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State Route 70

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Routing Routing

  1. Rte 70 Seg 1Route 99 near Catlett Road to Route 20 in Marysville.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, Route 70 was defined to run from Route 99 near Catlett Road to Route 395 near Hallelujah Junction via Quincy and Beckwourth Pass.

    In 1986, Chapter 928 split the route into the current two segments: (a) Route 99 near Catlett Road to Route 20 in Marysville. (b) Route 20 in Marysville to Route 395 near Hallelujah Junction via Quincy and Beckwourth Pass. The portion in Marysville became part of Route 20.

    The segment from Route 99 in Sacramento to the Route 70/Route 99 split is cosigned as Route 70/Route 99, although it is legislatively Route 99.

    Some chronological notes:

    • 1967. Route 70 began (cosigned with Route 99) either at Route 16 or at Route 275 (Capitol Avenue, former US 40/US 99W and Route 16).
    • 1970. I-5 completed through Natomas between Elkhorn and downtown Sacramento, bypassing the old El Centro Road (LRN 232/Route 24) routing of Route 70/Route 99. According to Joel Windmiller, Route 70 may have continued down I-5 into downtown Sacramento for a very short period of time.
    • Early 1970s. Route 70 is truncated to begin at the Elkhorn Y, co-signed with Route 99.
    • Late 1990s Route 70 signage pushed back further, this time to the legislative western terminus (in Catlett). Note that through all these years, the legislative definition never changed; none of the Route 70 extension south to downtown Sacramento (co-signed with Route 99) was ever covered by it but was probably a direct replacement of former Route 24.

    Note that the original plans were for there to be an "East Valley" corridor, consisting of Route 99 from I-5 north to Route 70, Route 70 north to Route 149, all of Route 149, and Route 99 north through Chico probably reconnecting to I-5 (although plans north of Chico were shelved in the 1990s). This was for a Midwest-style expressway with freeway segments through the significant towns and interchanges at major intersecting highways. This would have included a freeway bypass of Marysville, the site of the last in-town surface street routing. Unfortunately only the segments at the ends of the corridor -- I-5 to Olivehurst and Oroville to just north of Chico -- were completed as planned; everything else was cut back to conventional 4-lane commercial standards (although a largely at-grade bypass of Marysville via the Feather River berm and making use of the present Yuba River Route 70 bridge is under study as of 2018) due to lack of the funding needed to acquire significant property between Marysville and Oroville for even an expressway upgrade.
    (Source: Scott Parker (SParker) on AAroads, 3/28/2018)

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    The portion of this route between Route 99 and Route 65 was LRN 232, defined in 1949. LRN 232 originally turned W out of Sacramento, running along the river with Route 16 to Woodland. The Gribblenation Blog, "Highways in and around Old Sacramento; US 40, US 99W, CA 16, CA 24, CA 70, CA 99, CA 275, and more" provides a detailed history of the various highways (US 40, US 99, Route 16, Route 24, Route 70, Route 99, Route 275, Route 51, I-5, and I-80 in the Old Sac area.

    The pre-1951 routing was cosigned with US 99E (and at one point, with Route 24), and likely ran along LRN 50. A 1969 map shows a different routing (cosigned with Route 99), along Jibboom Street, Garden Highway and El Centro Road. Note that the segment from Route 99 to Route 65 was not signed state highway until the move of Route 24 from the westerly (Woodland) route to the El Centro Avenue route in the 1950s. The portion of El Centro Road S of I-80 was still in existance as of 1995, but has since been replaced by residential streets.

    From Route 65 near Marysville to Marysville, this was part of LRN 3 (1910).

    Tom Fearer, in a discussion on AARoads in June-July 2017, provides more history of Route 70: Route 70 from Oroville along the Feather River Highway to Quincy has some interesting history in terms of route numbering and alignments. Originally the Feather River Highway was part of Route 24, asseen on the 1938 State Highway Map. Prior to the construction of Oroville Dam the Feather River Highway was substantially different. East out of Oroville, Route 24 took what is now Oroville Dam Blvd/County Route B2 to the approximate location of Oroville Dam where it would have crossed the Feather River. Route 24 followed the west bank of the North Fork Feather River where it would have joined the modern alignment of Route 70 via Dark Canyon Road. The 1935 County Road Map shows the older alignment. In 1955, the Feather River Highway was renumbered as US 40A and really honestly it is kind of the perfect alternate to even Donner Summit, much less Donner Pass. By 1958 the newly adopted planned alignment of US 40A out of Oroville appears to the west of the highway to make way for the Oroville Dam project. By 1963, US 40A is shifted onto the new aligment modern of the Feather River Highway. By 1965, State Highway Maps show the Feather River Highway renumbered to Route 70.

    Status Status

    Marysville Expressway

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed a comprehensive Route 70/Route 99 project. The project (stretching from the I-5/Route 99 junction (~SUT 0.0) to Route 149 in Butte County (~ BUT R20.641L)) converts two-lane conventional corridors to four-and-five-lane expressways, completes key segments to freeway by constructing interchanges, and provides additional capacity and throughput for current and projected future populations. It connects the Sacramento, Yuba-City and Chico urbanized area with an improved facility, saves lives by removing two lane segments, and supports improved freight movement.

    The following project is planned this route: Upgrading Route 70 to 4-lane expressway from Route 99 (070 SUT 0.0) to the existing freeway S of Marysville. This will eventually be upgraded to full freeway. This was on the April 2002 CTC agenda for approval for future consideration of funding [2.2c.(4), 2.5b(5), north of Bear River (apx 070 YUB 0.093) to S of McGowan Parkway (070 YUB R7.351)]

    Route 70 East NicolausIn 2007, it was noted that the California Transportation Commission allocated $126 million for a project in Yuba and Sutter counties to widen Route 70 to four lanes from south of East Nicolaus (apx 070 SUT R4.102) to the Bear River (apx 070 YUB 0.127). The East Nicolaus bypass would relieve traffic congestion and improve highway safety, and is scheduled to last from spring 2008 to fall 2011. The bypass will be to the west of East Nicolaus. This southern section of Route 70 closely follows the route of the old Sacramento Northern Railroad. South of East Nicolaus, the old rail grade is visible on the west side of the highway. North of East Nicolaus, the grade is visible as Route 70 zags at the intersection of El Centro Blvd - the grade runs between Route 70 and El Centro Blvd north to Kempton Road. This widening will make Route 70 a 4-lane facility from the the southern end of the route all the way to Marysville. In October 2009, a local newspaper reported on the effects of the rerouting on East Nicolaus, for Caltrans rerouted Route 70 around East Nicolaus partly to eliminate traffic backups at a stop sign where the highway and Nicolaus Avenue met. The switch was part of an $82 million project to expand Route 70 to four lanes between Route 99 and Marysville, a project set for completion in 2011. Most residents are happy. Marcum-Ilinois School officials said their traffic situation has improved immeasurably, with far fewer cars and trucks zooming past the school, which fronts what was Route 70 until June 2009. The highway now runs about a half-mile to the west, with an full interchange to Nicolaus Avenue. Some businesses adapted to the rerouting with signs, such as the Country Store, a stone's throw from the former intersection but far from eyesight of drivers now. Other businesses failed, such as The Hub, a burger joint near the intersection whose menu board still boasts of a Dragon Burger with 2⅓ pounds of beef, closed its doors; the restaurant occupies what was once Perozzi's, a popular eatery for locals and commuters for more than 36 years. The old road is now known as El Centro Boulevard, the name used before Route 70 was established. Yet modern mechanisms haven't caught up--Google Maps still lists the road by the Route 70 designation.

    In articles noting the completion of the Route 149 widening, it was noted that there are also plans to widen Route 70 to 4 lanes from the junction of Route 99 in Sutter County (~ SUT 0.0) to Marysville (~ YUB 14.59). It will also be 4 lanes in the Oroville area and north to the junction of Route 191. About 2 more miles will be widened to 4 lanes immediately south of Oroville.

    In May 2019, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Sutter (County) on Route 70 from Route 99 to Rio Oso Road (03-Sut-70-PM 0.0/7.6, 5 segments), consisting of superseded highway and collateral facilities. The County, by cooperative agreement dated June 11, 2003, and by amendment to agreement dated April 21, 2011, agreed to accept the relinquishment. The County, by letter dated March 6, 2019, agreed to waive the 90-day notice requirement and accept title upon relinquishment by the State.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.3c)

    In January 2019, the CTC authorized vacation of right of way in the county of Sutter along Route 70 from 0.15 mile south of to 0.30 mile north of Marcum Road (2 segments, 03-Sut-70-PM R2.8/R3.3), consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes. It has been determined that the facilities in the vacation resolution summarized below are not essential to the proper functioning of the State Highway System and may be disposed of by vacation. Upon the recording of the approved vacation resolution in the county where the facilities are located, the public’s right to use the facilities will be abandoned. The vacation complies with Sections 892, 8313 and 8330.5 of the Streets and Highways Code.
    (Source: January 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.3d)

    In October 2013, the CTC received a MND for future consideration of funding regarding a project located on Route 70 east of the Feather River, approximately 13 miles south of the City of Marysville in Yuba County. The proposed project will replace the existing at-grade intersection of Feather River Boulevard at Route 70 (apx 070 YUB R0.353) with a modified L-1/L-9 configuration interchange. The interchange will include a five-lane overcrossing of Route 70, five interchange ramps, removal of the existing at-grade intersection and traffic signal, and utility relocation.

    In December 2013, the CTC approved funding $4.361M for the Feather River Boulevard/Route 70 Interchange in Yuba County near Plumas Lake and north of Bear River at the southern intersection of Feather River Boulevard and Route 70 (apx 070 YUB R0.353) . The project will remove the traffic signal and construct interchange.

    As of November 2007, construction had begun on an interchange with Plumas Lakes Blvd (070 YUB R3.472). It is just to the south of the Union Pacific RR/Arobga Rd twin bridges.

    The following project is planned this route: Marysville Bypass. Starting at Route 70/Route 65 junction (070 YUB R8.414), running E of Marysville and linking with the existing Route 70 freeway south of Oroville (apx 070 BUT 11.532). Note that this bypass was later deprecated for the widening discussed below.

    Business Routes Business Routes

    Oroville. Home to the famous "Business I-70" shield.

    Blue Star Memorial Highway Blue Star Memorial Highway

    The portion of this route that is former US 99 was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947.


  2. Rte 70 Seg 2Route 20 in Marysville to Route 395 near Hallelujah Junction via Quincy and Beckwourth Pass.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, Route 70 was defined to run from Route 99 near Catlett Road to Route 395 near Hallelujah Junction via Quincy and Beckwourth Pass. Note that Hallelujah Junction was formerly called Chats, CA.

    In 1986, Chapter 928 split the route into the current two segments: (a) Route 99 near Catlett Road to Route 20 in Marysville. (b) Route 20 in Marysville to Route 395 near Hallelujah Junction via Quincy and Beckwourth Pass. The portion in Marysville became part of Route 20.

    The route between Blairsden and Indian Falls is cosigned as Route 70/Route 89, although it is legislatively Route 70.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This portion of the Route 70 routing started life in 1919, when the LRN 21 routing replaced former LRN 30, the Oroville-Quincy Highway, between a point NW of Oroville and Quincy. In 1931 the routing was extended from Quincy to Chats, CA (Hallelujah Junction) near (signed) US 395 [LRN 29]. The rationale for the extension was that the extension would extend the Feather River road, [LRN 21], joining' it to [LRN 29] (now US 395) near the latter 's interstate connection with State of Nevada highways. The inclusion in the State system extended State jurisdiction over a section that was projected to eventually be considered state and interstate. It was anticipated that LRN 21 would provide the advertised water grade arterial through the scenic Feather River to the county seat, Quincy. National forest highway in cooperation with Plumas County aid were completing on good standards a surfaced road E of Quincy as funds permitted; but they were unable to complete the connection through Plumas and Lassen counties. State aid permitted that connection.

    In 1933, LRN 87 was added to the mix. LRN 87 ran between Marysville and Oroville. In 1934, the routing was signed as Route 24. In the late 1930s, it was resigned as Alternate US 40 (and was likely still Route 24). In 1963, it was renumbered as Route 70 when that route number was freed by the decomissioning of US 70.

    In the late 1930s, there was a temporary routing of Alternate US 40 that took a more southern alignment than the current Route 70 routing, running through Berry Creek and Bucks Lake to Quincy along Orville-Quincy Highway, Spanish Ranch, and Bucks Lake Road. This appears to be the former LRN 30. Much of that route is no longer part of the state highway system, although the portion from Oroville to Brush Creek is part of Route 162.

    In 1956, a new routing was adopted for Alt US 40 (Route 70) that relocated the route to the east due to the construction of the Oroville Dam.

    Freeway Freeway

    Rte 70 Feather River Bypass ProposalIn May 1956, the Feather River Bulletin published an article, together with a proposed route map, for the rerouting of Alt US 40 (Route 70) E of Oroville between Oroville and Jarbo Gap. This was called the Lake Oroville Bypass Alignment. The article noted:
    (Source: Joel Windmiller on California's Historic Highways FB Page, 6/1/2020)

    J. W. Trask, District engineer of the Division of Highways, announced today that preliminary studies for a future relocation on a freeway basis of 19.3 miles of  US 40 Alternate (Feather River Highway [Route 70]) in Butte County between Montgomery Street in Oroville and Jarbo Gap have now reached a stage to permit a tentative conclusion as to basic plan. Relocation of the Feather River Highway is one of the first steps in the proposed construction of the Oroville Dam, a portion of the Feather River Project. Before the dam can be built, this important state highway will have to be relocated. G. T. McCoy, state highway engineer has instructed Trask to hold a public meeting to explain the various studies and the tentative conclusions reached by the highway engineers. The meeting will be held in Oroville on May 9, at 10 AM in the supervisor's room in the county courthouse. Trask urged all interested individuals and civic groups to attend the meeting and to present any information which may be pertinent to a freeway routing for the portion of US 40 Alt concerned. This information may be delivered orally or a written statement may be filed with the division of highways. Studies, by the division of the proposed route from Montgomery Street to Jarbo Gap, include all of the numerous factors influencing the location of a highway through developed and semi-developed areas. The factors involved include consideration of the proposed Feather River dam reservoir, traffic service, cost of construction and right-of-way, future developments, and overall effect on the area, including the city of Oroville. Trask also stated that in addition to local conditions all route studies on 40A have to consider the importance of the road as a primary state highway and a part of the network of strategic highways. The tentative' routing departs from the existing road just west of Oroville, crosses the Feather River on a new bridge, and lies south of the existing Oroville-Chico highway through Thermalito. It swings east again at Wicks Corners. It lies north of Table Mountain between Pentz and Cherokee. It crosses the West Branch of the Feather River at Vinton Gulch and runs north of Yankee Hill, joining the existing highway just west of Jarbo Gap. The tentative routing eliminates many of the sharp curves in the Feather River Canyon. After a public explanation of the route studies between Montgomery Street and Jarbo Gap has been given, a complete report of the data and conclusions, including information provided by interested persons attending the meeting, will be forwarded by Trask to State Highway Engineer McCoy. McCoy will furnish the information and his recommendation for routing to the California highway commission. Route adoption's responsibility for the commission.

    Status Status

    Route 70 Passing Lane Project Yuba/Butte County - 03-Yub-70 PM 14.70/25.82, 03-But-70 PM 0.0/11.8

    Rte 70 Yuba/Butte WideningIn December 2013, the Project Study Report proposed what became PPNO 9801 (9801A, 9801B), on Route 70 between 14th St. in Marysville to Ophir Road in Oroville, a project to widen the existing 2-lane conventional highway into a 5-lane facility, 2 lanes per direction with a continuous two-way left turn lane. The existing freeway north of Ophir Road will be extended S to Palermo Road. The current facility included several driveways along the corridor serving residential, agriculatural, and industrial properties; no new connections were proposed. The report noted that there have been several proposed improvements along this corridor including the proposed "Marysville Bypass to Oroville Freeway", which would have used a new alignment. This project does not use that alignment. The 2009 Transportation Concept Report proposed multiple "passing lane" projects, but has been revised for a continuous five-lane facility. The corridor has been divided into six segments:
    (Source: January 2014 Project Study Report)

    • Segment 1: S of Palermo Road to Ophir Road (BUT 8.8 to 11.8)
    • Segment 2: N conform of the East Gridley Road Passing Lane Project to S of Palermo Road (BUT 5.7 to 8.8)
    • Segment 3: N of the Yuba/Butte County Line to the S conform of the East Gridley Road Passing Lane Project (BUT 0.3 to 3.8)
    • Segment 4: N of Woodruff Lane to N of the Yuba/Butte County Line (YUB 20.2 to 25.8, BUT 0.0 to 0.3)
    • Segment 5: N of Laurellen Road to N of Woodruff Lane (YUB 16.4 to 20.2)
    • Segment 6: 14th St in Marysville to N of Laurellen Road (YUB 14.7 to 16.4)

    In October 2017, the CTC added the following project into the SHOPP: 03-But-70 5.6/8.8: On Route 70 in Butte County: Near Oroville, from 0.3 mile north of Cox Lane to south of Palermo Road. Widen for two-way left-turn lane and standard shoulders, and provide a roadside clear recovery zone. This is Segment 2.

    In October 2017, the CTC added the following project into the SHOPP: 03-But-70 8.8/11.8: On Route 70 in Butte County: Near Oroville, from south of Palermo Road to north of Ophir Road. Widen for two-way left-turn lane and standard shoulders, and provide a roadside clear recovery zone. This is Segment 1.

    In December 2017, the CTC amended the SHOPP to add the following project, for planning only: 03-But-70 0.0/3.8: On Route 70, in Butte County: Near Oroville, from Yuba County Line to south of East Gridley Road/Stimpson Road; also, in Yuba County on Route 70 from PM 25.7 to PM 25.8. Widen for two-way left-turn lane and standard shoulders. This is part of Segment 4.

    In March 2018, it was reported that the California Transportation Committee approved $400 million in funding to widen the highway to five lanes between the Yuba County line (~ BUT 0.0) and Oroville (~BUT 14.708). Construction on the first project, the stretch of road between Ophir and Palermo roads, south of Oroville, won’t happen before 2020. The article included a very touching story about Caltrans engineer Paul Inman, who was killed on that dangerous stretch of road. This appears to be segments 1, 2, 3, and part of 4.
    (Source: Chico ER News, 3/23/2018)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to adjust the funding for these segments, seemingly delaying two of the segments for a year. The PPNOs involved are PPNO 9801 (Segment 1), PPNO 9801A (Segment 2), PPNO 9801B (Segment 3), PPNO 9824 (Segments 4 and 5).

    In January 2019, the CTC amended the SHOPP regarding this project: 03-But-70 8.8/11.8 8.8/12.1 PPNO 2294. Proj ID 0318000053. Route 70 Near Oroville, from 0.2 mile south of Palermo Road to 0.2 mile north of Ophir Road. Widen for two-way left-turn lane and standard shoulders, and provide a roadside clear recovery zone. Update the project limits to extend the construction zone. The extended project limits facilitate staging and traffic handling will allow the project to finish construction in one season.
    (Source: January 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a(1) Amendment Item 5)

    In March 2019, the CTC approved an allocation of $7,400,000 for the State-Administered STIP Route 70 Passing Lanes (Segment 1) project (PPNO 9801), on the State Highway System, in Butte County, programmed in 2019-20. Project details: 03-BUT-70 M8.8/R12.1. PPNO 03-9801. Proj ID 0312000155. On Route 70, from 0.1 mile south of Palermo Road, to 0.3 0.6 miles north of Ophir Road/Pacific Heights intersection. Construct passing lanes. (Future Consideration of Funding approved under Resolution E-18-155; December 2018. (EA 3F280, PPNO 9801 combined with EA 03-3H710, PPNO 2294 for construction under EA 3H71U, Project ID 0319000051)
    (Source: March 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5c.(4))

    In November 2019, Caltrans District 3 tweeted: "Today we celebrated the completion of the SR-70 Segment 1 Safety and Passing Lanes!"
    (Source: Caltrans District 3 Tweet, 11/18/2019)

    In March 2020, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding another segment of this project: Route 70 (03-Yub-70, PM 25.5/25.8, 03-But-70, PM 0.0/3.80) in Butte and Yuba Counties. Widen highway, construct a bridge, and build other safety improvements in Butte and Yuba Counties. (PPNO 9801B and 2296) This project is located within Butte and Yuba Counties on Route 70 and proposes to widen Route 70 from a two-lane highway to five-lane facility with a paved center two-way-turn lane median for approximately 4.0 miles north of the existing Honcut Creek bridges. At Honcut Creek, a new
    two-lane bridge structure will be constructed parallel to the existing structures to span the levee prism and provide additional lanes of southbound traffic. The project is fully funded and currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP and 2018 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for a total of $65,868,000 which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in 2021-2022. Additionally, in March 2020, the CTC approved the following financial allocation: 03-But-70 PM 0.0/3.8, 03-Yub-70 PM 25.7/25.8. PPNO 2296. ProjID 0318000102. EA 3H930. Near Oroville, from Yuba County Line to south of East Gridley Road/Stimpson Road; also, in Yuba County on Route 70 from PM 25.7 to PM 25.8. Widen for two-way left-turn lane and standard shoulders. (Concurrent consideration of funding under Resolution E-20-14; March 2020.) Financial allocation: PS&E $3,000,000 R/W Sup $2,500,000.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1), 2.5b.(2a) #4)

    Additionally, in March 2020, the CTC approved the following financial allocation: $9,240,000 for CONST and CON ENG on 03-But-70 PM 5.6/9.1 PPNO 9801A. ProjID 0314000057. EA 3F281.  SR70 Passing Lanes (Segment 2). On Route 70, from 0.1 mile north of Cox Lane to 0.2 mile south of Palermo Road. Construct Passing Lane. (CONST savings of $180,000 to be returned to Butte County
    regional shares.) (CONST savings of $180,000 to be returned to interregional share balance.) (Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-18-155; December 2018.) (Concurrent allocation for SHOPP Project EA 03-3H720/PPNO 2295 under Resolution FP-19-61) (EA 03-3F281/PPNO 9801A combined with SHOPP EA 03-3H720/PPNO 2295 under EA 03-3H72U, Project ID 0320000087)
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5c.(5))

    Lastly, in March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which made no changes to the funding programmed for PPNO 9801, 9801A, 9802B or PPNO 9824. Note that the STIP program stated that the interregional program "Does Not Include County Shares"; however, the Interregional numbers seemed to just be duplicates of the county numbers:
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    PPNO
    Project
    Prior
    20-21
    21-22
    22-23
    23-24
    24-25
    9801 Psng Lns, Palermo-Ophir, Seg 1 (RIP)(SHOPP)(decr at vote) 4,070K 0 0 0 0
    9801 Interregional Passing Lanes, Palermo-Ophir, Seg 1 (IIP)(SHOPP) 4,070K 0 0 0 0 0
    9801A Passing Lanes, Cox-Palermo, Seg 2 (RIP)(SHOPP) 1,800K 4,800K 0 0 0 0
    9801A Interregional Passing Lanes, Cox-Palermo, Seg 2 (IIP)(SHOPP) 1,800K 4,800K 0 0 0 0
    9801B Passing Lanes, East Gridley-Co Line, Seg 3 (RIP) (SHOPP) 2,300K 0 8,600K 0 0 0
    9801B Interregional Passing Lanes, East Gridley-Co Line, Seg 3 (IIP)(SHOPP) 2,300K 0 8,600K 0 0 0
    9824 Passing Lanes, Segments 4&5 (APDE) 4,000K 4,000K 0 0 0 0
    9824A Passing Lanes, Segments 4&5, Phase 1 (NEW) 0 32,000K 0 0 0 0

    In August 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will rehabilitate the route in the city of Marysville, including new pavement, curb ramps, and sidewalks. The CTC also approved $41,500,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in Marysville, from First Street Undercrossing to east of Binney Junction; also on Route 20 from Feather River Bridge to 0.1 mile east of Levee Road, that will rehabilitate 17.0 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the road surface, minimize the costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life. (Vicinity of 070 YUB 14.734)

    Simmerly Slough Bridge (03-Yub-70, PM 15.4/16.5)

    Rte 70 Simmerly Slough BridgeIn December 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project, located near the city of Marysville, proposes to replace the Simmerly Slough Bridge on Route 70 (03-Yub-70, PM 15.4/16.5). The project also proposes to realign the approach roads at both ends of the new bridge, construct a new access road to Laurellen Road, and rehabilitate pavement leading to the new bridge. The project is fully funded and programmed in the 2016 SHOPP for an estimated total of $82.9 million, which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in December 2019. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 SHOPP. The project was also included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018.

    In May 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP allocation: $82,800,000 (Const, Const Engr). Yuba 03-Yub-70 15.5/16.5. Route 70 Near Marysville, from 0.1 mile north of Binney Junction Underpass to 0.3 mile north of Laurellen Road, at Simmerly Slough Bridge No. 16-0019. Outcome/Output: Replace existing bridge to address scour and seismic deficiencies. As part of this allocation request, the Department is requesting to extend the completion of CONST and CON ENG an additional 24 months beyond the 36 month deadline.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) Item 6)

    Laurellen Road to Honcut Creek Bridge Improvements (03-Yub-70, PM 16.2/25.8)

    In June 2019, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project located on Route 70 from Laurellen Road to Honcut Creek Bridge, near Marysville in Yuba County (03-Yub-70, PM 16.2/25.8). The project proposes to modify the existing lanes, widen shoulders, and improve the clear recovery zone. The project also proposes to construct left turn lanes and bring Route 70 up to current design standards. This project proposes to address the operational and safety issues by reducing injury type collisions and traffic fatalities including crosscenterline collisions/fatalities. The project is fully funded and currently programmed in the 2018 State Highway Operation Protection Program (SHOPP) for an estimated total of $104.6 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in 2021. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.

    In June 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP support phase allocation: $11,111,000 03-YUB-70 16.2/25.8 PPNO 9058 ProjID 0314000153 Route 70 Near Marysville, from Laurellen Road to South Honcut Creek Bridge. Widen shoulders and improve clear recovery zone. PS&E $4,884,000 R/W Support $6,227,000 (Concurrent amendment under SHOPP Amendment 18H-010.)
    (Source June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2) Item 17)

    In June 2019, the CTC approved a Right of Way capital allocation of $15,200,000 for the SHOPP project (PPNO 9819, ProjID 0314000153, 03-Yub-70 16.2/25.8), in Yuba County programmed in fiscal year 2019-20, that will widen shoulders and improve the clear recovery zone. The project is located near the City of Marysville from Laurellen Road to South Honcut Creek Bridge on Route 70 in Yuba County. The project will widen and pave the shoulders, provide turn lanes and bus pull outs, straighten and flatten curves, install rumble strips, replace or extend culverts and establish a Clear Recovery Zone for errant vehicles. Wider shoulders will allow room for slow moving farm equipment as well as provide the Department’s Maintenance crews and California Highway Patrol a safe work zone. With numerous school bus stops within the project limits, designated locations will also provide students with safer access to buses. The project scope requires that the Department acquire 84 parcels, including fee acquisitions, permanent easements, and temporary construction easements. The project will also require coordinating utility relocations, providing relocation assistance, and securing demolition contracts. The Department’s Division of Right of Way is actively managing the delivery risks associated with working near gas lines and residential acquisitions impacting complex improvements. The original Right of Way capital programming was based on the right of way capital estimate developed in 2014. An updated estimate, based on improved mapping and positive location of utility facilities, was completed in 2018. However, the total acquisition area has increased and additional utility conflicts were identified and the current right of way capital estimate is $15,200,000.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b.(3))

    In February 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of Butte, between Lower Honcut Road and Grover Lane, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads. (apx 070 BUT 0.949)

    In May 2015, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Butte along Route 70 at East Gridley Road and Stimpson Road near Robinsons Corner, consisting of reconstructed county roads. (apx 070 BUT 4.018)

    State Route 70 Corridor Improvements Project (03-But-70, PM 5.7/12.1)

    Rte 70 Corridor ImprovementsIn December 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project located on Route 70 near Oroville in Butte County that proposes to widen Route 70 from 2 lanes to 4 lanes. The proposed project addresses the significant operational and safety concerns along the Route 70 Corridor. The proposed project involves two segments for funding purposes and will combine SHOPP and State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) funds from FYs 2019-20 and 2020-21 for each segment and is estimated to cost approximately $82.0 million in total. This project is currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for approximately $69.6 million. Construction is estimated to begin in 2018-19 for one segment and 2019-20 for the other segment. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.

    A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will result in less than significant impacts to the environment after mitigation. The following resource areas may be impacted by the project: parks and recreation, emergency services, Traffic, pedestrian and bicycle facilities, cultural resources, visual resources, water quality, geology/soils, paleontology, hazardous materials, biological resources. Avoidance and minimization measures will reduce any potential effects on the environment. These measures include, but are not limited to, a Traffic Control Plan shall be developed, disturbed areas shall be reseeded with native grass and wildflowers, a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan shall be developed, credits will be purchased at an off-site mitigation bank for impacts to wetlands and special species plants, and pre-construction surveys for the Western Pond Turtle will be conducted. As a result, an MND was completed for this project.
    (Source: December 2018 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    In March 2019, the CTC approved the following allocation: $19,700,000 Butte 03-But-70 8.8/12.1 PPNO 03-2294. Proj ID 0318000053. Route 70 Near Oroville, from 0.1 mile south of Palermo Road to 0.6 mile north of Ophir Road. Outcome/Output: Improve safety by widening for two-way left-turn lane and standard shoulders, and provide a roadside clear recovery zone. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions. Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-18-155; December 2018.
    (Source: March 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b.(4) Project 1)

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the following financial allocation: 03-But-70 PM 5.6/9.1. PPNO 2295. ProjID 0318000054. EA 3H720. On Route 70 near Oroville, from 0.2 mile north of Cox Lane to 0.1 mile north of Palermo Road/Welsh Road. Outcome/Output: Improve safety by widening for two-way left-turn lane and standard shoulders, and provide a roadside clear recovery zone. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions. (Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-18-155; December 2018.) (EA 3H720/PPNO 03-2295 combined with STIP EA 3F281/PPNO 03-9801A for construction under EA 3H72U/Project ID 0320000087.)  Financial allocation: $22,240,000.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #8)

    In April 2006, the CTC considered a resolution to approve for future consideration of funding a project to upgrade Route 70 near Ophir Road (070 BUT 10.8/12.6) in Butte County to freeway, including construction of an interchange near Oroville. This was based on a Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) prepared due to the potential for significant levels of hazardous waste within the project limits. This project consists of three independent phases: a Safety phase, Phase 1, and Phase 2. The Safety phase is fully funded in the 2006 State Highway Operation and Protection Program for $10,213,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006-07. Phase 1 is fully funded in the 2004 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for $25,886,000 for capital and support and is estimated to begin in FY 2007-08. Phase 2 is not funded. The total estimated cost of Phase 2 is $54,000,000, and the proposed year of construction is FY 2011-12.

    In May 2019, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Butte (County) along Route 70 on Pacific Heights Road (03-But-70-PM 12.3/12.8, 2 segments), consisting of a relocated and reconstructed county road. The County by freeway agreement dated February 10, 2009, agreed to accept the relinquishment and by letter signed February 27, 2019, agreed to waive the 90-day notice requirement and accept title upon relinquishment by the State.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.3c)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1821: Construct an interchange on Route 70 at Georgia Pacific Road (070 BUT 12.482) in Oroville. $2,028,000.

    Wicks Corner Improvements

    [Route_70 near Route_149 and Route_191]The following project is planned this route: Construction of a new four-lane freeway along a route from 1.25 mi S of Route 149 (070 BUT R19.052R) to .25 mi N of Route 191 (070 BUT R22.1) in the County of Butte. This route is just N of Table Mountain Blvd. This was on the June 2003 agenda as a Route Adoption of a Controlled Access Highway at 03-But-70 KP 31.0/35.6 (PM 19.3/22.1) in the County of Butte.

    On July 24, 2008, Caltrans announced the opening of all four approaches to the new signal at the junction of Route 70/Route 191 (070 BUT R21.937). Also opened at that time was the new WB Route 70 alignment from the intersection of Route 191, including the connector ramp to westbound Route 70 and the ramp to northbound Route 149. The next day, the connector ramp from SB Route 149 to EB Route 70 opened. EB Route 70 from Oroville remained in its current alignment. This work was part of the $105 million project to make Route 149 a four-lane expressway with freeway-to-freeway interchanges at the intersections of Route 70/Route 149 and Route 99/Route 149. Completion is expected in 2009.

    In July 2010, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Butte along Route 70 between Route 149 and Route 191 (3-But-70-PM 20.5/21.9).

    In October 2013, the CTC reviewed a project for future approval of funding. This project in Butte County will replace the existing Flag Canyon Creek Bridge (070 BUT 24.26) on Route 70 near the city of Oroville. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $5,595,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    In September 2012, the CTC approved SHOPP funding of $4,040,000 on Route 70 in Butte County PM 28.2 near Oroville, at West Branch Feather River Bridge (#12-0134) (070 BUT 28.22). Outcome/Output: Seismic retrofit one bridge and repair of damaged worn elements.

    In November 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to seismically retrofit the West Branch Feather River Bridge (070 BUT 28.22) near Oroville (actually, closer to Pentz and Cherokee, PM 28.22). The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. Total estimated project cost is $23,409,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. A copy of the Negative Declaration (ND) has been provided to Commission staff. The project will avoid and minimize potential impacts to storm water, water quality, and the American peregrine falcon. The project will also require construction activities in the habitat of the pallid bat and the cliff swallow. All of which are either State fully protected, State species of special concern, or protected by the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act. As a result, an ND was completed for this project.

    Vertical Alignment Corrections near Paradise (03-But-70 46.0/47.0)

    Vertical Alignment Corrections near Paradise (03-But-70 46.0/47.0)In January 2018, the CTC added the following project to the SHOPP: 03-But-70 46.0/47.0. Route 70 Near Paradise, from 0.8 mile west to 0.2 mile east of Shady Rest Area. Restore and repair damaged roadway by raising the existing vertical alignment by approximately five feet and protecting the embankment against future flooding with Rock Slope Protection (RSP) or a retaining structure. PA&ED Allocated at $1,700,000. Other phases not authorized yet. PA&ED: 10/11/2019. R/W: 11/10/2020. RTL: 12/05/2020. BC: 06/05/2021.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.1a(1))

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Major Damage Restoration item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 03-Butte-70 46.0/47.0 PPNO 2293 Proj ID 0318000012 EA 3H540. Route 70 Near Paradise, from 0.8 mile west to 0.2 mile east of Shady Rest Area. Restore and repair damaged roadway by raising the existing vertical alignment by approximately five feet and protecting the
    embankment against future flooding with Rock Slope Protection (RSP) or a retaining structure. Programmed in FY20-21, with construction scheduled to start in March 2021. Total project cost is $58,866K, with $45,966K being capital (const and right of way) and $12,900K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.),
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In August 2018, the CTC approved $2,731,000 in SHOPP funding for Plumas 02-Plu-70 11.5/11.9: Route 70 Near Belden, from 2.1 miles to 1.6 miles west of Chipps Creek Bridge. Outcome/Output: Improve safety by realigning roadway curves, widening shoulders, adding new guardrail, and constructing a gabion-style retaining wall. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions.
    (Source: August 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.5f.(3) Item 5)

    In March 2015, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Plumas County near Quincy that will replace the existing Yellow Creek Bridge (070 PLU 14.90) and construct retaining walls, slope protection, guardrails, and other improvements. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated cost is $13,420,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 SHOPP.

    Spanish Creek Bridge (070 PLU 35.32)

    Route 70 KeddieIn March 2006, the CTC considered a plan to replace an existing bridge near Keddie. This project is fully funded in the 2006 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $42,040,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. There are three alternatives:

    • Alternative A: This alternative would build a new bridge alongside the existing Spanish Creek bridge. The existing bridge would be seismically retrofitted and remain in active use.
    • Alternative B: This alternative would build a new bridge alongside the existing Spanish Creek bridge. The existing bridge would be removed.
    • No Build Alternative.

    In March 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to replace the existing Spanish Creek Bridge (070 PLU 35.32) and construct roadway improvements north of the city of Quincy. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated project cost is $58,064,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10.

    In January 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project on Route 70 (02-But-70, PM 42.06/42.21/46.44, 02-Plu-70, PM 23.67/31.82) in Butte and Plumas Counties: Construct fish passages at five tributaries along Route 70 in Butte and Plumas Counties. The project involves improvement of aquatic organism passage at five tributaries in Butte and Plumas Counties to the Feather River along Route 70. The five locations that are tributaries to the Feather River are Mill Creek, Bear Creek, Rush Creek, Soda Creek and an unnamed tributary. The project is fully funded by District 2 Minor A and United States Forest Service for an estimated $12.7 million. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2019-20. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP).
    (Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    Spring Garden Bridge

    In August 2015, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Plumas County that will rehabilitate and widen the Spring Garden Bridge (070 PLU 51.21) near the town of Quincy. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $17,670,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2015-16. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    In August 2016, the CTC approved $13,545,000 for Plumas 02-Plu-70 50.6/51.7. Route 70 near Quincy, from 0.6 mile west to 0.5 mile east of Spring Garden Bridge Overhead No. 09-0062 (070 PLU 51.21). Outcome/Output: Rehabilitate the existing structure by replacing the bridge deck, widening to make shoulders standard, retrofitting the sub-structure, and installing standard bridge rail.

    In October 2017, it was reported that in Spring 2017, Plumas County residents encountered a traffic signal at the Spring Garden Bridge, 5 miles east of Quincy, that interrupted a normally fluid drive. It is quiet on top of the bridge, and if it weren’t for the signal and the extensive roadwork caution signs, commuters would probably never guess that underneath the 50-year-old bridge is a flurry of activity. The $10.2 million bridge rehabilitation project has been in the California Department of Transportation’s repair lineup for about six to seven years and is estimated to take about two years, 1,200 cubic yards of concrete, and 600,000 pounds of steel to complete. Because there are no alternate routes and the bridge has to remain functional for traffic, the project had to be divided into five stages. With the help of MCM Construction Inc. from Sacramento, the bridge is already in Stage 2 of the process. The piers that hold up the bridge are lined with a massive amount of lumber and falsework (temporary construction) that will be removed when the project is done. The crew is made up of 12 to 30 construction workers a day who have filled walls with thousands of pounds of concrete and widened the bents that hold the deck. The result will be a 16-foot wider bridge, with a higher friction surface that should reduce the accident rate on the roadway, updated railing and even a new bike lane. The project will pause for winter 2017 and the signal will be removed until weather permits the crew to start work again next spring. The next phase of work will then begin: repairing the deck, which will entail a complete replacement of the girders, supports and road surface, making one-way traffic a must.
    (Source: Plumas News, 10/13/2017)

    PPNO 3703 Feather River Inn (~ PLU R66.073)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $330K for PPNO 3703 Feather River Inn, intersection improvements (~ PLU R66.073), with the bulk of the work being done in FY21-22.

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which continued the programmed funding for PPNO 3703 Feather River Inn, intersection improvements.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In December 2014, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Plumas along Route 70 at 0.6 miles west of Grizzly Road (apx 070 PLU R78.759), consisting of collateral facilities. The County, by resolution dated April 16, 2013, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. 

    Naming Naming

    Feather River HighwayThe portion of this route from Oroville to Quincy was historically named the "Feather River Highway". A plaque was installed in September 1995 that reads: "This highway was opened to auto traffic on August 14, 1937 as State Route 24. It was later changed to State Route 40A and finally to State Route 70. The initial cost of this 70 mile stretch was 8 million dollars. The cost of repair from the February 1986 flood was over 10 million. On October 3, 1987 a celebration was held at the Plumas County Courthouse in Quincy celebrating the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Feather River Highway. Stanley C. Young, Plumas County Superior Court Judge was chairman of the celebration."
    (Image source: NoeHill Travels)

    The portion of this route from Pacific Heights/Georgia Pacific Way to the westbound ramp of Garden Drive (~ BUT 12.498 to BUT 16.622) is named the "Post No. 1747 Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States Memorial Highway". This section of Route 70 runs near the Headquarters of Post No. 1747; the naming was in honor of the 100th Anniversary of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, and the 70th Anniversary of Post No. 1747 in Oroville. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 149, Chapter 97, July 12, 2000.

    Wick's Corner InterchangeThe junction between Route 70 and Route 149 near the City of Oroville (~ BUT R20.643R), in the County of Butte, is named the "Wick's Corner Interchange". This segment was named in memory of Moses Wick, born in Ohio in 1822. Moses Wick served in the Mexican War under the command of General Zachary Taylor, who eventually became President of the United States. In 1852, Moses Wick moved to California with his wife Maria in a wagon train pulled by his team of oxen on a journey that took six months. The land in the area of the current cloverleaf junction between Route 70 and Route 149 was deeded in 1852 to Moses Wick as a reward for his military service. On September 3, 1852, Moses Wick made a homestead of the 160 acre territory and began raising cattle as a pioneer cattle rancher. Through purchases and other land grants, he eventually owned about 800 acres adjacent to "Wick's Corner". Wick made a modest living as a butcher by selling and supplying beef to gold miners and merchants in the area. He also used his faithful team of oxen to haul freight and cargo back and forth to the mines between Oroville and Sacramento. Moses Wick died in 1888 at the age of 66 years and was survived by his second wife Roxie Ann, his son Charles, and daughter Ella Wick Crum. He cattle ranch was operated until his son Charles sold most of the ranch to Senator Thomas Rockhill in 1906 for $25,000. The cattle ranch became a tavern and an early stagecoach stop for the Central Pacific Railroad. Although Wick's historic home was demolished in 1947, this area continues to be known as "Wick's Corner". The modern Route 70 was constructed in the 1960s when the former highway was submerged beneath the rising waters of Lake Oroville. Mrs. Merle McAndrews, the great granddaughter of both Moses Wick and Senator Thomas Rockhill, still lives on the property in a portion of one of the original ranches that was built more than 70 years ago. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 39, Resolution Chapter 71, on 7/3/2007.
    (Image sources: Enterprise Record)

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Grizzly Dome TunnelTunnel 09-0001 (PLU 000.73), in Plumas county near Tobin, is named the "Grizzly Dome Tunnel". It was built in 1936. Grizzly Dome Tunnel is one of three tunnels built by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) along the Feather River Highway in northeast California.  The tunnels were the final pieces in the construction of the Feather River highway (Route 70)  by the State of California (1928-37).
    (Image source: The Living New Deal)

    Elephant Butte TunnelTunnel 09-0024 (PLU 000.99) in Plumas county is named the "Elephant Butte Tunnel". It was built in 1937, and was named through historical and long usage. Elephant Butte Tunnel is one of three tunnels blasted through granite by Works Progress Administration (WPA) workers along the Feather River Highway (present highway 70) in northeast California.  The tunnels were the final pieces in the construction of the Feather River highway by the State of California (1928-37).  Elephant Butte tunnel is the northern-most tunnel of the three. The tunnels were blasted through solid granite in and around Grizzly Dome. Rock from the tunnels was used for rock safety walls along the highway.
    (Image and information source: The Living New Deal)

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Massack Rest AreaMassack, in Plumas County, 6.5 mi E of Quincy. (PLU 49.736)
      (Image source: Caltrans District 2 on FB)
    • Lester T. DavisLester T. Davis, in Plumas County, 3 mi E of Portola. It was named after Lester T. Davis, a member of the California State Assembly from 1946 to 1952, when he died in office. (PLU R79.144)
      (Image Source: JoinCalifornia)

Historical Route Historical Route

Assembly Concurrent Resolution 180, 1998, designated those portions of US 40 that are still publically maintained and not already designated as part of Historic US 40 as "Historic US 40".

Senate Concurrent Resolution 66, Chaptered May 18, 2006 (Resolution Chapter 51), designated, upon application by an appropriate local governmental agency, any section of former Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40 that is still a publicly maintained highway and that is of interest to the applicant, as Historic Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40. This recognizes the role that Former Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40 played in the development of the transportation routes into California over what is now known as the Davis "Y". Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40 is currently Route 113 from Davis to Woodland and Yuba City, and Route 70 through Marysville, Oroville, and the Feather River Canyon to Hallelujah Junction on Route 395, a route that today serves 27 towns and the six counties of Yolo, Sutter, Yuba, Butte, Plumas, and Lassen. The Feather River Scenic Byway is a 130 mile segment of Route 70, which was part of Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40.

Exit Information Exit Information

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Scenic Route Scenic Route

[SHC 263.4] From Route 149 near Wicks Corner to Route 89 near Blairsden.

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. This is constructed to freeway standards in segment (1) from Olivehurst to Marysville; and in segment (2) from Route 162 to Route 149.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 70:

Blue Star Memorial Highway Blue Star Memorial Highway

This route is designated a Blue Star Memorial Highway between Marysville and Hallelujah Junction. The marker is located at the roadside rest stop by the Feather River in Belden. Designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 150, Chapter 98, July 12, 2000.

Interregional Route Interregional Route

[SHC 164.14] Between Route 149 north of Oroville and Route 395.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

US Highway Shield The Route 70 designator was used for US 70, which ran along what is roughly now Route 10 (I-10). The US 70 designation was added in 1935. US 70 ran concurrent with US 60 throughout much of California. By 1938, the portion of US 70 W of Beaumont was moved off the shared alignment of US 60/LRN and onto a multiplex of US 99, where it ran into downtown Los Angeles along portions of US 99 and US 101.US 70 really never had a distinct identity in the state (it was always cosigned: either with US 99 or US 60, if not both). It does appear that the portion of LRN 77 along Valley Blvd between the eastern city limits of Los Angeles and El Monte was signed as US 70 after 1935.

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Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that became LRN 70 was first defined in 1925, by Chapter 351 which directed the commission “...to transfer and convey unto the State of California that certain road situate in the said county of Mendocino and described as follows: Commencing at a point on the state highway 2446 ft from the S boundary of the town limits of the town of Ukiah city and running thence in an E-ly direction along the course of the right of way of the present county road to the W line of the grounds of the Mendocino State Hospital...” In 1935, this route was codified as:

"[LRN 1] near Ukiah to the west line of the grounds of the Mendocino State Hospital"

This definition remained until 1963. It is present-day unsigned Route 222.


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 69 Forward Arrow Route 71

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