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Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 148

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

  1. Rte 148 Seg 1Unconstructed From Route 5 near Sacramento to Route 143 south of Route 16.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, the entirety of Route 148 was defined as "Route 5 near Sacramento to Route 143 south of Route 16." Segment (b) was added in 1985.

    This was a proposed routing, and was LRN 248, defined in 1959, between LRN 238 (I-5) and LRN 247 (proposed Route 143). It is reported that Consumes River Road is an approximate routing for this, but it is not an adopted routing. Caltrans is apparently involved, however, with a street extension along Consumes River Road (for more information, see the entry for I-5). The following is from the approval for the I-5/Consumes River Road interchange:

    Construction of the I-5/Cosumnes River Boulevard interchange was originally identified in a study of the Route 148 corridor conducted by the Department in the early 1960s. On February 27, 1963, the Department adopted the Route 148 freeway corridor segment between I-5 and Route 99. In 1974, the Commission withdrew the freeway designation of Route 148 due to financial constraints.

    In a memorandum dated July 1, 1974, the County of Sacramento’s Department of Public Works recommended that the City of Sacramento maintain the adopted route as an east-west transportation corridor that would be less than freeway status. The City of Sacramento then embarked on the necessary steps to begin preserving right-of-way within the Route 148 corridor.

    On November 4, 1981, the Sacramento City Council certified an Environmental Impact Report for the Route 148 Arterial Plan and adopted the route alignment for the arterial. That approval allowed the City to begin reserving the right-of-way for the future development of Route 148 and to construct segments of the approved route as funds became available. After approval of the Route 148 Arterial Plan, the name of the proposed facility was changed to Cosumnes River Boulevard. The names Route 148 and Cosumnes River Boulevard are synonymous and refer to the same proposed facility within the city of Sacramento.

    The freeway route adoption was rescinded in 1975. The City of Scramento planned an arterial street (Consumes River Road) within the alignment; this precluded any state construction. E of Route 99, the city included a short portion of Calvine Road. As of 2002, Caltrans was recommending deleting the route from the state highway system.

    Status Status

    Cosumnes River Boulevard Extension

    In March 2006, Sacramento released its draft environmental analysis for its planned $80 million Cosumnes River Boulevard extension. The project would extend Cosumnes River Boulevard from its current end point at Franklin Boulevard west to I-5 with a major interchange, and a short distance farther to Freeport Boulevard. Officials said construction is targeted to start in 2008, with a finish date in 2010.

    According to an article in the Sacramento Bee, SACOG (Sacramento Area Council of Governments) is exploring a 30-plus-mile route that would start at I-5 in the south, head east across Route 99 in Elk Grove, and angle up the east county to US 50 in El Dorado County, skirting the edges of Rancho Cordova and Folsom. They are exploring the name "Cosumnes Parkway." The most often mentioned potential alignment would be along an extension of Kammerer Road between I-5 and Route 99, then along Grant Line Road and a straightened White Rock Road. Tuttle said the road would be four lanes, with a limited number of intersections. It probably would have an overpass at Highway 16. Chris Sampang guesses this might be a revival of Route 148.

    In May 2013, it was reported that the Cosumnes River Boulevard Extension and I-5 Interchange Project had broken ground. The project will provide east-west connectivity between Route 99 and I-5, as well as open up room for an 800-acre Delta Shores development. The cost is about $82M. Sacramento officials say this project is expected to take around two years complete and should be finished by 2015. The project will also include more traffic lanes, on street bike lanes, and provide access to two future regional transit light rail stations to Cosumnes River College.
    (Source: CBS Sacramento, 5/2/13)

    In May 2015, it was reported that the new Cosumnes River interchange with I-5, just one mile south of Meadowview Road, opened for traffic on May 4 2015. The Cosumnes River Boulevard Extension project from I-5 to Franklin Boulevard is scheduled to be open for traffic by fall 2015.
    (Source: Project Page)

    In December 2015, it was reported that the 3-plus-mile, $95 million Cosumnes River Boulevard extension opened, offering a major, new east-west connector between Route 99 and I-5. The road, which alternates between four and six lanes, connects from Franklin Road to Freeport Boulevard and includes a major interchange at I-5 near the town of Freeport, just south of the Meadowview and Pocket areas of Sacramento. The new road and interchange also pave the way for construction of Delta Shores, a major shopping center and residential community – the biggest Sacramento has seen since the North Natomas area opened 15 years ago.
    (Source: Sac Bee, 12/15/2015)

    Capital Southeast Connector

    Capitol Southeast ConnectorIn August 2010, Sen. Feinstein requested funding for the Capital Southeast Connector, a proposed 37-mile downtown Sacramento bypass, from I-5 in Elk Grove to US 50 in El Dorado Hills. The requested funding would support the construction of an initial phase in the City of Elk Grove at Route 99, which will be completed in 2012. The total cost of the Elk Grove segment is $36 million, towards which the City has secured $34 million. This is approximately the Route 148 routing.
    (Image source: Capitol SE Connector JPA Website)

    The project is divided into a number of segments:
    (Source: Capitol SE Connector Findings of Fact Statement of Overriding Consideration)

    • A new four-lane expressway segment from the I-5/Hood Franklin Road interchange, east along an extension of Kammerer Road to the existing Kammerer Road/Bruceville Road intersection, with at-grade signalized intersections  (spaced at a minimum of one mile apart) at Franklin Boulevard, Willard Parkway and Bruceville Road. These intersections would be converted to grade-separated interchanges as required by traffic volumes and LOS conditions (A2/A2);
    • A four-to six-lane thoroughfare segment east on Kammerer Road from its intersection with Bruceville Road to the  Route 99 interchange, and then northeast on Grant Line Road to  its intersection with Bond Road, with at-grade signalized intersections spaced 0.5 mile apart where feasible, and including two potential bypasses of Kammerer Road (B1/B2/B3);
    • A Reduced Access Roadway segment on Grant Line Road from its intersection at Bond Road to its intersection at Calvine Road; (C)
    • A four- to six-lane expressway segment on Grant Line Road from its intersection with Calvine Road to White Rock Road, and on White Rock Road from Grant Line Road to the Sacramento County/El Dorado County line, with directional grade-separated interchanges at most major cross streets when warranted by LOS conditions (D1/D2/D3);
    • A four- lane thoroughfare segment on White Rock Road from the Sacramento County/El Dorado County line to Latrobe Road, and a six-lane thoroughfare segment from Latrobe Road to the US 50/Silva Valley Parkway interchange (E1/E2/E3); and
    • A full-length in-corridor multi-use path for non-motorized travel and multi-modal facilities, including Class I, II, and III Bike lanes throughout the Project corridor, depending on the design.

    For structuring purposes, the project is divided as follows:
    (Source: Capitol SE Corridor Details Page)

    • A1: I-5 to Bruceville
    • A2: Bruceville to Route 99
    • B1: Route 99 to Waterman
    • B2: Waterman to Bradshaw
    • B3: Bradshaw to Bond
    • C: Bond to Calvine
    • D1: Calvine to Route 16
    • D2: Route 16 to White Rock
    • D3: White Rock to El Dorado
    • E1: El Dorado to Latrobe
    • E2: Latrobe to US 50
    • E3: US 50 to Silva Valley

    In January 2016, an update was provided on the Capital SouthEast Connector. This is a 34 mile "limited access" parkway style expressway connecting I-5 S of Elk Grove and US 50 in the El Dorado Hills. Various segments are completed and the Silva Valley Interchange is under construction. Another 19 miles are in the environmental clearance phase, including the 5-mile Folsom/El Dorado segment that is about to enter final design.

    This is not a Caltrans project. The group behind the effort was expecting funding from Measure B in 2017. The connector joint powers board – made up of representatives from Sacramento and El Dorado counties, and from the cities of Folsom, Elk Grove and Rancho Cordova – had to determine what to do when that measure failed. It will take several decades to get the expressway built. Even then, it will be a smaller road than first imagined. Previously, officials talked of building six lanes in some spots, with interchanges instead of intersections, with an estimated cost at one point of $700 million. Eventually, when expected east county growth causes congestion on the new road, the connector could be turned into a full expressway by turning intersections into interchanges. The group built an initial 2.2-mile section in 2012, expanding and straightening part of White Rock, from Grant Line to Prairie City Road. That section offers a preview of what the entire corridor will look like. Future sections are expected to have a bike trail separated from the roadway. Despite the ballot box setback, the connector project is far from financially bereft. It is in line to receive $118 million over the next two decades from the county’s existing Measure A transportation sales tax, approved by voters in 2004. The connector group also will collect fees from developers who build housing projects near the connector corridor. The group currently has $15 million it plans to use in 2018 to further widen another 2 miles of White Rock Road to four lanes between Prairie City Road and the northern branch of Scott Road. Planners said they had hoped to build a longer section all the way to Latrobe Road in El Dorado County but do not yet have the extra $24 million that would cost.
    (Source: Andy Field on AARoads, "Re: Capital Southeast Connector (Sacramento, CA)", 1/2/2017)

    In 2018, it was reported that a $20 million grant was secured for the Capital Southeast Connector.
    (Source: Chris Sampang on AARoads, "Re: Capital Southeast Connector (Sacramento, CA)", 8/13/2018)

    In July 2020, Scott Parker noted on AARoads that it's likely the corridor will use Caltrans templates for suburban/rural expressway. The Sacramento-area project doesn't replace any existing state facilities, though eventually the Route 148 designation may be applied to the final product more for navigational purposes than anything (and it would get Caltrans off the fiscal hook as far as developing the long-dormant Route 148 corridor is concerned) -- although undoubtedly considerable state funds would be mixed into the project development. 
    (Source: Scott Parker on AARoads, "Re: Capital Southeast Connector (Sacramento, CA)", 7/14/2020)

    In terms of current status, it was reported that the section of White Rock Road between Prairie City Road and East Bidwell/Scott Road in Folsom is about to get upgraded to expressway.  Authorities have already moved the utility lines about 200 feet south of the existing roadway.  Planning for the expressway was first announced in 2001.  This is the third stretch of the expressway to be constructed.  The first section, from Prairie City Road to the Grant Line Road-White Rock Road split was completed in 2014.  The second section from Route 99 to Waterman Road was completed around 2016 or so.  The next section of Grant Line Road that will be upgraded will be the section between Waterman Road and Bradshaw Road in Elk Grove.
    (Source: Concrete Bob on AARoads, "Re: Capital Southeast Connector (Sacramento, CA)", 7/15/2020)

    In May 2020, the CTC approved the following allocation: $25,000,000. PPNO 03-1785. ProjID 0320000120. Capital Southeast connector - Segment D3. In Folsom on White Rock Road in the vicinity of the Scott Road Intersection. Widen 1 mile of 4-lane roadway and signalize 1 Intersection.
    (Source: May 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5s.(9))

    In June 2020, the CTC approved an allocation of $10,800,000 for the locally-administered Multi-Funded Senate Bill 1 (SB 1) Local Partnership Program (LPP) (Competitive)/State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) Capital Southeast Connector – Segment B2 (PPNO 1784) project. This project is in Elk Grove on Grant Line Road from Waterman Road to Bradshaw Road. Realign and widen from 2 to 4 lanes and signalize at Mosher Road and Bradshaw Road (Part of the overall Capital Southeast Connector project).
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5s.(7))

    Interstate Submissions Interstate Submissions

    Submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1958; not accepted.


  2. Rte 148 Seg 2Unconstructed From Route 143 south of Route 16 to Route 65.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, (a) was the entirety of Route 148. In 1985, Chapter 46 added segment (b): "(b) Route 143 south of Route 16 to Route 65." In 1990, Chapter 1187 fixed the formatting.

    In 2002, the Traversable Highways report noted that some studies have been conducted but further analysis is needed regarding a route adoption. There is no traversable highway and the area is built-out precluding any new alignment. Caltrans recommended removing the route from the state highway system.


Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

Signed Route 148 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 148 between 1934 and 1964.

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 148:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "Guadalupe to Sisquoc via Santa Maria" to the state highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 148 as follows:

"[LRN 56] near Guadalupe to Sisquoc via Santa Maria"

The definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. This is present-day Route 166 between Route 1 and Santa Maria, and was 1964-1984 Route 176 between Santa Maria and Sisquoc. The highway continued from Sisquoc (although not as part of the present state highway system) to Los Olivos. The route from Santa Maria was along Main Street to Philbric Road, then to Foxen Canyon Road, and along Foxen Canyon Road through Sisquoc into Los Olivos.


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 147 Forward Arrow Route 149

© 1996-2020 Daniel P. Faigin.
Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.