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Interstate Shield

Interstate 8

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

  1. From Sunset Cliffs Boulevard to Route 5 in San Diego.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This was formerly Route 109; it was transferred to Route 8 in 1972 by Chapter 1216. See below for 1934-1963 signed Route 8.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was LRN 286. It was added to the state highway system in 1959 by Chapter 1062.

    Naming Naming

    This portion of Route 8 is named the "Ocean Beach Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 117, Chapter 233, in 1968.

    Status Status

    Postmile Note: Owing to the status of this segment as former Route 109, the postmiles are distinct from the rest of I-8, being L postmiles. There are also some T postmiles, so this segment runs from 008 SD T0.407 to approx 008 SD L2.367.

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.3] Entire portion.

    Interstate Submissions Interstate Submissions

    Interstate (non-chargable).


  2. Rte 8 Seg 2From Route 5 in San Diego to Yuma via El Centro.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was added in 1963 by Chapter 385. See below for 1934-1963 signed Route 8.

    US Highway Shield This is approximately what was previously designated as US 80. The US 80 designation disappeared on July 1, 1964, when the Route 80 designation was reassigned to what was US 40. US 80 as a route dates back to at least 1929.

    Michael Ballard has a page that details the history of the segment between Alpine and Descanso, the plans for a tunnel on US 80 in that area, and the new construction for I-8 that obviated the need for the tunnel. See A TUNNEL ON US 80? for more information.
    (Source: Southern California Regional Rocks & Roads "A Tunnel on US 80?")

    Note: The current I-8 bridge in Yuma was built in 1978. The old US 80 bridge is now the Business Route 8 bridge, and the old old US 80 bridge is a pedestrian bridge. This bridge, the "Ocean to Ocean Highway" bridge, will be reopened to one-lane traffic in the near future to serve traffic visiting the Quechan Reservation.

    Eastbound I-8 follows the alignment of US 80 across Telegraph Pass. Westbound I-8 was constructed on a new alignment. The topography dictated the crossover of the roads, as there was no place to economically place a WB alignment north of the EB roadway. Vestiges of an older US 80 alignment can be seen in the pass west of the Dome Valley TI.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield The portion of this segment between San Diego and El Centro was LRN 12, and was added to the state highway system in 1909. It was signed as US 80.


    US Highway Shield The portion of this segment between El Centro and the Arizona state line was LRN 27, and was added to the state highway system in 1915. Part of this was realigned in 1972 (Chapter 742) near El Centro, with a portion becoming Route 115.

    There is a plank road just off of I-8 (~ 008 IMP 77.651); this it appears to be actually associated with the earlier Southern National Highway, which created the first all-season southern route across the U.S, between Washington, D.C., and San Diego. The named highway had its origins in the early 1910s, and came into prominence in 1915, predating the Old Spanish Trail by more than eight years. To arouse interest in the Pan-Pacific Exposition of 1915, a cross-country caravan set out from San Diego along the Southern National Highway in November 2, 1915, and reached D.C. in 32 days. See the discussion of former US 80 for more information.

    Status Status

    San Diego/El CajonArea

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #3120: Completion of I-5 and I-8 Connectors (~ 008 SD R0.113), San Diego. $4,800,000.

    Lane Additions near I-5:

    Widening bwn 8 and Taylor St - Image adapted from Google MapsIn March 2017, the CTC authorized additional funding for a safety project in San Diego County in San Diego on westbound I-8 from 0.2 mile west of Morena Boulevard to 0.1 mile east of Hotel Circle North interchange ramps (11-SD-8, PM R0.1/2.0). Restripe westbound I-8, add an additional westbound lane, and improve signage. The project is in the City of San Diego and will improve safety and reduce collisions by widening and enhancing striping and signage on westbound I-8 where it approaches Interstate 5 (I-5). The project is south of the San Diego River and the San Diego River bike path runs directly north of and parallel to I-8. The widening will add a westbound lane to I-8 that is supported by a retaining wall that is about 2,100 feet in length. The project is currently in the PS&E phase and is about 65% complete. The Department has expended over $1,967,396 in Support Cost including addressing project scope changes that were unforeseen in the Project Approval & Environmental Document (PA&ED) phase. The requested funds are needed to complete the PS&E phase to address this modified scope. The additional funds are a result of a significant change in the retaining wall design and to minimize the impacts of closing an off-ramp during construction of the project.The project is currently in the PS&E phase and is about 65% complete. The Department has expended over $1,967,396 in Support Cost including addressing project scope changes that were unforeseen in the Project Approval & Environmental Document (PA&ED) phase. The requested funds are needed to complete the PS&E phase to address this modified scope. The additional funds are a result of a significant change in the retaining wall design and to minimize the impacts of closing an off-ramp during construction of the project. During the PA&ED phase, a Standard Plan retaining wall (Type 1) was recommended along westbound I-8 to accommodate the proposed widening. The proposed Type 1 retaining wall was determined based on the existing boring data from nearby locations. The use of a Type 1 retaining wall was identified as a risk in the PA&ED Risk Register, which recommended that geotechnical field investigations be performed in the PS&E phase. The geotechnical field investigations revealed soil conditions and a higher ground water table that differed from the assumed conditions used in the PA&ED phase. Due to the higher water table, a Type 1 retaining wall that supported the base of the fill slope was no longer a viable alternative. As such, the Department evaluated many other special wall type alternatives. After further analysis, these proposed wall type alternatives were rejected due to the fact that the soil is highly liquefiable, which increases the chances of wall failure during a seismic event. Therefore, a Geosynthetically Reinforced Embankment (GRE) Reinforced Slope was selected to support the I-8 widening instead of using the Standard Plan Type 1 retaining wall. Due to the change to the GRE Reinforced Slope, an existing trapezoidal concrete drainage channel needs to be removed and a new rectangular channel needs to be designed. This additional effort will increase the Support Cost for the PS&E phase. The PA&ED phase of the project estimated an 8 week closure to the I-8 westbound Morena Boulevard off ramp. During the PS&E phase the design team concluded that the closure needed to complete the work to realign the ramp to support the widening of the freeway, would need to be a minimum of 6 months. Shortly thereafter, an executive constructability team meeting was conducted to review the project including the potential duration of the ramp closure. The Morena Boulevard off-ramp provides access to the University of San Diego (USD), the Morena Business District and the Linda Vista community and a prolonged closure could cause severe traffic impacts. A revised construction staging concept was developed to provide an interim connection to the Morena Boulevard off ramp which will cut the 6-month duration of the closure in half. This will reduce the severe impacts to the traveling public, USD and the nearby businesses. During the ramp closure, several detour options will be available including use of the preceding off-ramp exiting at Taylor Street. Although the closure of the Morena Boulevard off-ramp was identified in the PA&ED phase, the additional design effort was needed to develop the staging concept that incorporates an interim connection to the Morena Boulevard off ramp. An extensive public outreach effort for the ramp closure will also be required during both the design and construction phases.

    In May 2017, the CTC authorized the above project for future consideration of funding, describing it as a project that proposes to improve safety on I-8 in the city of San Diego by adding one lane, enhanced striping and improved signage (11-SD-8, PM R0.1/2.0). This project is programmed in the 2016 SHOPP for $19,791,000 in construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Interesting Note: With a starting post mile of R0.1, you would expect this to be at the beginning of the route, but instead the regular and R postmiles start at I-5. Postmiles for Segment 1 are L postmiles. On the ending side, there are three difference 2.0 postmile segments, L2.0 on the former Route 109 segment, 2.0 in this segment, and H2.0L and H2.0R, out near Boulder Park, where the route splits.

    In May 2017, the San Diego City Council’s Smart Growth and Land Use Committee approved shaving off the edge of Sefton Park (~ 008 SD R0.827). essentially approving a plan to widen westbound I-8 by one lane between Taylor Street and I-5. Construction of the additional I-8 lane, projected to cost $13 million, is scheduled to start in late 2018 and conclude the following year. Caltrans will oversee and pay the cost of the project. Adding the lane to westbound I-8 requires the city to shave off a small portion of the southeastern part of Sefton Park, which has several baseball fields, a picnic area, a concession stand and parking spots. Removing that land from the park won't impact the ball fields or nearby bike lanes, according to Caltrans, although the bike lanes could be affected during construction (however, access for cyclists will be maintained throughout). The project aims to boost flow for vehicles heading from I-8 onto north I-5.
    (Source: San Diego U-T, 5/19/2017)

    In August 2017, the CTC allocated $15,844,000 for San Diego 11-SD-8 R0.3/1.7 I-8: In the city of San Diego, from 0.1 mile west of Morena Boulevard to 0.5 miles west of Hotel Circle Drive Undercrossing. Outcome/Output: Enhance striping and signage on westbound I-8 and add an additional westbound lane to distribute traffic more evenly approaching the I-5 Connector. The project will reduce the severity and number of traffic collision.

    In June 2018, a fact sheet was published on the "Improve the Move" project, which will construct an additional westbound lane on I-8 between Taylor Street and the I-8/I-5 Interchange to improve traffic safety and operations in the area. The estimated total cost for the project is $22 million including approximately $13 million in construction capital and $173,000 in right-of-way capital. The project is funded by the State Highway Operations Preservation Program. Construction is scheduled to begin in early 2018, with completion in summer 2019.
    (Source: I-8 "Improve the Move" Fact Sheet, June 2018)

    In January 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of San Diego, at the intersection area of Camino Del Rio North and Mission Center Road (11-SD-8-PM 3.08), consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets.

    In February 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of San Diego along Route 8 near Fairmount Avenue/Mission Gorge. on Alvarado Canyon Road west of Mission Gorge Place (11-SD-8-PM 6.6), consisting of reconstructed city streets.

    In May 2016, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Diego along Route 8 on Alvarado Canyon Road, Alvarado Road and 70th Street (11-SD-8-PM 6.7/9.6). The City, by cooperative agreement dated May 3, 2005 and by Amendment No. 1 to the agreement dated December 8, 2009, agreed to waive the 90-day notice requirement and accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    Also, in May 2016, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of La Mesa along Route 8 on Alvarado Road and 70th Street (11-SD-8-PM 9.3/9.8). The City, by cooperative agreement dated January 15, 2002, agreed to waive the 90-day notice requirement and accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    Alpine (E of El Cajon) (~ 008 SD R29.261) to Ocotillo/Route 98 (~ 008 IMP R10.517)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1639: Resurface and construct truck lane at Route 94 and I-8 interchange (~ 008 SD R65.901). $2,400,000.

    Note that for much of this route, there is a parallel road "Old Hwy 80" that is the former state highway.

    Ocotillo/Route 98 (~ 008 IMP R10.517) to El Centro/Route 111 (~ 008 IMP R40.928)

    From the Route 98 separation near Ocotillo, County Sign Route S80 captures the old routing.

    In September 2011, it was reported that the CTC approved $13,600,000 to rehabilitate 40 lane miles of I-8, from the San Diego County Line, near Ocotillo, (~ 008 SD R77.714R/IMP 0.0) eastward to Route 98 in Imperial County (~ 008 IMP R65.719). This project includes improvements to the main road, shoulders and ramp pavement, and dikes in both directions, as well as upgrade metal beam guard rails and end treatments and replace rock fence.

    Imperial Avenue Interchange (11-Imp-08 36.5/37.5)

    Imperial Avenue Interchange (11-Imp-08 36.5/37.5)The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #2861: Construct off ramp at I-8/Imperial Avenue Interchange, El Centro. $2,400,000.

    It was also reported in March 2016 that there is also an interchange upgrade project at I-8 and Business Loop 8 (Imperial Avenue, ~ 008 IMP R36.971) in El Centro that will remove existing trumpet interchange with a new diamond/partial cloverleaf style interchange, which would allow extension of Imperial Avenue south of I-8 and increase development potential south of the freeway. This project is slated to cost $40 million and is scheduled to begin construction next year, at the end of 2017 with completion at the end of 2019. Project Factsheet.
    (Source: Andy3175 @ AAroads, March 2016; Image source: Caltrans Project Page)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to adjust the funding of PPNO 0526 from $37,840K to $42,080K, with the bulk of the work being done in FY19-20. This project is on 11-Imp-08 36.5/37.5, In El Centro, on Route 8 at Imperial Avenue. Reconstruct Interchange. The purpose of this project is to to improve this Interchange from a 2-lane to a 4-lane diamond type OC in the City of El Centro in Imperial County, which would realign the I-8 westbound off and on ramps, reconstruct the eastbound off and on ramps, provide access to Imperial Avenue south of I-8 which is an intregral part of the region's circulation plan, and improve drainage at all quadrants of the interchange. This project is one of the highest priority interchange improvement projects for Imperial County.

    In August 2019, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding of funding the following project for which a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed: 11-Imp-8, PM R36.5/R37.5 I-8 in Imperial County. Reconstruct an existing interchange on I-8 at Imperial Avenue in the city of El Centro. (PPNO 0526). This project is located on I-8 in the city of El Centro in Imperial County. The project proposes to reconstruct the existing interchange at I-8 and Imperial Avenue. The proposed project will realign the westbound exit and entrance ramps to I-8 and reconstruct the eastbound exit and entrance ramps. This project also proposes to replace/upgrade the Imperial Avenue Overcrossing from two lanes to four lanes and to modify/improve drainage. The project addresses the need to accommodate existing and planned growth, improve circulation systems within the city of El Centro, improve traffic safety and accident rates and upgrade drainage that currently does not control flooding. This project was amended into the 2018 State Transportation Improvement Program in March 2018 and is currently programmed for an estimated total of $44.2 million, which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in November 2019. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 STIP.
    (Source: August 2019 CTC Agenda/Minutes, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    In August 2019, the CTC had on its agenda an allocation of $28,656,000 from the Budget Act of 2019, Budget Act Items 2660-301-0042 and 2660-301-0890 for construction and $6,000,000 for construction engineering for the Reconstruct I-8/Imperial Avenue Interchange project (11-IMP-8 36.5/37.5, PPNO 0526 Proj ID 1112000095 EA 41040). (Concurrent future consideration of funding under Resolution E-19-81; 8/14/2019.) (R/W Certification: 05/15/2019) Additional $1,500,000 Right of Way from Imperial County shares.
    (Source: August 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5c.(1))

    In January 2020, it was reported that a two-year project will completely reconstruct the I-8 and Imperial Avenue interchange. Caltrans, in partnership with the Imperial county Transportation Commission and the City of El Centro announced the extensive project in January 2020. Construction will begin late spring or early summer 2020, according to Caltrans. The two-year-project will remove the existing bridge and eastbound on- and off-ramps. The entire structure, as well as on- and off-ramps in both directions will be rebuilt. This new undertaking will include a new entrance loop ramp from southbound Imperial Avenue to eastbound I-8. It will also create access to El Centro's upcoming extension of southbound Imperial Avenue to south of I-8.
    (Source: KYMA, 1/13/2020)

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which appeared to continue the programmed funding for PPNO 0526 "Imperial Av IC, reconstruct". This appears to be all prior year programmed funding.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In May 2020, it was reported that road construction has already begun on the I-8/Imperial Avenue interchange in El Centro and the effects of that work were already being felt by motorists. The project will result in a new interchange that will allow El Centro to extend Imperial Avenue south of the interstate.Construction rolls out in a two-stage process. Initially, both eastbound and westbound on/off ramps of I-8 remain open to traffic. But after July 1, the eastbound on/off ramps will be closed and only the westbound on/off ramps remain open as work proceeds on the southern portion of I-8, which will take approximately 8-10 months. In Stage 2 of construction, the westbound on/off ramps will also be closed beginning late spring-early summer of 2021. Additionally, some work extending Imperial Avenue south, first to Wake Avenue, will occur about the same time. It will require four to six months leading into late 2021. The total expense of the project is $44 million with $42 million funded through the states’ Regional Improvement Program, which has been Imperial County’s share of California Transportation Commission funds over the years. Another $2 million comes from the Federal Highway Priority Projects Program. This project has been on Imperial County’s long-range plan for the past 20 years, but in fact, the total delay has been nearly 50 years. The original proposal to extend Imperial Avenue south when I-8 was first built was halted in the 1970s amid a lawsuit filed by downtown El Centro merchants.
    (Source: Holtville Tribune, 5/8/2020)

    In July 2020, it was reported that the half-a-century old Imperial Avenue interchange on I-8 was reduced to a pile of rubble of cement and rebar on July 24, 2020 in El Centro. The interchange was constructed in 1967 as a business thoroughfare to El Centro. Six excavators with breaker attachments were used to demolish the bridge interchange — beginning on the east side of the bridge.  The I-8/Imperial Avenue Interchange Project will remove the existing bridge and eastbound on- and off-ramps, then reconstruct the structure and the on- and off-ramps in both directions. Construction will include a new entrance loop ramp from southbound Imperial Avenue to eastbound I-8 and create access to the City of El Centro’s upcoming extension of southbound Imperial Avenue to city areas south of I-8.
    (Source: Desert Review, 7/28/2020)

    In August 2020, it was reported that stage 2 work on the northern portion of the interchange is anticipated to take four-to-six months to complete and could begin as early as December 2020. During this stage, all I-8/Imperial Avenue on- and off-ramps will be fully closed. The project will be executed in two phases. The first phase will demolish the existing bridge and construct the new Imperial Avenue Bridge. This phase will include all the work involved on the south side of I-8 and a portion of the north side. This phase began in May and is scheduled to be completed by October of 2021. The second phase will remove the westbound on/off ramps and is scheduled to begin in January 2021. The entire construction project is scheduled to be completed in October 2021. During the course of the project, the I-8 freeway will be subjected to full freeway closures. The bridge removal closure has already occurred, but the second full freeway closure is scheduled for January 2021 to install false work for the new bridge. The last closure is set to take place June 2021 to remove falsework. Crews will install approximately 5,400 linear ft. of a new storm drain system. The first phase will be installed in November 2020 and phase two will be installed in April 2021.
    (Source: Construction Equipment Guide, 8/25/2020)

    Dogwood Road Interchange

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #950: Widen I-8 overpass at Dogwood Road, Imperial (~ 008 IMP R38.968). $1,698,000.

    In January 2014, the CTC authorized $16,699,000 to improve the Dogwood Road interchange near El Centro (~ 008 IMP R38.968). 

    In March 2016, it was reported that there is an Interchange upgrade project at I-8 and Dogwood Road near El Centro (~ 008 IMP R38.968) that will include traffic signals, wider offramps, wider Dogwood Road, and new overcrossing at a cost of $28.1 million. Construction is underway current and should be completed by October 2016. For more information: Project Factsheet.
    (Source: Andy3175 @ AAroads, March 2016)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1557: Improve I-8 offramp at Ocotillo to the Imperial Valley College Desert Museum/Regional Traveler Visitor Center, Imperial County (~ 008 IMP R40.924). $800,000.

    El Centro/Route 111 (~ 008 IMP R40.928) to Arizona State Line near Yuma

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #2352: Improve I-8 off ramp to the Desert Farming Institute, Imperial County near Calexico (seemingly ~ 008 IMP R40.928). $800,000.
    • High Priority Project #3285: Improve access from I-8 and construct parking lot for the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area Visitor’s Center, Imperial Valley. $800,000.

    I-8 Update Project.

    El Centro WideningIn March 2016, it was reported that the I-8 Update Project (between Route 111 and Arizona State Line) began in February 2016 and will end in December 2017 (first of five phases is just outside of Holtville). It will replace 48 miles of mostly original concrete lanes with new Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement (CRCP) lanes and shoulders that is expected to last for the next 75 years at a cost of $417.7 million. For more information: Caltrans Factsheet.
    (Source: Andy3175 @ AAroads, March 2016)

    In September 2016, it was reported that ieavy construction work along I-8 in California between the Arizona state line and El Centro will be affecting drivers for some time to come, with the 7-mile segment just west of Yuma expected to be down to one lane in each direction until toward the end of 2017. As of September 2016, Eastbound ramps at Algodones and the currently closed westbound ramps where Fourth Avenue meets the freeway just across the Colorado River were expected to be reopened by the end of 2016. California began work in summer 2016 on the three-year process of reconstructing I-8 through the Imperial Valley, replacing the existing pavement on the road and shoulders with continually reinforced concrete pavement, expected to be a longer-lasting surface requiring fewer repairs. The total project cost is $417.7 million. As part of the process, steel bars are inserted underneath the roadway underneath the concrete to provide reinforcement when the surface starts to crack. Three sections of the interstate were under construction in Fall 2016, including "Segment Three," which begins at the edge of Yuma and ends at the Agricultural Inspection Station 6.8 miles to the west. Segment Two is between the Gordons Well Road exit on the east and extends just past the ramps at Route 98, the first exit toward Calexico. Segment One is from the Route 115 exit on the east (Holtville exit) and extends past Route 7 on the west. Both are about 10 miles long. Work will start in March 2017 for Segments Four and Five, which are actually three pieces between the Agricultural Checkpoint and Ogilby Road, Route 98 and Route 115, and east of Route 111. The segment which goes through the Imperial Sand Dunes will not be affected. While the highway surface is being redone, it's necessary to put both directions of traffic onto one two-lane side of the road or the other, leading to single-lane driving and slower traffic for people heading to and from the coast on the weekend.
    (Source: Yuma Sun, 9/23/2016)

    In May 2017, it was reported that Caltrans said it will close westbound I-8 ramps at Algodones Road/Route 186 beginning in early May 2017 due to ongoing construction. Signs will be in place to alert motorists to the ramp closures and alternate routes. The closures and detours will be in place through August. These closures are part of a major pavement rehabilitation project consisting of five segments that will construct Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement (CRCP) over 48 miles on I-8 in Imperial County. The work will result in a long-lasting superior roadway, capable of withstanding the heaviest traffic loads. Construction began in 2016 on three of the five segments. The remaining two segments will begin work in 2017. Work will be completed by 2019.
    (Source: KYMA-11, 5/8/2017)

    In July 2017, it was reported that a five-mile section of I-8 would reduced to one lane in each direction from approximately one-half mile west of Route 111 (Route 111) to one-half mile east of Barbara Worth Drive. The lane reductions on this section will be in place for about a year as crews work on Segment 4 of the I-8 Update Project. Construction of this final segment began in July and will cover nearly 15 miles along two sections of I-8. The first section of Segment 4 is located just west of Route 111 to just west of Anderholt Road. The second section is located one-half mile east of East Highline Canal Bridge to just west of the junction at Route 98/I-8 separation. The I-8 Update is a major pavement rehabilitation project consisting of five segments that will construct Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement (CRCP) over 48 miles on I-8 in Imperial County. The work will result in a long-lasting superior roadway, capable of withstanding the heaviest traffic loads. Construction began in 2016 and will be completed by 2019.
    (Source: KYMA-11, 7/19/2017)

    In August 2016, it was reported that there appear to be some unrelinquished 8U miles in Winterhaven. According to CalTrans Postmile Services site, it runs 0.211 miles from just north of I-8 Exit 172 to the state line just before the bridge. Its postmiles are either related to those for I-8 or US-80 (I'm guessing the latter), running from T96.546 to 96.946. It appears to be the only portion of Business Route 8 in Winterhaven that's under state control still.

    Business Routes Business Routes

    • San Diego: Hotel Circle Drive (1960s)
    • San Diego: Washington Avenue, El Cajon Blvd
    • El Cajon: El Cajon Blvd, Main Street, County Business Route 8.
    • Alpine: Alpine Road.
    • El Centro: Imperial Avenue, Adamas Avenue (Route 86/County Sign Route S80), Fourth Avenue
    • Winterhaven: Winterhaven Road, Fourth Avenue, 32nd Street

    Naming Naming

    Within metropolitan San Diego, this freeway appears to be named either the "Mission Valley" or "Mission Freeway", although at one time it appears to have been named the "Alvorado Freeway". None of these are official names. The Mission Valley name areas because the freeway traverses Mission Valley.

    Officer Donna P MauzyThe portion of this route from Route 67 (~ 008 SD 15.744) to Greenfield Drive (~ 008 SD R18.76) in the City of El Cajon is named the Donna P. Mauzy Memorial Freeway. It was named after Officer Donna P. Mauzy, a City of San Diego Police Officer who was killed while driving on Interstate Highway 8 in the City of El Cajon, on her way to work, the morning of June 23, 2001. The driver of the vehicle causing the accident was arrested on the scene, on suspicion of vehicular manslaughter and felony driving while under the influence of alcohol. Officer Donna P. Mauzy was an admired and respected veteran of the San Diego Police Department. She also had served as a police officer for the City of El Cajon. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 93, Chapter 127, September 24, 2001.
    (Image Source: San Diego Police Museum)

    Between El Cajon's Eastern Boundary (~ 008 SD R19.157) and the Imperial County boundary (~ 008 SD R77.714R/IMP 0.0), this route has been officially designated the "Kumeyaay" Highway. The people of the Kumeyaay Indian Nation, once referred to as Diegueno by the Spanish, are the original native inhabitants of San Diego County and have lived in that region for more than 10,000 years. Historically, the Kumeyaay greeted the Spanish when they first sailed into San Diego harbor with the Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo expedition of 1542. The boundaries of the Kumeyaay lands changed with the arrival of the Europeans, but once extended from the Pacific Ocean, south to Ensenada in Baja Norte, Mexico, east to the sand dunes of the Colorado River in Imperial Valley and north to Warner Springs Valley. The Kumeyaay had a sophisticated social, political, and religious structure and were wise stewards of the land and natural resources. The original trails through the mountains and connecting desert and the coast and inlands were cleared and used by the Kumeyaay, some of which evolved into current freeways in San Diego and Imperial Counties. Today Kumeyaay tribal governments have jurisdiction over approximately 70,000 acres of federal trust land concentrated in reservations in East County from El Cajon, Lakeside, Poway, and Ramona to the desert, and the nation is represented by 13 separate bands, those being the Barona, Campo, Cuyapaipe, Inaja-Cosmit, Jamul, LaPosta, Los Coyotes, Manzanita, Mesa Grande, San Pasqual, Santa Ysabel, Sycuan, and Viejas Bands. The named portion of the route approximates a named indian trail. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 57, Chapter 112, in 1997. The designation was extended to Nimitz Boulevard in Mission Bay by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 156, Chapter 90, on June 27, 2002.

    Jimmy ArevaloThe portion of I-8 between post-miles R27.30 and R28.46 in the County of San Diego is named the Jimmy A. Arevalo Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of Jimmy A. Arevalo, born in 1952 in Calexico. Mr. Arevalo graduated from Calexico High School in 1971, served in the United States Army and was honorably discharged in 1972, attended Imperial Valley College and later San Diego State University, receiving an associate of arts degree and a bachelor’s degree in liberal studies, respectively, received his teaching credential in 1978, subsequently was awarded a master’s degree in public administration from San Diego State University in 1980, and received a community college instructor credential from the California Community Colleges. Mr. Arevalo began his lifetime teaching career at Dool Elementary School in the Calexico Unified School District on January 3, 1978, where he taught for 34 years, most recently as a fifth grade teacher. Mr. Arevalo also taught at Imperial Valley College as an adjunct instructor in the English Department, and was employed by the Imperial County Office of Education as a migrant education principal for the Heber Migrant Summer School Program. Mr. Arevalo has been recognized for his leadership skills and outstanding service to the St. Mary’s 4-H Club, Heber Migrant Program, El Centro Elementary School District Migrant Program, Imperial Valley College, and Calexico Unified School Districtd. Mr. Arevalo was known for his interest in aerodynamics, rocketry, and woodworking, among other things, was always willing to lend someone a helping hand, and was always encouraging his students to continue with their education. On June 11, 2012, Mr. Arevalo was tragically killed in a multivehicle crash on State Highway Route 8 near Alpine in the County of San Diego involving a suspected drunk driver. In order to keep Mr. Arevalo’s spirit alive, the Calexico Educational Foundation established a scholarship in order to grant funding to a Calexico High School senior who has been admitted to a four-year accredited university or college, through the Jimmy A. Arevalo Memorial Scholarship. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 51, August 5, 2013. Resolution Chapter 65.
    (Image Sources: Legacy.Com; San Diego Jewish World, 4/21/2016)

    Here are more details on Mr. Arevalo: “There was a young girl, Angela Cherene August, 25. She was a valedictorian student in high school, and she was graduating from UCSD summa cum laude. She was just a week away from graduation. She went out dancing and she got drunk, the alcohol in her blood testing at .12. She crashed and came to rest in the fast lane on her roof. A Good Samaritan, Jimmy Arevalo, a teacher from El Centro, pulled his truck up, got out, and was trying to assist her. He was on 911 talking to our dispatcher, and while he was doing that, another drunk driver doing 80 miles an hour, with no braking apparatus, killed both Arevalo and the girl. The dispatcher heard it all on the radio. ‘I’m over here – Oh my God!’ and the lights went out. The driver who killed them had moved here from Washington, was here only a month, had no license, no insurance, and several drug convictions. She was driving to a casino. Now she is serving 9 ½ years in state prison on a plea bargain. Mrs. Arevalo says her husband was killed by two drunk drivers: the first being the girl who started the whole chain of events, and then the next driver.
    (Source: San Diego Jewish World, 4/21/2016)

    Rosas Memorial SignThe portion of Route 8 between post mile R51.000 and post mile R53.5000 in the County of San Diego is officially designated the "Border Patrol Agent Robert W. Rosas Jr. Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of United States Border Patrol Agent Robert W. Rosas Jr., who was born and raised in El Centro, California, and was often referred to as the "Mayor of El Centro" because of his popularity and friendly, witty demeanor. Agent Rosas graduated from Central Union High School in 1997 where he met his future wife, Rosalie. Prior to becoming a United States Border Patrol Agent, Agent Rosas worked as a correctional officer for six years at Centinela State Prison, in addition to serving two years as a reserve police officer for the El Centro Police Department. Agent Rosas began his career with the United States Border Patrol on May 22, 2006, as a member of the 621st Session of the Border Patrol Academy. Around his fellow agents at the Campo Station, Agent Rosas was known for his enthusiasm and sound work ethic in carrying out his sworn duties. His leadership skills were also evident through his efforts in organizing and managing the station's softball team. On July 23, 2009, Agent Rosas was working near the United States-Mexico international border near Campo, California, and was responding to suspected illegal cross-border activity when fellow agents heard multiple gun shots. After a brief search, Agent Rosas was found lying on the ground, mortally wounded. It was later determined that Rosas’ killers lured him into the brush in the remote borderland to rob him of his night vision goggles and other equipment. A suspect was later identified, tried, and convicted in the murder. Agent Rosas was 30 years old at the time of his death. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 37, Resolution Chapter 54, on July 14, 2011. Unveiling of the signs memorializing Rosas were part of a ceremony at the Campo Border Patrol Station on April 13, 2012.
    (Image Sources: OC Register, 4/17/2012; US CBP)

    Irene B RiosThe westbound segment of Route 8, between westbound postmile R4.60 and R6.60, in the County of Imperial, as the "Deputy Probation Officer Irene B. Rios Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Deputy Probation Officer Irene Beatrice Rios of the Imperial County Probation Department (ICPD), who died in the line of duty on August 13, 2008, who was the first female peace officer to die in the line of duty in Imperial County. Deputy Probation Officer Irene Rios was born in Brawley on July 20, 1980, to Emilio and Elisabet Rios. She grew up in Holtville, where she also attended local schools. After graduating from Holtville High School in 1998, she pursued her education at Imperial Valley College in Imperial, and two years later, transferred to San Diego State University, Imperial Valley Campus, where she received a bachelor of science degree in criminal justice administration with a minor in psychology/ Shortly thereafter, Deputy Probation Officer Irene Rios began working for the Betty Jo McNeece Receiving Home in 2002, where she worked until she was hired as Deputy Probation Officer for the Juvenile Division in January 2005. She graduated from Probation Officer Core Academy during her first year of employment. Her love for helping families and youth began when she started working at the receiving home where she found a balance of her two wishes of working in law enforcement and of working with children. In keeping Deputy Probation Officer Irene Rios' spirit alive, her brothers and sisters in law enforcement formed the 718 Foundation in order to grant scholarships to students from local, low-income families to promote professional, academic, or artistic achievement through the Irene B. Rios Memorial Scholarship. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 66, Resolution Chapter 99, on September 22, 2011.
    (Image Source: Officer Down Memorial Page)

    Jaime ObesoThe portion of I-8 in the City of El Centro (~ 008 IMP R36.432/R39.527) is named the "Caltrans Highway Maintenance Leadworker Jaime Obeso Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Jaime Garcia Obeso, of the City of Imperial, who passed away on June 7, 2011, when he was struck by an errant motorist while working on a stretch of Route 8 near the Sunbeam Rest Area for the Department of Transportation (Caltrans). Jaime Obeso was born to Gregorio and Magdalena Obeso on January 25, 1958, in El Centro, California. He attended Ben Hulse Elementary, Frank Wright Junior High, and Imperial High School. While at Imperial High School, he excelled in football and track, holding records in pole vault, and 4x100 relay. Jaime Obeso worked for H.E. Wiggins and Sons for many years and later gained employment with Caltrans. He was known as a hard working employee and he received many awards during his service with Caltrans. His last promotion was as a Leadworker with the El Centro Travelway Crew. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 52, Resolution Chapter 94, on September 15, 2011.
    (Image Source: Legacy.Com Obituary)

    James D SchultzThe portion of this route between Gordon's Well Road (~ 008 IMP R73.495) and Brock Research Center Road (~ 008 IMP R68.825) in Imperial County is named the "James D. Schultz Freeway". This segment was named in memory of California Highway Patrol (CHP) Officer James D. Schultz, a dedicated officer, who was killed in the line of duty at the age of 46 years while conducting an abandoned vehicle check on westbound I-8 between Gordon's Well Road and Brock Research Center Road in Imperial County. Officer Schultz, while conducting his investigation, was struck by an errant, sleepy driver during the late evening of November 15, 1996, and died in the early morning hours on November 16 as a result of injuries sustained in the collision. After graduating from Fredonia High School on June 23, 1968, in Fredonia, New York, Officer Schultz enlisted in the United States Army on August 19, 1968. He bravely served his country, including a one-year assignment in Vietnam, and received an honorable discharge from the United States Army on August 18, 1971. He began his career with CHP on January 31, 1972, and proudly served the State of California in the South Los Angeles, Oakland, El Centro, Garberville, Barstow, Bridgeport, and Winterhaven CHP areas. Officer Schultz was known by his fellow officers for his dedication to CHP and to the protection of the people of California. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 21, Resolution Chapter 87, on 7/10/2007.
    (Image Source: California Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

    Robert F DickeyThe segment of I-8, between Sidewinder Road (~ 008 IMP R88.702) and Ogilby Road (~ 008 IMP R83.834), in the Town of Winterhaven in the County of Imperial, is designated the "Officer Robert Franklin Dickey Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of CHP Officer Robert Franklin Dickey who was killed in the line of duty on June 10, 2007. Officer Dickey graduated from the CHP Academy on February 22, 2002, and was assigned to the central Los Angeles area. On May 1, 2003, Officer Dickey transferred to the Winterhaven area. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 80, Resolution Chapter 70, on 7/3/2008.
    (Image Source: California Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

    The entire route (from San Diego to the Arizona state line) has also been designated the "Border Friendship Route". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 104, Chapter 254, in 1968.

    Named Structures Named Structures

    State Senator Jack Schrade (R-Del Mar)Bridge 57-720, the I-8/I-805 interchange in San Diego county (~ 008 SD 4.014/SD 4.773), is named the "Jack Schrade Interchange/Mission Valley Viaduct". It was built in 1973, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 41, Chapter 101, in 1972. California State Senator Jack Schrade (R-Del Mar, 1963-1976) was a delegate to Republican National Convention from California in 1964. During the UC Berkeley student uprisings in the 1960s, Sen. Schrade called for dismissal of professors and expulsion of students who have taken part in Free Speech Movement activities, going so far as to draft a proposed constitutional amendment to require similar disciplinary action in the event of future demonstrations. Sen. Schrade also provided support for environmental causes. As chairman of the Senate Rules Committee in 1970, he introduced Senate Resolution No. 137, that officially established May 15 at Peace Officers' Memorial Day.
    (Image Source: Our Campaigns)

    Danielle Van DamThe overpass on I-8 at 2nd Street in El Cajon (~ 008 SD 17.36) is named the "Danielle van Dam Memorial Overpass." Named after Danielle Nicole van Dam, a young child abducted from her bedroom, and for whom the search, story, and subsequent trial garnered national attention. Danielle was born on September 22, 1994, in Plano, Texas. Her favorite colors were pink and purple and she enjoyed writing in her journals, ballet, gymnastics, Girl Scouts, and playing with her brothers and with friends. When she was seven, Danielle's family was planning a trip to Italy which was to take place on February 9, 2002, but before this could happen, on February 2, 2002, Danielle was abducted from her bedroom by a neighbor. A search center was put together by the Laura Recovery Center and over 2,000 people volunteered to search for Danielle. On February 27, 2002, Danielle's body was found on Dehesa Road in El Cajon, near I-8. Wikipedia has more details on the sad story. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 73, Chaptered 7/2/2003, Chapter 86.
    (Image Source: San Diego Jewish World, 4/7/2016; Wikipedia)

    Nello Irwing Greer TombstoneThe Pine Valley Creek Bridge (008 SD R041.70) is named the "Nello Irwin Greer Memorial Bridge". This segment was named in memory of Nello Irwin Greer. Greer was born on March 9, 1922, in Phoenix, Arizona and, after briefly residing in Victorville, California, moved to St. Johns, Arizona where he spent his formative years. Mr. Greer fought during World War II, serving with General George S. Patton, Jr. at the Battle of the Bulge. After returning from the war, Mr. Greer began his career with the Department of Transportation (Caltrans) in 1948, advancing to an engineering position and working on many state freeway projects in San Bernardino, California. In 1960, Mr. Greer moved to District 11 in San Diego, California, where he lived until retiring from Caltrans in 1977, and some of his projects there include Route 163 from I-8 north to the Geneese exit, the design of the first bridge on Friars Road with 13 lanes of traffic, as well as various other projects throughout the county. The Pine Valley Project was by far the most incredible of Mr. Greer's projects; while Caltrans wanted the project's freeway to run through the town of Pine Valley, California, Mr. Greer moved the project to the location where it currently exists, overcoming numerous obstacles to complete it. One such obstacle was the design of a new bridge that was over 800 feet high, and Mr. Greer suggested its construction as a hollow bridge. The construction of the bridge in the Pine Valley Project received many engineering awards, and the projected removals and quantities to finish the Pine Valley Project along with the tightest budget in Caltrans history, earned Mr. Greer many awards and recognition throughout the country. After retiring, Mr. Greer worked for an engineering company that sent him all over the world designing and supervising the projects that he had designed, including the Glenwood Canyon Project (Interstate 70) in Glenwood, Colorado, that, was named the eighth man-made wonder of the world. Mr. Greer died on August 15, 2002. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 33, Resolution Chapter 89, on 7/10/2007. At the time of its construction, it was the first bridge constructed in the United States using the segmental balanced cantilever method. The northern span is 1,691 ft long while the southern span is 1,741 ft long. The two spans rise 450 ft above the valley floor, placing Pine Valley Creek Bridge among the highest bridges in the United States.
    (Image Source: Find a Grave)

    Sgt Brud Joseph CronkriteThe overpass on I-8 at Buckman Springs Road (008 SD R048.84R) in Pine Valley is named the "Army Sergeant Brud Joseph Cronkrite Memorial Bridge." This segment was named in memory of SGT Brud Joseph Cronkrite. Cronkrite was born on June 24, 1981, in El Cajon at El Cajon Valley Hospital. He moved to Potrero, California, with his parents in December of 1994, at the age of 13, and fell in love with the family' s 11-acre property, which he dreamed of someday inheriting and living at with his future family. Brud attended Mount Empire High School and was on the wrestling team. Brud joined the United States Army in March of 2001, attended boot camp and special training at Fort Knox, graduating with honors and receiving an excellent in marksmanship, and knew that he had found his calling in life. He was stationed at Camp Casey in South Korea for one year, and was then assigned to the 1st Battalion, 37th Armor, 1st Armored Division, in Friedberg, Germany, and he served in Iraq for one year. Brud's Division was scheduled to come home when their assignment in Iraq was extended by the President. Three weeks after this extension, Brud died in Baghdad, Iraq, on May 14, 2004, at the age of 22 years, from injuries that he sustained on May 13, 2004, in Karbala, when a rocket-propelled grenade fired into a building near him during a security patrol. Brud was awarded the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart, and is buried at the Fort Rosencrans Cemetary. Brud was the 775th American soldier killed in the Iraq War and he and his family gave the ultimate sacrifice to keep all Americans safe. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 32, Resolution Chapter 95, on 7/12/2007.
    (Image Source: Casper Star Tribune, 5/28/2012)

    Eric N CabralThe Round Mountain Bridge located between Postmile R072.55 and Postmile R072.57 on I-8 in the County of San Diego is named the "Border Patrol Agent Eric Norman Cabral Memorial Bridge". It was named in memory of Border Patrol Agent Eric Norman Cabral, who was born in 1976 in San Diego, California. Agent Cabral was active in sports and athletics and graduated from Morse High School in 1994. His passion for health and fitness led him to obtain a Bachelors Degree of Science in Kinesiology from the San Diego State University in 2001 and a Master’s Degree of Science in Physical Education from Azusa Pacific University in 2003. Before joining the Border Patrol, Agent Cabral worked as an Exercise Physiologist at US Spine and Sport in San Diego. He later became the Assistant Fitness Director, as well as a professor, at Southwestern College where he taught health and fitness classes for three years. In September 2005, he joined the United States Border Patrol and graduated with the 601st Academy Session in February 2006. On July 26, 2007, Agent Cabral died from heat-related injuries after tracking a group of suspected undocumented immigrants on foot. Agent Cabral was found unconscious along the Carrizo Gorge Railway railroad tracks, near the south entrance to the De Anza Springs Resort, about one-half mile north of I-8. He was flown to Sharp Grossmont Hospital in San Diego via Mercy Air, where, tragically, Agent Cabral was pronounced dead. Agent Cabral was the fourth Border Patrol agent to die in the line of duty during 2007. Agent Cabral’s death is a reminder of the dangers that agents face every day while securing America’s borders and protecting its people. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 99, Res. Chapter 39, on 05/30/14.
    (Image Sources: US CBP Article on Dedication; US CBP EOW)

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Buckman Springs, in San Diego County, 3.3 mi. E of Pine Valley (~ 008 SD R47.965). This was named due to its location near Buckman Springs. Buckman Springs appears to have been named after the Buckman family that lived in the area. NOTICE: THE RV DUMP STATION AT THIS LOCATION WAS CLOSED PERMANENTLY ON 09/14/2016.
    • Jaime ObesoSunbeam, in Imperial County, 6 mi W of El Centro (~ 008 IMP R31.242). This rest area is officially named the "Jaime Obeso Sunbeam Rest Area". It was named in memory of Jaime Garcia Obeso, of the City of Imperial, who passed away on June 7, 2011, when he was struck by an errant motorist while working on a stretch of Route 8 near the Sunbeam Rest Area for the Department of Transportation (Caltrans). Jaime Obeso was born to Gregorio and Magdalena Obeso on January 25, 1958, in El Centro, California. He attended Ben Hulse Elementary, Frank Wright Junior High, and Imperial High School. While at Imperial High School, he excelled in football and track, holding records in pole vault, and 4x100 relay. Jaime Obeso worked for H.E. Wiggins and Sons for many years and later gained employment with Caltrans. He was known as a hard working employee and he received many awards during his service with Caltrans. His last promotion was as a Leadworker with the El Centro Travelway Crew. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 52, Resolution Chapter 94, on September 15, 2011.
      (Image Source: Jaime Obeso Memorial FB Page; Legacy.Com Obituary)
    • Sand Hills, in Imperial County, 20 mi W of the Arizona State Line (~ 008 IMP 80.249).

    Historical Route Historical Route

    US Highway Shield ACR 123 (Resolution Chapter 104, 8/16/2006) designated segments of former U.S. Highway Route 80 in San Diego and Imperial Counties as Historic U.S. Highway Route 80, and requested the Department of Transportation to design and facilitate the posting of appropriate signs and take related actions in that regard. The resolution noted that US 80, largely parallel to current I-8, was a 180-mile highway spanning San Diego and Imperial Counties from San Diego Bay to the Colorado River, and played a major role in the development of this state during much of the 20th century. In 1909, California voters approved a statewide bond measure for road improvement purposes in the amount of $18 million, providing, among other things, funds to construct a road between San Diego and Imperial Counties, and their county seats of San Diego and El Centro. In 1915, a unique wood plank road was built over the Imperial Valley sand hills, resulting in a shorter route. In 1925, the federal government became involved in standardized highway route designations across the nation and even numbers were assigned to major highways running east and west, and odd numbers for highway running north and south. The numbering of highways proceeded in numerical order beginning in the north and east and continuing south and west, respectively, and, as a result, the routing along California's southern border was formally designated as US 80. This road, from San Diego to Tybee Island, Georgia, was adopted as US 80 on November 11, 1926. US 80 was the first ocean-to-ocean transcontinental highway to be completed, and portions of the route were known as the Bankhead, Broadway of America, Dixie, Lee, Old Spanish Trail, and Southern Transcontinental Highway.

    INTERSTATE

    This portion approved as chargeable Interstate on 7/7/1947. There was an adjustment E of San Diego in August 1965. In August 1957 this was proposed as I-8. In December 1957, the California Department of Highways proposed designating this as I-10, following a recommendation from Arizona. This was rejected by AASHTO, and this went back to the I-8 designation.

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.3] From Route 5 to Route 98 near Coyote Wells.


Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Diego 8 L0.71 R0.00
San Diego 8 R0.00 R0.11
San Diego 8 R0.18 5.18
San Diego 8 5.37 6.52
San Diego 8 6.79 8.12
San Diego 8 8.20 12.86
San Diego 8 12.94 13.26
San Diego 8 14.38 R18.21
San Diego 8 R18.43 R18.92
Imperial 8 R36.46 R38.48

Exit Information Exit Information

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, Route 8 was signed along the route from Stockton to the California-Nevada State Line near Woodfords, via Jackson. In 1964, the portion running (1) from Stockton to Route 12 near Valley Springs via Linden and Bellota, and then (2) from Route 12 near Fosteria through Mokelumne Hill was resigned as Route 26. This routing was LRN 5.

The remainder of 1934 Route 8, running from Route 49 near Jackson to Woodfords (near the Nevada state line) through Pine Gr., Cooks Sta., and through Carson Pass, was resigned as Route 88 by at least 1948. The portion between Woodfords and the Nevada State Line was cosigned with Route 4 until 1963. It was LRN 34.

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

National Trails National Trails

Interstate Shield De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.


US Highway Shield Atlantic-Pacific Highway Sign This route (as US 80) was part of the "Atlantic-Pacific Highway".

US Highway Shield Old Spanish Trail Sign This route (as US 80) was part of the "Old Spanish Trail".

Dixie Overland Highway Sign Lee Highway Sign Bankhead Highway Sign Lone Star Trail Sign This route (as US 80) appears to have been part of the "Bankhead Highway", the "Dixie Overland Highway", the "Lee Highway", and the "Lone Star Trail".

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 8:

Blue Star Memorial Highway Blue Star Memorial Highway

The portion of this route from San Diego to the Arizona state line was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 62, Ch. 107 in 1961.

Interregional Route Interregional Route

[SHC 164.10] Entire route.

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The routing that would become LRN 8 was defined in the first highway bond act of 1909, running from Ignacio to Cordelia via Napa. By 1935, it had been codified into the highway code without change:

From Ignacio to Cordelia via Napa

The entire route was a primary route.

In 1937, Chapter 841 changed "Cordelia" to "[LRN 7] near Cordelia". In 1961, the description was relaxed to read “[LRN 1] (US 101) near Novato to [LRN 7] near Cordelia via the vicinity of Napa”.

Starting from US 101 (LRN 1), LRN 8 was signed as Route 37 until the present Route 37/Route 121 junction. It then continued N signed as Route 37 (post-1964 Route 121) to Shellville, continuing easterly towards Napa cosigned as Route 12/Route 37 (post 1964 Route 121). From Napa S, it was cosigned as Route 12/Route 29 (present-day Route 221), until Route 29 diverged. LRN 8 continued signed as Route 12 to Cordelia, where it joined with US 40 (LRN 7).


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 7 Forward Arrow Route 9

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