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State Route 125

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Routing Routing

  1. Rte 125 Seg 1From Route 905 near Brown Field to Route 54.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    Rte 117 historyIn 1963, Route 125 was defined as the route from "Route 75 near Brown Field to Route 56 passing near La Mesa." The Route 75 referenced in this definition was a segment of Route 75 defined at that time as "Route 125 east of Brown Field to Route 5 near the south end of San Diego Bay." In 1972, a new definition of Route 117 was created (the previous one having been deleted in 1965) was was defined as " "the international boundary near Borderfield northeasterly to Route 5." These come together because, in 1975, the 1963 segment of Route 75 was transferred to Route 117 (and, in 1983, to Route 905).

    In 1964, the Highway commission located two freeway stretches on Route 125. One is for approximately our miles between I-8 in La Mesa and two-tenths mile south of Mission Gorge Road west of El Cajon. The second extends for 8.5 miles between four-tenths mile north of the Otay River and future Route 54 in the unincorporated community of Sunnyside.

    125 75 adoptionIn 1965, the CHC adopted a freeway routing for Route 125 and Route 75. Route 75 later became Route 117 and then Route 905. Specifically, the CTC adopted freeway routings for 9.7 miles of interconnected Route 75 and Route 125 near the Mexican border. The new alignment will take Route 75 easterly for 7.1 miles from I-5 near 27th Street, just south of Iris Avenue in San Diego, to about a halfmile east of Brown Field. From this point, the newly adopted alignment for Route 125 runs 2.6 miles northward, with a slight jog to the west between Johnson Canyon and the Otay River. It connects on the north with a previously adopted location for Route 125 northward to Route 54 near Sweetwater Reservoir. The Route 75 and 125 freeways will form the southern and eastern legs of a belt-line system of freeways around the San Diego Metropolitan area.

    In 1965, Chapter 1371 split the route into three segments: "(a) Route 75 near Brown Field to Route 54. (b) Route 54 to Route 94 near La Mesa. (c) Route 94 near La Mesa to Route 56."

    In 1972, Chapter 1216 changed the origin of this segment to "The international boundary southerly of Brown Field".

    In 1986, Chapter 928 transfered the portion added to in 1972 to Route 905, making (a) "(a) Route 905 near Brown Field to ..."

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was "routing determined" proposed LRN 282, defined in 1959, to the junction with present-day Route 905.

    Route 125 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 125 between 1934 and 1964.

    Status Status

    Route 125 / Route 905 / Route 11 Connectors (~ SD 0.000)

    125-905-11 ConnectorsIn October 2015, it was reported that work had begun on construction of the connectors between Route 125, Route 905, and Route 11. Officials said over the past two decades, trade between the U.S. and Mexico has grown by an average of 10 percent a year — an increase that exceeds that of U.S. trade with the rest of the world. Last year, more than 800,000 northbound trucks and $39 billion in goods passed through the Otay Mesa Port of Entry. The $21.5 million project is expected to be completed in late 2016. Funding sources include a $15.9 million chunk from Proposition 1B Trade Corridors Improvement Fund and $2.7 million from the TransNet half-cent sales tax for transportation uses approved by San Diego County voters, among other funding sources. Caltrans officials said the project is designed to remedy one of the last missing links in the overall border road network. Currently, truckers congest city streets and local roads to access Route 125. The new connectors will create a seamless highway system, greatly reducing wait times at the border, according to Caltrans.
    (Source: KPBS, 10/26/2015)

    In November 2016, it was reported that construction crews just wrapped up a year-long project that will help reduce congestion at the Otay Mesa Port of Entry. Three freeway connectors that link Route 905 and Route 11 to the northbound South Bay Expressway (Route 125) opened to traffic. More than 7,000 trucks travel across the Otay Mesa Border Crossing every day. The heavy traffic here during rush hour has caused major headaches for anyone trying to get to toll road Route 125 from Route 905 and Route 11. Before the connectors, vehicles exiting the Otay Mesa Port of Entry had no direct access to northbound 125 and drivers were forced to use local streets just to get there. Now, the new access will provide another option of travel for people living in southern San Diego and eastern Chula Vista. Drivers can avoid congestion on I-805 and I-5 by going east on Route 905 and north on Route 125. Now that the northbound connectors are complete, officials with SANDAG say they are hard at work finishing up designs on the southbound connectors. That project expected to begin construction in 2018.
    (Source: CW 6, 11/30/2016)

    With respect to the Southbound Connectors: In June 2019, it was reported that Skanska has won the construction contract for Route 905 in San Diego, California. The $101 Million contract with California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) is for a four-lane highway with freeway connectors on Route 905, located at Otay Mesa, one of three ports of entry in the San Diego-Tijuana Mexico metropolitan region. Construction work includes two freeway-to-freeway flyover bridges that will connect three highways (Route 125, Route 11 and Route 905), as well as a 1.25-mile greenfield extension of Route 11 to the east toward a future port-of-entry. The project will involve more than 15,000m3 of structural concrete, 30,000m3 of concrete paving, 35,000 tons of asphalt, and about 840,000 m3 of earthworks. Construction is scheduled for completion in September 2021.
    (Source: Construction Index, 6/10/2019)

    In June 2019, the CTC amended the TCEP Project Baseline Agreement and established it as the basis for project delivery and monitoring. The amendment programmed $1,708,000 in savings from the TCIF program for construction on the Route 125/Route 905 Connector project (PPNO 1036) in San Diego County. This project is one of six projects included in the Baseline Agreement for the California-Mexico Border System Network Improvements. The Route 125/Route 905 Connector project will construct a freeway to freeway South-West connector, thereby completing the remaining connector needed to integrate three major state roads serving the border region just north of the Otay Mesa Port of Entry at the United States/Mexico border. In May 2018, the project received $21,980,000 in TCEP funding. In August 2018, the California-Mexico Border System Network Improvements Baseline Agreement was approved, including this Route 125/905 Connector project. In February 2019, bid results from an adjacent project along the same corridor reflected a 10 percent increase in project costs. Upon review of those bid results, the project development team prepared a revised cost estimate for the Route 125/905 Connector project using the updated unit prices from the adjacent project. The revised estimate indicated a cost increase of approximately $1,708,000. Therefore, the Department and SANDAG propose to program $1,708,000 in TCIF savings from other projects to this connector project. A construction allocation of the programmed TCEP and TCIF funds is expected to be requested in Fall 2019.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1s.(1))

    In June 2019, the CTC amended the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund Program to add the Route 125/Route 905 Connector Project in San Diego County as Project 133, at a cost of $1,708,000. The Route 125/Route 905 Connector Project will construct a southbound Route 125 freeway connector to the westbound Route 905 freeway to integrate three major state roads serving the border region just north of the Otay Mesa Port of Entry. This project will contribute to a safer and more efficient border highway network that will alleviate congestion while providing more reliability for cross border international freight movements. The Trade Corridors Enhancement Program Baseline Agreement, approved in August 2018 will be amended to include the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund, thereby eliminating the need to adopt a stand-alone Trade Corridors Improvement Fund Baseline Agreement. The recently refined engineer’s estimate identified a cost increase of $1,708,000 in construction to bring the total estimated construction cost to $33,108,000. The need for the additional funds is due to updated unit pricing based on recently opened bids on nearby projects. The funding for this amendment is made available through savings generated from other projects programmed in the Trade Corridor Improvement Fund and is consistent with the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund Program Close-Out Policy approved at the May 2019 Commission.
    (Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 4.27)

    In March 2020, the CTC approved an allocation of $23,636,000 for the State-Administered Multi-Funded TCEP/TCIF Route 125/Route 905  Connector (PPNO 1036) project, on the State Highway System, in San Diego County. Specifically, the resolution was that $18,636,000 be allocated from the Budget Act of 2017 and 2019, Budget Act Items 2660-301-3291 and 2660-304-6056 for construction and $5,000,000 for construction engineering for the State-Administered Multi-Funded TCEP/TCIF project: 11-SD-905 PM 9.8/9.8: Route 125/Route 905 Connector. In and near San Diego at Route 125/Route 905 separation. Construct freeway to freeway South-West connector.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5s.(6))

    In April 2020, it was reported that crews from Skanska US Civil were constructing the final segment of the future Toll Route 11 and the southbound connector ramps, linking southbound Route 125 to eastbound Route 11 and eastbound state Route 905. Construction began on Skanska's contract ($103M) began in July 2019 and will be completed August 2021. Roadway and connector ramp construction currently underway will ultimately provide a direct connection to the new Otay Mesa East Port of Entry and a California Highway Patrol Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facility, helping to enable fast, predictable, and secure border crossings. Since construction began last summer, crews have focused their efforts on building 1.2 new mi. of Route 11 and setting up falsework for the construction of the two connector bridges at the Route 11/Route 905/Route 125 interchange. This work includes roadway and connector ramp construction, earth work, site preparation, and drainage infrastructure installation. Six bridges (cast-in-place box tube girder types) are being constructed for the interchange — two connector and four smaller underpass ones and the paving of Route 11 (east-west) that will connect with the new POE, three lanes in direction, will start in October and be finished in March 2021. One unique aspect of this project is the inclusion of a divergent diamond interchange, one of the first to be built in California. There are two connector bridges at the interchange, one that will connect southbound Route 125 to eastbound Route 11 and the other will connect southbound Route 125 to eastbound Route 905.
    (Source: Construction Equipment Guide, 4/7/2020)

    South Bay Expressway (Toll Road) (~ SD L1.014 to SD 8.804)

    [SB Expressway]*TOLL* This is a 11.2-mile, north-south toll road between Route 905 and Route 54. It was originally to be constructed by California Private Ventures, Inc. However, as of September 2002, according to a report by Eric Armourer from the Union Tribune, California Private Ventures sold those rights to an Austrailian firm that had many successful similar projects. He reported that the article seemed to imply that though there have been three lawsuits against the project since the rights were granted in July 2001. It seems that the major hold up was the ability to get construction financing, a problem that was not an issue with the new firm. The article states that the tollway is expected to break ground in January 2003. Tolls may be collected until 2047.

    According to Don Hagstrom in October 2002, the Route 125 Toll Freeway between Route 54 (South Bay Freeway) and Route 905 was to be completed by 2005. This toll freeway will initially be 4 lanes, with an ultimate plan for 8 lanes in the northern section and 6 lanes from southern Chula Vista to the Route 905 Freeway.

    According to Sign On San Diego in April 2003, construction was to begin shortly on the Southern Extension of this route. According to the article, "Planners first envisioned state Route 125 more than 40 years ago. It took another 20 years, as Chula Vista began to annex land to the east and residential developers created new neighborhoods, for local officials to declare the route a necessary part of the regional transportation plan.". The article notes that toll road portion was held up by legislation for a while, but is now cleared for construction. This is due to the fragile ecosystem, which contains several threatened species, including fairy shrimp, the Quino checkerspot butterfly and the Otay tarplant. Developers have spent $2.5 million to acquire more than 1,000 acres of land, including parcels northeast of Sweetwater Reservoir and east of Otay Reservoir, where those species will be protected.

    In November 2007, the 10 mile South Bay Expressway opened between Route 905 and Route 54. As of May 2008, the toll road draws an average of 30,000 drivers each weekday, about what state transportation officials expected. Many cash-paying customers have complained about the automated toll machines, while some Chula Vista merchants say it has not fueled the business boom they were hoping for. Tolls range from 75 cents to $3.75, depending on the length of the trip and how it is paid – with cash or through an electronic toll system called FasTrak. According to the Macquarie Infrastructure Group, the parent company of South Bay Expressway, the tollway generated an average of $54,600 in daily revenue from mid-January through March, or about $2 per vehicle. The road attracts an average of 26,500 vehicles daily, including weekends. Nearly four out of five motorists pay through FasTrak. As a result of construction of the route, according to Caltrans, the volume of morning traffic on northbound I-805 in Chula Vista has dropped 11% since opening. Congestion has increased, however, at two interchanges north of the tollway: at Route 125 and Route 94, and at Route 125 and I-8 in La Mesa.
    [Source: SD Union Tribune]

    In Mid-January, the cost of driving the South Bay Expressway, increased by as much as 75¢. Tolls for cash-paying customers will increase 50 to 75 cents, to a range of $2.50 to $4.50 per trip, depending on length. Just under 30,000 vehicles travel at least part of the 10-mile roadway each weekday.

    In March 2010, the South Bay Expressway (SBE) company filed for a reorganization in Chapter 11 US bankruptcy, writing off around $200m in shareholder equity. The project suffered from being in an area affected by the subprime mortgage meltdown, as well as major ongoing litigation over huge claims made by Fluor/URS, the contractors who built the road but spent over a year longer than contracted at the job. SBE are proposing to the US Banktuptcy Court that it address both the reorganization and write-off of debt and the Fluor/URS litigation claims, which are cited as a major reason for the Chapter 11 filing.
    (Source: "South Bay Expressway company files for bankruptcy in San Diego", Tollroad News, 3/24/2010)

    In July 2011, it was reported that the San Diego Assn. of Governments agreed to purchase the bankrupt Route 125 toll road near the U.S.-Mexico border for approximately $345 million. Under the new ownership, the road won't be free but tolls will be reduced.

    In December 2014, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Diego along Route 125 at Lonestar Road (a/k/a La Media Rd, ~SD L1.799), consisting of collateral facilities. The City, by freeway agreement dated November 27, 2000, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expired October 28, 2014.

    Naming Naming

    South Bay Expressway"South Bay Expressway"
    (Image source: San Diego Forward)

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Mary Augustine BridgeThe horse bridge that crosses Route 125 and is located in Bonita, west of the Summit Park Campground in San Diego County (Bridge 57-1176, SD 008.00, Sweetwater Regional Trail POC), is named the "Mary Augustine Bridge". This segment was named in honor of Mary Augustine, a long-time resident of Bonita, California, and an equestrian and trail advocate. In 1969, Mary was a founding member of a new horse club in Bonita called Equestrian Trails, Inc. (E.T.I.), a national club with a southwestern base in Los Angeles whose purpose was to build a network of trails throughout the country. The Bonita Club, E.T.I. Corral 89, concentrated its efforts in Bonita and worked in concert with other corrals throughout San Diego County. From its early days through the subsequent reorganization and creation of Bonita Valley Horsemen (BVH) in February 1975, through approximately 1989, Mary worked tirelessly on various trails projects in Bonita and San Diego County. Mary was instrumental in getting the first large trail project in Bonita started and completed. It is the current trail around the Chula Vista Golf Course used by, among others, riders, bikers, and hikers, During the critical years of the 1970s and 80s, Mary worked with state and local agencies and persuaded developers to give land easements for dedicated trails, or to preserve existing trails, through Bonita Downs, Bonita Woods Park, Bonita Ridge, and Ranchito Robinwood. These trails were to eventually feed into other trails planned for Sweetwater Regional Park. At that point there were an estimated 1,300 horses in Bonita, and San Diego County had the largest per capita population of horses in the U.S.A. As time went on developers began to see the wisdom of calling Mary for advice regarding trails through their developments or rerouting existing trails. As interest and success in local and county trails grew, horse camps at Cuyamaca Rancho State Park had come into being and the Anza-Borrego horse camp was on the horizon. Mary was one of the first volunteers on the Mounted Assistance Unit, designed to aid park rangers on search and rescue missions, patrol the areas of the park that the rangers could not get to easily, uphold park rules, interpret the park regulations, and many other duties. In the late 1970s, Mary headed up the new Sweetwater Summit Park east towards Jamul and the trail was built with the aid of a Comprehensive Employment and Training Act grant in the amount of $40,000. This trail was dedicated July 17, 1980, and on that day Mary led the first trail ride on the new trail, which is still used today regularly by riders, bikers, and hikers. Mary's ultimate goal, which she fulfilled, was to ride from the Pacific Ocean to Cuyamaca State Park and beyond to the desert regions of Cleveland National Park. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 17, Resolution Chapter 59, on 6/22/2007.
    (Image source: GrokSurf's San Diego, SD Union Tribune, Equestrian Trails Inc)

    Other WWW Links Other WWW Links


  2. Rte 125 Seg 2From Route 54 to Route 94 near La Mesa.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, Route 125 was defined as the route from "Route 75 near Brown Field to Route 56 passing near La Mesa."

    In 1965, Chapter 1371 split the route into three segments: "(a) Route 75 near Brown Field to Route 54. (b) Route 54 to Route 94 near La Mesa. (c) Route 94 near La Mesa to Route 56." This is the 1965 segment (b).

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was "routing determined" proposed LRN 282, defined in 1959, to the junction with present-day Route 905.

    Route 125 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 125 between 1934 and 1964.

    Status Status

    In November 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of San Diego, from Swap Meet Road to Palm Street (~ SD 9.802 to SD 12.075), consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads, frontage roads, and cul-de-sacs.

    Route 125 / Route 54 Interchange (~ SD 9.925)

    This is part of the "Inner Loop" route. The Route 125 southern extension along Sweetwater Road opened in early May 2003. There is a gap between the end of the Route 54 freeway and the start of Route 125 fwy, but there is construction along this portion. However, Route 54 eastbound does directly turn into Route 125 northbound—there's just one signalized intersection at Sweetwater Rd southbound. Farther north on Route 125, the freeway is open continuously from Route 94 all the way to Route 52 in both directions. And the Route 52/Route 125 freeway to freeway interchange was completed some time ago. There is still construction on Route 125 at Grossmont College Dr with traffic in both directions squeezed onto the northbound lanes. But all intersections and stoplights have been eliminated. Note: when heading southbound on Route 125 thru the Route 94/Route125 interchange, you have to exit far right to "stay" on Route 125, as the freeway maintains its legacy of the "thru" direction being onto westbound Route 94.

    The construction noted above was completed with the opening of the toll road section to the south; the final phase of the construction was the interchange with Route 54. Since Route 125 was designed as part of a loop route, the main lanes connect though as follows - Route 125 South to Route 54 West, Route 54 East to Route 125 North. The section from Route 94 north to Route 52 is also complete, and has been since 2005. Signs have recently been posted near the Route 52/Route 125 interchange for the extension of Ropute 52 further east, which will require some work on the interchange at the northern end of Route 125. These signs indicate a projected completion date of 2011. There appears to be no any movement toward the extension of Route 56 or for the extension of Route 25 further north. It currently (2008) ends at an at-grade T intersection beneath the Route 125 North-Route 52 West flyover ramp.

    Naming Naming

    The portion of this route constructed to freeway standards is named the "Ramona Freeway". It is part of the "Inner Loop" with Route 52 and Route 54. Ramona was the central character in the Helen Hunt Jackson novel Ramona, which was a seminal novel in the early 20th century in creating the romance of California.

    Commuter Lanes Commuter Lanes

    HOV lanes are planned between 0.2 mi N of Tyler Street to Route 94.


  3. Rte 125 Seg 3From Route 94 near La Mesa to Route 56.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, Route 125 was defined as the route from "Route 75 near Brown Field to Route 56 passing near La Mesa."

    In 1965, Chapter 1371 split the route into three segments: "(a) Route 75 near Brown Field to Route 54. (b) Route 54 to Route 94 near La Mesa. (c) Route 94 near La Mesa to Route 56." This is the 1965 segment (c).

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was "routing determined" proposed LRN 282, defined in 1959, to the junction with present-day Route 905.

    It appears that the segment between Route 94 and I-8 was originally part of Route 67.

    Route 125 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 125 between 1934 and 1964.

    Status Status

    In December 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of La Mesa along Routes 94 and 125 between Grove Street and Spring Street (~ SD M10.274), consisting of relocated and reconstructed county roads and frontage roads. The County of San Diego, by freeway agreement dated September 30, 1968, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State to roads which on that date were within an unincorporated area of the county and have since been annexed by the City.

    Route 125 / Route 94 Interchange (11-SD-125, PM R10.5/T11.5)

    IntersectionIn September 2000, the California Transportation Commission considered a $1.7 million phase 1 proposal (TCRP Project #87) for two new freeway connector ramps at the Route 94/Route 125 interchange. Total estimated cost is $90 million. This funding was extended in September 2005 as the project is ready to proceed. In April 2007, the CTC amended project 87.2 to orogram an additional $3,610,000 in TCRP funds for Project Approval & Environmental Document (PA&ED). This project will construct the ultimate two-lane freeway-to-freeway connectors from westbound Route 94 to northbound Route 125 and from southbound Route 125 to eastbound Route 94. The project will also widen Route 125 providing additional lanes from Spring Street to Lemon Avenue, and provide auxiliary lanes from the connectors to the next interchange at Lemon Avenue. The additional $3,610,000 for PA&ED was needed to study impacts to the large number of residential, commercial, and resource rich areas that will be impacted by this project. It is estimated that four years will be required to complete the needed environmental studies, complete the draft environmental document, circulate it for public comment, and gain final approval. The project was scheduled for construction between FY 2012 and FY 2017.

    In August 2016, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project on Route 94 (11-SD-94, PM 13.6/14.6) and Route 125 (11-SD-125, PM R10.5/T11.5) in San Diego County that will construct a freeway-to-freeway connection from southbound Route 125 to eastbound Route 94 in the city of La Mesa. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the Traffic Congestion Relief Program. The total estimated cost is $188,496,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2018-19. The Department has identified the need for a scope change to reduce the number of connectors from two to one. An amendment will be placed on the October 2016 California Transportation Commission meeting agenda to reflect the scope change.

    In January 2017, it was reported that construction had not yet commenced on this project, although some homes in the area had been sold by Caltrans. A fact sheet from January 2016 noted that the project encompasses two miles, with the freeway-to-freeway connector passing under the existing Route 125 and joining eastbound Route 94 between Bancroft and Kenwood drives, according to the fact sheet. Construction of two auxiliary lanes is planned: one lane along southbound Route 125 from Lemon Avenue to the connector and the other lane from the connector to Kenwood Drive. Other proposed improvements include replacing the Mariposa Street overcrossing, widening the Route 94 bridges over Bancroft Drive, constructing “bridge structures” on Panorama Drive and Echo Drive over the connector, and constructing noise barriers along Route 94 and Route 125. The estimated project cost totaled $71.33 million, with $5 million coming from the State Transportation Congestion Relief Program and $1.7 million in TransNet funds from the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) for environmental studies. (“TransNet,” says SANDAG’s website, “is the half-cent sales tax for local transportation projects that was first approved by voters in 1988, and extended in 2004 for another 40 years.”) However, “construction of these improvements will be scheduled as funding becomes available.” In December 2016, Caltrans project manager Lou Melendez responded, when asked about the status of the project. “We stopped the project when we ran out of money.” He said Caltrans funds ran out in 2015, and the project was “put on a shelf.” Melendez said there was no funding because the SANDAG-sponsored Measure A failed in November. In the year “2021, things might improve”. The City of La Mesa is aware of the project status, and that it is awaiting funding, said Greg Humora, the La Mesa public works director/city engineer whose promotion to assistant city manager was announced at the December 13, 2016 city-council meeting. On December 15, Humora said the Route 125/Route 94 is the “number one interchange project in the county” and identified by “TransNet as a high-priority project.”
    (Source: San Diego Reader, 1/18/2017)

    In June 2017, the CTC authorized the following TCRP allocation: Allocation Amendment - TCRP Project. Request the reallocation of $536,000 for Environmental on TCRP Project 87.2 – Build two new freeway connector ramp projects in San Diego County. (PPNO 0356) [Approved.]: This is a financial re-allocation of $536,000 for TCRP Project 87.2 – Route 94/Route 125; build two new freeway connector ramps project (PPNO 0356) in San Diego County. Re-allocate $536,000 in previously allocated funds for PA&ED.

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate Advance Project Development Element (APDE) funding of $7.948M in FY18-19 for PS&E on PPNO 0356 Route 94/Route 125 Connectors.

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2020 meeting, continued the programmed funding for PPNO 0356 "Rt 94/125 Connectors (APDE)".
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In August 2020, the CTC approved an allocation of $4,000,000 for the State-Administered Senate Bill 1 (SB 1) Local Partnership Program (LPP)  (Formulaic) Route 94/Route 125 Connector (PPNO 0356) project.
    (Source: August 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5s.(1))

    In April 2010, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Lemon Grove along Route 125 between Ildica Street and Sweetwater Way (~ SD 11.512), consisting of collateral facilities. The County of San Diego, by freeway agreements dated September 30, 1968 and January 2, 1969, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State to roads which on that date were within an unincorporated area of the county and have since been annexed by the City of Lemon Grove. The 90-day notice period expired January 12, 2010, without exception.

    In December 2016, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of La Mesa along Route 125 on Bowling Green Drive and Echo Drive (11-SD-125-PM 13.5/14.0) and along Route 94 on Panorama Drive (11-SD-94-PM 10.5/10.8), consisting of collateral facilities. The City, by letter dated August 1, 2016, agreed to waive the 90-day notice requirement and accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    In October 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of La Mesa, from Alvarado Avenue to Blue Lake Drive (~ SD 18.493), consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets and frontage roads.

    In October 2008, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Diego along Route 125 near Fletcher Parkway (~ SD 18.556) on East Lake Drive between Flume Road and Lake Angela Drive, consisting of relocated and reconstructed city streets.

    Under Construction Unconstructed Completed between Route 94 and Route 52 . The remainder, from Route 52 to Route 56, is proposed but no completion date has been set. The section between Amaya Drive and Fletcher Parkway opened on 1/3/2001.

    There have been some plans to connect Route 125 with Route 79, making an east-side freeway corridor to I-10.

    Naming Naming

    The portion of this route constructed to freeway standards is named the "Ramona Freeway". It is part of the "Inner Loop" with Route 52 and Route 54. Ramona was the central character in the Helen Hunt Jackson novel Ramona, which was a seminal novel in the early 20th century in creating the romance of California.

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Bridge 57-0972R over Fletcher Parkway in San Diego County (SD 018.42) is named the "Benjamin E. Polak Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1991, and was named (before construction) by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 120, Chapter 64, in 1990. Benjamin E. Polack, President of Harbor Management, was active in the United Way and instrumental in its establishment in Costa Rica in the 1970's.

    Commuter Lanes Commuter Lanes

    HOV lanes are planned for the portion from I-8 to Route 52. These are scheduled to open by 2011.


Exit Information Exit Information

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Scenic Route Scenic Route

[SHC 263.6] From Route 94 near Spring Valley to Route 8 near La Mesa.

Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Diego 125 9.59 12.68
San Diego 125 12.77 13.71
San Diego 125 14.12 18.45
San Diego 125 R18.54 22.14

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 125:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the segments from "[LRN 56] near Moro to [LRN 4] near Fresno via Stratford" and "[LRN 4] near Fresno to Yosemite National Park" as part of the highway system. In 1935, this was defined in the highway code as LRN 125, with the definition:

  1. [LRN 56] near Moro to [LRN 4] near Fresno via Stratford
  2. [LRN 4] near Fresno to Yosemite National Park

In 1937, Chapter 841 removed the explict routing via Stratford and fixed some spellings in segment (a), giving "[LRN 56] near Morro to [LRN 4] near Fresno"

This route was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 56 (Route 1) near Morrow to LRN 4 (US 99) near Fresno.

    This was US 466 (present-day Route 41) between Morro Bay and Cholame, and Route 41 between Cholame and US 99 in Fresno. It appears that, for some period (likely ~late 1950s through 1964), the portion between Atascadero and Shandon was signed as part of Route 41 and not US 466.
  2. From LRN 4 (US 99) near Fresno to Yosemite National Park.

    This was Route 41.


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 124 Forward Arrow Route 126

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