOPP.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    In December 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Merced along Route 99 from the Atwater city limits (~MER 20.532) to 0.3 mile northwesterly of Cressy Way (~ MER 26.266), consisting of collateral facilities. It also authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Atwater along Route 99 on Olive Avenue from the westerly city limits to 0.05 mile easterly thereof, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In March 2013, the CTC authorized $52,000,000 to widen Route 99 to 6-lane freeway, including demolition of Buhach Road interchange (~ MER 20.527), and construct new interchange near Atwater, from 1.0 mile south of Buhach Road to 0.1 mile north of Buhach Road.

    The CTC in July 2002 considered for future funding converting Route 99 from a four lane expressway to a six lane freeway near Atwater. [2.2c.(4)]. As of early 2007, construction was underway on this segment, between Atwater and Livingston (~ MER 21.638 to MER R30.034).

    Applegate Overpass (MER 22.756)

    Rte 99 Applegate DetourIn October 2018, the Applegate Road-Route 99 overpass (MER 22.756) and the northbound fast lane of the highway were shut down after a big rig struck the overpass, according to California Highway Patrol. The highway lane was expected to reopen, but Caltrans later determined the collision caused structural damage and the overpass was shut down indefinitely. The bridge is the main connector between the major shopping center south of the highway and the cities of Atwater and Winton to the north. What happened was that in late September, a 2013 Kenworth big rig towing an excavator on a flatbed trailer was traveling north in the left lane on Route 99, underneath the Applegate Road overpass, when the excavator’s boom arm struck the underside of the bridge, according to the California Highway Patrol. Four girders on the overpass were damaged. Three are expected to be patched up while the state of the fourth one remains unclear. The overpass is safe to pass under, but officials wanted to keep additional weight off the top of it. Caltrans does not expect to close down any other surface streets or highway lanes while the overpass is repaired, and repairs have been expedited. The expectation is that it will be closed at least a month. There have been previous crashes in the area. The southbound Applegate Road exit was closed for about a month and re-opened in June 2017 after a fiery crash involving tanker truck driven by Kamkyo Ramon Gnotsavath, 57, was headed to the Arco gas station on Bell Lane on May 23, 2017, to deliver 8,600 gallons of gasoline, officials said. The man died in the crash. A similar, but not deadly, crash happened in June 2018 in the same area. A 2009 Freightliner being driven by 48-year-old Oakland resident Steve Edward Anderson was traveling south on Route 99 when he attempted to take the Applegate Road off-ramp at about 7:10 a.m. June 12, CHP said. Emergency repairs began in mid-October, with work being performed by R.A. Nemetz Construction, a contractor based in Galt. Repairing the damaged fourth girder gets underway Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018. The excavator clipped the underside of the overpass, damaging four girders. Three girders will be patched with concrete, Caltrans said in a news release, but the fourth requires reconstruction that will take several weeks to complete.
    (Source: Merced Sun Star, 10/11/2018; MercedSun Star 10/12/2018; Merced Sun-Star 10/17/2018)

    In November 2018, it was reported that the Applegate Road bridge over Route 99 reopened to traffic in mid-November 2018, more than five weeks after a truck’s cargo slammed into it and caused structural damage.
    (Source: Merced Sun-Star, 11/20/2018)

    In June 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Atwater along Route 99 on Olive Avenue (~ MER 23.734), consisting of collateral facilities.

    In October 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Merced along Route 99 from 0.3 mile east of Arena Way (~ MER 26.351) to the Livingston city limits, consisting of reconstructed county roads and frontage roads. They also approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Livingston along Route 99 from the east Livingston city limits to 0.05 miles east of Hammett Avenue, consisting of a frontage road.

    Livingston Widening (MER 28.2/R37.3)

    In December 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project on a portion of Route 99 near the town of Livingston in Merced County that will widen an 8.5-mile portion of Route 99 (between MER PM 28.8 and PM 37.3) from four lanes to six lanes within the median. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $81,820,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program.

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $5,500K in construction funding in FY21-22 for PPNO 0161A, In Livingston, from 0.8 mile south of Hammatt Avenue to Merced/Stanislaus county line. Widen freeway from two lanes to three lanes in the northbound direction only. PM MER 28.2/R37.3. The SB widening is PPNO 0161B, and does not appear in the 2018 STIP.

    In October 2018, the CTC approved amended the Route 99 Bond Program by including the Livingston Widening Northbound Project (PPNO 0161A). The proposed Livingston Widening Northbound Project will widen the freeway from two lanes to three lanes in the northbound direction of Route 99 from Hammatt Avenue to the Merced/Stanislaus County Line.
    (October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 4.17)

    In March 2019, the CTC approved an allocation of $43,080,000 for the multi-funded State-Administered Senate Bill 1 (SB 1) Trade Corridors Enhancement Program (TCEP)/State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP)/Proposition 1B Route 99 Program Livingston Widening Northbound project (PPNO 0161A), on the State Highway System, in Merced County, programmed in Fiscal Year 2021-22. Details: Merced 10-MER-99 28.2/R37.3. PPNO 10-0161A. Proj ID 1014000167. Livingston Widening Northbound. Route 99 In Livingston, from 0.8 mile south of Hammatt Avenue to the Merced/Stanislaus county line. Widen freeway from two lanes to three lanes in the northbound direction only. (Future Consideration of Funding approved under Resolution E-14-60; December 2014. IIP savings of $34,500,000 to be returned to Interregional share balance. RIP savings of $186,000 to be returned to Merced County share balance. Non-proportional spending for construction to allow for the expenditure of Route 99 and TCEP funds before expenditure of RIP funds. ALLOCATION IS CONTINGENT UPON APPROVAL OF A BUDGET REVISION BY THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE.
    (Source: March 2019 CTC Minutes Agenda Item 2.5s.(8))

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which continued the programmed funding for PPNO 0161A "Livingston Widening Northbound (RIP)(TCEP)" of $5,314K in FY20-21. It also included PPNO 0161A, Livingston 6-lane widening, northbound (IIP)(TCEP), in the Interregional portion of the STIP with no change in programming: $2,860K in prior year funding; as well as PPNO 0161B Livingston 6-lane widening, southbound, with 5,000K in prior year, and 33,950K in FY21-22.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In December 2012, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Merced along Route 99 at North Pacific Avenue (~ MER R30.699, near Livingston), consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In March 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of Merced between Sycamore Avenue and Early Dawn Road ( 10-Mer-99-PM 32.3/36.2), consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads, frontage roads and cul-de-sacs.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #716: Preparation of a Project Study Report for new Route 99 interchange between Bradbury Road (~ MER R35.55) and Route 165 (~ STA R1.649), serving the Turlock/Hilmar region. Related to this is Transportation Improvement #18. $400,000.
    • Transportation Improvement #18: Hilmar/Turlock Route 99 interchange engineering and construction in Merced County. This is related to HPP #716.$1,000,000.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $72,611,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in and near Modesto, from the Merced County Line to the San Joaquin County Line , that will rehabilitate 148 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality and prevent further deterioration of the road surface.

    Route 99 Turlock Fulkerth Interchange (10-STA-99 R4.1/R4.9)

    Rte 99 Fulkerth InterchangeIn September 2018, there was an update on the Route 99 Turlock Fulkerth Interchange project. The project will widen Fulkerth Road to accommodate six to seven lanes, with five-foot wide shoulders and six-foot wide sidewalks; Widen the northbound (NB) off-ramp to provide two lanes where it connects to Fulkerth; Reconstruct the NB on-ramp to provide two mixed-flow lanes and one future high occupancy vehicle (HOV) preferential lane with provisions for future ramp metering; Realign the southbound (SB) off-ramp to improve intersection spacing and provide three lanes where it connects to Fulkerth; Realign the SB on-ramp to improve intersection spacing, and provide two mixed- flow lanes and one future HOV preferential lane with provisions for future ramp metering; Align Dianne Drive with existing Auto Mall Drive, eliminating the offset local street intersection on Fulkerth Road; Signalize the Dianne Drive/Fulkerth Road, Route 99 SB ramps/Fulkerth Road and Route 99 NB ramps/Fulkerth Road intersections. This project includes $5.5 million from the Local Partnership Program, part of Senate Bill 1. The project will provide a more efficient interchange at Route 99 and Fulkerth Road, while also improving surface streets adjacent to the interchange. The on-ramps also will be made ready for future ramp metering. This project also positively responds to the city’s Northwest Triangle Specific Plan and the Westside Industrial Specific Plan. Construction is scheduled to start in October 2018 and the project is scheduled to be completed December 2019.
    (Source: Route 99 Fulkerth Interchange Project Page, 11/2018)

    In January 2019, the CTC approved an allocation of $5,510,000 for the locally-administered Route 99/Fulkerth Road Interchange Improvements Senate Bill 1 (SB 1) Local Partnership Program (LPP) – Formulaic and Competitive project (PPNO 3414), on the State Highway System, in Stanislaus County. Route 99 In Stanislaus County at the interchange of Route 99 and Fulkerth Road in the City of Turlock ramp widening, modifications, and signalization.
    (Source: January 2019 CTC Minutes Agenda Item 2.5s.(2a))

    Mitchell/Service/Route 99 Interchange (10-Sta-99, PM 9.5/11.4)

    99 Diverging DiamonIn July 2015, it was reported that Caltrans is acting slowly to approve a "diverging diamond" design for the future Mitchell/Service/Route 99 interchange (~ STA R10.167). Caltrans officials from District 10, which covers Ceres, like the design but it is being viewed cautiously at state headquarters. If approved, this would be the first Caltrans approval of the unique "diverging diamond" road design. Additionally, the proposed interchange - centered on Service Road - would be closer than the one-mile minimum distance from the next closest interchange that Caltrans prefers. If Caltrans has misgivings about the distance to the downtown interchange, Ceres may have to go with a less desired alternative. The alternative design would seek to correct the way Mitchell's southbound off-ramp conflicts with the southbound on-ramp but it would do nothing to improve southbound freeway access to the west side of Route 99 where the city hopes to see industrial parks built. If Caltrans decides to try the design, Ceres could be the first city in California to use it, especially if the project starts in 2020. Ceres officials like the design, believing it's the best to handle traffic volumes into 2040, said Wells. That's why triple left-hand turn lanes are being designed for the intersection of Service and Mitchell roads. That equates to five or six times to movement potential than exists today. The design also takes into consideration the limitations caused by the railroad tracks that run parallel just to the west of Route 99. The diverging diamond design would allow full freeway access at Service Road. The interchange design would also eliminate the current way motorists get off southbound Route 99 at Mitchell Road. Motorists now must stop at the end of the off-ramp and wait for clearance of southbound Mitchell Road on-ramp traffic coming from the left. The only freeway access at Mitchell Road to remain would be the southbound on-ramp and the northbound freeway on-ramp. In a typical diamond interchange, a vehicle travelling westbound over a freeway overpass would be on the north side while eastbound motorists would be on the south side of the overpass. The diverging diamond flips that, mostly because it allows for less traffic conflicts, better and increased traffic flows and better access to the freeway. Proper signage are a "critical component" in keeping motorists from becoming confused about movement. The diverging diamond is considered safer than other designs because it results in a slower traffic movement - about 25-35 mph - and affords less chance for serious accidents. If the city gets its way, construction would start in about five years and be completed in 2023. The project depends on the passage of a countywide half-cent transportation tax in 2016 which would fund approximately $31 million of the project. The city also can use $9 million in Public Facility Fees collected on new development and would need to obtain state and federal grants. There is also the possibility of issuing bonds to finance.
    (Source: Ceres Courier, 7/29/2015)

    In March 2019, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project located on Route 99 in the city of Ceres in Stanislaus County (10-Sta-99, PM 9.5/11.4). The project proposes to improve the Route 99/Service Road/Michell Road Interchange. The proposed project will provide capacity to accommodate projected increase in traffic volume. The project proposes to address the issues of congestion, circulation and access associated with the existing interchange during peak traffic periods. This project is currently programmed in the 2018 Federal Transportation Improvement Program for approximately $83.0 million with anticipated funds coming from the local Redevelopment Agency, Public Facility Fees and Stanislaus County local Measure L. Construction is estimated to begin in 2021.
    (Source: March 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    In January 2020, it was reported that Ceres is moving into detailed design for a new Route 99 interchange near the south end of town. The $133.5 million project would include a full interchange at Service Road, which now has a bridge across the highway but does not directly connect with it. The work also would involve upgrades to the current Mitchell Road interchange, about half a mile to the south. The Stanislaus Council of Governments voted 1/15/2020 to allot $6.59 million toward the design. StanCOG oversees transportation planning in the county. The project could be done by 2027 if funding comes together, City Manager Toby Wells said last week. The city plans to pay for it with fees on developers, redevelopment money and Measure L, a countywide sales tax approved by voters in 2016.
    (Source: Modesto Bee, 1/22/2020)

    In May 2020, an update was provided on this project, which is still in the planning stages. News of the state’s prediction of a $54 billion budget shortfall for the 2020-21 fiscal year has officials worrying about the prospects for funding. The council took action in May 2019 to formally request Caltrans to approve creating a new connection between Route 99 at Service Road. Caltrans signed on to connect the planned interchange at Service Road to the freeway. Currently the project is in its plans, specifications and estimates (PS&E) stage – work being performed by Nolte Associates (now NV5). The firm has been involved with the project from its inception. The focus of the work is to protect all the ultimate right-of-way and best position the city to pursue the funding necessary to construct the project. The PS&E should be completed in June 2020 at a cost of $3.89 million. Funds for the design work are coming from Measure L, the half-cent sales tax approved by voters in November 2016. Approximately $7 million have been spent to get the project to the current status. The Stanislaus Council of Governments, or StanCOG, committed to use $30.74 million of Measure L tax revenue on the Ceres interchange. More funding is expected from SB 1, the state’s gas tax increase and car registration fee hike that survived a repeal effort in November 2018. The entire project is expected to cost somewhere in the area of $95 million. The city has the option of a design-build procurement and will have to see how to fund the remaining 35 percent of plans. The new interchange design would eliminate the way motorists exit southbound Route 99 at Mitchell Road. The southbound Mitchell Road on-ramp and Route 99 off-ramps cross each other, so drivers coming off the freeway must stop and wait for a break in southbound Mitchell Road traffic headed toward the on-ramp. Under the diverging diamond design, the only freeway access at Mitchell Road to remain would be the southbound on-ramp and the northbound freeway on-ramp. The interchange at Service Road will also include a diverging diamond design. Normally a vehicle travelling westbound over a freeway overpass would be on the north side while eastbound motorists would be on the south side of the overpass. The diverging diamond flips that circulation pattern to allow for less traffic conflicts, better and increased traffic flow and better access to the freeway. The city has been planning a new Service/Mitchell/Route 99 interchange since 1997. The original design called for couplets – where Mitchell Road was southbound and Moore Road was the northbound movement – but it was scrapped for an expensive 2002 design plan which Caltrans ultimately rejected in 2009. The city dusted off the interchange project in 2011 and consulted Caltrans about better designs. The design calls for the Brickit Court industrial area to be accessible by Don Pedro Road and not the current route via El Camino Avenue.
    (Source: Ceres Courier, 5/13/2020)

    In April 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Ceres along Route 99 near the Whitmore Avenue Over-Crossing (~ STA R11.906), consisting of collateral facilities.

    Hatch Road Auxiliary Lane Project (10-Sta-99, PM 13.4/13.8)

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 0037. 10-Stanislaus-99 R13.4/R13.8. Route 99 Near Ceres and Modesto, in the northbound direction from Hatch Road onramp to S. 9th Street offramp. Construct auxiliary lane. Begin Con: 11/16/2020. Total Project Cost: $8,699K.

    In December 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project located on Route 99 near Modesto in Stanislaus County. The project proposes to construct a northbound auxiliary lane between the Hatch Road/Joyce Avenue on-ramp and the South 9th Street off-ramp. The project also proposes to widen shoulders, and replace and construct new soundwalls. The proposed project is currently estimated to cost approximately $8.7 million. This project is fully funded and currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for approximately $8.7 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in 2021. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
    (Source: December 2018 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    In August 2020, the CTC approved the following financial allocation for construction and construction support: $5,658,000. 10-Sta-99 PM R13.4/R13.8. PPNO 10-0037. ProjID 1015000003 EA 0L870. Route 99 Near Ceres and Modesto, in the northbound direction from Hatch Road onramp to South 9th Street offramp. Outcome/Output: Construct northbound auxiliary lane to improve highway operations and mobility.
    (Source: August 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #49)

    In April 2017, it was reported that Caltrans is preparing a project that will install an Automated Warning System on northbound Route 99, allowing better monitoring of local traffic and weather conditions to benefit motorists and businesses. Time-saving information will be relayed through a Changeable Message Sign (CMS) and Caltrans' QuickMap (http://quickmap.dot.ca.gov), which provides near real-time updates on traffic congestion, accidents and other factors that threaten to delay motorists. The project is scheduled to start in April 2017 and finish in July 2017. Work on Route 99 will be performed from Kansas Avenue (~ STA R16.821) to Standiford Avenue/Beckwith Road (~ STA R20.253), near Ceres and Modesto. The project will install electronic monitoring equipment along this 2.5-mile stretch of Route 99, enhancing a critical commercial corridor in the Valley. More than 140,000 vehicles, including 20,000 big rigs, travel Route 99 in Stanislaus County on a typical day - compared to 91,000 vehicles in 2000 - a 54 percent increase in 17 years. Caltrans will install a Changeable Message Sign (CMS) just north of Kansas Avenue, as well as several Traffic Monitoring Stations (TMS), a closed circuit television camera and a weather information system on northbound Route 99. The technology will help quickly identify traffic and weather-related issues, allowing Caltrans to provide automated updates that will save motorists time and money on their highway journey. The monitoring stations include traffic loops that will be installed beneath the roadway, allowing Caltrans' Traffic Monitoring Center to remotely monitor the speed and volume of traffic. The changeable sign will automatically alert drivers to congested conditions ahead, and it can broadcast alternative routes and weather conditions, as well. The camera will help identify roadway incidents, congestion and other incidents that could impact the flow of traffic.
    (Source: Ceres Courier, 4/12/2017)

    Route 132 Expressway West (10-Sta-99, PM 15.7/17.5)

    ☞ Note: Most of the information on this project may be found in the Status section on Route 132, as the only impact on Route 99 is the interchange.

    In July 2017, it was reported that Stanislaus County Board of Supervisors was expected to give its support to rebuilding the Route 99 SB off-ramp at Kansas Avenue(~ STA R16.821) as part of the Route 132 Expressway project, which will serve as a new, roughly 4-mile route for Route 132 from Dakota Avenue in west Modesto to Needham Street near downtown. Supervisors are being asked to recommend to the California Department of Transportation that the Kansas off-ramp be rebuilt as part of the project. The alternative is to build a southbound Route 99 off-ramp at Needham Street. But a staff report says rebuilding the Kansas off-ramp has the support of Caltrans, Modesto, the county and the Stanislaus Council of Governments, a regional transportation planning agency. Building the Needham off-ramp would entail closing the Kansas on- and off-ramps, which would harm nearby businesses; whereas rebuilding the Kansas off-ramp will not require any of the businesses to move. construction on the expressway should start in spring 2019, with its opening in late 2020. The expressway is phase one of the project to realign a portion of Route 132 and get it off Maze Boulevard. Phase two would turn the two-lane expressway into a four-lane highway at an estimated cost of $132 million. Phase one is being paid for by local, state and federal funding. Phase one suffered a recent hit when the California Transportation Commission took about $11 million in construction funding away, but local officials were able to get more than $3 million of that back. Local officials will work to get the roughly $8 million from the state or federal government. Phase one also could look to Measure L — the transportation sales tax voters approved in November — for all or part of the roughly $8 million.
    (Source: Modesto Bee, 7/17/2017)

    In May 2018, the CTC received and accepted the environmental report for, and approved for future consideration of funding, the following project: Route 132 and Route 99 in Stanislaus County. Construct a new four-lane freeway along an adopted route from near Dakota Avenue to Route 99 in the city of Modesto. (PPNO 0944M) (10-Sta-132, PM 11.0/15.0, 10-Sta-99, PM 15.7/17.5). This project is located on Route 132 in the city of Modesto in Stanislaus County. The project proposes to construct a four lane freeway/expressway. Improvements to the Route 132/Route 99 interchange are also included in the proposed project. The purpose and need of the proposed project are to improve regional and interregional circulation within Modesto and Stanislaus Counties. The proposed project would also relieve traffic congestion along Route 132. The proposed project is estimated to cost $214.0 million over two phases. The project is not fully funded and is currently programmed for $46.4 million in the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), Federal and Local programs. The project is estimated to begin construction in 2019. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 STIP.
    (Source: CTC Minutes, May 2018 Agenda Item 2.2c(12))

    In August 2018, Scott Parker (Sparker) noted on AAroads: The Route 99/Route 132 trumpet interchange was laid out and planned in the mid-50's to serve as the southern "split" point for I-5, originally slated to follow US 99 in the San Joaquin Valley, into I-5W, which would follow Route 132 over to Route 33 and then take a new-terrain route to near Altamont, at which point it would follow US 50 into Oakland; and I-5E (i.e., what became I-580), simply following US 99 north through Stockton and Sacramento. Although the switch to the Westside alignment had been done by 1958, the basic plans for the interchange weren't changed -- but only the preliminary grading was done; no structures were built, and the corridor was only cleared for about a mile west of Route 99. Currently the route has, after 53 years of existence as a partially cleared corridor, been budgeted for construction; it'll be a 4-lane Route 132 facility immediately west of Route 99 but shrinking to a 2-lane undivided expressway after that. It's the only limited-access state highway project in the area since the Turlock bypass was opened in 1973. Instead of freeways, both state and local jurisdictions have concentrated on developing a series of arterials serving the ever-expanding housing area north and east of central Modesto; projects concerning Route 108 (the effective "spine" of the housing expansion) are part & parcel of that regional effort.

    In March 2020, it was reported that there are concerns about the soil being removed for the Route 132 / Route 99 projects. The issue is the disposal plan for tons of dirt contaminated with toxic barium, the dirt coming from the former FMC chemical plant, which was situated north of Kansas Avenue near Route 99. Crews are removing 400,000 cubic yards of dirt to create a sunken expressway on the new route, which was acquired by the state more than 60 years ago. The two lanes and a median will pass under Carpenter Road and Rosemore Avenue. The contractor will soon provide a bypass route for traffic while the Carpenter Road bridge is constructed. Rosemore will be closed for bridge construction. When asked about dust control, the city said a certain amount of dust and haze are natural for the Northern San Joaquin Valley due to agriculture and windy conditions. City spokesman Thomas Reeves said water is being sprayed at the construction sites to prevent dust clouds. The excavation and containment project for the three mounds of barium-tainted soil is proceeding with a strict regimen of dust control and monitoring to keep people from being exposed to toxins, the city said. Barium is a dangerous heavy metal that can affect the lungs, heart and other organs. The state has said the concentrations of barium, strontium and lead in the soil are too low to cause cancer and other health problems. Crews are moving a stockpile of contaminated dirt on the east side of Route 99, near the south end of Franklin Street. The dirt trucked from that berm is placed over two mounds in the expressway route on either side of Emerald Avenue. The berm west of Emerald is about 900 feet long. The tainted soil will be encapsulated in concrete behind retaining walls and bridge abutments along the expressway or underneath the pavement. The tainted dirt placed in “non-traveled” areas will be covered by native soil, the city said. For years, local residents and critics of the remediation plan had hoped the contaminated berms would be hauled away from Modesto. That would cost an estimated $20 million. The contaminated soil operation is monitored by closed-circuit cameras watched by Caltrans and the state Department of Toxic Substances Control. “Material handling protocols are in place to ensure that all personnel working on the project and the surrounding community are protected from exposure,” the city said. Workers at the stockpiles are wearing personal protection badges that detect exposure to barium. Truck beds carrying the tainted dirt are covered at all times. Decontamination measures are used to make sure barium is not spread outside the construction zone. Those procedures include wiping down equipment, tires and workers’ shoes. In addition, an independent consultant is monitoring the work at the stockpiles. So far, no barium has been detected above the safe levels established by the state, the city said.
    (Source: Modesto Bee, 3/3/2020)

    In March 2019, it was reported that the CTC allocated $2.2 million for an estimated $2.7 million project that will rehabilitate and improve the structure and increase the vertical clearance of the bridge on the Route 99 overcrossing at Wilson Way (STA R017.71, Bridge 29-0306L/R) in the City of Stockton in San Joaquin County.
    (Source: Sierra Sun Times, 3/25/2019)

    Beckwith Road Ramps

    In October 2015, the CTC approved the following SHOPP funding: 10-Sta-99 R18.0/R19.7 Route 99 In Modesto, from north of West Modesto Overhead to south of Beckwith Road. Construct acceleration and deceleration lanes at southbound ramps to improve safety. PAED: 09/01/2015 R/W: 04/01/2016 RTL: 05/01/2016 CCA: 12/01/2017 Costs: $7K (R/W); $4,200K (C) Completion FY15/16 Support costs: PA & ED $645K; PS & E $181K; RW Sup $29K; Con Sup $424K; Total $1,279K

    In August 2016, the CTC approved $7,923,000 in funding on Route 99 in Modesto (R18.0/R19.7), from 0.1 mile north of West Modesto Overhead to 0.5 mile south of Beckwith Road. Outcome/Output: Reconstruct off-ramp and construct acceleration and deceleration lanes at southbound ramps to improve safety and reduce the number and severity of collisions.

    Route 99/Pelandale Avenue Interchange (~ STA R21.666)

    In August 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that County will reconstruct the Route 99/Pelandale Avenue Interchange (~ STA R21.666) in the city of Modesto. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program for Right of Way only. The project is anticipated to be programmed with Route 99 bond program savings for Construction and Construction Support. The total estimated cost is $57,356,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will result in no significant impacts to the environment. Avoidance and minimization measures would reduce any potential effects on noise and paleontological resources. These measures include noise abatement along Route 99 south of Pelandale Avenue and the preparation of a paleontological Mitigation Plan.

    In October 2017, the CTC authorized the following financial allocation: 10-Sta-99 R21/R22.1: On Route 99 in Stanislaus County: Pelandale Avenue Interchange. In Modesto and Salida, from 0.75 mile south of Pelandale Avenue to 0.35 mile north of Pelandale Avenue. Reconstruct the Route 99/Pelandale interchange and construct auxiliary lane. $4,336,000

    In March 2020, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way, consisting of collateral facilities, in the city of Modesto (City) along Route 99 on Salida Boulevard and Pelandale Avenue (10-Sta-99-PM R21.4/R22.0). In May 2020, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the same segment, this time consisting of collateral facilities, in the county of Stanislaus (County) along Route 99 on Pelandale Avenue and Sisk Road (10-Sta-99-PM R21.4/R22.0).
    (Source March 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.3c; May 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.3c)

    Route 219 - Kiernan Ave Interchange (~ STA R22.515)

    In June 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will reconstruct the interchange at Route 219 (Kiernan Avenue), including the overcrossing, on- and off-ramps, and certain roadway segments within the interchange limits. The project is not fully funded. The total estimated project cost is $46,548,000 for capital and support. The project is anticipated to be programmed with Route 99 bond program savings in Fiscal Year 2012-13. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13.

    In January 2013, the CTC approved de-allocation of $3,699,000 in Proposition 1B State Route 99 (SR99) bond funds for the Kiernan Avenue Interchange project (PPNO 9463) in Stanislaus County, thereby reducing the original SR99 construction capital allocation of $37,100,000 to $33,401,000 to reflect contract award savings.

    Modesto to Stockton

    Stanislaus River Bridge No. 29-0013 (10-SJ-99, PM 0.0/0.5, 10-Sta-99, PM 24.3/24.8)

    In January 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will replace a portion of the southbound Stanislaus River Bridge No. 29-0013 on Route 99 near the city of Ripon (10-SJ-99, PM 0.0/0.5, 10-Sta-99, PM 24.3/24.8). The project is programmed in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total programmed amount is $23,563,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2019-20. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    In March 2020, the CTC approved an additional $3,867,000 in Capital and Support cost, PPNO 0321 on Route 99, in San Joaquin County. This ongoing construction contract project will remove and replace a portion of the 1,220 foot long Route 99 Stanislaus River Bridge, in the City of Ripon in San Joaquin County. The project  will be removing the 117 year old, 206 foot long, two-lane wide, two concrete arch-span segment; which now is a part of southbound lanes in the southwest corner of the larger structure. The current full bridge was constructed in various segments, as Route 99 was expanded over the decades, around these two original arch-spans. This project will replace the arch-spans due to structural deficiencies and life span. There are three piers that support this 117 year old structure segment, which is located in the river channel and therefore require in-water work to complete the substructure foundation replacement. There is a limited work period due to migration in the river. Finally, access to the project site is also constrained by both a Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) trestle and a buried Kinder Morgan high pressure jet fuel pipeline, located downstream and adjacent to the project. The project has a temporary construction easement which encroaches on both of these facilities, and the contract requires that these external agencies approve operations and coordination of all work affecting those facilities. The winter of 2019 was an extremely wet year in California, receiving over 200 percent of the average snowpack per the Department of Water Resources (DWR). This resulted in water levels in the Stanislaus River fluctuating significantly during the beginning stages of the construction project; providing shorter windows to complete the preparation work necessary to work adjacent to the UPRR railroad. This affected the UPRR approval process, causing the remaining in-water work to be delayed about 6 weeks until July 22, 2019, limiting time to complete the in-water work during the permit window in 2019. Also, shortly after the in-water work was ready to begin, it was found that the Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) Nationwide 404 Permit (Permit) requirement for river traffic, due to the Goodwin Dam’s continued release of high river flows, was determined to be outside the scope in the contract documents. The Permit and the United States Coast Guard (USCG) verbally defined that there is to be minimal impact to river navigation, or there needs to be an approved written river closure plan. At the time the project was developed, water flow was minimal and decreasing annually due to the drought. It did not appear to the project team that water flow levels would have significant impact on river navigation during construction, except during a two week demolition window, so no formal closure plan was developed. As a result, the contractor had set up to build a temporary trestle over the river for access and demolition activities. Unfortunately, in 2019, high river flows from the release of water from Goodwin Dam would result in limited vertical clearance for river navigation if the trestle was put into place. As a result, a change was developed to provide for these various restrictions. However, the additional delay related to the UPRR reviews, USCG public notice coordination, and extended high flow days provided insufficient time to complete the in-water work by the permit restriction of October 15th and the Department suspended the contract for the winter.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5e.(5))

    In September 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of San Joaquin, at Olive Avenue (near Modesto) and Austin Road (~SJ 4.877), consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads, frontage roads and cul-de-sacs.

    Route 99/Route 120 Connector Improvements near Manteca (10-SJ-99 PM 3.1/6.2)

    Rte 99 Rte 120 Interchange ImprovementsThe 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $13.550 for PPNO 3162, the Route 99/Route 120 Connector near Manteca (~ SJ 5.722)

    In October 2019, the CTC had on its agenda for future consideration of funding the following project: 10-SJ-99 PM 3.1/6.2 Route 99 and Route 120 in San Joaquin County. Construct roadway and interchange improvements on Route 99 at Route 120 near the city of Manteca in San Joaquin County. (PPNO 3162, Proj ID 1016000038 EA 1E740). This project is located near the eastern/southeastern border of the City of Manteca on Route 99/Route 120 in San Joaquin County. This project proposes to construct improvements to the Route 99/Route 120 interchange. The project is divided into three phases. The purpose is to reduce traffic congestion and improve operations of Route 99 with the Route 120 and Austin Road interchanges. Phase 1A of this project is currently programmed in the 2018 STIP with $13.6 million in Regional Improvement Program funds and $3.4 million in Senate Bill 1 Local Partnership Program funds for Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Phase 1A is currently not fully funded, but it is a candidate for the 2020 SHOPP. The total cost estimate for this project is $115.3 million which includes all three phases. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2020-21. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 STIP.
    (Source: October 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    Also in October 2019, the CTC approved an allocation of $3,408,000 for the SB 1 Local Partnership Program (LPP) (Formulaic) Route 99/Route 120 Connector Project (PPNO 3162). Add new auxiliary lanes, upgrade existing bridges, relocate an at-grade railroad crossing, intersections, construct additional connector lanes, ramp upgrades, and new signals/lighting. Due to funding constraints, the Project will be constructed in three phases. The initial phase will construct a second lane on the eastbound Route 120 to southbound Route 99 connector and auxiliary lanes, which will require the partial closure of the Austin Road/Route 99 interchange. The second phase will widen the connector from northbound Route 99 to westbound Route 120 to two lanes an widen Route 120 from four lanes to six between Main Street and SR 99. The third phase will construct braided ramps to the Austin Road interchange to restore full access.
    (Source: October 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5s.(1))

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, made a number of adjustments related to this:
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    PPNO Project Prior 20-21 21-22 22-23 23-24 24-25
    3162 Rt 99/120 Connector 3,408K 10,142K 0 0 0
    3162 Rt 99/120 Connector -3,408K -10,142K 0 0 0 0
    3162A Rt 99/120 Connector, Phase 1A 3,408K 0 10,142K 0 0 0
    3162B Rt 99/120 Connector, Phase 1B 0 0 0 0 7,893K 0

    Widening Manteca to Stockton (SJ PM 4.9 to SJ PM R22.488)

    The Arch Road interchange in San Joaquin County (groundbreaking: 6/17/02) will be the first SPUI in the central valley and the third in California. It was completed in 2005.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #2067: Complete the engineering design and acquire the right-of-way needed for the Arch-Sperry project in San Joaquin County (~ SJ R22.488). The Project will widen Arch-Sperry Road to six lanes west of Airport Way to Route 99 and construct an interim four lane elevated roadway including five bridges crossing three railroads, two roadways and French Camp Slough east to I-5. The project will include reconstruction of the French Camp/I-5 interchange.$4,000,000.

    [Stockton]In March 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Joaquin County will widen the highway from four to six lanes in each direction and construct roadway improvements between Arch Road and Route 4 in the city of Stockton. The project is programmed in the State Route 99 Bond Program and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes local funds. The total estimated cost is $250,500,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12.

    In July 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen a portion of Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes in the cities of Manteca and Stockton, between S Austin Road (SJ PM 4.9) and Arch Road (SJ PM R22.488). The project is programmed in the Route 99 Bond Program and the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. Total estimated project cost is $250,000,000 for capital and support.

    It was also reported that the Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin project is programmed in the Route 99 Bond Program. The project consists of widening Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes from Route 120 west to 0.4 mile north of Arch Road, and reconstructing the French Camp Road and Lathrop Road interchanges. The baseline project limits would leave a short section of 4-lane highway, from Austin Road to Route 120 west, between two sections of 6-lane highway. It was proposed to extend the southern limit of the project by 0.4 mile to Austin Road to allow for a continuous 6-lane highway. The approved environmental document covers the proposed project limits. It was also noted that according to the baseline schedule, this project would begin construction within three months of the adjacent Route 99 (South Stockton) Widening project (PPNO 7668). This could limit the number of bidders available to perform the work, which could result in higher bids, and increase construction-related traffic impacts. It was proposed to split the Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin project into five projects, an environmental only project (Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin (Environmental Only), PPNO 7634), a widening project (Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin Phase 1, PPNO 7634A), a French Camp Road interchange project (Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin Phase 2, PPNO 7634B), a Lathrop Road interchange project (Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin Phase 3, PPNO 7634C), and a mitigation planting project (Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin Mitigation Planting, PPNO 7634D). The environmental phase has already been completed. The combined cost of the five projects equals the baseline cost of the original project.

    In December 2011, it was reported that the state has released $50 million to start the first phase of a $250 million project to widen Route 99 between south Stockton and Manteca. The project will go out to bid in January, and construction could begin as early as spring 2012. The project will widen the freeway to six lanes by building new lanes in the existing median and adding soundwalls and auxiliary lanes. The 8.3-mile stretch of road heads south from Arch Road to Austin Road, south of the Route 120 interchange. Landscaping also is planned. The next two phases to build interchanges along the way will follow, possibly for completion in 2015. The $250 million for the project comes from San Joaquin County's half-cent Measure K sales tax, bond funds approved by state voters in 2006 and other state funds. A second $250 million project to widen Route 99 also is expected to begin construction in 2012. That project would build new interchanges and widen the freeway from four to six lanes between the Crosstown Freeway and Arch Road in south Stockton.

    In Spring 2012, Caltrans put out for bid reconstruction of the segment from 0.8 Mile south of the French Camp Road undercrossing(~SJ 11.498) to 0.3 mile north of the Arch Road Undercrossing. This is a complete rebuild of that segment, with the old freeway, in some parts, being many feet below the new roadway. This also eliminates a bridge with open concrete railing plus some older signage.

    In January 2013, it was reported that the CTC approved $10,485,000 for a Prop. 1B project that includes widening lanes from 4 to 6 lanes from just north of Arch Road to just south of Route 4.

    In February 2013, it was reported that construction was soon to start to widen Route 99 through south Stockton, a $214 million project intended to relieve traffic congestion and create a safer and more modern roadway. Construction work will bring temporary delays and detours until the project's expected completion date in 2015. Drivers will see some permanent changes taking shape, with the replacement or addition of interchanges in places and the removal of on- and off-ramps in others. Spanning from near the Crosstown Freeway south to Arch-Airport Road, it is part of another widening project under way that will widen Route 99 from four to six lanes through Manteca. The project replaces access points at the same level as the highway, instead using interchanges with more room to speed up to merge with traffic. Originally slated as a $250 million project, the south-Stockton widening came in from bidding at $214 million. It is paid for with $132 million from Proposition 1B, a transportation bond approved by voters statewide in 2006. It also receives $47.5 million from Measure K, the 1/2-cent sales tax approved by voters in San Joaquin County. Those changes required more space, which means Caltrans needed to acquire property. It amounts to all or part of 133 parcels of land. Most of these were already bought from the property owners.
    (Source: Recordnet.com, 2/21/13)

    It will be constructed in stages, starting with building a new interchange at Golden Gate Avenue. That will be ready for use before work crews close the interchange at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.

    In July 2015, it was reported that Caltrans had completed the Route 99 widening project that started in Stockton and ran all the way to the Yosemite exit at Route 120. Along with the widening of Route 99 to six lanes, Lathrop and French Camp Roads are now more user friendly. The new on- and off-ramps encourage drivers to get off the road and spend money in Manteca. The project was funded by two voter measures -- $89 million came from a 2006 voter-approved transportation bond. The remaining $36 million came from a local 1 cent sales tax. The project also constructed a sound barrier wall for residents and a concrete median to improve safety.
    (Source: Fox 40 News, 7/16/2015)

    In November 2016, it was reported that the 4-mile expansion of Route 99 from the Crosstown Freeway near Hwy. 4 to Arch Road in Stockton was complete. Caltrans and the San Joaquin Council of Governments built an interchange, over crossings and upgraded the Mariposa Road Interchange. It was a $214 million project, where $132 million came from a transportation bond approved by voters in 2006, and $47 million came from local Measure K. The daily commute hours saved will be 4,722 hours.
    (Source: KCRA 3, 11/2/2016)

    Operational Improvements: Austin Rd to Rte 120 (10-San Joaquin-99 PM 4.6/5.3)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following NEW Mobility item of interest: 10-San Joaquin-99 PM 4.6/5.3 PPNO 3126A Proj ID 1018000159 EA 1E74U. Route 99 in Manteca, from south of Austin Road to south of Route 99/Route 120 Separation. Operational improvements by lengthening and reconstructing overcrossing and railroad overhead, eliminate one interchange, and upgrade safety barriers.  Financial Contribution Only (FCO) to San Joaquin Council of Governments (SJCOG) for construction implementation. Programmed in FY21-22, with construction scheduled to start at the end of February 2022. Total project cost is $29,019K, with $28,736K being capital (const and right of way) and $283K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In March 2017, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Manteca along Route 99 along Main Street and West Lathrop Road (10-SJ-99 PM 8.8/9.2), consisting of collateral facilities. The City, by freeway agreement dated August 3, 2010 agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expired January 15, 2017.

    In October 2019, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of San Joaquin (County) along Route 99 between West Lathrop Road and Brunswick Road (10-SJ-99-PM 9.5/9.8), consisting of collateral facilities. The County by freeway agreement dated November 9, 2010, agreed to accept the relinquishment and by letter signed August 5, 2019, agreed to waive the 90-day notice requirement and accept title upon relinquishment by the State.
    (Source: October 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.3c)

    In April 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Stockton along Route 99 on the 99 Frontage Road (Kingsley Road), ~ SJ 14.344, north of Arch Road, consisting of a collateral facility.

    Mariposa Road (~ SJ 16.727) / Charter Way (~SJ 17.538)

    2007 CMIA. A project on Route 99 in Stockton (widening and operational improvements) in San Joaquin ($50M) was submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) for funding. It was not recommended for funding. Neither was the Central Galt Interchange. In May 2008, there was a Draft EIR in circulation regarding this that proposed four alternatives:

    1. Alternative 1 — No Build.
    2. Alternative 2 — This alternative would widen a 2.7 mile portion of Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes and reconfigure the Mariposa Road interchange to a partial cloverleaf configuration.
    3. Alternative 3 — This alternative would widen a 2.7 mile portion of Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes and realign the existing Charter Way interchange. A new interchange would also be constructed south of Golden Gate Avenue on Route 99.
    4. Alternative 4 — This alternative would widen a 2.7 mile portion of Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes and reconfigure the Mariposa Road and Farmington Road interchanges.

    Farmington Road Vertical Clearance (10-SJ-99 PM 16.8/17.6)

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the following financial allocation:10-SJ-99 PM 16.8/17.6. PPNO 3148. ProjID 1013000265. EA 0X310. On Route 99 and Route 4: In Stockton, at Route 4/Route 99 Separation (Farmington Road) Bridge No. 29-0155. Outcome/Output: Replace structure to provide standard vertical clearance, reconstruct approaching roadway, including approach slabs, curb ramps, sidewalk, guardrail, fencing, signs, drainage, landscaping, and electrical elements. Financial allocation: $10,832,000.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #26)

    Martin Luther King Jr Interchange - Stockton (~ SJ 18.034)

    Rte 5 MLK Blvd interchange in StocktonIn May 2009, the CTC approved a public road connection to Route 99 at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, in the county of San Joaquin. The San Joaquin Council of Governments (SJCOG), in conjunction with the City of Stockton, San Joaquin County, and the Department, are proposing to construct a new interchange at Route 99 and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in San Joaquin County, near the junction with Route 4. Within the project limits, Route 99 is a four-lane freeway with four closely spaced interchanges. Traffic in the project area is highly congested during peak hours, with high demand from both regional and local traffic. These high traffic volumes, coupled with localized traffic weaving on Route 99, cause traffic to slow down to below acceptable levels. The proposed project is expected to improve the safety and operations of Route 99. In order for this project to proceed, Commission approval is required for the new public road connection to Route 99 at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. This two mile section of Route 99 is a four-lane divided freeway with 12-foot wide travel lanes, 8-foot wide outside shoulders, and 5-foot wide inside shoulders. The median width varies from 36 feet to 26 feet between Mariposa Road and the Crosstown Freeway, Route 4 west of Route 99. Route 4 is not continuous through this area. Ramp connectors from Route 99 to Route 4 east of Route 99 are provided at Farmington Road interchange. Proposed improvements will include freeway widening to six-lanes, reconstruction of structures to accommodate a future eight-lane facility, construction of auxiliary lanes in both directions from Mariposa Road interchange to the Crosstown Freeway, modification and reconstruction of the Mariposa Road interchange, removal of the Farmington Road interchange, removal of the Charter Way interchange, and construction of the new Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard interchange. Golden Gate Avenue will be realigned and renamed Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. In addition, approximately 0.2 miles of Route 4, east of Route 99, will be reconstructed to align with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard at the new interchange, hence providing route continuity between Route 99 and Route 4.

    In September 2011, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 99 from 0.4 mile south of East Hammer Lane to 0.3 mile north of East Hammer Lane (near Stockton), consisting of collateral facilities.

    In December 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Stockton along Route 99 on Hammer Lane (~ SJ 22.964) between Moreland Streets and Maranatha Drive, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In March 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 99 at Hammer Lane (~ SJ 22.964), consisting of collateral facilities inadvertently omitted from a previous relinquishment.

    North of Stockton to Sacramento

    In May 2011, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 99 from the Calaveras River Overcrossing (~ SJ 21.814) near Stockton to 0.2 mile north thereof.

    In June 2012, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 99 on Cherokee and Waterloo Roads (near Stockton), consisting of collateral facilities inadvertently omitted from a previous relinquishment (~ SJ 20.843).

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $2,504,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Lodi, from 0.5 mile north of Harney Lane (~ SJ 28.481) to East Pine Street, that will rehabilitate 4.5 lane miles of pavement to improve safety and ride quality.

    Victor Road Bridge Clearance (10-SJ-99, PM 30.7/31.3)

    Rte 99 VIctor RdIn January 2018, the CTC amended the SHOPP as follows: 10-SJ-99 30.9/31.3: Route 99 In Lodi, from south of Route 12 (Victor Road) to south of Turner Road. Realign northbound onramp, lower mainline ramp vertical profile for increased vertical clearance increase bridge vertical clearance, and construct auxiliary lane. Updated total cost: $15,803,000.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.1a(1))

    In October 2018, the CTC authorized for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed: Route 99 in San Joaquin County (10-SJ-99, PM 30.7/31.3). Construct roadway improvements on a portion of Route 99 at the Victor on-ramp in the city of Lodi. (PPNO 3145) This project is located on Route 99 in Lodi in San Joaquin County, between the Victor Road northbound (NB) on-ramp and the Turner Road northbound off-ramp. This project proposes to improve the vertical clearance for vehicles by raising the elevation of three overcrossing bridges, realign and widen the Route 99 NB on-ramp from Victor Road, add a NB auxiliary lane on Route 99 between Victor Road and Turner Road, construct retaining walls and storm water drainage systems. The proposed project addresses the need to improve turning radius, specifically freight trucks, at the Victor Road/Route 12 NB on-ramp and the clearance height on Route 99 at three bridge overcrossing structures. The proposed project is currently estimated to cost approximately $16.4 million. This project is fully funded and is currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for approximately $16.4 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and-Right of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2019-20. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
    (Source: October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    In June 2020, it was reported that the CTC approved funding for the Route 99 Victor Road /Route 12 Ramp Realignment Project in San Joaquin County: The $15 million project will realign the northbound on-ramp between Victor Road and Turner Road in Lodi. Specifically, at its June 2020 meeting, the CTC approved the following allocation for CONST and CON ENG:  $14,992,000. 10-SJ-99 30.9/31.3. PPNO 10-3145. ProjID 1014000134. EA 1C280. Route 99 in Lodi, from 0.1 mile south of Route 12 (Victor Road) to 0.3 mile south of Turner Road. Outcome/Output: Improve traffic operations by realigning the northbound onramp, increasing bridge vertical clearance and constructing an auxiliary lane. Twelve month time extension for CONST and CON ENG approved under Waiver 19-29; June 2019.
    (Source: Source: The Pinetree.Net, 6/26/2020; June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #31)

    Central Galt Interchange (~ SAC 0.807)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1257: Construction of the Central Galt and Route 99 Interchange (~ SAC 0.847) and Access Improvements. $2,400,000.

    As of July 2012, it was reported that the new C Street Overcrossing was almost complete with just a few finishing touches remaining before the bridge will be ready for traffic. Fairway Dr. and the new on-ramp to Southbound Route 99 have been paved but will remain closed to traffic to allow additional work to be completed in the area. A Street was being realigned between Lincoln Way and the A Street Overcrossing. On the other side of the freeway the Contractor was also working to reconstruct Boessow Road between the C Street Overcrossing and Crystal Way.

    [Central Galt Interchange]In August 2012, information was posted about improvements in Galt. The goal of the Central Galt Interchange project is to modify the existing interchange at Route 99. Currently, the traffic conditions are extremely congested during the morning and afternoon hours. Most of the congestion occurs at the C street/Fairway Drive/Route 99 southbound off-ramp intersection and Boessow Road/Route 99 northbound on and off-ramp. Some of the improvements that have been included in the design of the project are:

    • Enhancing safety by extending and expanding on and off-ramps .
    • Improving the operations and safety for drivers entering or exiting Route 99.
    • Improving local traffic circulation.
    • Providing safe pedestrian crossings and bicycle access through the interchange.

    In October 2012, it was reported that Caltrans and the city of Galt on Friday started construction on the Central Galt interchange on Route 99. The $41 million project includes extending and expanding the north and southbound onramps and exits to improve safety and traffic flow. The project also includes improved lighting, and a safer pedestrian crossing with bicycle access through the interchange. The project will be funded by state transportation bonds and Sacramento County transportation sales tax funds.

    Cosumnes Bridge Replacement CM/GC Project (03-Sac-99 7.1/9.4)

    Rte 99 Cosumnes River Bridge ReplacementIn December 2018, Granite Construction Incorporated (NYSE: GVA) announced that it has been selected by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) as the Construction Manager/General Contractor (CM/GC) for the estimated $113 million Cosumnes Bridge Replacement CM/GC Project in Sacramento County, ~ SAC 8.539. The Cosumnes Bridge Replacement Project is located on Route 99, in Elk Grove, CA. Project scope includes the removal and replacement of four bridges over the Cosumnes River and to relinquish an underpass railroad structure, requiring partial realignment of Route 99 southbound.
    (Source: Daily Journal, 12/17/2018)

    The project fact sheet describes the project as follows: The project is located on Route 99, in Sacramento County, in and near Elk Grove, from 0.3 mile south of Dillard Road Overcrossing to 0.6 mile south of Grant Line Road. The project proposes to replace four bridges, relinquish an underpass (UP) structure {requiring partial realignment of Route 99 southbound (SB) with a new overhead (OH) structure}, and rehabilitate/replace the bridge deck/barrier railings on an overcrossing (OC) structure. The four bridges to be replaced are Cosumnes River Overflow Bridge, Br. No. 24-0021R/L, and Cosumnes River Bridge, Br. No. 24-0020R/L. The structure to be relinquished is the McConnell Underpass, Br. No. 24-0048L. The new structure to be constructed is the McConnell Overhead, Br. No. 24-0048L. On Dillard Road OC, Br. No. 24-016, the project will replace the non-standard bridge railing, remove the deck AC surfacing, and place a polyester concrete deck overlay. In addition, the project will reconstruct/overlay the OC approaches and ramp, replace structure approach guard railing on and beneath the OC, along the freeway that are shielding OC columns. A Roadway Informational System (RWIS) will also be installed on the freeway and ramps, just north and south of Dillard Road OC. Other proposed electrical work includes installing a fiber optic cable along freeway, and upgrading existing freeway lighting. The project also proposes to abandon the SB on and off ramps to Eschinger Road, and relinquish an UP structure (McConnell UP, Br. No. 24-0048L) to Union Pacific Railroad.

    The project fact sheet noted that the original work scope (widen Route 99 SB structures, seismically retrofit Route 99 SB/NB structures, and replace Dillard OC Barrier Rails) and related roadway approach work that was proposed in the PR does not address current deficiencies and long term needs of the transportation facility along this stretch of Route 99. Upon further investigation by technical staff, it was determined that all four bridges are scour critical. A load rating analysis was performed on these four structures also. The results of the analysis indicates that should the calculated scour occur, live loads from permit vehicles would exceed the design capacity of a majority of the piles for each structure.
    (Source: CGMC Nomination Project Fact Sheet)

    On AAroads, Scott Parker noted that this means that of the four original "over/under" RR crossings (one direction goes under the tracks on the original 2-lane underpass while the other direction, added later, bridges over the tracks) that Route 99 inherited from US 99 at the time the shields were swapped in mid-'66, two were gone by the mid-80's (south of Route 46/Famoso and the Route 198 interchange near Goshen) with two remaining: Chowchilla and Elk Grove. This construction eliminates one more: the crossing south of Grant Line Road in Elk Grove. That over/under is being reconstructed as double bridges, with the SB underpass (which featured a low 14'5" clearance) bypassed by a new bridge adjacent to the existing NB bridge; at this point, the berms are being constructed with the actual bridge to follow. Also, the NB 2-lane bridge is being widened to accommodate shoulders (the new SB bridge will be able to accommodate 3 lanes+ shoulders). However, there are no immediate plans to widen or replace the series of older bridges immediately to the south crossing the Consumnes River floodplain. Several miles to the south, the section through Galt has been rebuilt with some new bridges (the old Route 104 interchange remains the same, however); but the interim section, about 5-6 miles, will remain the same for the time being. But the most egregious substandard structure (the old underpass) will be history.
    (Source: Sparker on AARoads, "Re: CA 99 ", 1/2/2020)

    In June 2019, the CTC approved the following CM/GC SHOPP amendment: 03-Sac-99 7.1/9.4 PPNO 6912 ProjID 0312000069. Route 99 In and near Elk Grove, from 0.3 mile south of Dillard Road Overcrossing to south of Grant Line Road (replace Consumnes River Bridge No. 24-0020L/R, and Consumnes River Overflow Bridge No. 24 -0021L/R; upgrade bridge rails at Dillard Road Overcrossing No. 24-0163; construct new McConnell Overhead No. 24-0048L. Bridge seismic retrofit, bridge scour retrofit, bridge rail replacement, and bridge replacement. Increase in construction capital is to build a wider McConnell Overhead bridge to accommodate both northbound and southbound directions with standard vertical and horizontal alignment. Coordination with Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) resulted in design change, which will allow UPRR to improve freight mobility in the future. Updated cost: $184,000K. Also CMGC Projects Item 2-6. 03-Sac-99 7.1/9.4 . Route 99 In and near Elk Grove, from 0.3 mile south of Dillard Road Overcrossing to south of Grant Line Road (replace Consumnes River Bridge No. 24 -0020L/R, and Consumnes River Overflow Bridge No. 24-0021L/R; upgrade bridge rails at Dillard Road Overcrossing No. 24-0163; construct new McConnell Overhead No. 24-0048L. Construct embankment for McConnell Overhead, and install associated drainage facilities and erosion control. Split the Construction Manager/General Contractor (CMGC) parent project EA 0F280/PPNO 03-6912 into five children projects EA 0F281/PPNO 03-6912A, EA 0F282/PPNO 03-6912B, EA 0F283/PPNO 03-6912C, EA 0F284/PPNO 03-6912D, and EA 0F285/PPNO 03-6912E to be constructed as independent construction contract work packages.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Meeting, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) CMGC Projects Item 1-6)

    In June 2019, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project located on Route 99, south of the Dillard Road overcrossing to south of Grant Line Road near the city of Elk Grove in Sacramento County (03-Sac-99, PM 7.1/9.4). The project proposes to replace four bridge structures, improve the Dillard Road Overcrossing, relinquish the McConnell Underpass, replace the McConnell overhead structure, and realign the southbound lanes. The proposed project addresses the current structural and seismic deficiencies of the four Cosumnes bridges, the non-standard horizontal and vertical clearances of the existing southbound McConnell underpass and structural deficiencies of the Dillard Road Overcrossing. In addition, the two southbound Cosumnes River bridges have sub-standard freeway/expressway bridge shoulder widths that may contribute to the higher than statewide average collision data. The project is currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for an estimated total of $139 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of- Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in 2020. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    In August 2019, the CTC authorized the following allocations related to this project:
    (Source: August 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) Items 12, 13, 14)

    • #12. $11,887,000. 03-Sac-99 7.1/9.4. Route 99 In and near Elk Grove, from 0.3 mile south of Dillard Road Overcrossing to 0.6 mile south of Grant Line Road. Early Work Package No. 1 for Consumnes River Bridge Construction Manager/General Contractor (CMGC) parent project EA 03-0F280. Outcome/Output: Import earthwork material and construct embankment for McConnell Overhead No. 24-0048L.
    • #13. $3,397,000. 03-Sac-99 7.1/9.4. Route 99 In and near Elk Grove, from 0.3 mile south of Dillard Road Overcrossing to 0.6 mile south of Grant Line Road. Early Work Package No. 2 for Consumnes River Bridge Construction Manager/General Contractor (CMGC) parent project EA 03-0F280. Outcome/Output: Construct foundations for temporary bridges over Consumnes River Overflow Bridge No. 24-0021L/R for traffic detour.
    • #14. $1,871,000. 03-Sac-99 7.1/9.4. Route 99 In and near Elk Grove, from 0.3 mile south of Dillard Road Overcrossing to 0.6 mile south of Grant Line Road. Early Work Package No. 3 for Consumnes River Bridge Construction Manager/General Contractor (CMGC) parent project EA 03-0F280. Outcome/Output: Fabricate pre-cast concrete girders for McConnell Overhead No. 24-0048L.

    In October 2019, it was reported that Caltrans and Granite Construction Inc. broke ground on a three-year, $158 million bridge project on Route 99 south of Elk Grove. The project will replace the Route 99 bridges over the Cosumnes River. North of the river, crews will also build a new overpass so that both northbound and southbound traffic on Route 99 will cross over the railroad tracks. The first construction task, however, is building a temporary road alignment next to the northbound lanes that traffic will use during construction. The current Cosumnes River Bridge was built in the 1950s. The barriers are not up to current design standards, and in the river, the water is washing away dirt and sediment from around the foundation of the bridge, potentially degrading the foundation. Currently there are four bridges. Northbound and southbound traffic is divided, and each direction has a bridge over the river and river overflow. After work is complete, both directions of traffic will be together on the same two structures, which will allow for wider shoulders. Also as part of the project, Route 99 will be moved away from the McConnell Underpass, which takes the southbound direction of highway underneath a railroad line. The underpass is too low, and has caused accidents; it is also not up to current design standards in terms of sight clearance. Crews will build a new overpass, so both directions of traffic go over the tracks. Work is set to take place over three seasons, so the road is set to be open by the end of 2022.
    (Source: Sacramento Business Journal, 10/22/2019)

    In December 2019, the CTC authorized the following construction allocation on this project: $44,340,000. 03-Sac-99 7.1/9.4 Route 99 In and near Elk Grove, from 0.3 mile south of Dillard Road Overcrossing to 0.6 mile south of Grant Line Road. Early Work Package No. 4 for Cosumnes River Bridge Construction Manager/General Contractor (CMGC) parent project EA 0F280. Outcome/Output: Construct pre-cast concrete girder bridge over the railroad at McConnell Overhead No. 24-0048L, and construct temporary bridge superstructures and approach paving at Cosumnes River Overflow No. 24-0021L/R. (Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-19-50; June 2019.) (Concurrent amendment under SHOPP Amendment 18H-013; December 2019.)
    (Source: December 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #9)

    In January 2020, the CTC amended the 2018 SHOPP to split the Construction Manager/General Contractor (CMGC) parent project EA 0F280/PPNO 03-6912 into project EA 0F285/PPNO 03-6912E as Early Work Package No. 5 to be constructed as independent construction contract. Also added was Early Work Package No. 4, Construct pre-cast concrete girder bridge and approach paving over the railroad at McConnell Overhead No. 24-0048L, and Early Work Package No. 5, Construct temporary bridge superstructures and approach paving at Cosumnes River Overflow No. 24-0021L/R. The CTC also approved a financial allocation of $25,990,000 for Work Package #4, and a financial allocation of $10,590,000 for Work Package #5.
    (Source: January 2020 CTC Agenda, 2.1a.(1g) Items 1, 2, and 3, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #10, #11)

    In March 2020, the CTC amended the SHOPP and approved the following financial allocation: 03-Sac-99 PM 7.1/9.4. PPNO 6912D. ProjID 0319000204. EA 0F284. Route 99 in and near Elk Grove, from 0.3 mile south of Dillard Road Overcrossing to 0.6 mile south of Grant Line Road. Early Work Package No. 4 for Cosumnes River Bridge Construction Manager/General Contractor (CMGC) parent project EA 0F280. Outcome/Output: Construct bridge over the railroad at McConnell Overhead No. 24-0048L. (Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-19-51; June 2019.) (Concurrent amendment under SHOPP Amendment 18H-015; March 2020.) Financial allocation: $20,210,000. The CTC also approved another financial allocation related to this: 03-Sac-99 PM 7.1/9.4. PPNO 6912F. ProjID 0320000123. EA 0F286. Route 99 in and near Elk Grove, from 0.3 mile south of Dillard Road Overcrossing to 0.6 mile south of Grant Line Road. Early Work Package No. 6 for Cosumnes River Bridge Construction Manager/General Contractor (CMGC) parent project EA 0F280. Outcome/Output: Remove and replace Cosumnes River Bridge No. 24-0020L/R and Cosumnes River Overflow No. 24-0021L/R (structure work only). (Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-19-51; June 2019.) (Concurrent amendment under SHOPP Amendment 18H-015; March 2020.) (As part of this allocation request, the Department is requesting to extend the completion of CONST and CON ENG an additional 12 months beyond the 36 month deadline.) Financial allocation: $70,360,000.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #10, #11)

    In May 2020, the CTC approved the following allocation: $61,967,000. 03-Sac-99 PM 7.1/9.4 PPNO 03-6912 ProjID 0312000069 EA 0F280 Route 99 in and near Elk Grove, from 0.3 mile south of Dillard Road Overcrossing to 0.6 mile south of Grant Line Road. Outcome/Output: Replace Cosumnes River Bridge No. 24-0020L/R, and Cosumnes River Overflow Bridge No. 24-0021L/R , upgrade bridge rails at Dillard Road Overcrossing No. 24-0163, construct new McConnell Overhead No. 24-0392. This is a Construction Manager/General Contractor (CMGC) project. CON ENG: $5,800,000; CONST $56,167,000.
    (Source: May 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #10)

    In May 2020, it was announced that Granite has been awarded the Child Project 4 (CP4) portion of the Construction Manager/General Contractor (CM/GC) contract of the Cosumnes Bridge Replacement Project by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) in Sacramento County, California. The Cosumnes Bridge Replacement Project is located on Route 99, in Elk Grove, California. Project scope includes the removal and replacement of four bridges over the Cosumnes River as well as replacing two existing railroad overhead and underpass bridges with a single new overhead bridge, requiring partial realignment of Route 99 southbound. Granite completed the early work portion of this project in December 2019 that included the construction of two approaches to the new overhead railroad bridge, foundations and approach fills for two temporary alignment bridge widenings, and procurement of the precast girders for the railroad bridge. Construction is expected to begin in June 2020 and conclude in October 2022.
    (Source: Business Wire, 5/26/2020)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following NEW Mobility item of interest: 03-Sacramento-99 PM 12.7/16.0 PPNO 6930 Proj ID 0316000193 EA 1H630. Route 99 in Elk Grove, from Elk Grove Boulevard to south of Calvine Road. Construct two auxiliary lanes and upgrade four ramp metering systems. Programmed in FY22-23, with construction scheduled to start in February 2023. Total project  cost is $23,030K, with $18,420K being capital (const and right of way) and $4,610K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    Sheldon Road Interchange - Elk Grove (~SAC 14.868)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1990: Route 99 improvements at Sheldon Road (~ SAC 14.868). $3,200,000.

    In August 2008, officials from Elk Grove to Rancho Cordova, Folsom and El Dorado County will gather for a historic summit that will focus on the long-proposed connector/expressway linking I-5, Route 99 and US 50.

    [TCRP 135 - From City of Elk Grove Website]TCRP Project #135 will reconstruct and expand the Route 99/Sheldon Road interchange. These improvements will provide efficient accessibility to and from Route 99, as well as improvement to Sheldon Road to accommodate the current and projected traffic volumes for the City of Elk Grove. Planned improvements include construction of a two-lane southbound loop off-ramp and a diagonal southbound on-ramp within the southwest quadrant; construction of a two-lane northbound loop on-ramp with one mixed flow lane and one high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) bypass lane and a diagonal northbound off-ramp within the southeast quadrant; construction of a diagonal northbound on-ramp within the northeast quadrant; replacement of the existing bridge over Route 99 (which dates to 1957); addition of bike lanes, landscaped medians, and sidewalks on Sheldon Road; installation of on-ramp metering with high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) bypass lanes; and relocation and expansion of the existing Park & Ride lot. The project is anticipated to be completed by Fall 2009.

    In June 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will modify the existing Elk Grove Boulevard/Route 99 Interchange by adding a northbound on-ramp to Route 99 from East Stockton Boulevard through Caltrans right-of-way, eliminating left turns and the traffic signal on Elk Grove Boulevard at the existing northbound on-ramp, adding a traffic signal at the northbound ramp intersection on East Stockton Boulevard, and modifying the southbound on-ramp intersection.

    In March 2013, the CTC approved $5,000,000 to add northbound on-ramp, remove existing traffic signal, add second left turn lane to southbound on-ramp, and add northbound deceleration lane at the Elk Grove Blvd/Route 99 Interchange.

    General Route 99 (Southern Segment)

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed a complete corridor enhancement master plan. This included conversion of a number of expressway sections to freeway, and widening a number of freeway sections. This will bring the corridor to a full freeway standard, add capacity/lanes overall, improve and add interchanges, and make other improvements. The project is estimated to cost $8.8 million. The project is currently funded with Local ($8.8 million) funds. Due to local fund revenue shortfalls construction is estimated to start in fiscal year 2015/16. The project is a potential candidate for future bond savings. Construction will begin in fiscal year 2012/13 if bond savings are granted.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Corridor. Section 1304 adds Route 99 to the list of high priority corridors (#54): The California Farm-to-Market Corridor, California State Route 99 from south of Bakersfield to Sacramento, California.

    Route 99 as an Interstate Highway

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • Future Interstate Routing The following language authorizes Corridor #54 to become part of the Interstate System in the "future": (5) INCLUSION OF CERTAIN ROUTE SEGMENTS ON INTERSTATE SYSTEM- (A) IN GENERAL- The portions of the routes referred to in clauses (I), (ii), and (iii) of subsection (c)(5)(B), in subsection (c)(9), in subsections (c)(18) and (c)(20), subsection (c)(45), subsection (c)(54), and subsection (c)(57) that are not a part of the Interstate System are designated as future parts of the Interstate System.

    Shafter Assemblyman Dean Florez has proposed creating a Route 99 supercorridor, in four phases, between Grapevine and Fresno. Fresno Mayor Alan Autry is lobbying federal officials to upgrade Route 99 and make it part of the nearly 47,000-mile interstate system. Backer says that say Fresno is the largest U.S. city (440,000 residents) not tied to the interstate system, and the absence of a federal highway is one reason national and international firms refuse to locate there. Preservationists oppose the change on historical grounds, as the old stagecoach trail that is now Route 99 was the longest toll-free road in the world—it the road traveled by the immigrants from Oklahoma, described by Steinbeck, Saroyan, McWilliams and Chavez. Everyone agrees on upgrading of the condition of the highway. This has been captured in a Master Plan for the Route 99 Corridor, which among other things, proposes applying for the designation Interstate 9. There were lots of discussions about including this funding in the 2005 Transportation Bill. Converting Route 99 to an interstate would mean rebuilding it to the higher standards or winning a federal waiver. Caltrans estimates the cost of a conversion at $20 billion to $25 billion. In contrast, the agency says it would cost $6 billion to widen Highway 99 to six or more lanes if interstate standards aren't applied. The difference is due to bridge retrofitting and improvement. Route 99 might alternatively be designated a High Priority Corridor. This would allow Route 99 to compete with more than 40 other highways for $3.3 billion over six years.

    The Fresno Bee provided more specifics: The legislation in question states "Section 1105(e)(5)(A) of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Act of 1991 (105 Stat. 2032; 115 Stat. 872) is amended by striking 'and subsection (c)(45)' and inserting the following: 'subsection (c)(45), and subsection (c)(54).' " What this does is make Route 99 eligible for Interstate designation, but doesn't directly designate it as an interstate. This lets the federal Transportation Department and the California Department of Transportation negotiate a long-range plan for the upgrading of the highway to meet interstate standards. Interstates, for instance, must maintain medians of at least 36 feet in rural areas. Paved shoulders on the right must be at least 10 feet wide. Bridges must offer at least 16 feet of clearance. A crucial part of future negotiations would identify which interstate standards might be waived. Bridge heights originally designed to permit passage of missile-bearing military trucks, for instance, could be waived, while highway shoulder requirements might be retained. The legislation doesn't spell out such details; that will be up to state and federal negotiators. The language did make it into the final bill, which was signed in August 2005. Some folks are suggesting that this might be designated as I-7. The legislation also included widening Route 99 between Goshen and Kingsburg and building a parkway connecting the highway to the new University of California at Merced campus.

    Business Routes Business Routes

    • Los Angeles, San Fernando: Before the highway renumbering in 1964, San Fernando Road was Business US 99 through the San Fernando Valley near Los Angeles.
    • Bakersfield: "Golden State Highway", Route 204.
    • Atwater
    • McFarland
    • Delano: High Street from Exit 54 to Exit 58 (at County Line Road)
    • Earlimart
    • Pixley
    • Tulare: J and K Street
    • Fresno: Golden State Avenue. This runs south all the way to Kingsburg, and about halfway thru that city. Also, both stretches of US 99 thru Selma, are still used as city streets. W. Front St. was the original US 99, and in the 30's moved over to Whitson Ave.
    • Highway City
    • Madera: N and S Gateway Blvd
    • Merced: 16th Street
    • Turlock: Golden State Blvd.
    • Modesto: 9th Street
    • Manteca: Moffet Blvd and Main Street. According to Jeremy Hannon, because of the widening of Route 99 from 4 to 6 lanes from the San Joaquin County Line (southern) to the Route 120 Interchange, the Mofett off-ramp (a left-hand off-ramp) was removed. Going Northbound, one would need to take the Austin Road Off-ramp, cross over Route 99 to make a right onto Mofett. At then end of Mofett, one then proceeds up Main Street to the right, following the old route. Southbound traffic can take the "Manteca" exit. Note, that this is not signed as "Business Route 99" as most segments are. There is no mention of Business Route 99 or Business Route 120 through Manteca.
    • Lodi: Cherokee Lane
    • Stockton: Charter Way to Wilson Way

    Naming Naming

    Entire Route

    Historically, the route was named the "Golden State Highway" between Sacramento and Bakersfield. This is because the route ran the length of the "Golden State".

    Route 99/I-5 Split to Bakersfield

    The portion of this route from the I-5/Route 99 junction to Bakersfield is part of the historic "Ridge Route". More details on the Ridge Route can be found on the page for I-5.

    The portion of this route between the southern terminus of Rout 99, three and one-half miles south of Mettler (KER 00) and the northern Kern County line in Delano at County Line Road (KER 57.356) (County Sign Route J44) is named the "Kern County Korean War Veterans Memorial Highway". This is in honor of the 42 Kern County military personnel killed in action in Korea, the three who died while missing, the two who died while captured, and the six who died from wounds, and the approximately 8,120 Korean War veterans who presently live in Kern County. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 46, Resolution Chapter 54, filed May 31, 2001.

    CHP Officer Gerald E. Dormaier Memorial InterchangeThe interchange of Route 99 and Route 166 in the County of Kern (~ KER 2.763) is named the "CHP Officer Gerald E. Dormaier Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Officer Gerald E. Dormaier, California Highway Patrol (CHP) Badge No. 4654, who was born in June 1938, in Arvin, California. Dormaier graduated from Bakersfield High School in 1955, went on to Bakersfield College, and then joined the United States Air Force shortly thereafter. Dormaier was a member of the Future Farmers of America poultry judging team in high school and won first place over 17 other judging teams in a San Joaquin Valley poultry judging contest held at Fresno State College. Prior to joining the California Highway Patrol, Dormaier worked in Kern County’s oil fields. Dormaier graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy in 1966, and during his 14 years with the CHP, served in the Los Angeles, Anaheim, Tejon, Buellton, Truckee, and Bakersfield areas. Officer Dormaier was killed in the line of duty on December 25, 1980, when he and his partner, Officer Jerry Bean, CHP Badge No. 6105, were attempting to set up road control for an overturned propane truck. Officer Dormaier was standing on the side of the road when a speeding tanker truck came barreling through the fog. The driver attempted to stop, causing the vehicle to jackknife near the center divider, striking Officer Dormaier and the patrol car. Officer Bean attempted to revive his partner and administered CPR until the ambulance arrived. Officer Dormaier was taken to Mercy Hospital, but unfortunately he succumbed to his injuries. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 78, Res. Chapter 155, Statutes of 2015, on September 3, 2015.
    (Image source: Assemblyman Rudy Salas, CHP Memorial Page)

    Deputy Daniel Lee ArchuletaThe interchange of Route 99 and Route 119 (~ KER 17.548) is named the "Deputy Daniel Lee Archuleta Memorial Interchange". Named in memory of Daniel Lee Archuleta, who was born in Huntington Beach, California. Daniel Lee Archuleta attended Golden West College, where he received an Associate of Arts degree on October 20, 1996, and subsequently attended California State University at Long Beach, where he received a bachelor's degree on May 28, 1999. Daniel Lee Archuleta attended, and graduated from, the academy of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department at East Los Angeles College on February 20, 2001, and began employment with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department in February of 2001. Archuleta was hired by the Kern County Sheriff's Department on October 5, 2002, and was assigned to the Support Services Bureau, the Training Division, and the Resource Pool, and also worked temporarily in the Court Services Division. Daniel Lee Archuleta transferred to the Law Enforcement Bureau, South Area Substation Division, Taft Court on November 2, 2002, and on May 27, 2003, he entered the Field Training Officer Program and was promoted to Deputy Sheriff II on October 4, 2003. Daniel Lee Archuleta was killed on September 12, 2004, when his patrol vehicle rolled over on Tupman Road, just north of the west Kern County town of Tupman, while he was traveling south on Tupman Road responding to an emergency call. A deputy from the Kern County Sheriff's Department driving north on Tupman Road found the battered patrol vehicle in the southbound lane of Tupman Road, and Daniel Lee Archuleta was found dead at the scene. California Highway Patrol investigative units from Bakersfield and Fresno were called to the scene but were unable to ascertain the cause of the accident. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 50, Resolution Chapter 86, on August 24, 2012.
    (Image source: National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund)

    Bakersfield to Tulare

    Mark C. SalvaggioThe intersection of Route 99 and White Lane in Bakersfield (~ KER 21.095) is named the "Mark C. Salvaggio Interchange". It was named in honor of Mark C. Salvaggio, a native Californian who graduated from California State University, Bakersfield in 1972. After obtaining his teaching credential, Mark C. Salvaggio taught seventh and eighth grade students in the Arvin Union School District for more than 30 years, from 1972 until his retirement in 2004. He also was a distinguished member of the Bakersfield City Council, representing Ward 7 for nearly 20 years, from 1985 to 2004. During his tenure on the Bakersfield City Council, Mark C. Salvaggio served as Vice Mayor from December 2000 to December 2002, and as a council member was instrumental in numerous projects that benefitted the community, including the Kern River Parkway Plan, construction of the Northeast Bakersfield Water Treatment Plant, the extension of the Bakersfield Bike Path, the establishment of the Bakersfield Educational Studies Area, and the enhancement of the White Lane-Route 99 Interchange in Bakersfield. He has received numerous awards and commendations for his community service. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 53, Resolution Chapter 39, on 4/26/2006.
    (Image source: Bakersfield.Com)

    CHP Officer Gerald N. Harris Memorial InterchangeThe interchange at Route 99 and eastbound Route 58 (~ KER 23.489) in the County of Kern is named the "CHP Officer Gerald N. Harris Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Officer Gerald Nathan Harris, who was born in 1938 in the City of Bakersfield, California. Officer Harris graduated from North High School in 1957, and enlisted in the United States Marine Corps shortly thereafter. After several years of service, he was honorably discharged on December 5, 1965. Officer Harris was a service salesman employed by Three Way Chevrolet prior to becoming a California Highway Patrol Officer. Officer Harris graduated from the Department of the California Highway Patrol Academy in 1967 with Academy Class CTC-IV-67, and was assigned to the Santa Fe Springs Area, where he served for approximately one year before being transferred to the Bakersfield Area, where he spent the remainder of his career. Officer Harris, badge number 5554, was killed in the line of duty on February 27, 1974, while directing traffic at an intersection in the City of Bakersfield, where he was struck by a hit-and-run driver. The impact of the collision left Officer Harris with a broken leg and other injuries, which, at the time, did not appear to be life threatening. When Officer Harris subsequently required special medical treatment, the president of Continental Telephone in the City of Bakersfield volunteered his company’s medical plane to take him to a hospital in San Francisco for special treatment, but Officer Harris, unfortunately, died shortly thereafter from an embolism. Officer Harris was a hardworking, dedicated officer who loved his job and enjoyed the people with whom he worked, and who, throughout his career, received several letters commending him on his exemplary service, including one from then Wasco Chief of Police, Robert Duke, and several thank you letters from those whose lives he saved or changed dramatically. Officer Harris was good natured, gracious, honest and loyal, and would always go out of his way to help those in need. In his spare time, he enjoyed weight lifting, the Police Olympics, softball, volunteering to teach bicycle safety to children in schools, and spending time with his family and friends. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 119, Resolution Chapter 131, August 28, 2014.
    (Image source: Scoopnet; Calif. Assn. of Highway Patrolmen)

    Richard Alan MaxwellThe interchange between Rout 99, Route 204, and Airport Drive in Bakersfield (~ KER 26.8) is named the "Richard Alan Maxwell Memorial Interchange". State Traffic Officer Richard Alan Maxwell began his career in law enforcement with his appointment to the California Highway Patrol on May 15, 1989, and was killed in the line of duty on July 11, 1994. Officer Richard Maxwell was shot and killed as he made a traffic stop in front of the suspect's house. As he was waiting for backup to arrive the suspect and his father both began to attack him. The father ran into the open garage to retrieve a shotgun and while doing so the suspect shot Officer Maxwell in the face and, as he sat on the driveway, was shot in the throat. CPR was administered but he later died at a local hospital. Officer Maxwell had served with the California Highway Patrol for five years.  Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 60, Chapter 135, in 1994, and Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 119, Chapter 147, in 1994.
    (Image source: Find a Grave, Officer Down Memorial Page)

    The portion of Route 99 between McFarland to Tulare (~ KER 49.654 to TUL 16.675) is named the "Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States Memorial Highway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 54, Chapter 19, in 1992.

    Tulare to Fresno

    The portion of Route 99 between the City of Tulare and the City of Fresno (~ TUL 16.675 to FRE 19.294) is officially designated the "Pearl Harbor Survivors Memorial Highway". Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 13, Chapter 81, in 1993.

    CHP Officers Brian M. Law and Juan J. Gonzalez Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 99 from the Fresno/Tulare County Line (FRE 0.0) to the Mountain View Avenue Overcrossing (~ FRE R3.8) in the County of Fresno is officially designated the "CHP Officers Brian M. Law and Juan J. Gonzalez Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of CHP officers Brian M. Law and Juan J. Gonzalez. Officer Brian Mitchio Law was born in 1979 in Redwood City, California. Prior to joining the California Highway Patrol, Officer Law served in the United States Marine Corps and the United States Air Force. Officer Law, graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy in April 2008 with the Cadet Training Class III-07 and, upon graduation, he was assigned to the Oakland Area, where he served for approximately five years before being transferred to the Fresno Area. At the time of his death, Officer Law and his wife were about to open a kickboxing studio for women in North Fresno—Fight Girl Fitness—into which he had put his “heart and soul”. Officer Juan Jaime Gonzalez was born in 1981, graduated from Fresno State University, and was a member of the Nu Alpha Kappa fraternity. Officer Gonzalez had dreams of becoming a California Highway Patrol Officer since five years of age and, in 2008, that dream came true. Officer Gonzalez graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy in April of 2008 with the Cadet Training Class III-07 and, upon graduation, he was assigned to the San Jose Area, where he served for approximately two years before being transferred to the Fresno Area. On February 17, 2014, the state suffered a tragic loss when California Highway Patrol Officers Brian M. Law and Juan J. Gonzalez were killed in a single vehicle crash while responding to an accident, thereby making the ultimate sacrifice while performing their sworn duty. Officers Law and Gonzalez were riding in the same patrol car responding to an accident which had been incorrectly reported in the opposite direction. Nearing the scene of the accident, the officers swerved to avoid one of the pedestrians that had been involved in the accident and struck a guardrail, which caused their vehicle to overturn. Both officers suffered fatal injuries and were pronounced dead at the scene. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 158, Resolution Chapter 176, September 11, 2014.
    (Image Source: Visalia Times Delta; CHP Memorial (Law); CHP Memorial (Gonzalez))

    William (Bill) Lehn Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 99 between Mountain View Crossing in southern Fresno County (near Kingsburg) (~ FRE R3.8) to the San Joaquin River on the northern boundary (on the northern edge of Fresno) (~ MAD 0.036) is named the "William "Bill" Lehn Memorial Highway". Named in honor of Fresno Police Officer William "Bill" Lehn, killed while in the line of duty on June 21, 1994, when his Fresno Police Department motorcycle collided with a car while he was attempting to make a traffic stop. Officer Lehn was born in Hanford and raised in Lemoore, graduating in 1974 from Lemoore High School. He began his career in law enforcement in 1979 when he joined the City of San Joaquin Police Department. In 1980, he was hired by the Kings County Sheriff's Department where he was a deputy until he was hired by the Fresno Police Department in 1986. He was a well liked officer who was remembered as a pleasure to know and to work with. He died at the age of 38. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 30, Chaptered 7/2/2003, Chapter 82.
    (Image source: Gribblenation; Find a Grave)

    Rosa ParksThe Route 41/Route 99 interchange (~ FRE 19.596) in downtown Fresno is named the "Rosa Parks Interchange". Rosa Parks (born February 4, 1913, in Tuskegee, Alabama) is considered the "Mother of the Modern Day Civil Rights Movement". This fame started when she was arrested on December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. Her arrest was the impetus for a boycott of Montgomery buses, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and joined by approximately 42,000 African Americans for 381 days. On November 13, 1956, the United States Supreme Court ruled that Montgomery's segregation law was unconstitutional, and on December 20, 1956, Montgomery officials were ordered to desegregate buses. Rosa Parks refusal to surrender her seat in compliance with Montgomery's segregation law inspired the civil rights movement, which has resulted in the breakdown of numerous legal barriers and the lessening of profound discrimination against African Americans in this country. Her courage and conviction laid the foundation for equal rights for all Americans and for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Rosa Parks was the first woman to join the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP, and was an active volunteer for the Montgomery Voters League. She cofounded the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development in 1987 with Elaine Easton Steele to motivate and direct youth to achieve their highest potential through the "Pathways to Freedom" program. She is the recipient of many awards including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, the highest honor Congress can bestow upon a civilian, and the first International Freedom Conductor Award from the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 3, Chaptered 7/16/2003, Chapter 98.
    (Image source: The Negro Woman in History Blog)

    Fresno to Merced

    The 100th Infantry Battalion Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 99 between the Cities of Fresno and Madera (~ FRE 20.755 to MAD 10.888) is (also) officially named "The 100th Infantry Battalion Memorial Highway". At the time of the Pearl Harbor attack on December 7, many Nisei served in the Federalized 298th and 299th Infantry of the Hawaii National Guard, inducted through three military drafts prior to Pearl Harbor. 1,432 Nisei soldiers transferred out of the 298th and 299th into the “Hawaiian Provisional Infantry Battalion” and sailed from Honolulu on the SS Maui on June 5, 1942. Upon arrival in Oakland, they were then activated into the “100th Infantry Battalion (Separate);” “separate” meaning not attached to any other military unit, literally a military orphan outfit. On September 2, 1943, the 100th landed in Oran, North Africa. On September 5th the 100th was assigned to the 133rd Regiment, 34th Division. On September 22, 1943, the 100th made an amphibious landing at the Salerno beachhead as part of the 34th “Red Bull” Division. Tough battles, especially at Cassino, marked the harsh, bitter route of the 100th from Salerno to Rome. For the Cassino battles alone, the 100th suffered 48 casualties, 144 wounded, and 75 hospitalized for trench foot. The 100th landed at Salerno with over 1,300 personnel, but after Cassino only 521 remained. The “Guinea Pig Battalion” had now become known as the “Purple Heart Battalion.” On March 10, April 2, and May 24, 1944, three waves of replacements from the 442nd arrived, replenishing the ranks of the 100th with 555 replacement troops. On June 26, 1944, the 100th, still retaining its name “100th Infantry Battalion” began fighting with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and fought together until the surrender of Germany on May 8, 1945.
    (Image source; AARoads; 100th Batallion; Military Wiki)

    Steven D. Lindblom (Madera Sheriff's Dept.) Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 99 from the San Joaquin River in northern Fresno (~ MAD 0.036) to the Madera/Merced County line in Madera County (~ MAD 29.357) is named the "Steven Lindblom Memorial Freeway". Named in honor of Madera County Sheriff's Deputy Steven Lindblom, who was killed by gunfire in 1975 when a deranged gunman ambushed him from a barricaded residence upon his response to a hostage situation. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 35, Chaptered 7/2/2003, Chapter 83.
    (Image source: Find a Grave)

    CHP Officer James J. Schumacher, Jr., Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 99 between Athlone Road (S of Merced) (~ MER 4.896) and Worden Avenue (~ MER 8.008) in Merced County is officially named the "CHP Officer James J. Schumacher, Jr., Memorial Highway". CHP Officer James J. Schumacher was a graduate of Luther Burbank High School in Sacramento, and attended Golden West College. Her served in the United States Army, where he achieved the rank of Sergeant. After graduating from the CHP Academy, he was appointed to the California Highway Patrol on May 19, 1969. An admired and respected 12-year veteran of the California Highway Patrol, he served in the South Los Angeles, Westminster, and Merced areas. Officer Schumacher was killed while in the line of duty, early on the morning of June 13, 1981, on Route 99 approximately four miles south of Merced. He had just finished writing a speeding ticket and was standing approximately four feet off the highway while obtaining the ticketed driver's signature and warning the ticketed driver to be careful pulling out onto the highway, when he was struck by another car driven at a high rate of speed by a driver who had fallen asleep at the wheel. He died instantly from massive injuries to his head and body. The tragedy was made worse by the theft of Officer Schumacher's badge from the scene of the accident by a bystander--it being the tradition of the California Highway Patrol since its inception, to memorialize a fallen officer by presenting his or her badge to the officer's family. Officer Schumacher was only 33 years of age at the time of his death and was survived by his wife, Roberta, and their sons, James, then aged 9, and Andrew, then aged 7, his parents, three sisters, and two brothers, one of whom was a fellow officer in the California Highway Patrol. He died only five miles north from where California Highway Patrol Officer Al Johnson died, when he was struck by a drunk driver while writing out a ticket, in August of 1972. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 111, Chapter 32, April 22, 2002.
    (Image source: Gribblenation; Calif. Assn. of Highway Patrolmen)

    Merced to Modesto

    Frago-Gore DedicationThe portion of Route 99 from E Mission Avenue (~ MER R11.596) to Campus Parkway (~ MER R11.687) in Merced is officially named the "CHP Officer Walter Frago and Roger Gore Memorial Freeway". On April 5, 1970, four California Highway Patrol Officers were murdered in one of the worst uniformed police officer killing incidents in American history when Officers George Aleyn, Walter Frago, James Pence Jr., and Roger Gore were gunned down just off of Interstate 5. Two of those officers, Walter Frago and Roger Gore were from Merced County, Officer Frago having grown up in Merced, while Roger Gore resided in Snelling. The officers were on the lookout for a suspect who had been reportedly seen brandishing a weapon. Officers Frago and Gore were the first on the scene, pulling over a vehicle with two men, when a gun fight ensued leaving both of these fine officers dead at the age of 23 years. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 180, Chapter 147, September 18, 2000. The signage was installed and dedicated on July 25, 2019. Caltrans was on-hand at the ceremony to support its partners such as the CHP. Caltrans' representatives on-hand included Deputy District Director for Maintenance Samuel Jordan, Valley Maintenance Manager Jon Bevan, Merced Maintenance Superintendent Dave Taylor, and Maintenance Supervisors Brian Cox, Dennis Clay, and Chad Grissom. Gore, Frago, and fellow Officers George Alleyn and James Pence, all lost their lives during a shooting on April 6, 1970.
    (Source: Dedication photo and information from Caltrans District 10 FB page; KHTS 1220)

    Officer Stephan Gene Gray Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 99 between Childs Avenue (~MER 13.054) and 16th Street (~ MER 16.583) in the City of Merced is named the "Officer Stephan Gene Gray Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Officer Stephan Gene Gray of the Merced Police Department, who was killed in the line of duty on April 15, 2004, while working in an undercover detail with the Special Operations Unit specializing in street level narcotics and gang violence suppression. Officer Gray was born on August 21, 1969, in Tulare; he attended local schools until his family relocated to Hanford, where he graduated from Hanford High School in 1987. Officer Gray attended Fresno City College for two years, and entered the Fresno Police Academy; upon completion, he was hired as an officer by the Merced Police Department. Highly decorated, Officer Gray was a gallant and dedicated officer who exemplified the true character of the brave men and women who devote their time and energy to the perilous duties of law enforcement. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 7, Resolution Chapter 56, on 05/25/2006.
    (Image source: Gribblenation; Merced PD)

    Correctional Officer Jose RiveraThe northbound and southbound portion of Route 99 between Franklin Road (~ MER 18.384) and the Winton Way and Applegate Road exit (~ MER 22.747) in Atwater is officially named the "Correctional Officer Jose Rivera Memorial Highway", This segment was named in memory of Federal Correctional Officer Jose Rivera was violently murdered on June 20, 2008 by two inmates while employed at the United States Penitentiary Atwater in Atwater. Officer Rivera died needlessly at a very young age. The third of five children, Officer Rivera grew up in Chowchilla and graduated from Le Grand High School in 2003. Shortly thereafter, Officer Rivera enlisted in the United States Navy. Officer Rivera served four years in the military, which included two tours in Iraq. After serving his country overseas, Officer Rivera returned to serve his country at home; and upon his return, Officer Rivera began working for the Federal Bureau of Prisons in Atwater. Officer Rivera's death is tragic and a reminder that the law enforcement officers who serve the public risk their lives on a daily basis. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 118, Resolution Chapter 129, on 9/7/2010.
    (Image source: Federal Bureau of Prisons)

    Kenneth L. Maddy Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 99 constructed to freeway standards near the City of Livingston (~ MER R28.8 to MER R31.068) is colloquially called the "Livingston Freeway". Officially, it is the "Kenneth L. Maddy Freeway" (signed as "Kenneth L. Maddy Memorial Highway"). Kenneth L. Maddy served as California Senate Republican leader (1987-1995) and was the legislative proponent of the Livingston Bypass on Route 99. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Chapter 85, in 1997.
    (Image source: Gribblenation; Join California)

    Bridge 39-196 over Shanks Road (~ MER R34.45) in Merced county is named the "Dallas C. Bache Interchange". Dallas C. Bache was a dedicated civic leader whose efforts helped to bring about the construction of the Delhi Freeway in the 1970's. It was built in 1979, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 104, Chapter 43, in 1978 (before construction was finished).

    Joash E. Paul Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 99 between the Stanislaus/Merced County line in the County of Stanislaus (near Turlock) (STA R0.0) and Mitchell Road (near Ceres) (~ STA R10.18) is named the "Joash E. Paul Memorial Highway". Named in honor of Joash E. Paul, a lifelong resident of the City of Turlock where he was a rancher, an entrepreneur, and a dedicated servant of the people of Stanislaus County. Born on September 23, 1919, Joash Paul was elected to the Stanislaus County Board of Supervisors in 1968 and served as a board member until 1980. He worked in real estate for 25 years, and until the mid-1970s helped operate a family-owned lodging and dining establishment along Route 99 when it passed through the City of Turlock. After retiring from the board of supervisors, he served as president of the fund-raising foundation for the then county-owned Scenic General Hospital in the City of Modesto. He was an active member of various community organizations in the City of Turlock, including the Assyrian American Civic Club, the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, and the Portuguese Union of the State of California. Joash E. Paul died in 2000. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chaptered 7/2/2003, Chapter 81.
    (Image source: Ceres Courier)

    CHP Officer Earl Scott Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 99 between the junction with Route 219 near Salida (~ STA 0.076) and the Pelandale Avenue exit (on the northern end of Modesto) (~ STA R21.67) in Stanislaus County is offiically named the "CHP Officer Earl Scott Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officer Earl Scott, who was tragically shot and killed on February 17, 2006 while making a traffic stop on Route 99 in Stanislaus County. Officer Scott was 36 years old and had served with the California Highway Patrol (CHP) for five years. Officer Scott came from a long line of family members who devoted themselves to public service under the auspices of the CHP, including his father and two uncles who retired from the CHP as sergeants, and a cousin who currently serves as a sergeant with the CHP. Officer Scott is remembered as being the first to volunteer for such causes as shaving his head for "Shave the Brave," a fundraiser for cancer victims; and he also frequently took youth Law Enforcement Explorers on ride-alongs. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 120, Resolution Chapter 130, on 9/7/2010.
    (Image source: Modesto Bee, Officer Down Memorial Page)

    Sergeant Howard K. Stevenson Memorial InterchangeThe interchange at Route 99 and Whitmore Avenue (~ STA R11.948) in the City of Ceres is named the "Sergeant Howard K. Stevenson Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Sergeant Howard K. "Howie" Stevenson, who was born on February 18, 1965. On June 3, 1986, at 21 years of age, Stevenson became a peace officer with the Ceres Police Department. On January 9, 2005, while responding to a call for assistance at a local liquor store, Sergeant Stevenson and fellow officers were ambushed and met with a hail of gunfire from an assault rifle. Sergeant Stevenson died almost instantly. Sergeant Stevenson was the first police officer in the 86-year history of the City of Ceres to be killed in the line of duty. Sergeant Stevenson is remembered affectionately by his fellow officers as being a role model and mentor to younger officers, and as being "a cops' cop". Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 20, Resolution Chapter 77, on 7/17/2009.
    (Image source: American Legion/Facebook, Ceres Memorial Page)

    John G. Veneman FreewayThe portion of Route 99 from the Stanislaus county line (seemingly the southern end S of Turlock, although it wasn't explicit in the resolution) (~ STA 0.0) to Route 132 in Modesto (~ STA 14.762) is named the "John G. Veneman Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 171, Chapter 131, in 1984. John Veneman was born in 1925 in Corcoran, California. In 1944, he graduated from Arizona State College. After serving with the United States Naval Reserve (1944-1945), he attended the University of Texas. In 1959, he was elected to the Board of Supervisors of Stanislaus County, where he served until 1962. In 1962, he was elected to the California State Assembly, serving until 1969. He authored legislation to improve and complete the section of Route 99 from Modesto to Turlock, which bears his name. In 1969, he was appointed Under Secretary, Department of Health, Education and Welfare. In 1973, he left government for private industry. He died in 1982 in Sacramento, California.
    (Image source: AAroads)

    Modesto to Stockton

    Jerry Medina Memorial FreewayThe portion of Route 99 between Tuolumne Boulevard (~ STA R15.116) and Standiford Avenue/Beckwith Road (~STA R20.269) in Modesto is named the "Jerry Medina Memorial Freeway". This section of highway was named to remind all of us of the need to keep safety a priority and a reminder to cherish every day and enjoy it to the fullest. It was named after Jerry Medina, an 18 year old killed on March 29, 2001 when a truck crossed the highway median and landed on Jerry's car near Maze Boulevard. Five other people were injured as a result of this accident. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 168, Chapter 140, on September 3, 2002.
    (Image source: Gribblenation)

    The 442nd Regimental Combat Team Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 99 between the Cities of Salida (~ STA R20.246) and Manteca (~ SJ 5.703) is officially named "The 442nd Regimental Combat Team Memorial Highway". The "100th Infantry" and "442nd Regimental" names are in honor of the Nisei Soldiers of World War II who served in units of the United States Armed Forces comprising the 100/442/MIS triad. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 62, Chapter 115 in 1994. The other part of the triad is on Route 23.
    (Image source: Gribblenation; 100th Batallion; Hawaii Reporter)

    Stockton to Sacramento

    Offer Pete PetersenThe portion of Route 99 between Mariposa Road (SJ 16.698) and Arch Road (SJ 14.568) in the County of San Joaquin is named the Officer Pepe Petersen Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of Officer Laurits “Pepe” Petersen, whospent 30 years with the Stockton Police Department. Officer Petersen graduated from Stockton High School and completed law enforcement-related courses at San Joaquin Delta College. Officer Petersen served his country from 1962 to 1964, inclusive, in the United States Army, and joined the Stockton Police Department in 1968. Officer Petersen started work as a patrol officer and then worked as a detective in the homicide division until his retirement in 1998. After retiring, Officer Petersen worked for the San Joaquin County District Attorney’s Office as an investigator and as a homicide detective. Officer Petersen died February 23, 2016, after he was attacked in the 8300 block of Tam O’Shanter Drive near Cortez Park north of East Hammer Lane, in the City of Stockton, and an autopsy revealed that Officer Petersen was stabbed and shot. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 46, Resolution Chapter 162, 9/20/2019.
    (Image source: Recordnet)

    The portion between Route 4 in Stockton (~SJ 17.467) and Hammer Lane (~ SJ 22.905) is officially designated the "Women Veterans' Highway". Named in recognition of the sacrifices made by women in defense of our nation that began over 220 years ago with the American Revolution and continues today. Throughout our country's history, nearly two million women have attained the esteemed title of veteran because of their service to the United States. In 1999, women comprised 14 percent of all Americans in military uniform and accounted for 20 percent of all new recruits. Though women were not permitted to participate in the United States' armed forces in earlier years, historical records verify that over 60 women were either wounded or killed at various battles during the Civil War. In 1901, the United States' Army recognized women's enthusiasm to serve our country by establishing the first official entity for women named the Army Nurse Corps, without providing the benefit of military rank, equal pay, or benefits. Because of their courageous efforts and determined commitment to their country, women were finally granted attendance to the United States Military Academies in 1975 when Congress introduced and passed a law allowing for these highly regarded universities to become coeducational. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 43, Chapter 129, 9/12/2003.

    Purple Hearts Veterans Freeway / HighwayThe portion of this route between Route 4 in Stockton (~SJ 17.467) and Route 50 (~ SAC R24.236) in Sacramento is named the "Purple Hearts Veterans Highway" (although it is signed as the "Purple Hearts Veterans Freeway"). It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 54, Chapter 19, in 1992.
    (Image Source: AARoads)

    Officer TonnThe portion of Route 99 in the City of Galt (~SJ 38.749 to SAC 0.005) is named the "Officer Kevin Tonn Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Kevin Tonn, who became interested in law enforcement prior to entering high school, as his father attended the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Academy and his uncle was a special agent with the Department of Justice. Kevin Tonn, in high school, joined the Roseville Police Explorers and started down the path of helping and serving others. At 19 years of age, Kevin Tonn enlisted in the United States Army and became a military policeman and, following his military service, he became a firefighter in the State of New York for eight years, rising to the rank of assistant chief. Kevin Tonn later returned to California and, after working as a fire prevention officer for the City of Sacramento and later owning and operating a letter and parcel shipping business, he attended the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Academy and eventually became a police officer in the City of Galt in September 2009. Officer Tonn was later promoted to the K-9 unit of the Galt Police Department, serving along with his dog, Yaro. On January 15, 2013, after three and one-half years of service, Officer Tonn, while responding to an in-progress residential burglary, was shot by an individual he had sought to question, and later succumbed to his injuries at Kaiser Hospital. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 74, Res. Chapter 74, on June 26, 2014.
    (Image source: NorCal COPS; Officer Down Memorial Page)

    The portion between the Sacramento County line near Galt (~ SAC 0.0) and Route 50 (~ SAC R24.236) is named the "South Sacramento Freeway". This was named after the unincorporated area of South Sacramento, which consists of parts of the incorporated city of Sacramento as well as the unincorporated enclave of Parkway, a place with a distinctive street grid where every route is a "parkway" of some sort.

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Bakersfield to Tulare

    Bakersfield Police Officer David J. NelsonThe Hosking Ave (~ KER 18.546) interchange over Route 99 in the City of Bakersfield is named the "Bakersfield Police Officer David J. Nelson Memorial Bridge". It was named in memory of Officer David J. Nelson of the Bakersfield Police Department, who gave his life on June 26, 2015 while performing his sworn duty to protect the citizens of the City of Bakersfield, Officer Nelson graduated from the Kern County Law Enforcement Training Academy on June 21, 2013, and served with distinction during his tenure as a City of Bakersfield police officer. Officer Nelson was chosen as a defensive tactics instructor for the Bakersfield Police Department in recognition of his advanced skill in officer safety techniques and, because of his commitment to excellence, was also selected to mentor and train police officer trainees. On June 26, 2015, Officer Nelson attempted to detain a dangerous and armed suspect who likely was planning to harm a citizen of Bakersfield. When the suspect failed to stop his vehicle as directed, Officer Nelson bravely gave chase and, during the pursuit of the suspect, Officer Nelson was killed in a fatal vehicle accident. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 107, Resolution Chapter 45, on May 23, 2016.
    (Image Source: Bakersfield.Com)

    Officer Robert W. WingetThe overcrossing, in both directions, on Route 99 at Exit 236, Main Street, in the City of Ripon (approximately post mile SJ 99 0.888) in the County of San Joaquin is named the Officer Robert W. Winget Memorial Overpass. It was named in memory of Officer Bob Winget, a United States Marine who served in Vietnam and who had a 37-year law enforcement career. This career begin in the early 1970s, serving the Los Angeles Police Department for 20 years, after which he moved north and became a deputy sheriff for the County of Stanislaus, where he served for 12 years and was a longtime Drug Abuse Resistance Education officer. In 2005, Officer Bob Winget moved to the Ripon Police Department, where his duties included working with K–9 officers and the all-terrain vehicle patrol. His partner was Topper, the department’s antinarcotics K–9.  Officer Robert “Bob” Winget left for patrol from the Ripon Police Department on the morning of April 10, 2007, where he was assigned to a southern area in the City of Ripon, near the banks of the Stanislaus River in the Ripon River Crossing area in his all-terrain patrol vehicle. At 11:40 a.m., dispatchers received an “undecipherable” transmission from Officer Bob Winget. The Ripon Police Department set up a mobile command center and began assigning Ripon police, fire, public works personnel, and citizens in search grids to attempt to locate Officer Bob Winget. At approximately 1:14 p.m., a Ripon Consolidated Fire District search crew located Officer Bob Winget unconscious following a crash of his all-terrain patrol vehicle along the river area west of Route 99. Crews immediately began cardiopulmonary resuscitation and brought in a four-wheel drive rescue vehicle that removed him from the area into a waiting Ripon Consolidated Fire District ambulance. Officer Bob Winget was transported to Doctor’s Hospital in the City of Modesto, where he was pronounced deceased at approximately 2:27 p.m. from traumatic injuries associated with the crash. Officer Bob Winget was memorialized and laid to rest on April 17, 2007. Nearly 1,000 uniformed peace officers from around the state gathered with Officer Bob Winget’s family and friends for the funeral service at First Baptist Church in the City of Modesto. Hundreds of citizens lined the streets of the Cities of Ripon and Modesto to watch the motor procession pass on its way to Burwood Cemetery in the County of San Joaquin, where he was laid to rest Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 127,  Res. Chapter 41, 09/14/20.
    (Image source: Recordnet.Com)

    Safety Roadside Rest Areas

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Philip S. Raine Rest AreaPhilip S. Raine (Tipton), in Tulare County 2.5 mi N of Tipton (~ TUL 22.4). It was named in 1982 in honor of Philip S. Raine, Chief of the Division of Highways in Sacramento until he was forced into an early retirement with subsequent death by cancer in 1981. CALTRANS and The Great Valley Center, with the support of the American Institute of Architects, California Council, and private organizations, are partnering in an open one-stage international competition to select a design, and thereby a design team, to update this stop as a self-sustainable and "off the grid" roadside GreenStop. In other words, the goal is to make this a "green" rest area that can serve as a model for current and future rest stops within the state system, with the ability to be customized so as to be regionally relevant for each location. Details on the competition may be found at http://www.greenstopdesign.com/.
      (Image source: Waymarking)
    • C. H. Warlow Rest AreaC. H. Warlow (Kingsburg) in Tulare County (~TUL 51.987) at Dodge Avenue near the Kings River. Chester Warlow was a member of the California Highway Commission from Fresno. He was also a member of the Shaver Lake fishing club (there is a picture of him in the gallery at www.shaverlake.org/gallery.html). Mt. Warlow near Muir Pass was also named for him.
      (Image source: Yelp)
    • Enoch Christoffersen Memorial Rest AreaEnoch Christoffersen Memorial Rest Area, S of Turlock in Stanislaus County (~STA R0.297). Enoch Christoffersen served as Mayor of the City of Turlock from 1952 to 1958, and again from 1962 to 1978. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 41, Chapter 60, in 1993.
      (Image source: AARoads)

    Historical Route Historical Route

    This segment is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993. Areas marked include San Fernando Road, Avenue 20, Main Street, and Valley Blvd in the City of Los Angeles, and San Fernando Blvd (I know one sign is just S of the Media Center Mall) in Burbank.

    National Trails National Trails

    Pacific Highway Sign The portion of this route from Fresno to Stockton was part of the "Pacific Highway (Valley Route Portion)".

    Lincoln Highway Sign Victory Highway Sign This portion of this segment from Route 120 to US 50 (i.e., former US 50) was part of the coast-to-coast "Lincoln Highway" and part of the "Victory Highway".

    National Park to Park Highway Sign Portions of this route were part of the "National Park to Park Highway".

    US 99 appears to have been part of the "Jefferson Davis Highway". This was an attempt to commemorate the "Lost Cause" or "Southern Cause" narrative of the Civil War. Along US 99, a monument was located near Bakersfield. This is discussed in more detail on the Trails and Roads page.

    Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Kern 99 20.82 21.48
    Kern 99 21.48 24.80
    Kern 99 24.86 25.37
    Kern 99 25.42 25.92
    Kern 99 25.92 27.06
    Kern 99 49.20 49.48
    Kern 99 49.85 50.07
    Kern 99 55.07 56.61
    Kern 99 56.61 57.13
    Tulare 99 5.98 6.29
    Tulare 99 6.29 7.45
    Tulare 99 12.16 12.93
    Tulare 99 18.65 19.33
    Tulare 99 28.33 30.06
    Tulare 99 53.63 53.94
    Fresno 99 0.00 1.26
    Fresno 99 4.72 5.99
    Fresno 99 6.17 6.81
    Fresno 99 10.83 11.38
    Fresno 99 12.61 12.93
    Fresno 99 12.98 13.18
    Fresno 99 14.71 16.54
    Fresno 99 16.60 16.92
    Fresno 99 16.92 17.10
    Fresno 99 18.03 24.39
    Fresno 99 24.39 24.48
    Fresno 99 24.48 26.22
    Fresno 99 26.22 26.64
    Fresno 99 26.64 28.00
    Madera 99 9.98 11.64
    Madera 99 11.74 12.63
    Madera 99 12.85 13.14
    Madera 99 13.93 14.40
    Merced 99 11.14 12.98
    Merced 99 12.98 13.30
    Merced 99 13.71 16.00
    Merced 99 16.00 16.06
    Merced 99 22.30 23.05
    Merced 99 23.28 23.47
    Merced 99 23.59 24.10
    Merced 99 26.90 27.52
    Merced 99 28.84 30.57
    Merced 99 33.17 34.43
    Stanislaus 99 R2.83 R3.87
    Stanislaus 99 R7.86 8.69
    Stanislaus 99 R11.24 R11.90
    Stanislaus 99 R12.91 R14.92
    Stanislaus 99 R15.06 R16.47
    Stanislaus 99 R22.20 R22.90
    Stanislaus 99 R22.94 R23.06
    San Joaquin 99 0.66 1.16
    San Joaquin 99 2.07 2.55
    San Joaquin 99 4.59 4.84
    San Joaquin 99 4.84 5.00
    San Joaquin 99 6.20 6.40
    San Joaquin 99 6.54 6.80
    San Joaquin 99 6.80 7.32
    San Joaquin 99 7.42 7.96
    San Joaquin 99 8.76 8.96
    San Joaquin 99 14.36 14.74
    San Joaquin 99 17.90 20.09
    San Joaquin 99 22.76 23.07
    San Joaquin 99 28.34 28.63
    San Joaquin 99 28.82 31.64
    San Joaquin 99 33.40 33.74
    San Joaquin 99 36.55 36.84

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.5] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

    Commuter Lanes Commuter Lanes

    HOV lanes currently exist between Mack Road and Martin Luther King Blvd. in Sacramento. These lines are in operation between 6 AM and 10 AM, and 3 PM and 7 PM, on weekdays, and require a minumum of two people.

    Caltrans plans to add lanes to the segments from 0.8mi S of Elk Grove Blvd to Mack Road (11.4 mi, planned opening October 1997), and from Martin Luther King Blvd to Route 51 (construction starts August 1999).


  3. Rte 99 Seg 2From Route 5 in Sacramento to Route 36 near Red Bluff, passing near Catlett and Tudor.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was covered by (b) and (c) of the original definition: “(b) Route 5 in Sacramento to Route 20, passing near Catlett and Tudor. (c) Route 20 to Route 5 near Red Bluff.”

    The segment from Sacramento to the Route 70/Route 99 split was once cosigned as Route 70/Route 99, although it is legislatively Route 99. In 1969, this segment ran along Jibboom St., Garden Highway, El Centro Road.

    The Chico bypass was completed by 1967. Before the Chico Bypass was constructed, the route through Durham and Richvale followed Richvale Highway west to Richvale, Richvale South Highway north to Nelson, Midway from Nelson to Chico via Durham, Main Street and Broadway through Chico, and Esplande north from Chico to current Route 99 near Wilson Landing Road.

    In 1984, Chapter 409 combined (b) and (c), creating "(b) Route 5 in Sacramento to Route 5 near Red Bluff, passing near Catlett and Tudor."

    In 1988, Chapter 106 changed the terminus of this segment to "Route 36 near Red Bluff"

    Note that the original plans were for there to be an "East Valley" corridor, consisting of Route 99 from I-5 north to Route 70, Route 70 north to Route 149, all of Route 149, and Route 99 north through Chico probably reconnecting to I-5 (although plans north of Chico were shelved in the 1990s). This was for a Midwest-style expressway with freeway segments through the significant towns and interchanges at major intersecting highways. This would have included a freeway bypass of Marysville, the site of the last in-town surface street routing. Unfortunately only the segments at the ends of the corridor -- I-5 to Olivehurst and Oroville to just north of Chico -- were completed as planned; everything else was cut back to conventional 4-lane commercial standards (although a largely at-grade bypass of Marysville via the Feather River berm and making use of the present Yuba River Route 70 bridge is under study as of 2018) due to lack of the funding needed to acquire significant property between Marysville and Oroville for even an expressway upgrade.
    (Source: Scott Parker (Sparker) on AAroads, 3/28/2018)

    With respect to the freeway connection from N of Chico to I-5. in March 1975, Caltrans advertised abandonment of an adopted routing from 3.5 mi N of Chico to the Butte/Tehama County line. That section was formally adopted as Freeway back in 1961. Subsequent discussion on that notice provided information on the eventual connection that would have been made with I-5: The freeway merge occurs where I-5 increases from two to three lines, which is where the proposed yet unconstructed connection for a future Route 99 freeway merge would have been. This merge point would be somewhere near Manor Lane (south of the Riverside Avenue overpass and north of the Flores Avenue interchange) based on the spot where two-lane asphalt roadway changes to three-lane concrete roadway.
    (Source: FB Discussion)

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    U.S. 99 in SacramentoThe present routing of Route 99 follows I-5 out of Sacramento along former Route 24, and then N cosigned with Route 70 to Marysville. This corresponds to portions of LRN 232 (defined in 1951), LRN 245 (defined in 1959), and LRN 87 (defined in 1933), and LRN 3 (defined in 1909). At one point this was signed US 40 Alternate between Route 113 north of Knight's Landing and Route 20 in the Yuba/Marysville area. According to Chris Sampang, the routing of US 99/US 40 between the Yolo Causeway and Route 113 was as follows:

    • County Road 32A (which still retains some of its original concrete) from the Frontage Road exit westbound to where it crosses the railroad tracks
    • Olive Drive (note that the connection between County Road 32A and Olive Drive was paved over by I-80 and may be approximated by the current bike trail)
    • Richards Boulevard, which was originally graded into Olive Drive; the Olive and Richards extensions were built circa 1960.
    • First Street westbound
    • B Street northbound
    • Russell Boulevard westbound at Central Park in Davis (home of a Lincoln Highway marker; Lincoln Highway markers have been appearing on portions of Old US 40 west of Davis and in Dixon on Route 113)

    At Route 113, US 99 (later US 99W) went north. Note that US 99W later was given this route solo (from Olive Drive west) in the early 1950s, after US 40 was placed on the bypass that is now I-80 and right when US 40A was first commissioned (but before the north-south connector from Russell to I-80 was constructed that would later become Route 113). Also note that the Yolo Causeway originally was a twin-bridge four lane structure up until the 1960s; the original Causeway (1910s-1920s vintage) was located between the current railroad and freeway structures and was dismantled to make way for the I-80 bridge. US 99 (and US 99W) were routed this indirect way to Woodland via Davis, rather than the direct route of former Route 16/Route 24 to Woodland, due to the issues of flooding and closure.
    (Based on information provided by Chris Sampang)

    Parts of the original US 99 12 foot wide original concrete slab (OCS) still exist in Siskyou County, and can be driven on:
    (Based on a posting by donutbandit on M.T.R)

    • Off Crag View Drive going north, just south of Dunsmuir, the original US 99 slab enters Dwight's Wrecking and Towing.
    • In Dunsmuir, driving north on Dunsmuir Avenue, go straight into Florence Loop, and you are on Old US 99 for 2 blocks. The bridge that once linked Florence Loop with present day Siskiyou Avenue is long gone.
    • In Mt. Shasta, at N. Mt. Shasta Blvd. and Ski Village Drive: The OCS is visible in front of the Humane Society compound. Go right on Ski Village, and you can see the OCS winding away between some houses into a field.
    • Off Spring Hill Road north of Mt. Shasta: the road ends under an arch leading into a private driveway. The original concrete slab is the driveway.
    • Truck Village Drive between Weed and Mt. Shasta: go north and watch the road turn into OCS just before it is gated.
    • Black Butte Drive in Weed: go south, and the road quickly turns into 12 foot wide asphalt, with gaping potholes revealing the OCS beneath. Additionally, a short spur of the OCS exists at the northern end.
    • One can easily short sight the route across the current I-5 freeway into S. Weed Blvd. on the other side of the freeway, which was part of the original US 99.
    • Edgewood Road (formerly Trailer Lane) north of Weed: asphalt covered US 99 intact for several miles. At one point, you can easily see across the freeway to the southern terminus of Old US 99 Road (emptying out onto the freeway), which would have been the original route.

    The bypass route used the modern Dunsmuir Avenue bridge over the Sacramento River in Dunsmuir, then followed current Dunsmuir Avenue/Mott Road to the northern terminus which is a dead end at the old Diamond Lumber building. It likely followed the existing freeway route from there up to S. Mt. Shasta Blvd.

    In the Lake Shasta area, I-5 replaced the former Route 99 routing, which was submerged when the lake was filled. Relics of this routing reappears when the lake water level drops, as noted in this story: "A bridge from Highway 99, the precursor to Interstate 5, was being used last week as a makeshift low-water boat ramp at Antlers Resort & Marina near Lakeshore Drive in Lakehead."

    Suffixed Routings Suffixed Routings

    U.S. 99 out of SacramentoThe old US 99 used to split into US 99E and US 99W in Sacramento:

    US 99E

    US Highway Shield The current routing is what was much of US 99E. US 99E ran concurrent with US 40 (now I-80) to Roseville along a portion of LRN 3, defined in 1909. At Roseville, still as LRN 3, it ran N to Lincoln along present day Route 65 (for a while, Route 65 and US 99E were cosigned). From Lincoln, US 99E ran to Marysville still as LRN 3 (this segment is present-day Route 65 to Olivehurst, and Route 70 from Olivehurst to Marysville).

    In October 2018, it was noted that the City of Sacramento Department of Public Works is proposing to replace the Auburn Boulevard Bridge at Arcade Creek due to its structurally deficient and functionally obsolete status, as determined by the Federal Highway Administration criteria. The project site is located in the north eastern corner of the City of Sacramento, near the border with Sacramento County, where Auburn Boulevard crosses Arcade Creek, east of Winding Way and west of Park Road and the I-80 ramps. The Auburn Boulevard Bridge over Arcade Creek is a reinforced concrete T-beam structure that was originally constructed in 1927 (and formerly used for US 40 and US 99E), and then widened in 1965. The bridge has two spans with a total length of 70 feet. It carries two lanes of traffic in both the eastbound and westbound direction, with a left turn pocket for westbound to southbound users. The new bridge will be 100 feet wide (see cross section below) and be raised slightly to remain operational during a 20-year storm event. The new bridge will also be designed to accommodate future improvements to the Auburn Boulevard/Winding Way intersection that the County may implement.
    (Source: City of Sacramento Auburn Bridge Replacement Project)

    Route 20 between Marysville and Yuba City was co-signed with US 99E and Alternate US 40. (US 40A east was multiplexed with 20 east and US 99E south)

    From Yuba City, US 99E turned north to Chico, and continued N along current Route 99 to near Oroville (~ BUT 11.105)

    It then went W along current Richvale Highway to Midway. It continued N along Midway to Chico.

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to include PPNO 2430, on Midway (old SR 99) approximately 0.2 miles south of White Ave to approximately 0.7 miles south of White Ave, spanning Butte Creek and Butte Creek Overflow. Replace two bridge structures. The more detailed description notes: The Midway is a vital two-way, major collector, running north-south through a major agriculture zone in Butte County. It connects the City of Chico with Route 162 to the south and travels through the communities of Durham, Nelson and Richvale. This route was once Route 99 (presumably, US 99E). Both of the structures proposed to be replaced have low sufficiency ratings and have been determined to be "Structurally Deficient" by Caltrans Structures Maintenance and Investigations. They are both load limited and are of sub-standard width. The structure over Butte Creek also carries a speed limit of 10mph for vehicles over 10 tons. It has been determined that replacement of the bridges is the most feasible alternative.

    In Chico, the route turned into Esplanade, and then rejoined current Route 99 N of Chico.

    In continued along current Route 99 (LRN 3) to Red Bluff presumably rejoining US 99W along Route 36, all as LRN 3. Note: Looking at a map, there is a distinct possibility that US 99E turned into Tehama at Aramayo Way, and then continued to US 99W along San Benito Ave. This is unconfirmed. It could also have turned onto South Ave near Vina, rejoining 99W near Corning. The best way to tell would be by the date on the bridge on South Ave, County Sign Route A9.

    Part of the US 99E routing in Sacramento is now part of Route 51, the former Elvas Freeway. See Route 51 for specific historical information.

    US 99W

    US Highway Shield US 99W originally ran W out of Sacramento along LRN 50, defined in 1933, and then W along US 40 to the vicinity of Davis (along LRN 6, defined in 1909). It ran to near Exit 73 westbound (Olive Drive), then somehow connected with 5th Street on a now-removed alignment headed from US 40 west to the current Power Line Road/5th Street junction. (This removed alignment of 5th Street seems to have existed as late as 1967). US 99W continued west on 5th Street through downtown Davis, continuing in that direction as the street name changed to Russell Boulevard at B Street (where Davis's Central Park is located). US 99W then followed Russell to current Route 113 where it then merged with Alternate US 40 eastbound going north on Route 113 (cosigned as Route 113/US 99W). It then ran N cosigned with Alternate US 40 (present-day Route 113) to Woodland (along LRN 7, defined in 1909). It jogged W briefly along Route 16 (LRN 50), and then continued N signed as US 99W, along LRN 7, to Red Bluff. This was later replaced with I-5 (LRN 238, defined in 1959), whose routing is a closer approximation to Route 16 out of Sacramento to Woodland.

    The routings in Davis changed to the Route 113 routing by 1953.

    There was also a split at one time between Manteca to Stockton, between 1930 and 1933. At this time, US 99 ran down to Stockton, and US 99W split from US 99 in Stockton.

    Thomas Creek BridgeNote: Much of this is still signed (at least in terms of name) as 99W. This is best seen starting around Williams, CA, where there is a road roughly parallel to I-5 that appears to be called "Old Hwy 99W", "County Road 99W", "Highway 99W" (as in Williams, CA), "99W Highway", "State Highway 99W", and "Road 99W". The latter designation is co-signed with Tehama County Sign Route A8 north of San Benito Avenue near Red Bluff, CA. Portions of this routing may even still be in the state highway system, although they are not signed as part of the formal Route 99. It is unclear if these portions have postmiles.

    99W & Gyle Road Project

    Additionally, in May 2017, the TCTC also proposes to amend the 99W & Gyle Road (roughly parallel to 099 TEH 11.819) to South Main Street & I-5 Overcrossing (~ 005 TEH R13.965) project (PPNO 2569) in Tehama County to delay Design (PS&E) and construction by one Fiscal Year (FY) and increase the project funding. This project is in Tehama from Gyle Road intersection of 99W (formerly old Route 99) and extends north to Red Bluff ending at I-5 overcrossing. The 99W & Gyle Road to South Main Street & I-5 Overcrossing project is programmed in the 2016 STIP with the Environmental (PA&ED) phase programmed in FY 17-18 and PS&E in FY 18-19. Also as part of the 2016 STIP, construction was reduced by $2,595,000 and delayed from FY 18-19 to FY 19-20. This road is the adopted I-5 alternate detour route which is used by oversized permitted vehicles and is critical for local manufacturing, lumber and agriculture industries. The project scope includes resurfacing and reconfiguring the roadway as well as work at the signalized intersection of South Main Street and I-5. In lieu of upgrading the signalized intersection, a roundabout is now being considered at that location which has added work to the environmental analysis and project cost.

    Additionally, in June 2017, the CTC amended the SHOPP related to another project on 99W: The 99W & Gyle Road to South Main Street & I-5 Overcrossing project is programmed in the 2016 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) with the Environmental phase programmed in FY 2017-18 and PS&E in FY 2018-19. Also as part of the 2016 STIP, construction was reduced by $2,595,000 and delayed from FY 18-19 to FY 19-20. This road is the adopted I-5 alternate detour route that is used by oversized permitted vehicles and is critical for local manufacturing, lumber and agriculture industries. The project scope includes resurfacing and reconfiguring the roadway as well as work at the signalized intersection of South Main Street and I-5. In lieu of upgrading the signalized intersection, a roundabout is now being considered at that location which has added work to the environmental analysis and project cost. To accommodate the loss of STIP funding and the addition of the roundabout, TCTC proposes to delay PS&E and Construction and also increase the project cost.

    Freeway Freeway

    U.S. Rte 99E/99W (Int 5) Route Adoptions near Red BluffIn April 1960, the Sacramento Bee published information on route adoptions in the Red Bluff area. Note that on this map, North is to the LEFT. The Sacramento Bee wrote regarding this:
    (Source: Joel Windmiller, California's Historic Highways on FB, 5/31/2020)

    Aide Outlines US99E Freeway Tehama Routing. The state highway commission is considering adoption of a route for construction of 30 miles of freeway at an estimated cost of $12,765,000 on US 99E [future I-5] in Tehama County. State Highway Engineer'J C Womack yesterday recommended a route for the freeway from the Butte County line to 32 miles south of Red Bluff .

    Taken Under Study. His recommendation was taken under advisement by the commission that opened a two day meeting in the Public Works Building. Womack said that of alternates studied his recommended route would save the state $1,228,000. He said it also would cause a minimum of interference with existing development and would involve the least acreage of cultivated land. His route would follow the existing highway to south of Deer Creek run, roughly parallel with and half mile east of the present highway to just north of Los Molinos, then turn northwesterly across the Sacramento River. It would cross the Southern Pacific Company tracks north of Proberta and join the adopted route of the US 99W Freeway (Route 99) south of Red Bluff The existing highway runs east of the Sacramento River to Red Bluff. The commission asked Womack to ascertain whether Tehama County Board of Supervisors wishes the commission to hold a public hearing on the routing before further action is taken.

    Status Status

    Overall Northern Segment

    The portion from Route 5 to 5 miles north of I-5 is cosigned with Route 70. Some old routings have been relinquished, for example, KP 20.5/29.1 in Sutter County. A proposed route adoption was also relinquished: From PM 36.0/42.2 in Sutter County and from PM 0.0/13.1 in Butte County.

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed a comprehensive Route 70/Route 99 project. The project (stretching from the I-5/Route 99 junction to Route 149 in Butte County) converts two-lane conventional corridors to four-and-five-lane expressways, completes key segments to freeway by constructing interchanges, and provides additional capacity and throughput for current and projected future populations. It connects the Sacramento, Yuba-City and Chico urbanized area with an improved facility, saves lives by removing two lane segments, and supports improved freight movement.

    Sacramento to Yuba City

    In October 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct an interchange at Route 99/Elverta Road (~ SAC 35.323) in northern Sacramento to replace the existing signalized “at grade” intersection. On July 14, 2009, the County Board of Supervisors certified the MND finding that the project will not have a significant effect on the environment. The project is estimated to cost $30,200,000. The project is programmed for funding with Route 99 Bond ($19,110,000) and Local ($ 11,090,000) funds. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2010/11. In November 2010, the CTC approved amending the project to (1) Revise the scope for the bridge structure to accommodate ten lanes versus eight lanes. (2) Revise scope to add 15 feet to the structure width to accommodate sidewalks and bike lanes on each side. (3) Revise the funding plan to reflect additional scope, funded from the Route 99 Corridor Bond program. In April 2012, it was reported that work on this project would begin in Summer 2012. Closeout is anticipated for July 2014.

    Riego Road Improvements (~ SUT 0.918)

    [Riego]There are plans to construct a new interchange to connect Riego Road (~ SUT 0.918) to Route 99 at the Sacramento/Sutter County line. The project is programmed in the Route 99 Corridor bond program and will be combined with local funds. The estimated cost of the project is $30,840,000 and is estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement.

    In April 2012, it was reported that work should begin by Fall 2012 for improvements at Riego Road and Route 99, after the California Transportation Commission approved a $21.1 million allocation for the project in March 2012. The work should take about two years and when it is done will result in an interchange similar to that at Elkhorn Boulevard and Route 99 at Sacramento's northern edge. The completed project will have off- and on-ramps for traffic going either direction on Riego Road and 99 as well as an overcrossing for through traffic on Riego. Funding for the project comes from Proposition 1B, a $4.5 billion transportation bond approved by voters in 2006. The project did have some delays due to coordination with the United States Army Corps of Engineers in obtaining the required environmental permits. During this process, there were difficult and lengthy discussions and negotiations relating to the required project mitigation proposals that were initially deemed costly and unattainable by the Department. These negotiations continued until a workable resolution was reached. These delays not only led to delays in Design and Right of Way (R/W) acquisition, it also affected the construction milestone dates.

    In August 2015, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Sutter at Power Line Road (~ SUT 10.812) (S of Nicolaus), consisting of a relocated and reconstructed county road.

    Feather River Bridge (~ SUT 12.015 to SUT 13.686)

    [Feather River Project]In June 2008, the CTC approved reallocating some funding related to the Feather River Bridge reconstruction, near Nicolaus. The Sutter 99 Segment 2, Feather River Bridge Project PPNO (8361B) is part of the Route 99 Bond Program. The project proposes to widen Route 99 in Sutter County from two to four lanes with a continuous left turn lane from just south of Nicholaus Road to Sacramento Avenue. The project mainly consists of a new 3,045 foot two-lane bridge east of the existing Feather River Bridge (#18-26). The project also realigns the ramps to Nicholaus Road. The existing two-lane Feather River Bridge will remain in service. As the design work started, and detailed design information became available, the design and construction strategies considered during the environmental phase were reevaluated. Foundation drilling revealed different foundation conditions than what was originally considered. Preliminary consultations with the regulatory agencies for permitting began with the updated information. It was determined that environmental permit requirements had become more stringent and the agencies were requiring a reduced impact on the river. In addition, a more restrictive construction window for work being done in the channel is required. These factors led to a change in design and construction strategy. To address these new requirements and information, the current design reduces the number of bridge spans and foundations in the water, in order to minimize impacts to the main river channel. The longer spans require longer and larger diameter piles and an increased super structure and deck thickness, which in turn increases structure costs. Other options available will not render any financial savings; in fact, they could potentially be more costly in time and money. The proposed construction method minimizes the work area in the channel and reduces the noise levels from pile driving.

    In May 2012, KCRA reported that Caltrans will no longer use Nehemiah Construction, Inc., to widen Route 99 over the Feather River. The Gold River-based construction company was terminated from the Sutter County project because of nonperformance. Specifically, Caltrans indicated that Nehemiah Construction couldn't provide an adequate work force, and didn't have enough employees to complete the job. The change could extend the work into another construction season and delay the $60.8 million project's completion until 2016. It was originally slated for finish by 2015.

    In May 2019, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Sutter (County) on Route 99 from 0.3 miles north of Central Avenue to Route 113 (03-Sut-99-PM 17.1/R20.1), consisting of superseded highway and collateral facilities. The County, by controlled access highway agreement dated May 31, 2006, agreed to accept the relinquishment and by letter dated March 6, 2019, agreed to waive the 90-day notice requirement and accept title upon relinquishment by the State.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.3c)

    Tudor Bypass (~ SUT R17.522 to ~ SUT 16.449)

    In early 2009, work began on a $54 million project to widen Route 99 to four lanes and realign connections at Wilson Road (~ SUT R17.522) and Route 113 (~ SUT 16.449), s of Yuba City. Completion is expected in 2010.

    [Tudor Bypass]There are plans to widen this route to four lanes near Yuba City. There are also plans to bypass the city of Tudor. As of Mid-May 2009, it was reported that visible progress is being made on the Tudor Bypass, a $54.8 million project to reroute Route 99 past the sweeping, accident-prone S-curve at Route 113. The new four-lane roadway, a straight shot through an expanse of orchards, is expected to open in September 2010. The section has the most need for improvements, as the junctions of Route 99 and Garden Highway and Route 113 have an unusually high incidence of accidents. Property owners were not happy with the loss of road frontage. Traffic signals will be added at the intersections with Route 113 and Wilson Road. The previous road became Graden Highway and Tudor Road.

    Route 113 Interchange (~ SUT 16.449)

    In May 2011, it was reported that there are plans to construct a new interchange near Route 113.

    In April 2013, it was reported that Caltrans will be building an overpass as part of a new interchange between Route 99 and Route 113 in hopes of improving traffic flow and safety conditions. A groundbreaking ceremony was held on April 26, 2013 when the $19.4 million project gets underway. The interchange will replace stoplights installed when the Route 99 Tudor Bypass was completed south of Yuba City in 2010.

    In August 2015, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Sutter from Obanion Road (~ SUT 22.613) to Oswald Road (~ SUT 25.624), consisting of a relocated and reconstructed county roads and county road connections.

    Yuba City to Chico

    Marysville and Gridley Bypass (SUT T36.0/42.2, Route 149, BUT 0.0/13.1)

    Rte 5 interchange in GridleyIn June 2007, the CTC considered rescinding a portion of the freeway adoption for Route 99 in the County of Sutter, Post Mile SUT T36.0/42.2 and the County of Butte, Post Mile BUT 0.0/13.1. This was up for a vote again in December 2007. Due to funding constraints, Caltarns is unable to construct a freeway on a new alignment (bypassing the cities of Live Oak and Gridley) to replace the existing Route 99 facility in Sutter and Butte Counties. The specific portion to be rescinded is along Route 99 from Encinal Road at PM T36.0 to PM 42.2 in Sutter County and from the Sutter/Butte county line PM 0.0 to SR 162, at PM 13.1, in Butte County. Numerous studies were conducted on the Route 99/Route 70 corridor, with the conclusion to upgrade Route 70 to freeway standards, parallel to Route 99. Route 70 has been designated as a focus route in the Interregional Transportation Strategic Plan and maintains priority for Interregional Transportation Improvement Program funding. Route 99 runs 36.8 miles through Sacramento County as a four-lane expressway to an eight-lane freeway. Route 99 continues northward through Sutter County for 42.3 miles as a two-lane conventional highway to a four-lane freeway. It continues 45.9 miles through Butte County as a two-lane conventional highway to a four-lane conventional highway. On May 22, 1963, the Commission adopted the current Route 99 corridor, which bypasses the cities of Live Oak and Gridley. Numerous parcels, but not all, were purchased to obtain the necessary right of way for the adopted corridor. A decrease in freeway funding caused the project to be suspended. In 1988, the Commission asked that a corridor study determine the alignment for a divided expressway, for ultimate conversion to a freeway, connecting Sacramento, Yuba City/Marysville, and Chico. The result was a Routes 70 and 99 Corridor Study, which was adopted by the Butte County Association of Governments and by the Sacramento Area Council of Governments in 1990. Twenty-four alternatives were studied. The recommended proposed alternative was “A four-lane freeway (initially to be constructed as an expressway) on Route 70 from the Route 70/99 interchange to Route 149 via a Marysville Bypass; a four-lane freeway on Route 149 from Route 70 to Route 99; and a four-lane freeway on Route 99 from Route 149 to the existing freeway section south of the City of Chico.” The Study’s proposed alignment does not include a new alignment for Route 99 bypassing the cities of Live Oak and Gridley, though such a bypass was studied in 7 of the 24 alternatives. Butte County’s direction on a bypass goes back to its 1984 General Plan Circulation Element, which does not discuss or map a bypass of Live Oak or Gridley along Route 99 as an alternative. Sutter County concurred with the State Routes 70 and 99 Corridor Study in its 1995 General Plan Circulation Element and did not discuss the Live Oak or Gridley bypass alternative nor recognize it as an alternative on any maps in the Circulation Element. Gridley City Council discussions indicate a strong desire to work with the Department to reach a mutually beneficial solution.

    In December 2009, an effort by the state to sell 24 parcels east of Gridley (~ BUT 4.187), purchased by Caltrans in the 1960s for a future Route 99 bypass around the city ran into problems. The plan was dropped in the 1990s when it became clear either Route 99 or Route 70 could be improved to freeway or expressway status, but not both. After study and debate, Route 70 was chosen. The state started proceedings to sell the land in 2004, but delayed at the request of Gridley, which saw an eventual need for such a bypass. The bypass has been retained in both the city and Butte County general plans now being developed... and in Demember 2009, the Butte County Association of Governments added its endorsement to those seeking to have the state retain the property. Caltrans estimates the sale would raise $2.2 million. In the Gridley and county general plans, the bypass would be an "arterial" constructed to local standards, rather than a highway that would trigger state and federal oversight.

    In October 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project on Route 99 in Sutter County that will construct roadway improvements in the city of Live Oak -- specifically, it proposes to rehabilitate Live Oak Boulevard (~ SUT 40.278).

    Chico to Red Bluff

    Widening Near Chico (~ BUT R9.554L)

    [99 aux lane near Chico]In February 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to construct an auxiliary lane near Chico. The project is located in the City of Chico on Route 99 between the Route 32 and East 1st Avenue interchanges and on East 1st Avenue in the vicinity of the Route 99/East 1st Avenue interchange. The project would improve the operational characteristics of Route 99 by providing an auxiliary lane in each direction between Route 32 and East 1st Avenue. Two build alternatives, the Inside Widening Alternative and the Outside Widening Alternative, were considered during the environmental process. The Inside Widening Alternative with signalized conventional ramp intersections on East 1st Avenue was selected as the preferred alternative. The preferred alternative results in certain environmental impacts related to land use, transportation, air quality, noise, hydrology and water quality, biological resources, cultural resources, earth resources, visual resources, public services and facilities that require mitigation to be reduced to a less than significant level. The project is planned to be constructed in three phases. Phase I consists of northbound ramp improvements at East 1st Avenue. The construction capital and support costs for this phase were programmed at $8,286,000. Phase I construction is nearly complete. Phase II consists of the construction of a northbound auxiliary lane and widening of median and structures. This phase is estimated to cost $39,520,000 and is programmed with Route 99 Bond ($23,520,000) and STIP ($16,000,000) funds. Construction is estimated to begin May 2010. Phase III will construct a southbound auxiliary lane. This phase is estimated to cost $12,500,000 and is not programmed.

    In February 2010, the CTC approved amending the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and the Route 99 Corridor baseline agreement for the Butte Route 99 Chico Auxiliary Lanes — Phase II project (PPNO 2410B) in Chico to add Phase 3 scope including southbound (SB) auxiliary lane improvements; change lead agency for Construction from BCAG to Caltrans; replace $1,653,000 Regional Improvement Program (RIP) Right of Way (R/W) funds with Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) funds; and update project schedule. This project is part of the Route 99 Bond Program. The ultimate Route 99 auxiliary lane project was approved in 2005, which included northbound (NB) and SB auxiliary lanes between Route 32 and East 1st Avenue. The project also includes improvements to the NB off-ramp at East 1st Avenue, a viaduct structure widening over Bidwell Park, widening of undercrossing structures at Palmetto Avenue, interchange ramp improvements and soundwall construction. The completed improvements will relieve congestion, increase capacity, and enhance safety. There are three phases due to funding constraints: Phase 1 — Improve NB off-ramp at First Avenue (PPNO 2410) — Completed; Phase 2 — Construct NB auxiliary lane, widen the NB and SB viaduct structures over Bidwell Park, widen both undercrossing structures (NB and SB) at Palmetto Avenue, and construct soundwalls (PPNO 2410B) — Currently programmed with Route 99 bond and STIP funds; and Phase 3 — Construct the SB auxiliary lane with corresponding ramp improvements, and widen East 1st Avenue. The adjusted end of construction is October 2013.

    In June 2010, it was noted that recent estimates now indicate lower construction costs for Phase 2 as well as additional savings if combined with Phase 3. BCAG proposed (and the CTC concured with) combining Phase 3 work with Phase 2. If the two phases could not be combined, the project runs the risk of increased costs for the delivery for each phase as well as an increase to the impact on traffic and to the public. There were also some funding shifts. The revised project completion shows:

    Begin Right of Way Phase 05/01/08
    End Right of Way Phase (Right of Way Certification Milestone) 05/10/10
    Begin Construction Phase (Contract Award Milestone) 01/15/11
    End Construction Phase (Construction Contract Acceptance Milestone) 10/15/13
    Begin Closeout Phase 10/15/13
    End Closeout Phase (Closeout Report) 10/15/15

    Cottonwood Creek Bridge Replacement (03-But-99 14.9/15.7)

    Rte 99 Cottonwood Creek BridgeIn May 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed: Route 99 in Butte County. Replace existing bridge on Route 99 near the town of Richvale. (PPNO 2425) (03-But-99, PM 14.89/15.67) This project is located on Route 99 near Richvale in Butte County. The project proposes to construct a new bridge adjacent to the Cottonwood Creek Bridge. The foundation of the existing bridge is determined to be scour critical. The project proposes for the existing bridge to remain open during construction of the new bridge and be demolished after completion. The proposed project is estimated to cost $8.1 million in Capital Outlay Right-of-Way and Construction. The project is fully funded and is currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for an estimated total of $12.0 million, which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in 2020. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
    (Source: May 2018 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP: PPNO 2425. 03-Butte-99 14.9/15.7. On Route 99. Near Richvale, at Cottonwood Creek Bridge No. 12-0120, from 0.3 mile south to 0.5 mile north of Nelson Avenue. Replace and realign scour critical bridge. Begin Con: 5/15/2020. Total Project Cost: $11,964K.

    In June 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP scope amendment: 03-But-99 14.9/15.7 PPNO 2425 ProjID 0314000101. On Route 99 Near Richvale, at Cottonwood Creek Bridge No. 12-0120, from 0.3 mile south to 0.5 mile north of Nelson Avenue. Replace and realign scour-critical bridge. Additional R/W capital is due to increased mitigation to purchase credits for Giant Garter Snake. During design, stage construction plans were revised requiring that the new alignment be built prior to removal of existing alignment. This resulted in increase of roadway excavation and asphalt quantities, and mobilization costs. Need for larger sized culverts and increase in unit price and quantities for structural items also resulted in higher construction capital. Updated total cost: $15,590K
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Scope Item 23)

    In June 2020, the CTC authorized the following allocation for Construction Support and Construction Capital for this project: $11,768,000. 03-But-99 14.9/15.7. PPNO 03-2425. ProjID 0314000101. EA 0F290. On Route 99 near Richvale, from 0.3 mile south to 0.5 mile north of Nelson Avenue at Cottonwood Creek Bridge No. 12-0120. Outcome/Output: Replace and realign scour critical bridge, rehabilitate drainage systems, and reconstruct Nelson Avenue intersection.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #3)

    In July 2010, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way along Route 99 from post mile BUT 22.8 to the Durham Dayton Highway (~ BUT 23.831).

    In January 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Butte County that will replace the northbound Butte Creek Bridge (~ BUT 28.745) near the city of Chico. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. Total estimated project cost is $15,517,000 for capital and support. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to elderberry shrubs in the project area will be mitigated by purchasing credits at a mitigation bank. Potential impacts to fish will be mitigated by replacing riparian vegetation at a 3:1 ratio.

    South Avenue Roundabout (02-Tehama-99 PM 4.2/4.8)

    In March 2020, the CTC amended the following project into the SHOPP: 02-Teh-99 PM 4.2/4.8 PPNO 3744 ProjID 0219000044 EA 0J010 Route 99 near Los Molinos, from 0.3 mile S to 0.3 mile N of South Ave. Construct roundabout. Total cost: $14,407K. BC 3/19/2024. Construction and R/W acquisition not yet programmed. The CTC also approved the following financial allocation: 02-Teh-99 PM 4.2/4.8. PPNO 3744. ProjID 0219000044. EA 0J010. Route 99 near Los Molinos, from 0.3 mile south to 0.3 mile north of of South Avenue. Construct roundabout. (Concurrent Amendment under SHOPP Amendment 18H-015; March 2020.) Financial allocation: PA&ED $1,050,000.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1a) #19, 2.5b.(2a) #3)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Collision Reduction item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 02-Tehama-99 PM 4.2/4.8 PPNO 3744 Proj ID 0219000044 EA 0J010. Route 99 near Los Molinos, from 0.3 mile south to 0.3 mile north of South Avenue. Construct roundabout. Programmed in FY23-24, with construction scheduled to start in March 2024. Total project cost is $14,407K, with $9,497K being capital (const and right of way) and $4,910K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    Rte 99 Champlin Slough BridgeChamplin Slough Bridge No. 08-0006 (02-Tehama-99 9.0/9.3)

    The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 3642. 02-Tehama-99 9.0/9.3. On Route 99 Near Los Molinos, from 0.2 mile south to 0.2 mile north of Champlin Slough Bridge No. 08-0006. Replace bridge to correct scour critical conditions. Begin Con: 4/19/2022. Total Project Cost: $7,560K.

    In October 2019, it was reported that Caltrans District 2 was holding public open houses to discuss the upcoming replacement of Champlin Slough Bridge on Route 99, approximately 3 miles south of Los Molinos. Construction on the approximately $4.4 million project is slated to begin in the summer of 2022. During that time, Route 99 will be closed just north and south of the construction area, and a detour around the construction zone will be in place and for two to three months. The closure will likely impact residents living along Route 99 and drivers traveling between Chico and Red Bluff. The new bridge will be constructed using Accelerated Bridge Construction technologies to reduce the amount of time needed to implement road closures. The Champlin Slough Bridge, originally constructed in 1918, is one of the last remaining pre World War I structures still in service along Route 99 in Tehama County. This project will replace the 100+-year-old bridge with a new bridge meeting current standards.
    (Source: Action News Now, 10/1/2019)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Bridge Preservation item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 02-Tehama-99 PM 9.0/9.3 PPNO 3642 Proj ID 0216000148 EA 1H510. Route 99 near Los Molinos, from 0.2 mile south to 0.2 mile north of Champlin Slough Bridge No. 08-0006. Replace bridge to correct scour critical conditions. Programmed in FY21-22, with construction scheduled to start in April 2022. Total project cost is $7,560K, with $4,460K being capital (const and right of way) and $3,100K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In June 2020, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the Champlin Slough Bridge Replacement Project, which will replace a bridge over Champlin Slough in Tehama County. (PPNO 3642) Specifically, the project proposes to replace the Champlin Slough Bridge near Los Molinos at post mile (PM) 9.1. The proposed replacement structure is 85 feet long, has a single-span, and will meet current safety standards when constructed. This project is fully funded and is currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for a total of $7,560,000 which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in 2022. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    In June 2020, the CTC approved the following support allocation for this project: 02-Teh-99 9.0/9.3 PPNO 3642 ProjID 0216000148 EA 1H510 Near Los Molinos, from 0.2 mile south to 0.2 mile north of Champlin Slough Bridge No. 08-0006. Replace bridge to correct scour critical conditions. Allocation: PS&E $1,170,000; R/W Sup $90,000
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2b) #7)

    In November 2010, the CTC approved amending the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and the Route 99 Corridor baseline agreement for the Los Molinos project (PPNO 3326) [In Los Molinos, from Orange Street to Tehama Vina Road, PM TEH 11.6 to TEH 12.6] in Tehama County to: · Update Phase 2 schedule and funding plan based on current estimates. · Increase Right of Way (R/W) funding to accommodate utility relocation work recently discovered. · Split out Transportation Enhancement (TE) project added as part of the 2010 STIP.

    In January 2012, the CTC approved about $3 million in funding for a "traffic calming" project on Route 99 from Grant Street in Los Molinos north to Tehama Vina Road (~ TEH 12.095 to TEH 12.538). Curbs, gutters, lights, drainage, bike buffers, landscape islands and a thin-blanket overlay will be installed.

    In May 2017, the CTC authorized deletion of the Los Molinos Phase III project (PPNO 2528) from the STIP (TEH 12.5 to TEH 13.5). The project is the last phase of a series of improvements in Los Molinos and was delayed until FY 20-21 due to funding constraints realized in the 2016 STIP cycle. The project was going to be delivered in conjunction with a project with a similar scope programmed in the 2016 State Highway Operations and Protection Program (SHOPP) which will update this location to current American’s with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements. The SHOPP project scope includes curb ramps, sidewalk gap closures, drainage, paving and lighting. However, due to ADA mandates, the SHOPP project cannot be delayed but is able to incorporate the scope in the Los Molinos Phase III Project.

    In August 2009, the CTC approved reinquishment of right of way in the county of Tehama along Route 99 near Los Molinos at Butler Street (~ TEH 13.451), consisting of a reconstructed county road.

    In May 2012, the CTC authorized SHOPP funding on Route 99, in Tehama County, 02-Teh-99 14.1 Near Los Molinos, from the south fork of Mill Creek Bridge #08-160 to First Avenue. $3,800,000 to replace one scoured bridge to maintain structural integrity, reduce the risk to lives and properties, and to comply with the Bridge Inspection Report recommendation.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved vacation of right of way in the county of Tehama along Route 99 between 66th Avenue and 68th Avenue (~ TEH 17.633 to TEH R17.955), consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In November 2010, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Tehama along Route 99 at 68th Avenue and Le Claire Avenue near Los Molinos (~ TEH R17.955 to TEH R18.195), consisting of reconstructed county roads.

    Business Routes Business Routes

    • Gridley
    • Chico: The Esplanade

    Naming Naming

    Sacramento to Yuba City

    Dean PattonThe interchange between Route 99 and Riego Road in Sutter County (~ SUT 0.918) is officially named the "Dean Patton Memorial Interchange." It was named in memory of Dean Patton of Grass Valley, who started his career with the Department of Transportation as a highway maintenance worker in 2006, initially assigned to the Marysville special crews yard as part of a stormwater and bridge crew, and more recently assigned to the Nevada City maintenance yard. On May 2, 2013, Mr. Patton was struck by another vehicle and killed while riding his motorcycle on his day off onRoute 99 at Riego Road in Sutter County on the way to the State Capitol in Sacramento, as a participant in the third annual Highway Workers Memorial Run, benefiting the children of fallen Caltrans employees. In his private life, Mr. Patton sought to improve his community through public service, active involvement in the Twin Cities Church in Grass Valley, helping others better themselves through Alcoholics Anonymous, and coaching a Little League team for children with special needs. It was named on 09/20/13 by SCR 55, Res. Chapter 125, Statutes of 2013.
    (Image source: The Union)

    Bernie RichterThe 5-mile segment of Route 99 south of its intersection with Route 70 in the County of Sutter (~ SUT 2.491 to SUT 7.491) is named the Bernie Richter Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of Bernie Richter, born September 7, 1931, a member of the Assembly of the State of California from 1992 to 1998. In January 1998 Bernie Richter witnessed a vehicle lose control, crash into a bridge abutment just south of the intersection of Route 99 and Route 70 in the County of Sutter, and burst into flames. At this point Assemblymember Richter raced to the vehicle with his own fire extinguisher, and with the assistance of another good Samaritan, rescued the driver by pulling him out of the vehicle. Bernie Richter died at the age of 68 on October 25, 1999. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 189, August 17, 2004, Chapter 142.
    (Image source: Local Wiki - Chico)

    Joan Bechtel Memorial HighwayThe Tudor Bypass segment of Rout 99, from the intersection of Route 99 and Central Avenue to the intersection of Route 99 and Route 113 (~ SUT 16.881 to SUT R20.042), in Sutter County is formally named the "Joan Bechtel Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Joan Bechtel, was elected to the Sutter County Board of Supervisors in November 1992, and who subsequently represented the citizens of the Fourth Supervisorial District from January 1993 to May 2002. She served as the Sutter County Clerk-Recorder from May 2002 to December 2007. Ms. Bechtel also showed her commitment to the community by serving as a member of the Fremont-Rideout Health Group's Board of Directors for 25 years, and on the Yuba-Sutter Fair Board for eight years. During her tenure as county supervisor, Ms. Bechtel led the effort to widen Route 99 for the safety of all citizens of Sutter County and all those that travel along Route 99. As a direct result of her efforts, there has been a precipitous drop in accident rates and fatalities on Route 99. Ms. Bechtel passed away on June 25, 2008, and the Legislature wishes to honor her commitment and dedication to Sutter County. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 150, Resolution Chapter 162, on 9/19/2008.
    (Image source: Appeal-Democrat)

    The segment of Route 99 between Hull Road and Stewart Road (~ SUT 22.829 to SUT 26.873) in Sutter County is named the "California Small Business Owners’ Highway". It was named in recognition of the tremendous contributions that small businesses make to the economic strength of our nation and state. The nation’s 28 million small businesses are the job creation engine of the American economy, responsible for one-half of all private sector jobs, and are the source of roughly 70% of all new jobs in the decade between 2004 and 2014. California is home to three and one-half million of these small businesses, accounting for 99% of the state’s employers and 52% of the state’s workforce, and producing more than one-half of California’s gross domestic product in 2014. California is home to the most innovative and competitive businesses in the world, placing the state consistently among the top 10 economies in the world, and California’s small businesses are critical to the economic health of the state because small businesses are innovative forces in the marketplace and are among the most likely to take risks to create new technologies and industries. The naming demonstrates a commitment to small businesses and support for small-scale private-sector job creators are among the most promising strategies to enhance California’s human capital, expand job opportunities, and increase the state’s competitive advantage in the global marketplace. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 118, Resolution Chapter 174, September 11, 2014.

    Yuba City to Chico

    The portion of this route from Route 65 to Red Bluff was historically called the "Capitol Highway" (now 070 YUB R8.316 to 036 TEH L41.141, along what is old 99W). In local usage, it is called the "East Side Highway".

    CHP Officer Archie E. NicholsThe portion of Route 99 from 9th Avenue (TEH 16.264) to 61st Avenue (TEH 16.691) in the County of Tehama is named the "CHP Officer Archie E. Nichols Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Archie E. Nichols, who was born in September 1919, in Long Beach, California. At 18 years of age in 1937, Archie joined the United States Army Air Corps, where he served for six years, including fighting in World War II, before being shot down in 1943. First Lieutenant Nichols was piloting a Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bomber fighting in Germany when he was shot down on his way back to England after a bombing run. Due to technology restrictions at the time, pilots wore electrical suits to regulate pressure and his suit was damaged in the crash, which caused it to short out and destroy one of his kidneys. During this time, the Department of the California Highway Patrol (CHP) was recruiting military personnel as the state population rose, and First Lieutenant Nichols was contacted and he thought it was a great opportunity to continue serving the public. Following his recovery, First Lieutenant Nichols was relieved from military service and moved back to California and joined the CHP. Initially, Officer Nichols served as an officer in the County of San Bernardino for one year before moving his family to the Red Bluff area and working patrol there until his death. The Nichols family lived on a walnut ranch near the community of Los Molinos in the County of Tehama and raised dairy cows to provide food for the family. Officer Nichols would often get called at home in the middle of the night to go handle an accident because he was one of the few CHP officers living in the County of Tehama at the time. Officer Nichols’ public service was not limited to the United States Army Air Corps or the CHP. He was also a volunteer at the local fire department in Los Molinos, and served in several other local civic organizations. Officer Nichols was very involved in the community, always helping neighbors and friends when needed. Officer Nichols and some other law enforcement officers spent a significant amount of off-duty time on a project painting trees near a dangerous area in the City of Red Bluff to prevent accidents. He and his wife were very involved in the Sacred Heart Catholic Church where a memorial to him still stands today. Officer Nichols’ love of service was passed on to his children as well, with five of his children serving in the United States Armed Forces, the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force, and another child becoming a Catholic nun. Officer Nichols’ grandchildren have continued his legacy of service, with his grandson, Dustin, serving as a CHP Lieutenant, his grandson, Steven, serving as a captain within the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, where his son, Taylor, Archie’s great-grandson, also is a corrections officer, and his son, Christopher, who served in the United States Air Force and was wounded in Afghanistan. Around the last year of his life, Officer Nichols was forced to go on a restrictive diet for the purpose of trying to save the function of his remaining kidney, but he eventually died of kidney failure in Los Molinos. CHP Officer Archie E. Nichols passed away on November 13, 1959, after a life of service to his state and nation. He is survived by 38 grandchildren, 37 great-grandchildren, and 3 great-great grandchildren. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 105, Res. Chapter 117, 7/6/2018.
    (Image source: Red Bluff Daily News)

    Patricia Ann Weston Memorial HighwayThe portion of Rout 99 in Sutter County, from SUT 36 (N of Yuba City) to SUT 40, inclusive, is named the “Patricia Ann Weston Memorial Highway”. This segment was named in memory of Patricia Ann Weston, who was born on July 19, 1951, in Mount Pleasant, Michigan. Weston graduated from the Central Michigan University in 1973 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Earth Science, Geography; and moved to California in 1974. She attended the University of California, Davis, from June 1976 to September 1977; and started her career in transportation with the Sacramento Area Regional Planning Commission. Weston began her career with the Department of Transportation (Caltrans) on January 9, 1979, in planning in the Marysville District 3 Office, transferred to the headquarters Division of Mass Transportation, and finally transferred to the headquarters Division of Transportation Planning as the Office Chief of Advance System Planning and Economics on January 4, 1993. Weston was a champion and advocate for rural agencies working to ensure that rural projects were included in the State Transportation Improvement Program. Weston changed state transportation planning by being instrumental in not only the development of the Transportation Development Act, an act that provides funding to counties and cities for transit projects, but also in assisting the State of California in securing the initial Urban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA) grants that provided funding to private and nonprofit groups for handicap services. Weston wrote the 1998 Interregional Strategic Plan, a plan that describes the framework by which the state carries out its responsibilities for the Interregional Transportation Improvement Program and identifies how the Department of Transportation works with regional agencies in gaining consensus on the prioritized improvements contained in the program. Weston was instrumental in writing GoCalifornia and the Governor's Strategic Growth Plan, which established the framework for the subsequent Proposition 1B Program. Weston mentored generations of planners and engineers at both the Department of Transportation and at transportation planning agencies and private planning firms statewide, freely sharing her experiences, expertise, wisdom, and extreme professionalism with all who endeavored to become more than they were. Weston dedicated 30 years of service to the State of California and all who travel on its transportation systems, spending her life improving those systems, and making travel options more accessible, faster, and safer for the traveling public. On September 8, 2009, Patricia Ann Weston peacefully and quietly passed away following a short illness. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 84, Resolution Chapter 66, on 8/4/2010.
    (Image source: Patricia: From Alaska to California; Legacy.Com)

    Milton and Karon LaMalfa of OrovilleThe portion of Route 99 between Oroville Dam Boulevard West (~ BUT 13.168) and Nelson Avenue (~ BUT 15.19) in Oroville is named the "Milton La Malfa Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Milton Joseph La Malfa, who died on October 5, 2008. Born in San Jose, California, to Tony and Marge La Malfa on February 22, 1937, Milton La Malfa was raised and lived nearly his entire life in Richvale, California, on the farm that his Italian grandfather, Giusseppe La Malfa, purchased in 1931. Earning a degree in agriculture/business from Fresno State University in 1959, Milton La Malfa married Karon Myers of Oroville, California, in 1958, and they had three children, Doug, Sherry, and Lisa. Distinguishing himself as a prominent rice farmer in the area, Milton La Malfa worked with his father to level the ground in the 1950's and 1960's, taming new acreage and improving irrigation methods of rice. Milton La Malfa was also involved with experimental projects through the rice experiment station, where he worked on fertilizer and herbicide studies to improve rice production and yields and grew foundation seed rice, and in 1960, a small rice dryer was built on the ranch for seed rice storage and isolation. In addition to utilizing his outstanding talent and skills as an innovative thinker in his farming operation, Milton La Malfa shared his wise counsel in numerous capacities on a broad range of public and private organizations, including several rice industry organizations. Milton La Malfa provided leadership and results-oriented vision as a director of the Butte County Rice Growers Association from 1973 to 1975 and again from 1981 to 1986, as well as secretary-treasurer for four years and chair for one year. Milton La Malfa also served with distinction as a director of Associated Rice Marketing Cooperative from 1988 to 1993, serving as chair for one year, and also gave his time as director of the Richvale Seed Growers for many years. Milton La Malfa was instrumental in organizing local farmers in 1985 to form the Western Canal Water Users Association, which initiated the negotiations with Pacific Gas and Electric to purchase the water rights and conveyance system for the farmers in the area; he subsequently became director of the Western Canal Water District (formed from the Western Canal Water Users Association) and also served as its president. Milton La Malfa also contributed extensively as a director of Drainage District 200 and was on the Board of the Northern California Water Association, which is the advocacy arm of the water districts in Sacramento. Milton La Malfa was recognized for his leadership in rice propagation, development, and in securing water for California rice's future, and was nationally awarded the prestigious 2008 Rice Farmer of the Year Award by the USA Rice Federation. Milton La Malfa was dedicated to philanthropy in his personal life, and his many contributions to the community will not be forgotten. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 71, Resolution Chapter 107, on 9/23/2009.
    (Image source: Chico Enterprise-Record)

    Ray E. JohnsonThe portion of Route 99 consisting of the four-lane expressway between the Pentz Road overcrossing (BUT 24.2) and the Edgar Slough (Bridge No. 12-128, BUT 030.03) is officially designated the "Ray E. Johnson Expressway". Ray E. Johnson was a member of the California Legislature for 18 years, having been first elected in 1964 to the Assembly, and to the Senate in 1976. He represented 15 counties as a Member of the Legislature and, in that capacity, was instrumental in securing the completion of the Route 65 Bypass of Interstate 80 and in the three-lane widening of Interstate 80. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 74, Chapter 113, in 1993.
    (Image source: Oroville Unified School District)

    Chico to Red Bluff

    Caltrans Leadworker Gary Wayne Smith Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 99, from one mile north of its intersection with Wilson Landing Road (~ BUT 38.816) to Broyles Road (~ BUT 44.33), north of the City of Chico, is named the "Caltrans Leadworker Gary Wayne Smith Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Gary Wayne Smith, who began working for Caltrans on May 16, 1978, and spent the majority of his career at the Chico Maintenance Station. On November 14, 2010, Gary Wayne Smith was struck and killed by a vehicle while performing traffic control at the scene of a fatal accident on Route 99 north of the City of Chico. Gary Wayne Smith was known as a kind-natured individual who was never without a smile and who helped many coworkers on the job. Gary Wayne Smith never hesitated to help or respond to callouts regardless of the time or day. Gary Wayne Smith had great pride regarding his service to the State of California. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 52, Resolution Chapter 94, on September 15, 2011.
    (Image source: Chico Enterprise-Record; Caltrans In-Remembrance)

    National Trails National Trails

    Pacific Highway Sign This segment was part of the "Pacific Highway".


    US 99 appears to have been part of the "Jefferson Davis Highway". This was an attempt to commemorate the "Lost Cause" or "Southern Cause" narrative of the Civil War. Along US 99, a monument was located near the Oregon Border. This is discussed in more detail on the Trails and Roads page.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.5] From Route 5 in Sacramento to Route 36 near Red Bluff. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

    Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Sacramento 99 0.59 0.99
    Sacramento 99 1.32 1.86
    Sacramento 99 13.70 14.00
    Sacramento 99 17.02 17.32
    Sacramento 99 17.46 24.35
    Sacramento 99 R32.12 R32.37
    Sutter 99 R30.67 R32.14
    Sutter 99 R32.47 R32.77
    Sutter 99 R33.79 R34.12
    Butte 99 R31.15 R31.72
    Butte 99 R32.21 R35.31

    Interregional Route Interregional Route

    [SHC 164.15] With routing to be determined via Route 70 or via Route 99 between Route 70 north of Sacramento and Route 149 north of Oroville.


  4. No current routing. As of 1964, the routing N of Red Bluff was part of I-5

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    U.S. 99 N of Int 5 / Rte 99 mergeBefore 1964, the current routing of I-5 was signed as US 99 to the Oregon border. This was LRN 3. Parts of this have been bypassed by the I-5 freeway. The older true Route 99 segments include present-day Route 273, Route 265, and Route 263.

    In October 2017, it was reported that Darion Fairburn, 23, and 73-year-old Dave Selby, succeeded in getting Historic US 99 signs for the portions of former US 99 in Mountain Gate, about 12 miles north of Redding. The first sign was unveiled in October 2017 at Fawndale Road and Wonderland Boulevard at the spot where motorists drive on the former highway. The ceremony took place not far from where a Texaco station used to attract drivers who wanted a full-service fill-up and stroll over to see a pen with of about eight buffalo. Fairburn said he got the idea for his US 99 sign project about two years ago when he was a California Conservation Corps worker working on habitat restoration along Route 99 near Sacramento. "That got me wondering about its history. So I looked and discovered it was the I-5 of the 20th century and it also ran through Mountain Gate until 1965," Fairburn said. Caltrans gave him old maps that he could study. He found out the Mountain Gate sections — Holiday Road and Wonderland Boulevard — were built by the state highway department in April 1917 as the Pacific Highway then in 1932 as US 99. Fairburn noted, I-5 north of Redding got its Cascade Wonderland Highway moniker from those two frontage roads. By 1964, the construction of I-5 had wiped out the old alignment of US 99, but some recognizable stretches still remain on Wonderland Boulevard and Holiday Road such as narrow concrete pavement, culverts and bridges, according to the Shasta County Public Works Department. The 2008 drought made even more segments visible when the level of Lake Shasta dropped to a 16-year low and exposed part of the old Pacific Highway and other short stretches and bridges of US 99 (similarly, in the South, when the drought dropped the level of Pyramid Lake, portions of the former Ridge Route section of US 99 were exposed). In Shasta County, US 99 went from Red Bluff to roads we know today as old Main Street in Cottonwood, Rhonda Road in Anderson and Route 273 between Anderson and Redding, where there's already a Historic Route 99 sign northbound just south of Buenaventura Boulevard. The old state highway went through Redding's Market Street, headed north onto the Miracle Mile to reach what is now Twin View Boulevard where it meandered past such landmarks as Joe's Giant Orange Restaurant on Cascade Boulevard in Shasta Lake. The route took drivers up Union School Road and Old Oregon Trail before hooking up with Wonderland Boulevard and Holiday Road and eventually using the Pit River Bridge and the Sacramento River canyon. The highway went past another landmark, the Mesquite Steakhouse, that's been abandoned for years and burned down earlier in October 2017 off Wonderland Boulevard. The former portions of US 99 in Mountain Gate are (1) Holiday Road from 2,600 feet south of Old Oregon Trail to 1,000 feet south of Old Oregon Trail; (2) Holiday Road from 1,000 feet north of Old Oregon Trail to 3,300 feet north of Old Oregon Trail; and (3) Wonderland Boulevard from Bass Drive to northerly limits.
    (Source: Redding Record Searchlight, 10/21/2017)

    In November 2017, it was noted that before Shasta Lake was built, the Pacific Highway headed west from Redding and then north to Keswick, following the Sacramento River and the RR tracks alongside it. Coram today (north of Keswick) is just below Shasta Dam; Kennett, north of Coram, is now underwater. There were actually two Pacific Highways: No 1 and No 2. No 1 became US 99 and No 2 went into Kennett. These were two separate -- and separately signed -- alignments.
    (Source: Discussion of a photo of Pacific Highway in Redding on Facebook, 11/3/2017)

    For the history of Route 99 in Redding, see Route 273.


Exit Information Exit Information

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

National Trails National Trails

Midland Trail Sign The portion of former US 99 that was cosigned with US 6 was part of the Midland Trail.

Interstate Submissions Interstate Submissions

Route 99 was not recommended for inclusion in the Interstate system. However, Assembly Joint Resolution 63 requested the President and Congress of the United States to enact legislation to include Route 99 in the interstate highway system. (August 19, 2004, Chapter 153).

The question is often raised of why this has not been designated as an interstate -- with the number being the subject of intense discussion. Scott Parker (Sparker) addressed this in an AAroads post on 7/10/2016, which is as good an explanation as any (minor editing was done to fit the conventions of this website). Route 99 may eventually become an interstate, which although it would give it a new shield, could very well disconnect it from the history of US 99 (and note that while the bastardizations of the x99 numbers are available (I-99 isn't, unless AASHTO decides to repeat the Pennsylvania designation in California, just like Pennsylvania has California University), the reasonable ones (199, 299) are taken in the state:

As with the Route 99 corridor, any push for Interstate status for Route 58 will have to come from political forces in the affected regions; there is little possibility that Caltrans itself would initiate such an action. Local political action was responsible for the last three [non-chargable] Interstate conversions (I-110 in '81, I-710 in '84, and I-880 in '86); in each case, a congressman from the area (the late Glenn Anderson, D-Gardena, in the case of the first two) was on point for the necessary AASHTO/FHWA vetting. Part of the problem is that the actual construction involved in Interstate upgrades is considered within Caltrans to be just another drain on their resources -- and that the budgeting process that is involved in apportioning funds to each district would be substantially disrupted by "piling on" such an outlay in addition to the requirements of the STIP under which they are operating. Unless an improvement to Interstate standards on one of the corridors in question is actually contained within the currently effective STIP, even considering 5 to 15-year windows for upgrades to any is thought of as an "off-book" project. It's not like it was with the pre-'73 Division of Highways; Caltrans is an omnibus tranportation/transit agency with as much $$ volume going to localized (mostly urban/suburban) programmed projects -- just examine any of the last three or four STIP's on a line-item level! [Ed: And if you note, the first interstate submissions for this route were prior to 1973] Long-distance corridor work, unless severely substandard facilities are involved (like Route 99 between Route 198 and the Fresno area), is undertaken if and only if there is sufficient funding available -- which, given the more recent bias toward street/transit issues in denser locales, is not always a given.

In short, Interstate conversion isn't cheap -- and Caltrans' priorities are presently focused on localized issues; they won't run point on such long-distance upgrades. If either Route 58 or Route 99 is to gain Interstate status -- despite being warranted by commercial traffic stats -- it will come from outside. Since the Route 99 corridor is already listed (via an addendum to the High Priority Corridor 54 description) as a future Interstate, the only legislative action required for signage would be for a member of Congress to pick a number and tack it onto the existing legislative description; the existence of the state plan to expand Route 99 would likely serve as a de facto "25-year-window" for facility compliance. Arranging for the same treatment for Route 58 would require an entirely new corridor designation (Barstow to Buttonwillow); the process would be similar if not identical to the language added to the yearly federal funding bill that eventually resulted in I–42 in NC. Again, that would have to come from a congressional source with sufficient clout to steer it through the committee process. In the case of either corridor, it's likely that Caltrans would approach either "mandate from above" with their usual shrug of the shoulders; they'd likely spread any upgrade projects over as many STIP terms as they could, and carry on as before, with work progressing at a marginally faster rate than before.

There was more discussion in December 2016 about Route 99 eventually becoming I–9, and AARoads has a whole page on the proposal. Is it likely to happen? Considering the cost and impact for resigning the route, it is more likely the 99 designation would be retained and the route would be upgraded (backgraded) to US 99 again, because renumbering would impact not only the southern Route 99 corridor, but the northern corridor as well (would it stay 99?), as well as forcing renumbering of Route 9 elsewhere in the state. Much less impact to keep the Interstate designation hidden and go back to a US highway shield.

Blue Star Memorial Highway Blue Star Memorial Highway

The portion of this route that is former US 99 was designated as a "North-South Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 99:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 53] at Rio Vista via Ryer Island to [LRN 6] near Broderick" to the highway system. In 1935, this was defined in the code to be LRN 99 with the same definition.

In 1961, Chapter 1146 relaxed the origin to be "[LRN 53] near Rio Vista".

This route ran from Route 12 near Rio Vista via Ryer Island to US 40), now I-80, near Broderick. It is part of the present-day unsigned Route 84 in this area.


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 98 Forward Arrow Route 100

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Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.