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State Route 111

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Routing Routing

  1. Rte 111 Seg 1From the international border south of Calexico to Route 78 near Brawley, passing east of Heber.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(a) Calexico to Route 78 near Brawley passing east of Heber. "

    In 1972, Chapter 1216 extended (a) south to change the origin of this segment to "The international boundary south of Calexico".

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    Between Calexico and Route 86 E of Haber, this was an extension of LRN 26, defined in 1931. It was originally signed as part of US 99.

    Between Route 86 E of Haber and Route 78 near Brawley, this was LRN 201, defined in 1933. It is not part of the original 1934 signing of Route 111.

    At some point between 1935-1938, Route 111 was extended south of Brawley over LRN 201 to US 99 near Heber. Route 111 terminating at US 99 in Heber can be first be seen on the 1938 Division of Highways Map.
    (Source: Tom Fearer on AARoads, 11/29/2019)

    Status Status

    In October 2012, the CTC amended the 2012 STIP to delete the Calexico Border Gateway and 1st Street Promenade project (PPNO 0508) on Route 111 in Imperial County. This project was originally programmed in the 2010 STIP - Transportation Enhancement Program for $2,301,000 in Interregional Improvement Program (IIP) funds. The project consists of pedestrian and bicycle improvements in the vicinity of the pedestrian border crossing at the United States/Mexico Border Inspection Station. However, a conflict between this project and a General Services Administration (GSA) contract has resulted in the need to delete this project from the STIP. Following the programming of this project, the GSA condemned the Department’s right of way within the limits of this project in order to construct a new port of entry. This prevented the Department from moving forward with the pedestrian and bicycle improvements project.

    Brawley Bypass

    There are also plans to build a 4-lane expressway from between Worthington Road and Keystone Road near Brawley and Imperial (March 2001 CTC Agenda). In June 2002, there was more on this: An agenda item for Route 111 near Brawley from Keystone Road to Route 78 to construct a four-lane expressway.

    According to Don Hagstrom in October 2002, Route 111 is undergoing a conversion to 4-lane expressway on parallel alignment between I-8 north of Calexico and the city of Brawley. The first segment from Ross Road (just north of I-8, near IMP PM 8.0) to Worthington (County Sign Route S28, IMP PM 12.9) opened on 23 September 2002. Segment 2 of 3 from Ross Road to Keystone Road (San Diego County Sign Route S27) is under construction now and is scheduled for completion in Fall 2003; Segment 3 from Keystone Road to the current Route 78 (Mead Road) in Brawley will go under construction soon and is scheduled for completion in Fall 2004. This would tie Route 111 into the planned Brawley Bypass (Route 78/Route 86) that would also be constructed as an expressway and would tie into the current Route 86 expressway. This Bypass will also be done by 2006-7. As part of this, the former routing will be relinquished and turned into a frontage road. According to Gary Rotto of Caltrans in September 2005, Route 111 in Imperial County is completed and opened to traffic. In November 2007, bids went out for construction of a 4-lane divided expressway and interchange on "old" Route 111 near Brawley from 0.5 Km South of Shank Road to the New River Bridge.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #926: Construct highway connecting Route 78/Route 86 and Route 111, Brawley. This is likely the route being explored by the CTC back in April 2003. $7,600,000.

    In March 2012, it was reported that not only is the Brawley Bypass under construction (the signs project completion later in 2012), but the eastern part of it has been opened and Route 111 has been moved onto it. That change appears to be recent, as there still is Route 111 signage in downtown Brawley on the old multiplex with Route 78, though the bypassed part of Route 111 north of Route 78 has already been renamed "Old Highway 111". The open part of the bypass is a four-lane expressway with one interchange (tie-in to Route 111/Old Highway 111 north of Brawley) and two at-grade crossings (Best Road, and Route 78).

    In May 2012, the CTC amended the the Trade Corridor Improvement Fund (TCIF) baseline agreement for Project No. 77 – Brawley Bypass (Route 78/Route 111 Expressway) – Stage 3 Project (PPNO 0021G) in Imperial County. The amendment revised the project schedule and split off a follow-up landscape mitigation project (PPNO 0021Y). The approved baseline schedule was been revised to update the end of construction and closeout phases. The original construction schedule was developed assuming minimal structural construction on the project. However, during the design phase, a bridge was added to allow for canal maintenance, triggering an extended construction period.

    In February 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Imperial along Route 111 between Ross Road and Robinson Road (~ IMP R8.268 to IMP R13.376, along "Old Highway 111"), consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Imperial along Route 111 between Robinson Road and 0.5 miles north of Keystone Road (~ IMP R13.356 to IMP R17.87, along "Old Highway 111"), consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    In March 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Imperial along Route 111 from 0.5 mile south of Carey Road to 0.2 mile north of Mead Road (~ IMP R17.824 to IMP R20.6, along "Old Highway 111"), consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    In December 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Brawley along Route78 at Best Road and along Route 111 from the south Brawley city limits to Route 78 (IMP R20.667 to Route 78, along "Old Highway 111"), consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities. The County of Imperial, by controlled access highway agreement dated May 6, 2003, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State to roads which on that date were within an unincorporated area of the county and have since been annexed by the City of Brawley. The City, by controlled access highway agreement dated May 20, 2003, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Imperial on Route 111 from the northerly city limits of Brawley to the realigned Route 78, consisting of superseded highway right of way (the bypassed segment of Route 111, along N 8th St.).

    Naming Naming

    The portion of Route 111 from E. Jasper Road near the City of Calexico to I-8 in the County of Imperial (~ IMP R3.232 to IMP R7.638) is named the Fire Chief F.S. "Pete" Pedroza Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of Froilan S. Pedroza, who was involved in a tragic vehicular accident on October 22, 2003, that took his life. This naming recognizes his service as Fire Chief to the City of Calexico Fire Department. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 64, July 8, 2004. Chapter 116.

    Imperial Valley Pioneers ExpresswayThe portion of Route 111 between I-8 and Route 78, in Imperial County (~ IMP R7.638 to IMP R21.993), is officially named the "Imperial Valley Pioneers Expressway" This segment was named in honor of the pioneers of Imperial Valley. In 1849, advancements in engineering made it possible for water to be conveyed from the Colorado River to the interior desert of Southern California, creating the opportunity for year-round farming. By 1901, courageous pioneers from throughout the world, staking their future on the region's agricultural promise, began to relocate to the vast desert area now called the Imperial Valley. These pioneers reflected the cultural melting pot of the early twentieth century, a patchwork quilt of peoples–including African American, Chinese, East Indian, Filipino, French, German, Greek, Irish, Italian, Japanese American, Lebanese, Mexican, Portuguese, and Swiss–that has contributed to California's rich diversity today. These pioneers envisioned the potential for prosperous and thriving communities in the harsh environment of the low desert, leveling their own land and constructing the first roads and canals, making way for the development of homes, schools, businesses, and places of worship. The determination, ingenuity, and hard work of the Imperial Valley pioneers helped to create a thriving $1 billion annual agricultural economy, making it one of the most productive farming regions in California. Imperial Valley pioneers became leading members of the community, helping to establish civic, religious, charitable, and other organizations to advance quality of life in the region. The Imperial Valley Pioneers Association was established in 1928 for the purpose of uniting pioneer families in the area and educating newcomers about the history of the early settlers to keep history alive for future generations. The Pioneers Museum and Cultural Center, located at Pioneers Park near the City of Imperial, is operated by the Imperial County Historical Society and is a rich archive of documents, newspapers, personal letters, period furniture, photographs, clothing, and sundry equipment used by early settlers, with galleries honoring the different ethnic communities and their history of settlement in the Imperial Valley. It is valuable and important to commemorate the remarkable modern history of the irrigated desert and of the people who settled it, to learn from the inspiring American story of diverse people uniting around the common dream of a better future, and to honor the vision and daring of those who opened the rugged desert frontier and built a community enjoyed by succeeding generations. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 160, 9/10/2010, Resolution Chapter 147.
    (Image source: AARoads)

    Historical Route Historical Route

    The portion of this route from the international border S of Calexico to Route 86 (~ IMP 0.000 to IMP R21.993) is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993.

    Named Structures Named Structures

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Two Rivers, in Imperial County 2.5 mi S of Calipatria. This facility was closed permanently in September, 2015

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.6] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

    Blue Star Memorial Highway Blue Star Memorial Highway

    The portion of this route that is former US 99 was designated as a "North-South Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947.


  2. Rte 111 Seg 2From Route 78 near Brawley to Route 86 via the north shore of the Salton Sea.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment was "(b) Route 78 near Brawley to Route 86 near Indio via the north shore of Salton Sea."

    In 1972, Chapter 1216 extended (b) north, changing the terminus to "Route 86 near Mecca via the north shore of the Salton Sea."

    In 1981, Chapter 292 removed the reference to "near Mecca"

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 111 was signed along the route from Jct. US 99 at Brawley to Jct. US 60 at Whitewater, via Mecca, Indio, and Palm Springs. This is LRN 187, defined in 1933.

    Status Status

    Niland Mud Spring (~ IMP 45.32)

    Rte 111 Mud SpringIn November 2018, there were reports regarding a concern about an aspect of the San Andreas Fault other than an earthquake. The San Andreas fault begins at the Salton Sea. At this point, a muddy spring mysteriously has begun to move at a faster pace through dry earth — first 60 feet over a few months, and then 60 feet in a single day, according to Imperial County officials. The movement is not seismic activity; rather, it is occurring partly as a result of historic earthquake activity that caused cracks, allowing gases produced deep underground to reach the earth’s surface. In the path of the moving spring are Union Pacific freight railroad tracks that connect the Inland Empire to Yuma, Ariz.; a petroleum pipeline owned by Kinder Morgan, one of North America’s largest energy companies; a stretch of fiber optic telecommunications lines owned by Verizon; and a portion of Route 111, a major roadway connecting Interstate 10 in the Coachella Valley to the California-Mexico border (~ IMP 45.32). Imperial County declared an emergency in Summer 2018, enabling officials to expedite efforts to prevent damage and perhaps even to stop the movement of the spring from getting closer to the railroad tracks. Officials have been trying to drain water from the moving spring. Union Pacific built a 100-foot long wall of large boulders and steel more than 75 feet deep in the earth in an effort to protect the railroad. But in October 2018, the muddy spring sneaked underneath the wall, moving it ever closer to railroad tracks. Overall, the pit has moved more than 240 feet from where it was documented as being in 2008. Based on publicly available satellite images, the spring hadn’t appeared to move much until roughly 2015, but movement became particularly noticeable earlier in 2018. Union Pacific has been forced to build temporary tracks to avoid running trains over land impacted by the spring. Trains are now moving more slowly through the area, according to the company. The railroad may need to consider more permanent solutions, including building a bridge to bypass potentially unstable land, a company spokesman said. Caltrans is also prepared to shut down a portion of Route 111 if the mud spring approaches the roadway, and has already planned a set of detours.
    (Source: LA Times, 11/1/2018)

    In October 2019, it was reported that construction began in August 2019 to build a temporary road to provide access to Route 111 at Davis and Gillespie roads about five miles northwest of Niland in Imperial County. A natural-occurring geyser, in existence since 1953, is moving toward Route 111 and is likely to reach the highway. The geyser/mud pot is releasing water, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide gases in low concentrations and does not pose a health hazard. In the past 11 years, the geyser has moved slowly; however, the rate of movement has increased, and the geyser has already encroached the railroad right of way impacting Union Pacific Railroad tracks. Caltrans plans to rebuild Route 111 as the geyser moves west and beyond the temporary road. The Niland Geyser Mitigation Project was constructed in three phases:
    (Source: Caltrans Niland Geyser Project Page)

    • Phase 1: Construct sheet pile walls to convey water to a gravel wash.
    • Phase 2: Construct a sub-surface drain to convey subsurface water beneath the roadway to a gravel wash on the west side of Route 111.
    • Phase 3: Construct a detour road west of the current alignment as a contingency to re-route traffic from Route 111.

    In March 2020, it was reported that Caltrans has been forced to to build a 5-mi. temporary road adjacent to Route 111 and install new underground infrastructure for the two-lane highway and the Union Pacific Railroad to abandon tracks and build new ones in the Imperial Valley, east of San Diego. Phase 1 of the project had crews from S&B Engineering Inc. build a temporary road (two lanes) and install underground infrastructure under Route 111 to deal with the water and gases when the mud pot passes under the highway. Phase 2 is based on two elements — build the tie-ins for the temporary road when the mud pot reaches the road and when it does pass, dismantle the temporary road. The project was fast-tracked: The contractor was given a two-week shutdown of the highway and had to work 24 hours a day with two, 12-hour shifts. The process involved grinding out the hole that they were replacing with dirt in 24 hours, and then immediately place geogrid fabric, and all the drainage with different types of aggregate and bring it up to grade. The excavation went down 12 ft. where slotted drain pipe was installed. The pipe was fragile and it had to be buried in rock. The contractor couldn't run equipment on top of it until they got it up to grade to avoid crushing anything. It was a tight work zone, especially with all the aggregate to bring in and stockpile adjacent to the Caltrans right-of-way. Once the subgrade was placed for the existing road, the permeable concrete was poured and covered by 6 in. of asphalt. All the material excavated from the existing highway was used to create the subgrade for the temporary road, which was also covered by 6 in. of asphalt and has a small shoulder on either side. Work on the project began on Aug. 2019 when construction crews placed one-way traffic control along a 2,000-ft. segment of SR-111 at Davis and Gillespie roads, about 5 mi. northwest of Niland in Imperial County. All work was completed by early 2020. The start of second stage of the project is dependent on how quickly the mud pot moves. As soon as it reaches the sheet pile wall, perpendicular for 520 ft. west from a nearby bridge, the tie-ins will be constructed and traffic switched to the temporary road. The mud pot, one of several thousand in the Imperial Valley region, has been in existence for about 70 years and has moved about 100 ft. per year. In 2016 there was a swarm of seismic events and it began to move faster. There is a deep vent, over one-half mi., that is venting gases and water through a perched groundwater table. Some believe it is moving along a fault line. A seismic event could accelerate the movement or shut it off. Experts are unable to predict the speed or movement of the mud pot.
    (Source: Construction Equipment Guide, 3/9/2020)

    Route 86 Expressway

    A new Route 86 expressway has been built almost to its entire Route 195 length. Currently, the expressway runs from I-10 at Coachella to Mecca, and will eventually join Route 86 at Oasis. The expressway ends near Route 111 in Mecca, and Route 111 between Mecca and Coachella has been rerouted to it. Route 111 thus joins Route 10 at Coachella for a short time and separates from it at Indio to head for Palm Desert and Palm Springs. The segment from Mecca to Coachella will be a joint section of 86 and 111 (it may be signed as such now) upon completion of the remainder of the expressway (at which time, Route 195 will be eliminated).

    SR 195 to SR 111 xferIn 2014, a portion of former Route 195 was moved to Route 111. The route adoption noted the history of the route, and specifically noted how, in March 1988, a supplemental project reported was completed for a Route 86 expressway between Avenue 82 and Avenue 66 (Route 195) and for a freeway between Avenue 66 and Dillon Road. This supplemental project report down scoped the previously approved project on Route 86 from a four lane freeway to an expressway between Avenue 82 and Avenue 66. In 2001, the Route 86 Expressway (Route 86S) was completed. The expressway runs from I-10 at Coachella to join Route 86 at Oasis. The segment from Mecca to Coachella is a joint section of Route 86 and Route 111. Additionally in 2001, a supplemental project report was completed to address specific terms of the rehabilitation and relinquishment of existing Route 86, Route 111 and Route 195 in the area. In 2009 the relinquishments for Route 86, Route 111 and Route 195 were completed. However, a one mile section of Route 195 between Route 86S (renumbered to Route 86 in December 2012) and Route 111 (Avenue 66) was not relinquished. Given the definition of Route 195 (which indicates it is no longer a state route), in December 2014 this segment was adopted as Route 111 Post Mile R18.5 to R19.4.

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.6] From Bombay Beach in Salton Sea State Park to Route 195 near Mecca.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.6] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  3. Rte 111 Seg 3The western city limits of Cathedral City to Route 10 near Whitewater.

    (b) The relinquished former portions of Route 111 within the unincorporated area of the County of Riverside and the Cities of Cathedral City, Coachella, Indian Wells, Indio, La Quinta, Palm Desert, and Rancho Mirage are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portions of Route 111, the County of Riverside and the Cities of Cathedral City, Coachella, Indian Wells, Indio, La Quinta, and Palm Desert, as applicable, shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 111 and shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portions of Route 111, including any traffic signal progression.

    (c) (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Palm Springs any portion, or the entirety, of Route 111 within its city limits, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

    (2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective on the date following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, all of the following shall occur:

    (A) Any portion of Route 111 relinquished pursuant to this subdivision shall cease to be a state highway.

    (B) Any portion of Route 111 relinquished pursuant to this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (C) For any portion of Route 111 relinquished pursuant to this subdivision, the City of Palm Springs shall maintain signs within its city limits directing motorists to the continuation of Route 111.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(c) Route 10 near Indio to Route 10 near White Water passing near Palm Desert."

    In 1976, Chapter 1354 changed "White Water" to "Whitewater"

    In the early to mid 1990s, Route 111 was routed off of Palm Canyon Drive (the traditional downtown routing) onto Gene Autry. That move was deemed a prerequisite for the city of Palm Springs to institute traffic calming and other modifications to Palm Canyon Drive.

    In 1996, Chapter 1154 deleted the portions in Rancho Mirage and Cathedral City, splitting this into two segments "(c) Route 10 near Indio to the southeast city limit of Rancho Mirage. (d) West city limits of Cathedral City to Route 10 near Whitewater, passing near Palm Desert."

    In 2003 (AB 1717, Ch. 525, 9/25/03), the definition was amended to clarify that the portions in Rancho Mirage and Cathedral City cannot become a state highway again. It also made some minor wording changes in the definition "(c) Route 10 near Indio to the southeastern city limits of Rancho Mirage. (d) The western city limits of Cathedral City to Route 10 near Whitewater."

    Senate Bill 186, Ch. 594, 10/6/2005 deleted the phrase "passing near Palm Desert", and permitted the CTC to relinquish to the Cities of Indian Wells, Indio, and Palm Desert the respective portions of Route 111 that are located within the city limits of those cities, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the applicable city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. The Cities of Indian Wells, Indio, and Palm Desert, as applicable, are required to maintain within their respective jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 111.

    In October 2006, pursuant to the above, the CTC had a resolution to relinquish right of way of Route 111 in the city of Indian Wells, under terms and conditions determined to be in the best interest of the State as stated in the cooperative agreement to be approved by the city in October 2006. Authorized by Chapter 594, Statutes of 2005, which amended Section 411 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    In January 2007, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of Indio, under terms and conditions determined to be in the best interest of the State, as stated in the cooperative agreement with the City, which is anticipated to be approved in January 2007. Authorized by Chapter 594, Statutes of 2005, which amended Section 411 of the Streets and Highways Code. It appears that the I-10 exit to Golf Center Pkwy was signed as Route 111 for a while (and was the source of some L mileage).

    Senate Bill 224, Chaptered October 14, 2007, Chapter 718, added the City of La Quinta to the list of cities authorized for relinquishment.

    In January 2008, the CTC relinquished the right of way in the city of La Quinta, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment cooperative agreement, dated December 6, 2007, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 718, Statutes of 2007, which amended Section 411 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    In March 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Palm Desert, under terms and conditions as stated in the cooperative agreement, dated December 10, 2007, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 594, Statutes of 2005, which amended Section 411 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    In February 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Cathedral City along Route 111 east of Golf Club Drive, consisting of highway right of way that is no longer part of the State Highway System.

    In 2009, Route 111 was realigned off of Grapefruit Boulevard onto its original alignment on 66th Avenue west of Mecca to reach the new Route 86 expressway. This segment of 66th Avenue had been more recently part of Route 195 and was formally added back to Route 111 in 2014 as Post Mile RIV 18.5-19.4.
    (Source: Tom Fearer, "California State Route 111 in Coachella Valley")

    In 2010, Chapter 421 (SB 1318, 9/29/10) changed the definition to reflect all the relinquishments: "(c) From Route 10 near Indio to the southeastern city limits of Rancho Mirage. (d) western city limits of Cathedral City to Route 10 near Whitewater"

    In 2012, Chapter 769 (AB 2679, 9/29/12) updated the reliquishment text to reflect the relinquishment in the unincorporated areas of the County of Riverside.

    In 2018, AB 2272, Chapter 433, Statutes of 2018, 9/17/2018, added the following section:

    (c) (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Palm Springs any portion, or the entirety, of Route 111 within its city limits, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

    (2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective on the date following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, all of the following shall occur:

    (A) Any portion of Route 111 relinquished pursuant to this subdivision shall cease to be a state highway.

    (B) Any portion of Route 111 relinquished pursuant to this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (C) For any portion of Route 111 relinquished pursuant to this subdivision, the City of Palm Springs shall maintain signs within its city limits directing motorists to the continuation of Route 111.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 111 was signed along the route from Jct. US 99 at Brawley to Jct. US 60 at Whitewater, via Mecca, Indio, and Palm Springs. This is LRN 187, defined in 1933. A portion of this route was at one time part of US 99.

    In 1950, a new direct path of Route 111 northbound from Mecca to Thermal was opened via Grapefruit Boulevard. The original alignment of Route 111 used a less direct route from Mecca via; west 66th Avenue, north Pierce Street and Grapefruit Boulevard. By 1950, Route 111 on Palm Canyon Drive west of Palm Springs had been partially expanded to an expressway. By 1958, Route 111 on Palm Canyon Drive in downtown Palm Springs had been expanded to expressway capacity. By 1960 the expressway expansion continued, with the segment west of Palm Springs on Palm Canyon Drive almost entirely all the way to US 99/US 60/US 70 being so designated. In 1964, the route in Palm Desert was converted to expressway, and by 1967, it was expressway between Palm Springs and Palm Desert. By 1970, the expressway was expanded to Coachella.
    (Source: Tom Fearer, "California State Route 111 in Coachella Valley")

    In the 1950s, portions were cosigned with Route 74.

    Status Status

    In July 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Riverside on: Route 86 between Route 86S and Avenue 54 including adjacent right of way along Route 86 for drainage purposes; Route 111 between Route 195 and Route 86S, and between Route 86S and the boundary line between Riverside County and the city of Coachella; and Route 195 between Route 86 and Route 86S, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    In March 2013, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that is located on Route 111 in the City of Indian Wells in Riverside County. The project will widen Route 111 from four to six lanes for a distance of approximately 4 miles. Other proposed roadway improvements include but are not limited to: installation of landscaped medians, dual left turn lanes, construction of bus turnouts, traffic signal modifications, storm drain catch basin relocations and rubberized asphalt overlay. The project will be constructed in phases. Phase III of the project will widen Route 111 from four to six lanes and construct other roadway improvements from 950 feet east of Cook Street to Hospitality Court, for a distance of approximately 3,000 feet and is programmed in the SLPP program of projects. Phase III of the project is estimated to cost $3,100,000. The project is fully funded through construction with SLPP ($1,550,000) and Local ($1,550,000) funds. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2012/13.

    In February 2019, it was reported that crews assessing damage after the January and February 2019 rains have found roadways in need of major repairs. Route 111 from Gateway Drive (RIV 55.258) to I-10 (RIV R63.255) and Tramway Road leading up to the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway are just two examples of roads that may be closed indefinitely. Caltrans announced Friday afternoon that $14 million in emergency contracts have been awarded for road repairs in Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Route 111 repairs will be funded through a $3.5 million contract.
    (Source: Desert Sun, 2/15/2019)

    Naming Naming

    Historically, a portion of this segment (from Route 74 to Rancho Mirage) has been named the "Pines to Palms Highway".

    Deputy Bruce Lee Memorial HighwayThe portion of (former) Rout 111 from Washington Street in the City of La Quinta to Jefferson Street in the City of La Quinta in Riverside County is officially named the "Deputy Bruce Lee Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Deputy Bruce Lee of the Riverside County Sheriff's Department, who died while responding to a domestic disturbance call. His untimely death at 45 years of age brought immense sorrow to the people of the community and the state, and to countless individuals whose lives he touched. Deputy Bruce Lee was recognized throughout the community as a fair man who treated people with respect and always went out of his way to help others, as the friendly officer on the beat, and as the officer who enjoyed his job and liked working for and serving the community. He began his career with the Riverside County Sheriff's Department on September 2, 1980, and in his assignment to the Indio Station, he demonstrated the highest standards of law enforcement. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 5, Resolution Chapter 15, on 04/22/2005.
    (Image source: Find a Grave)

    Police Officer Jose (Gil) Vega and Police Officer Lesley Zerebny Memorial HighwayThe portion of Rout 111 from Overture Drive (post mile 58.478) to West San Rafael Drive (post mile 54.413) in the County of Riverside is named the "Police Officer Jose “Gil” Vega and Police Officer Lesley Zerebny Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Jose Vega and Lesley Zerebny. Jose “Gil” Vega began his career in law enforcement as a reserve police officer for the Indio Police Department in 1982 and became a reserve police officer for the Palm Springs Police Department later that year. Officer Vega became a police officer trainee with the Palm Springs Police Department in 1985, and, after graduating from the police academy, he was promoted to a police officer later that year. In his 34-year career in law enforcement, Officer Vega had various assignments. He was a very successful detective with the Riverside Auto Theft Interdiction Detail and with the Property Crimes Division of the Palm Springs Police Department. Officer Vega also served on the Palm Springs Police Department’s Mounted Enforcement Unit. Officer Vega served as a training officer and, during his time with the department, trained over 30 police officers, many of whom were promoted up through the ranksd. Officer Vega was very highly decorated. He is the only officer to have been twice named the Palm Springs Police Department’s “Officer of the Year,” first in 1992 and then again in 2011. He received a medal in 2010 for saving the life of an infant and received a Medal of Merit in 2013. Officer Vega also received many complimentary letters regarding his excellent work performance during his time with the department. Officer Vega was set to retire from the Palm Springs Police Department on December 28, 2016, and was to be awarded a Special Recognition Award for his 34 years of exemplary and dedicated law enforcement service. The other officer memorialized, Lesley Zerebnym was born and raised in Hemet, California, and wanted to be a police officer from a very young age. Officer Zerebny came from a family of law enforcement officers. Her father served as a California Highway Patrol officer for 30 years and her husband is a deputy in the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department. Officer Zerebny was hired as a police officer trainee by the Palm Springs Police Department in 2014 and was promoted to a police officer after graduating from the police academy. Officer Zerebny had a great attitude toward her career as a police officer, never hesitating to take on additional tasks and offering to help out the department and her fellow officers in any way she could. After giving birth to a daughter in 2016, she returned to work early to help out. While responding to a domestic disturbance call, Officer Vega and Officer Zerebny were fatally shot in Palm Springs on October 8, 2016. Named by ACR 2, 8/30/2017, Res. Chapter 125, Statutes of 2017.
    (Image source: Patch, Officer Down Memorial Page (Vega), Officer Down Memorial page (Zerebny))

    Business Routes Business Routes

    Apparantly, there is at least one sign for Business Route 111 pointing towards the pre-1990 routing in Palm Springs (South Palm Canyon Drive and East Palm Canyon Drive).

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.6] Entire portion.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.6] From San Rafael Dr. in Palm Springs to Route 10. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Blue Star Memorial Highway Blue Star Memorial Highway

The portion of this route that is former US 99 was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947.

Interregional Route Interregional Route

[SHC 164.15] Between the Mexico border near Calexico and Route 10 near Whitewater.

National Trails National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 111:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 23] near Rush Creek via June Lake to [LRN 23]" as a state highway. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 111. The definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering The route ran from US 395 near Rush Creek via June Lake back to US 395, and was present-day Route 158, the June Lake Loop.


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 110 Forward Arrow Route 112

© 1996-2020 Daniel P. Faigin.
Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.