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US Highway Shield

US Highway 395

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

  1. U.S. 395 in 1942, 1965, 2018From Route 15 near Cajon Pass to the Nevada state line passing near Little Lake, Independence, Bridgeport, and Coleville.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, Route 395 was defined as "(a) San Diego to Route 10 near San Bernardino via Temecula and passing near Riverside. (b) Route 15 near Cajon Pass to the Nevada state line passing near Little Lake, Independence, Bridgeport, and Coleville. (c) Nevada state line northwest of Reno to the Oregon state line near New Pine Creek via Alturas."

    In 1969, Chapter 294 transferred the routing that was (a) to other routes. The portion from San Diego to Route 103 [which became Route 15 in 1969] was transferred to Route 163; the portion from Route 103 (present-day Route 15) to Route 71 (present-day Route 15) was transferred to Route 15; and the portion from Route 71 (present-day 15) to Route 31 (present-day Route 15) was transferred to Route 215.

    Thus, the current segment (a) is the original 1963 (b).

    Note that it appears that, prior to the elimination of US 395 signage in San Diego, US 395 ran along 10th and 11th Ave from the southern end of Balboa Park (i.e., where Route 163 and I-5 now meet) to Market Street, where it continued W along Market Street to Harbor Drive (US 101 until it was eliminated and replaced by I-5). The portion along Market appears to have been cosigned with Route 94 (LRN 200). At one point, US 395 may have been extended to the Coronado Ferry which was at the end of Pacific, at least according to some San Diego Council minutes, meaning that the route wasextended down Pacific to Seaport Village. Route 94 may have been moved from Market to the F/G couplet in 1959.
    (Source: Discussion on AARoads, 5/2019. Multiple contributors.)

    There are unconstructed but adopted portions from 3 mi S of Route 18 to 7 mi S of Route 58, and from the San Bernardino County line to 8 mi S of Route 178, for 44 miles parallel to the existing traversable route.

    According to Scott Parker on AARoads,  there is a pathway preserved for a US 395 freeway/expressway facility through the west end of Hesperia and Victorville, extending north from the current US 395 split from I-15 and closely following the current US 395 alignment, but shifting from one side (west) to the other (east) from time to time.  That continues out to where US 395 veers slightly NW south of Adelanto.  Any freeway alignment would have to arc west from the current US 395 facility to circumvent development in that town -- but not too far, maybe a mile to a mile and a half west.  That was planned to allow as much of the present US 395 to remain as a site for commercial activity.  Alternate alignments well to the west have also been proposed; most of those simply skirt the west end of Victorville development by veering NW from the I-15/US 395 interchange around the north end of Baldy Mesa and then heading due north (and steering around the industrial parks in NW Victorville) to align with any Adelanto bypass; all of which would rejoin current US 395 at some point north of town.  For a time, there was thought of simply multiplexing US 395 traffic with the eastern extension of the High Desert Corridor to interchange with I-15 north of Victorville, but since the removal of the freeway portion from those plans, it's likely that US 395 will, when upgraded, simply use one of the above options to reach the current interchange in Hesperia.
    (Source: Scott Parker on AARoads, "Re: CA-58 Kramer Junction Bypass", 5/30/2020)

    Another planned freeway adoption was US 395 between the McGee Maintenance Station south to Crowley Lake Dam Road, adopted at the same time before the 1964 renumbering. This was built as an expressway (with one interchange); Old US 395 became "Crowley Lake Road".

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    Originally, a number of different state signed routes (and LRNs) corresponded to US 395. It appears that at the June 1934 meeting of AASHTO, US 395 was first created. An August 15, 1934 letter from AASHTO to the State of Oregon indicated that US 395 had just been established running from the Canadian border to San Diego. In California, by the October 1934 or 1935 signage of routes, US 395 was first signed.

    The initial route of US 395 is first shown in clear detail on the 1936 State Highway Map City Insert. US 395 entered the San Diego area southbound using the following route:
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog California State Route 163; Old US Route 80/395 on the Cabrillo Freeway)

    • Fairmount Avenue to US 80 on El Cajon Avenue. It is unclear if US 395 ended at US 80 (LRN 12) at El Cajon Avenue or multiplexed into downtown. It is likely US 80 and US 395 had a mutual terminus at Market Street on 12th Avenue in common terminus points had a precedent in other locations in California.
    • A possible multiplex of US 80 on El Cajon Avenue to Park Boulevard.
    • A possible multiplex of US 80 on Park Boulevard through Balboa Park which became 12th Avenue in downtown San Diego to US 101 on Market Street.

    Of course, after 1964, route numbers were changed again (as detailed above), with US 395 truncated to start at I-15, and earlier portions being subsumed into the new routings of I-15, I-215, Route 74, and Route 163. Specifically, before 1964, US 395 had the following legislative routes and signing:

    1. Between US 101 (present-day I-5) in San Diego and a point just S of the Mirimar Naval Air Station: This is present-day Route 163 and was LRN 77, defined in 1931. Route 71/US 395 started at US 101 near present day University of San Diego. It followed Linda Vista Road to current Route 163, then followed Kearney Villa Road to roughly the present day I-15/Route 163 interchange. Although the original plan was to sign this as Route 71, by October 1935, it was signed as part of US 395.
      • In 1934, the route of LRN 77 was changed. After the change, LRN 77 went down Fairmount and terminated at Route 12 on El Cajon Blvd. US 395 was contiguous with US 80 along LRN 12 until the terminus at Market St and 12th. LRN 12/US 395 was later extended west to Pacific Highway (in 1943) . A 1935 map showing routes to the California-Pacific Exposition in Balboa Park clearly shows several US 395 shields along Fairmount, El Cajon Blvd, and Park Blvd (the last two with US 80 shields also). The State Highway map of 1930 does not show Fairmount Blvd at all, but the State Highway map of 1934 does show Fairmount. Some route US 395 along Fairmont as late as 1948. At the time of this change, the start was also moved to have it start (with US 80) at US 101 in downtown San Diego, later the starting point for Route 163 (more information on this historical portion may be found under Route 163). It headed north on Park Blvd with US 80, then headed east on El Cajon Blvd. It split from US 80 at Fairmont Ave, heading north on Fairmont. It crossed the San Diego River just east of current I-15, then ultimately followed that routing north to Miramar Rd / Pomerado Rd. Thus, it appears (based on input from Steve Varner and Cameron Kaiser) that from 1934-1948, US 395 went north along 12th (Park) with US 80 from Market St and then cut over on A St and north on Park "again" to El Cajon, then left US 80 north on Fairmount (potentially meaning that the "interchanges" on Fairmount were originally part of US 395).
      • Around 1942, US 395 appears to have been routed on Fairmount from Camino Del Rio, up what looks like the old Ward Rd, and then along Murphy Cyn Rd. Around 1948, it was routed to the current Route 163, with the freeway constructed in 1948.
    2. Between a point just S of the Mirimar Naval Air Station and 2 mi N of Temecula: This is present-day I-15, and was LRN 77, defined in 1931. It was signed as Route 71 between Mirimar (Miramar) and Temecula between 1934 and 1935, when US 395 was first signed. US 395 followed what is now Pomerado Road from a point 3 miles north of the I-15/Route 163 interchange to the interchange of Pomerado Road/I-15 at a point just south of the Lake Hodges / San Dieguito River crossing near the southern city limits of Escondido.
      • In Escondido until 1948-49, US 395 was routed 2 blocks to the east of Centre City Parkway along Escondido Blvd. Note how Escondido Blvd has many old motor court style motels from the 20s as well as art deco buildings from the 30s. Note that in the 1950s, US 395 followed four-lane Centre City Parkway. There is still a US 395 mile marker near the downtown area on Centre City Pkwy. Many 1950s era Googie-style cafes remain on this stretch of old highway. Lastly, note that Escondido Blvd (pre-1949 US 395) was actually called San Diego Blvd at the time, as noted on this page from the Escondido Historical Society.
      • One correspondent notes that in 1939 & 1942, US 395 entered Escondido along Escondido Blvd; thence northeast along Grand Ave; thence northwest along Broadway; thence southwest along Mission Ave (old name Grant Ave) and out of Escondido toward Vista. The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers Escondido Quadrangle 1942 edition shows Escondido Blvd north of Grand as only a dry weather road, and California Highways and Public Works magazine September 1939 page 10 has a small scale map that shows US 395 entering Escondido along a street that is probably Escondido Blvd, then going east to another street that is probably Broadway, then north again.
      • US 395 headed west along Mission Ave (former Route 78, now San Diego County Sign Route S14), which turns into South Santa Fe Ave west of San Marcos. It continued to travel E/W along South Santa Fe Ave, and then turned north on Vista Way (San Diego County Sign Route S13) to the current junction with Route 76, following it east. Just to the north of this junction there is a beautiful bridge over the San Luis Rey River (Bonsall Bridge), built in 1925 that was supplanted by a modern crossing in the late 1980s. US 395 followed the current routing of Route 76 to Bonsall, where it diverged from the state route, heading north on Mission Ave (San Diego County Sign Route S13). There is another old US 395 bridge on the south side of Fallbrook that was bypassed with road improvements to South Mission. You can find a description here. Not far south of this bridge there is an old alignment of US 395 (between Fallbrook and Bonsall) that was bypassed called Hellers Bend. The road still has that name.
      • In Fallbrook, US 395 appears to have followed the current routing of County Sign Route S13 through town and made its 90 degree turn at the same place as Mission Ave does today. It then followed County Sign Route S13 to a point less than 1/4 mile east of I-15. It rejoined what is now known as "Old Highway 395" in this area. Note that the current route of Mission Ave changed in the not-too-distant past. Today, Mission Avenue heads north into Fallbrook as "South Mission" Ave. Main Street splits from Mission, heading straight north, while South Mission jogs west, then heads north along what was once Hill Ave. After crossing Alvarado it becomes "North Mission." It currently makes a 90° turn to the east and becomes "West Mission" until crossing Main again after which it is "East Mission", and heads east to the I-15. According to online maps like those on Yahoo, this is the path of County S13. However, if you look on Topozone at the 7.5 minute map, this routing does not exist on the 1968 Morro Hill quad. Instead, from both the topo map and historical descriptions from the Fallbrook Historical Society that are online, it appears that US 395 followed Mission north until it became Main Street, it then turned 90° east on what the topo calls Juniper St (now East Mission). It then jogged north, then east as Mission Road, following that east to the current "Old 395" near the I-15.
      • Much of "Old 395" is still drivable. According to one contributor who lives in that area, Old Highway 395 in that area is still well traveled (and mostly well maintained), functioning mostly as a bypass around the border patrol checkpoint for local traffic. It parallels the southbound side of Route 15 for many miles (well before Route 76) then at/with Mission Road (Fallbrook) crosses over Route 15 to the North side of the freeway (via 2 90 degree turns), parallels I-15 for a few more miles until the Rainbow Valley Blvd exit. where it diverges somewhat and becomes a narrow windy mountain road (with some great vantages over the City of Temecula). Once everything levels out, it runs into Pala Road (sometimes "Pechanga Parkway") about 1/8 mile south of Route 79. South of Route 76, stretches are a narrow mountain road. The abandoned 40-foot Ostrich Creek Bridge in downtown Fallbrook is another relic of old US 395.
      • US 395 diverged again to the south of the grade to Temecula Creek, following Rainbow Canyon Road, where it ultimately joined with current Route 79 (formerly Route 71). The current routing of I-15 was originally a four lane bypass of town, opened in 1949. A relic of the old routing are the two tiny country gas stations on Rainbow Valley Boulevard, their pumps long gone.
    3. Between 2 mi N of Temecula and Riverside: This is present-day I-215, and was LRN 78, defined in 1931. For a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982. Note that, until 1950, US 395 was routed along the route of present-day I-15 from Temecula to the junction with present-day Route 74, then along present-day Route 74 to "D" Street in Perris, and then up "D" Street along present-day I-215. This is shown on some of the older maps. US 395 signage started in 1935 for the dogleg route. The US 395 designation was moved to the I-215 direct routing in 1952-1952, upon completion of construction of the new highway. The older dogleg routing through Elsinore remained as Route 71 (eventual I-15) and Route 74. Note that the routing from Perris to Riverside was originally signed as part of Route 740.

      In 1915, the road through Temecula was first constructed, spawning businesses such as the Swing Inn, known as Mother's Cafe and Alesandro's Place in its earliest days, and other eateries like Mrs. L.M. Hall's Temecula Lunch Rooms, the B-Bar-H Cafe and the Rite-Spot. The two-lane concrete road, built by Riverside County, ran from Perris through Murrieta and into Temecula along Jefferson Avenue and Front Street before heading up the grade toward Rainbow, according to Phil Brigandi's book, "Temecula at the Crossroads of History." Eventually designated US 395, that road and others like it were built to make automobile travel more practical and comfortable. In 1949, US 395 was rerouted out of the business area and up to about where I-15 runs today. There were fears in Temecula that the bypass would severely damage local merchants. A study by the California Division of Highways showed business at the five cafes in Temecula decreased more than 18 percent between 1949 and 1950. However, that same study showed that throughout the entire county the cafe business was also down about 18 percent in the same period.
      (Source: San Diego Union Tribune, 7/28/2005)

    4. Between Jct US 60/US 91 and Jct US 60/US 395 (i.e., through Riverside): The route was cosigned as US 60/US 395, and was LRN 19 (defined in 1909). This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982.
    5. 1944 MapBetween Riverside and San Bernardino: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 395, and was LRN 43 (defined in 1931). This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982. As the 1944 map shows, US 395 entered into Colton, where the routing dropped the cosigning with Route 18, and continued N along Waterman as LRN 31.
    6. Between San Bernardino and Devore: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 66/US 395, and was LRN 31 (defined in 1915). This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982. The portion between former US 66 and Route 14 (former Route 7) was originally part of state signed Route 95, defined in 1934, renumbered to US 395 upon the definition of US 395.
    7. Between Devore and 7 mi SW of Victorville: The route was cosigned as US 66/US 91/US 395, and was LRN 31, defined in 1915.
    8. Between 7mi SW of Victorville and the vicinity of Inyokern. The route was signed as US 395, and was LRN 145, defined in 1933. This is part of present-day US 395. The portion between former US 66 and Route 14 (former Route 7) was originally part of state signed Route 95, defined in 1934, renumbered to US 395 upon the definition of US 395 around 1935.
    9. Between the vicinity of Inyokern and Bishop. The route was cosigned as US 6/US 395 (and was formerly Route 7). This was LRN 23, defined in 1909. This is part of present-day US 395. The signage as part of US 395 occurred around 1935.
    10. Between Bishop and the vicinity of Topaz Lake. The route was signed as US 395, and was LRN 23, defined in 1909. This is part of present-day US 395, and was originally part of state signed Route 7. The signage as part of US 395 occurred around 1935.
    11. From Topaz Lake to the Nevada state line. The route was signed as US 395, and was LRN 95. This is part of present-day US 395, defined in 1933, and was originally part of state signed Route 7. The signage as part of US 395 occurred around 1935.

    East of the Route 203 interchange, "Old Highway" takes a routing parallelling Mammoth Creek for a bit and crossing it a bit northeast of the current US 395 expressway. It serves as a connection to several local roads, including a forest route along Antelope Springs Road. However, it is unclear if Old Highway directly connects with existing US 395 (Mapquest shows it as doing so; MSN's map service does not).

    An "Old State Highway Road" parallels Route 120/US 395 from south of West Portal Road on the east side of Grant Lake all the way north to Oil Plant Road south of Lee Vining. (This is shown on Mapquest and on Compass's maps.)

    Status Status

    General Southern US 395

    In November 2011, the first workshop for the "Historic Highway 395 Corridor Study" project, also known as the Jefferson Avenue Corridor project, was held in Murrieta. The 16-mile arterial corridor is proposed to parallel the west side of I-15 where old US 395 used to travel. It would extend from Rancho California Road along Jefferson Avenue through the cities of Temecula and Murrieta, continuing along Palomar Street and Mission Trail through the cities of Wildomar and Lake Elsinore, and continuing along East Lakeshore Drive to Main Street in Lake Elsinore. Additional information may be found at http://www.highway395corridorstudy.org/.

    High Desert Corridor

    Note: The bulk of the information on the High Desert Corridor is discussed with Route 138.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #624: Begin construction of a road from US 395 west towards Route 14. The specifics of this aren't given, but it could relate to the High Desert Corridor and the Cross-Valley Connector (see Route 138), which when combined with the I-5 to Route 14, and US 395 to I-15 segments, would complete the Metropolitan Bypass Freeway. The funding, however, is insufficient to complete this. $800,000.
    • High Priority Project #1342: Construction of new freeway between I-15 and US 395, including new interchange at I-15. This is the last part of the High Desert Corridor (see Route 138). This will provide new highway access to the Southern California Logistics Airport. $4,000,000.

    Jct I-15 to Jct Route 14 near Inyokern

    In July 2007, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Hesperia, at Outpost Road, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city street. The City, by relinquishment cooperative agreement dated April 16, 2007, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    US 395 Expressway / Realignment

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #2427: US 395 Realignment and Widening Project. $400,000.

    There are currently plans to realign US 395 near the cities of Oak Hills, Hesperia, Victorville, Adelanto and incorporated areas of San Bernardino County. This is based off of a draft EIR. The plan is to realign US 395 from the I-15/US 395 interchange (approx SBD R3.981) to Farmington Road. The proposed US 395 Realignment Freeway/Expressway corridor to be evaluated is located either on existing US 395 or west of existing US 395, through the cities of Oak Hills, Hesperia, Victorville, Adelanto and incorporated areas of San Bernardino County. The entire proposed project length is approximately 45.0 miles long. There are four alternatives currently being considered:

    • Alternate A: No Build. This Alternative consists of no change to existing facilities along the proposed project portion of the US 395 corridor.
    • Alternative D: Existing Alignment. The Existing Alignment Alternative follows the existing alignment or a slightly offset alignment throughout the project limits.
    • Alternative F: Realignment West of Existing Corridor. This Alternative proposes to realign the corridor from the I-15/US 395 interchange to Farmington Road. This realignment heads northwest in the vicinity of the Oak Hills Community and the Union Pacific Railroad, and then continues in a northerly direction just west of Caughlin Road within San Bernardino County limits and traversing the western portions of the City of Adelanto, where it converges back to paralleling the existing US 395 alignment for the remainder of the project limits.
    • Alternative G: Realignment West of Existing Corridor along Oro Grande Wash. This alternative consists of a realignment detaching from existing the I-15/US 395 interchange, where immediately crosses the Union Pacific Railroad within the first 1½ miles heading northeast along the Oro Grande Wash. the realignment continues northeasterly throughout the western portions of the Cities of Hesperia and Victorville and follows in a northerly direction just west of Cuaghlin Road within San Bernardino County limits and traversing the western portions of the City of Adelanto where it converges back to paralleling the existing US 395 alignment for the remainder of the project limits.

    In June 2016, it was reported that state financial issues have resulted in all STIP funding being removed from the 395 Expressway Project which would widen Route 395. But Caltrans will continue to seek funding to complete widening of existing Route 395, according to Caltrans spokeswoman Terri Kasinga.
    (Source: Mass Transit, 6/6/2016)

    US 395 Widening - I-15 to Route 18 (~ SBD R3.99 to SBD 11.22)

    In March 2015, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will construct operational efficiencies on US 395 from 0.16 mile north of the junction of US 395 and I-15 in the city of Hesperia to approximately 1.80 miles south of Desert Flower Road in the city of Adelanto. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $55,191,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program.

    In July 2018, it was reported that this phase has received environment clearance, and is on hold pending construction funding.

    US 395 Widening - Route 18 to Chamberlaine Way (SBD 11.2 to SBD 16.3)

    U.S. 395 Widening Phase 1 - Rte 18 to Chamberlain WayIn March 2015, the CTC allocated $5,550,000 to SANBAG for US 395 Interim Widening. In Hesperia, Victorville and Adelanto. Widen US 395, from Route 18 to Chamberlaine Way (08-SBd-395, PM 11.2/16.6), from two lanes to four lanes and construct left-turn channelization at various intersections.

    In August 2016, it was reported that Measure I funding included widening of US 395 from Mojave Drive (~ PM SBD 12.633) south to Star Street (~ PM SBD 12.385), which is expected to cost $4.1 million, with 63.5 percent of the funding required from development impact fees.
    (Source: VV Daily Press, 8/26/2016)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $9.333M for PPNO 0260J Widening, Rt 18-Chamberlaine Way (~ SBD 11.22 to SBD 16.742).

    In July 2018, it was reported that work was scheduled to begin in Fall 2018 on nearly $60 million in improvements to the busy stretch of highway between Route 18 and Chamberlaine Way — a major freight traffic route and passenger corridor that connects economic centers, recreation areas, cities and rural communities. These improvements will widen that portion of the highway by providing two lanes in each direction, and includes the addition of turn pockets and signals at key intersections along the corridor. The start of construction is the culmination of years of planning and securing the funds needed to make it happen, including nearly $18 million in voter-approved Measure I funds, the half-cent sales tax measure for San Bernardino County. The San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA) is partnering with the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) to see this and subsequent phases of the 395 improvement project through completion. Tthe Victorville-to-Adelanto leg is just one of three phases of an overall US 395 plan for which state and federal funds have been secured. Those future phases — from Interstate 15 to State Route 18 and from Chamberlaine Way to Desert Flower Road — have received environmental clearance and should begin once those additional funds are obtained. It is anticipated to be open in Fall 2020, with project closure in late 2021.
    (Sources: VV Daily Press, 6/24/2018; U.S.395 Phase 1 Project Page; June 2018 Project Fact Sheet)

    In August 2018, the CTC approved an allocation of $33,625,000 for the locally-administered multi-funded Senate Bill 1 (SB 1) Trade Corridor Enhancement Program (TCEP)/State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) Route 395 Widening from Route 18 to Chamberlaine Way project (PPNO 0260J), in San Bernardino County.
    (Source: August 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.5s.(9))

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, continues programmed funding for PPNO 0260J Rt 395 Widening, Rt 18-Chamberlaine Way (TCEP).
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    US 395 Widening - Adelanto (SBD 15.95) to Desert Flower Road (~ SBD 21.086) and beyond to SBD 36.40

    Adelanto Rumble StripsIn May 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will widen the median and shoulders along US 395 (PM 15.95 - PM 36.40), install rumble strips, resurface the roadway, and widen the following intersections to accommodate the new width of US 395: Colusa Road. Desert Flower Road. Purple Sage Street, Shadow Mountain Avenue, Sun Hill Ranch, and Princess Pat Mine. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $55,460,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 SHOPP.

    In July 2018, it was reported that this phase (at least the portion between Adelanto and Desert Flower Road) has received environment clearance, and is on hold pending construction funding.

    In August 2018, the CTC approved $15,171,000 in SHOPP funding for San Bernardino 08-SBd-395 35.5/39.1 US 395 Near Adelanto, from 1.0 mile south of Kramer Hills to 2.6 miles north of Kramer Hills. Outcome/Output: Widen median and shoulders and construct rumble strips. This project will increase safety and reduce the number and severity of collisions.
    (Source: August 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.5f.(3) Item 14)

    Kramer Hills Widening

    395 Kramer HillsIn October 2015, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will construct a median barrier, widen shoulders, and install rumble strips on US 395 near the community of Kramer Hills. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $40,657,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017/18. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. (Approx SBD 38.633 to SBD 46.207)

    In August 2017, the CTC allocated $28,597,000 for San Bernardino 08-SBd-395 39.0/45.9 US 395: Near Adelanto, from 2.5 miles north of Kramer Hills to Route 58. Outcome/Output: Widen median and shoulders and construct rumble strip to reduce the number and severity of traffic collisions. Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-15-56; October 2015.

    In August 2019, it was reported that construction crews are working on two projects south of the intersection of US 395 with Route 58 where they’re widening shoulders to eight feet, placing centerline and shoulder rumble strips and reinstalling two passing lanes south of Kramer Junction, going both ways. Striping will also be widened from four to six inches on the entire stretch of US 395 from I-15 to the Kern County line. In some sections, Caltrans has also put in channelizers — thin fiberglass paddles — that will help deter crossing the double-yellow lines. The three projects should be completed by the end of the year at an overall cost about $35.5 million. Some of that total is funded with Senate Bill 1 funds, the so-called “gas tax,” according to a Caltrans document.
    (Source: Victor Valley Daily Press, 8/19/2019)

    In California City, there is a proposal for a new road that would run from Muroc Junction following the alignment of Rosamond Boulevard at the Edwards Air Force Base north gate. The road would curve to connect with California City Boulevard at the curve just south of the city. It would then proceed north to connect with 20 Mule Team Parkway, which would be paved all the way to its current connection with US 395. This will provide a faster connection between Edwards AFB and the Naval Air Weapons Center.

    Jct Rte 14 (near Inyokern) to N end of Bishop

    Olancha Bypass (09-Iny-395 29.2/41.8)

    Olancha WideningIn 2007, the CTC did not recommend funding construction of the Olancha and Cartago Expressway ($107,600K total cost; $59,000K requested) from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA). However, the minutes from the 11/08 meeting of the Inyo County Local Transportation Commission discussed the five options for US 395's realignment (either expansion or a movement west). The main problem is the proximity of the LA Aqueduct.

    In February 2016, it was reported that discussions of the Olancha Bypass continue. The Caltrans preferred alternative is a bypass of the community that has Olancha residents in an uproar. Although the bypass alternative seems to be the much safer option, Olancha residents don't want to lose the business highway traffic brings into the already struggling town. Olancha residents claim the bypass alternative is unfair because the other towns on the US 395 corridor in Inyo country (Bishop, Big Pine, Independence, Lone Pine) got to keep the highway running through town. If the bypass alternative is chosen the current alignment will be turned into a combination of a local road and an extension of Route 190, a major state route taking year round visitors to Death Valley National Park. The bypass routing would be to the west, close to the base of the Sierras, which would give travelers a beautiful view. The extension of Route 190 would be to the south, through Olancha, terminating at an intersection with the newly aligned US 395.
    (Source: Inyomono395 @ AAroad, February 2016)

    In August 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding 09-Iny-395 PM 29.2/41.8 Olancha/Cartago Four-Lane Project: This project in Inyo County will construct two new lanes (one new lane in each direction) on a portion US 395 near the town of Olancha. The project will increase safety and the Level of Service. The project is not fully funded. The project will be funded from State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) funds and is currently programmed in the 2016 STIP for an estimated $16.6 million Right of Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2020-21. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 STIP. A copy of the FEIR has been provided to Commission staff. Resources that may be impacted by the project include community impacts, noise, water quality, air quality, cultural resources, paleontological resources, hazardous waste, aesthetics, and biological resources. Potential impacts associated with the project can all be mitigated to below significance. As a result, an FEIR was prepared for the project. Note that this appears to be distinct from the once-proposed Olancha Bypass.

    395 Olancha BypassIn January 2018, the CTC approved a request from the California Department of Transportation’s (Department) to adopt US 395 in Inyo County from INY 29.9 to INY 41.9 as a controlled access highway, redesignate a segment of superseded US 395 as Route 190 and, upon construction completion of the new controlled access highway, relinquish the remaining portion of the superseded US 395 to Inyo County. The Department proposes to adopt this 12.14 mile section of US 395 to construct a new expressway within the adoption limits, which will improve safety for the traveling public, raise the level of service, and provide a continuous four-lane facility in Inyo County. A final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Assessment (EIR/EA) prepared pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act and the National Environmental Policy Act was approved by the Department on March 7, 2017 and by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) on May 26, 2017. The Department approved a project report on June 27, 2017 recommending construction of the new US 395 expressway on a new alignment and redesignation of a portion of the superseded segment as Route 190. The remaining portion of the superseded highway will be relinquished to Inyo County after project construction completion.

    Within the proposed adoption limits, US 395 is currently a two-lane undivided conventional highway. It traverses gently sloping terrain at elevations between 3,600 and 3,900 feet as it passes through the communities of Olancha and Cartago. Olancha is sparsely developed with a few businesses, a post office, and one service station. Cartago is located about three miles north of Olancha and is primarily a residential community. There are a few businesses and residences adjacent to the highway, but in general, the highway corridor is rural in nature. This project will connect the four-lane divided expressway segments at both ends of the adoption limits.

    The existing highway generally consists of two 12-foot lanes and 8-foot paved shoulders within 100 feet of right of way. There are no shoulder improvements such as curb, gutter or sidewalk throughout this section of the highway. There is no median and approximately 50 percent of the highway is barrier striped to prevent passing. There are undivided passing lanes for both northbound and southbound traffic north of Cartago. The posted speed limits vary from 65 mph outside of the communities to 55 mph within the communities. In addition to the intersection with Route 190, there are six other public road connections and numerous other private roads and access points to the existing highway within the project limits.

    Due to the numerous access points and limited sight distances along US 395, passing zones are limited. There is also a mixture of slower recreational and commercial vehicles, local residential and business traffic, and faster through traffic. The limited passing opportunities and mixed traffic has led to queuing within the communities, driver frustration, and frequent unsafe passing maneuvers. In 2006, shoulders were widened and the posted speed limit reduced within the communities, but the fatal accident rate remained at 1.29 times the statewide average. This section of highway is currently operating at Level of Service (LOS) D and is projected to fall to LOS E within the 20-year planning period.

    The proposed route adoption will allow the Department to construct the expressway on a new alignment. It will eliminate traffic congestion and significantly increase safety for the traveling public by separating opposing traffic, removing passing restrictions, and controlling access points. Finally, the new expressway will provide route continuity on US 395 and will complete the construction of four-lanes throughout the US 395 corridor in Inyo County.

    A draft project report was approved in September 2010 to evaluate five alternatives. Their environmental impacts were evaluated in an Initial Study/Environmental Assessment circulated end of 2010. Focused studies performed for the preferred alternative determined that mitigation of cultural impacts to insignificant levels may not be possible. As a result, the environmental document was elevated to a Draft Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Assessment (EIR/EA) which allowed the Department to discuss the potential cultural impacts and evaluate the preferred alternative. The Draft EIR/EA was circulated from August to October 2015, after which the preferred alternative was selected.

    The portion of the existing highway between the intersection with Route 190 and the southern intersection with the new expressway is proposed to be redesignated as Route 190. A concurrent Commission’s action to approve the redesignation of this portion of US 395 as Route 190 is on the January 2018 Commission agenda. This action will reestablish the terminus of Route 190 at US 395. The remaining portion of the superseded highway between the intersection with Route 190 and north of the community of Cartago will be relinquished to Inyo County after project completion. The superseded highway will continue to provide a local route that preserves the existing uses and access along the existing corridor. The project will also construct or reconstruct a couple other county roads, all of which will be relinquished to Inyo County.

    This project has been jointly funded by the Inyo County Local Transportation Commission, Mono County Local Transportation Commission, Kern Council of Governments, and the Interregional Improvement Program. Due to shortfalls in the programming available for the 2016 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), the Construction Capital and Construction Support components were deprogrammed. Funding for the Construction Capital and Construction Support components have been restored in the proposed 2018 STIP. The estimated total cost of the project, including construction and right of way costs escalated to the year of construction, is $138,819,000. The project is scheduled to start construction in September 2020.The Department and Inyo County have agreed with the public road openings proposed for the new expressway and intend to execute a Controlled Access Highway Agreement following the Commission’s approval of this route adoption. Currently, the Department and Inyo County are negotiating the terms of the relinquishment agreement. Inyo County has agreed in principle to accept the relinquishment of the facilities.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.3a(1))

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to restore funding from this, moving the total from $11,420K to $41,487K, including an additional $23,495K in FY21-22, presumably for construction. The project is near Olancha and Cartago, south of the Los Angeles Aqueduct Bridge to south of the Ash Creek Bridge. Widen 2 lane conventional highway to 4 lane expressway. There also appears to be additional funding for this from the Kern and Mono County shares.

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which appears to continue the programmed funding for PPNO 0170 "Olancha-Cartago 4-lane expressway (RIP 25%)" in both Inyo and Kern counties. This funding includes $17,992K in prior year funding, and 23,495K in FY21-22 for Inyo and $4,498K in prior year funding and 9,295K in FY21-22 for Kern. It also included PPNO 0170 Olancha-Cartago 4-lane expressway (IIP 40%), in the Interregional portion of the STIP with no change in programming: $17,992K in prior year funding. and $49,615K in FY21-22.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    In April 2020, it was reported that Caltrans was in the final stages of design and right-of-way acquisition for the Olancha-Cartago 4-Lane project. The project will upgrade 12.6 miles of the current two-lane highway to a four-lane access-controlled expressway. The new alignment will begin four miles south of Olancha to four miles north of Cartago and will close the gap between the existing four-lane sections to the north and the south. Preconstruction activities include utility verification and relocation, vegetation removal and/or relocation, staking the new alignment, installing desert tortoise exclusion fence, and other various preliminary items. This $83 million-dollar project is jointly funded by Inyo and Mono Counties’ Local Transportation Commissions, Kern Council of Governments, and Caltrans with State Transportation Improvement Program funds. Project completion is tentatively scheduled for late 2023.
    (Source: Sierra Wave Media)

    Manzanar Improvements (approx INY 67.69)

    In October 2004, the CTC considered adoption of 2.6 kilometers (1.6 miles) of Controlled Access Highway for Route 395 from 2.9 kilometers (1.8 miles) south of Mazourka Canyon Road to 0.3 kilometers (0.2 mile) south of Mazourka Canyon Road in Inyo County. Currently, this segment of Route 395 is a two-lane conventional highway crossing generally level terrain. Cross-section consists of two standard 3.6 m (12 ft) lanes with predominantly non-standard 1.2 m (4 ft ) shoulders, where 3 m (8 ft) is standard. At the southern limit of the adoption, the route will connect to the recently approved Manzanar four-lane divided section (Resolution HRA-04-02 approved August, 2004). This segment south of Independence was not included in the Manzanar adoption, as it was an integral part of a possible Independence bypass alternative and subject to various alignment considerations. This bypass alternative had less than a 3% approval at public hearings and was ultimately rejected for the recently approved 4-lane improvement project through Independence. Current and twenty year projected Level of Service (LOS) for the existing facility is ‘D’, congested. The current and twenty year LOS for the proposed project is ‘A’, free flowing. The majority of the property through which this segment of the route passes is owned by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, with little development adjacent to the existing or proposed right of way south of Independence. The route adoption proposes a controlled access highway on predominantly existing alignment from the northern end of the Manzanar four lane section adopted in August, 2004, to a point 0.3 kilometers (0.2 miles) south of Mazourka Canyon Road, at Independence. Construction is currently scheduled for FY 2007-08, based on programming in a 2004 STIP.

    The four lane project between Lone Pine and/through Independence is nearly completed as of August 2010. The last portion is around Manzanar where a new bridge is being completed for the southbound alignment; the northbound alignment is pretty much intact. The new alignment in Manzinar leaves a stretch of the old alignment as a frontage road, and the only connection from the new US 395 to the frontage road is at Manzanar Reward Rd. This means all of US 395 from Inyokern to Conway Summit is four-lane expressway except for the piece through Olancha which is unlikely to be upgraded anytime soon. The segment was completed in October 2010.

    In January 2011, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Inyo along Route 395 at the Manzanar National Historic Site, consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In Independence (roughly INY 73.35), Caltrans is attempting to widen US 395. However, trees are in the way, according to an article in the LA Times. Specifically, Caltrans engineers say 100 trees are standing in the way of plans to widen a stretch of the route in Independence from two to four lanes and line it with about 400 feet of sidewalks. The project, they say, would improve safety and the flow of vehicles on the rural fringe of the community. The issue has its roots in Caltrans' decade-old proposal to widen US 395 to four lanes between Ridgecrest and Mammoth Mountain. The mile-long stretch, edged with dirt shoulders, is among the last to be expanded.

    In August 2003, the CTC considered relinquishment of the county road and frontage road portion of Route 395 between PM 90.9 and PM 99.6 (i.e., between South Fish Springs Road and Big Pine Dump Road) in the County of Inyo. Also considered was vacation of the right of way in the County of Inyo, between North Fish Springs Road and 0.25 mi S of the Town of Big Pine, that is a right of way superseded by construction on a new alignment. In September, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of Mono (County), at Utility Road (County Road No. 3203), consisting of reconstructed and relocated county road.

    Bishop Area (approx INY 115.341) Access and Circulation

    [Bishop Bypasses]In 2003 the Inyo County Local Transportation Commission, with the support of the City of Bishop and Inyo County, requested that Caltrans District 9 conduct a Bishop Area Access and Circulation Study. This study was published at http://inyoltc.org/pdfs/baacs.pdf. The basic goal was to develop a plan and alternatives to (1) Improve circulation and safety for all modes of transportation in the downtown area. (2) Accommodate commercial truck traffic for US 395 and US 6. (3) Plan for downtown improvements (i.e. landscaping, parking, pedestrian facilities, etc.) along with the rerouting of truck traffic. (4) Facilitate ground access improvements to the airport and its associated development improvements. (4) Keep services in Bishop visible for through-traffic on any route and have easy on/off connections. The plan notes that a bypass of the Bishop business district was considered in 1966 (see http://www.ca-bishop.us/Misc/07_1009_BAACS_Appendix.pdf) but traffic didn't justify it; the alternatives from that plan are no longer practical as the land is either privately owned and developed, or tribal lands. The basic recommendations of this study (which has not been adopted yet by the CTC) are:

    1. A two-lane eastern alternative truck route beginning somewhere between Gerkin Road and Schober Lane and connecting back to US 6 and US 395 at the Wye Road location. This new route should be developed as a City/County road to Caltrans standards in order to allow the City and County the option to exchange this route for Main Street/US 395 at sometime in the future.
    2. Improved access between the City and the housing areas to the west (i.e. South Barlow, Manor, McLaren, Highlands/Glenwood, Meadow Creek, Bishop Reservation, etc.). This recommendation includes the development of new local roads to provide options other than Route 168/West Line Street and US 395/North Sierra Highway to get into town.
    3. Improved City street alternatives to Main Street/US 395 that accommodates north/south movements of local traffic on either side of Main Street.

    Some other interim recommendations from the report include: better alignment of the Wye Road/US 6 intersection and the eventual reconfiguration of the US 6/US 395/ Wye Road intersection; the aligning of side streets off of Main Street/US 395 to create at least one more full four way intersection; extending See Vee Lane north of US 395; signalizing the See Vee/US 395 intersection; and defining access along the North Sierra Highway corridor with sidewalks and driveways.

    As of May 2009, Cameron Kaiser reports that repaving is taking place on the Sherwin Grade, as well as a big resurfacing project north of the Bishop city limits. The 4-lane project for Inyo is proceeding but in several distinct phases. The first phase from Black Rock to Elna Rd is apparently complete but now they're repaving the original (NB) lanes, so everyone uses the new southbound lanes. The rest area isn't done. There is a second phase from Black Rock to Independence which has some asphalt and grading work on its new NB lanes but is not nearly as complete. Independence's street widening project is in full swing. All of the sidewalks have been torn up and the traffic lanes shifted over while work is done on the original NB side. No paving or concrete yet but the entire new section(s) are fully graded in preparation for moulds. The final phase is from Independence to Lone Pine via Manzanar. This only looks just started; there is only grading existing on the new NB lanes, no asphalt and no bridgework (several of the channels will need culverts or bridges).

    N of Bishop to the Nevada State Line

    Widening and Slope Flattening near Tom's Place (09-Mono-395 PM 6.9/9.6)

    U.S. 395 near Toms PlaceIn October 2018, the CTC approved for for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed: US 395 in Mono County (09-Mno-395, PM 6.92/9.62). Widen existing shoulders on a portion of US 395 in Mono County. (PPNO 0662) This project is located on US 395 between Bishop and Toms Place in Mono County. The project proposes to widen the existing paved highway shoulders at the project location. The proposed project addresses the need to reduce the number and severity of collisions and enhance safety. Also included in the proposed project will be added rumble strips, replacement of guardrails, upgrading of drainage systems, modification to slopes for improvement in sight distances around curves and additions to bicycle right turn lanes. The proposed project is currently estimated to cost approximately $22.5 million. This project is fully funded and is currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for approximately $20.4 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2020-21. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
    (Source: October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Collision Reduction item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 09-Mono-395 PM 6.9/9.6 PPNO 0662 Proj ID 0914000003 EA 36070. US 395 near Tom's Place, from 2.4 miles south of Lower Rock Creek Road to 0.3  mile north of Lower Rock Creek Road. Widen shoulders, flatten slopes, install ground in rumble strips, reconstruct and install guardrail. Programmed in FY20-21, with construction scheduled to start in November 2020. Total project cost is $22,451K, with $16,208K being capital (const and right of way) and $6,243K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In May 2019, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project located on US 395 between the towns of Mammoth and June Lake (09-Mno-395, PM 30.7 & 36.5), in Mono County. The project proposes to pave three locations to provide off-highway parking to access hiking, bicycle and snowmobile trails along US 395. The project addresses the need to provide winter access parking for recreations users and to avoid parking on highway shoulders creating potential hazard for snow plowing and motorists. The proposed project has been developed and studied in conjunction with the US Forest Service-Inyo National Forest. The estimated total overall cost of the project is $1.6 million. The project is not currently programmed in the SHOPP. The project is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2020-21.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    In August 2015, the CTC authorized vacation of right of way in the county of Mono along Route 395 at Material Site Number 190, approximately 0.8 mile north of Route 120 (approx MNO 51.595), consisting of highway right of way (a material site) no longer needed for State highway purposes. The site will revert to the Bureau of Land Management.

    Curve Improvements near Lee Vining (09-Mono-395 PM 58.2/60.2)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Collision Reduction item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 09-Mono-395 PM 58.2/60.2 PPNO 2624 Proj ID 0916000006 EA 36640. US 395 near Lee Vining, from Route 167 Junction to 0.2 mile north of Conway Ranch Road. Widen shoulders, install shoulder rumble strip, correct compound curve, and improve chain control area. Programmed in FY21-22, with construction scheduled to start in January 2023. Total project cost is $9,376K, with $5,996K being capital (const and right of way) and $3,380K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In August 2020, the CTC approved the following financial allocation: $830,000 for PS&E; $590,000 for R/W Support. 09-Mno-395 PM 58.2/60.2. PPNO 2624 ProjID 0916000006 EA 36640. US 395 Near Lee Vining, from Route 167 Junction to 0.2 mile north of Conway Ranch Road. Widen shoulders, install shoulder rumble strip, correct compound curve, and improve chain control area.
    (Source: August 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2a) #28)

    In May 2019, the CTC deleted the long-lead project 09-Mno-395 69.9/71.9. PPNO 2639. Proj ID 0917000014. On US 395 Near Bridgeport, from north of Route 270 Junction to Green Creek Road. Widen shoulders to eight feet, install rumble strips, improve sight distance, and upgrade signing and striping to current standards . Remove project from the Long Lead list and develop a Minor project to install rumble strips.
    (Source: May 2019 CTC Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Item LL#2)

    In May 2015, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Mono County that will widen the paved shoulders on a portion of US 395 near the town of Bridgeport (approx MNO 75.846). The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The estimated cost is $16,574,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    Aspen Fales Shoulder Widening Project (09-Mno-395 PM 88.42/91.55)

    Fales WideningIn August 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding 09-Mno-395 PM 88.42/91.55 Aspen Fales Shoulder Widening Project: This project in Mono County will widen shoulders on US 395 in the town of Bridgeport. The project will improve safety and operations for the traveling public. The project will be funded from State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) funds and is programmed in the 2016 SHOPP for an estimated $14.2 million Construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2018-19. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 SHOPP. A copy of the FEIR has been provided to Commission staff. Resources that may be impacted by the project include visual and aesthetics, cultural resources, noise, and biological resources. Potential impacts associated with the project can all be mitigated to below significance. As a result, an FEIR was prepared for the project.

    In January 2019, the CTC approved the following allocation: $9,555,000 Mono 09-Mno-395 88.4/91.6. US 395 Near Bridgeport, from north of Devils Gate Summit to Burcham Flat Road. Outcome/Output: Widen shoulders and construct rumble strip. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions. Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-17-54; August 2017. Related supplemental funds vote to re-advertise EA 35780/PPNO 09-0615 under Ref. 2.5e.(2), Resolution FA-18-36.
    (Source: January 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) Item 21)

    In July 2019, Caltrans began holding preliminary meetings on the Aspen-Walker Shoulder Widening Project, which will widen the highway shoulders from the existing width of 2-3 feet to 8 feet, as well as construct retaining walls and install rumble strips. The project will run along US 395 from 5 miles south of Sonora Junction at State Route 108 to 2 miles north of the junction (~ MNO 88.765/MNO 95.765).
    (Source: Record Courier, 7/13/2019)

    Shoulder Widening N of Burcham Flat Road to near Rte 108 Jct

    In January 2019, the CTC approved a request for an additional $2,985,000 for the State Highway Operation Protection Program (SHOPP) Collision Severity Reduction project (PPNO 0615) on US 395, in Mono County, to re-advertise the construction contract. This project is located on US 395, near the town of Bridgeport, in Mono County (09-Mno-395 93.4/95.7). The project will widen shoulders, install rumble strips, replace and upgrade guardrails, install new concrete barriers, improve roadway cross-slope and stopping sight distance, and install rock-fall protection to reduce the severity and number of collisions. The performance measure goal is to reduce collisions by 28 collisions and improve 2.9 lane miles from “fair” to “good” condition and improve one census station from “poor” to “good” condition. The improvement is consistent with the Commission-adopted goals and objectives of the Transportation Asset Management Plan. As of January 2019, all contract bids have been rejected. The Department will re-advertise the contract upon approval of this supplemental funds request. The updated certified Engineers Estimate and adjusted project cost is expected to attract more bidders when the project is re-advertised in February 2019 if this supplemental fund request is approved. Over the last half year, the Department has seen a trend that shows a significant increase in the cost of materials and significant decrease of available contractors and subcontractors in a busy construction market. Based on the discussion with several non-bidding contractors, the Department believes that readvertising the project is in the best interest of the State, as the Department is combining this project with the Aspen Fales Shoulder Widening Project, for construction. This will help decrease the overall costs and allow the contractor to control the entire operations of both projects, therefore eliminate dueling prime contractors and subcontractors working adjacent to each other. The Department will also perform contractors outreach events during the advertisement period. The Department will also make available a site near the city of Lee Vining for contractors use as the Baseline Material Site. In addition, both projects to the north and south, have since been completed so the project is no longer “land-locked” between ongoing construction or competing contractors. Based on conversations with those non-bidding contractors, this could also provide a more favorable bidding environment upon re-advertising the project.
    (Source: January 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5e(2))

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Collision Reduction item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 09-Mono-395 PM 91.6/93.4 PPNO 2460 Proj ID 0917000011 EA 36800. US 395 near Bridgeport, from Burcham Flat Road to 0.3 mile south of Route 395/Route 108 Junction. Widen shoulders, install rumble strips, and correct superelevation at three curves. Programmed in FY22-23, with construction scheduled to start in December 2023. Total project cost is $20,060K, with $14,422K being capital (const and right of way) and $5,638K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    As of May 2009, Cameron Kaiser reports that most of the pass closure signs have been replaced with automated flashers, including the Caltrans-erected one in the Carson Valley, but there is still an old clapboard sign south of Route 89

    As of May 2009, Cameron Kaiser reports that there have been significant widening projects. There seems to have been some widening and four-laning in the Antelope Valley, mostly between Topaz Lake and Coleville. The route is still one-lane-per-direction between Devils Gate and Coleville, and of course a fair bit south of Bridgeport and around Mono Lake. 

    Naming Naming

    Grand Army of the Republic HighwayThe portion of this route that was cosigned with US 6 (i.e., from Route 14 to US 6 in Bishop (~ KER 26.958 to INY 114.898) was named the "Grand Army of the Republic Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 33, Chapter 73, in 1943. According to CalTrans in March 1994, the Grand Army route is now US 6, then US 395 to Route 14, Route 14 to I-5, I-5 to I-110, and then south to San Pedro. A monument marking the western terminus of the Grand Army Highway may be found on the wall on the S side of Ocean Avenue, in front of the Terrace Theatre.
    (Image Source: Clamshack on Flikr)

    El Camino SierraHistorically, the portion of this route from Route 14 to Bridgeport (~ KER 26.958 to MNO 76.758) was part of "El Camino Sierra" (Road to the Mountains). El Camino Sierra is the name given to US 395 and the southern portion of US 6 by the Bishop based, Inyo Good Road Club back in 1910. The name was part of a marketing plan to draw the attention of Sacramento politicians and highway department officials to this lightly populated area of the state, in order to obtain a share of the first state highway construction bond, to build new roads in Inyo and Mono counties.
    (Image source: Sierra Wave; YouTube)

    In March 2017, it was reported that the Inyo County Board of Supervisor’s heard a presentation on the county’s plan for a reintroduction and dedication, of US 395 to its original name of El Camino Sierra. During the presentation, County Chief Administrative Officer Kevin Carunchio briefed the Board on the County’s recent efforts to resurrect and promote the name El Camino Sierra, telling the Board that banners had been placed at the north and south entrances of Lone Pine, Independence, Big Pine and Bishop, promoting the towns as being in “the Heart of El Camino Sierra.” Carunchio also stated that Inyo County was in the process of placing new highway signs at the county’s north and south borders, that also proclaimed “Inyo County-The Heart of El Camino Sierra.” Carunchio indicated the banners and signs, along with a few other measures, were part of a phase one in the County’s efforts, and sought the Board’s approval to move forward with a phase two. The highlight of this next part of the El Camino Sierra promotional efforts would be to have interpretive highway markers erected and placed at various historic sites throughout Inyo County. Carunchio explained that the signs would be built in the shape of the historic markers first erected by the Inyo Good Roads Club back in 1910. Carunchio displayed a prototype of the new markers to the Board and the audience that was present.
    (Source: Sierra Wave)

    Paul H. PinoThe segment of US 395 from Gill Station Coso Road to the junction with Route 190 in the County of Inyo (~ INY R17.857 to INY 34.479) is named the "Paul H. Pino Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officer Paul H. Pino, badge number 9735, who was killed in the line of duty during the morning of December 30, 2003. Paul H. Pino was issuing a citation on US 395 south of Olancha in the County of Inyo when an impaired driver collided into his patrol vehicle killing the officer; he succumbed to his injuries as a result of the collision. Officer Pino was born on August 26, 1955, in The Hague, Holland. He immigrated to the United States in 1960 and subsequently relocated to Carson, California. He attended and graduated from Carson High School in 1973; from Los Angeles Harbor College with a degree in Police Science in 1977; and joined the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department as a Deputy Sheriff in 1977 and served in that capacity for three years. He joined the California Highway Patrol in August, 1980. After successfully completing his academy training, he reported to the South Los Angeles Area as an officer on January 8, 1981. Paul H. Pino made significant contributions to traffic safety and assisting the motoring public while assigned to the South Los Angeles, Barstow, and Bishop Area offices; in total, he served 23 years as a sworn peace officer for the California Highway Patrol and was known by his fellow officers for his dedication to the department and to the protection of the citizens of our state. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 55, Resolution Chapter 50, on 5/9/2006.
    (Image source: Calif. Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

    BIshop Police Officer Richard PerkinsThe segment of US 395 from its intersection with Warm Springs Road in Inyo County to the southern city limits of Bishop (~ INY 112.873 to INY 114.853) is named the "Police Officer Richard Perkins Memorial Highway". Named in honor of Officer Richard E. Perkins of the Bishop Police Department, who was killed in the line of duty on August 15, 2001, when a truck struck his patrol car as he was making a turn in order to assist another law enforcement agency in pursuit of a possible drunk driver. Officer Perkins was an 11-year veteran of the Bishop Police Department, was highly respected in the community he served, and is survived by his wife Cheryl and three children, Andrew, Pauli, and Kati. He was the first police officer to die in the line of duty in the City of Bishop's 100-year history. He was dedicated to family, friends, church, and the community, and was known for his work with the Bishop Mural Society and as one of the founding members of the Bishop Police Mounted Unit. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 46, Chapter 53, May 5, 2004.
    (Image source: Officer Down Memorial Page)

    Just off of US 395 is the community of Bodie (exit at Rout 270, MNO 0.064) Bodie has been designated the Official State Gold Rush Ghost Town. Bodie was founded by Waterman S. Body in 1859, and rose to prominence due to mining in the nearby Comstock Lode. At its peak in 1879, Bodie boasted a population of 10,000 citizens and had a reputation for its wicked climate as well as its clientele. By 1882, the big strikes were mostly gone and with them the need to stay in Bodie. One hundred twenty years later, in 2002, Bodie is one of the largest and best-preserved ghost towns in the West. Designed by Assembly Bill 1757, Chapter 365, 9/5/2002.

    Senator David E. Cogdill, Sr.The portion of US 395 from the South Buckeye Creek Bridge (Bridge 47–33; MNO 79.168) to the junction of Route 182 (MNO 76.3) in the County of Mono is named the "Senator David E. Cogdill, Sr., Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Senator David E. “Dave” Cogdill, Sr., born in December 1950, in Long Beach, and was raised in San Bernardino until moving with his family, in his senior year of high school, to Bridgeport. After high school, Senator Cogdill enlisted in the United States Air Force and served as a member of the Air National Guard. Senator Cogdill began his professional career in Bridgeport in 1971, as a clerk-typist in the Mono County Assessor’s Office, eventually becoming Chief Appraiser, then, at the end of the decade, moved to Modesto, where, in 1981, he and David R. Giomi cofounded the appraisal firm Cogdill & Giomi, which became one of the oldest, best known, and most respected appraisal firms in the Central Valley. In Bridgeport and Modesto, Senator Cogdill demonstrated a tireless commitment to his church and community, taking on leadership roles in organizations ranging from the Bridgeport Fire Protection District, the Bridgeport Volunteer Fire Department, and the YMCA of Stanislaus County to the Modesto Chamber of Commerce and the Modesto City Council. In 2000, Senator Cogdill was elected to the California State Assembly to represent the 25th Assembly District, which included Calaveras, Mariposa, Mono, and Tuolumne Counties, and portions of Madera and Stanislaus Counties, and, during his six-year tenure, became Assembly Minority Floor Leader. During this time, Senator Cogdill, with Senator Charles S. “Chuck” Poochigian, revived the California State Legislature Rural Caucus to amplify the concerns of rural communities, including by collaborating with local leadership to advocate for access to health care and quality education in those communities. In 2006, Senator Cogdill was elected to the California State Senate to represent the 14th Senate District, which included Mariposa and Tuolumne Counties and portions of Fresno, Madera, San Joaquin, and Stanislaus Counties, and, in 2008 and 2009, was Senate Republican Leader. As Senator, Senator Cogdill was recognized as Senate Small Business Legislator of the Year by the California Small Business Association, and honored by the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation with the prestigious Profile in Courage Award for taking on a challenging leadership role during the first year of the state budget crisis of 2008–12. Senator Cogdill remained active in community and statewide organizations after leaving the Legislature, becoming Stanislaus County Assessor in 2011, and President and Chief Executive Officer of the California Building Industry Association in 2013. Through his untimely death on July 23, 2017, at 66 years of age, Senator Cogdill was a man of faith, stoic and steadfast, who strove to do more than his duty to make the lives around him better. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 133, Res. Chapter 243, 9/12/2018.
    (Image source: Legacy.Com)

    Sonora and Mono Wagon RoadThe portion of this route from Bridgeport to Route 108 (~ MNO 76.758 to MNO 94.461) was named the "Sonora and Big Meadows Wagon Road" by Senate Bill 289 in 1901. It was also named the "Sonora and Mono Wagon Road" by Resolution Chapter 11 in 1901, and extended by Resolution Chapter 510 in 1919.
    (Image source: Tuolumne County Historical Society)

    Named Structures Named Structures

    CHP Officer Larry J. JaramilloThere is a memorial marker at SBD 66.0 (San Bernardino County) in memory of CHP Officer Larry J. Jaramillo. California Highway Patrol Officer Larry J. Jaramillo died in the line of duty in a traffic collision on Route 395 at the Kern County San Bernardino County line, while returning from court in Inyo County on June 22, 1993. Officer Jaramillo joined the Department of the California Highway Patrol in 1985, after successfully completing training at the patrol academy where he received the outstanding athlete award for his class, and, upon graduation, he reported to Morongo Basin, as a state traffic safety officer in December 1985. In 1989, Officer Jaramillo tested and qualified with the department to become a fixed wing pilot and was assigned to the Inland Division Air Operations Unit stationed in Daggett, California. On December 8, 1992, Officer Jaramillo received the second highest award that the department may bestow, the Special Act Award, for his rescue of two young men stranded in the snow-covered mountains of Kern County during which Officer Jaramillo continued his search for the young men despite warnings of adverse weather conditions, endangering his life to continue the search until the men were found. Memorial authorized by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 173, Resolution Chapter 142, September 18, 2000.
    (Image source: Calif. Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Coso Junction, in Inyo County, 17 mi S of Route 190. (~ INY R17.81)
    • Division Creek, in Inyo County, 10 mi N of Independence. (~ INY R83.872)
    • Crestview, in Mono County, 1.6 mi S of Crestview. (~ MNO 32.457)

    National Trails National Trails

    Midland Trail Sign The portion of this segment between Route 14 and US 6 was part of the "Midland Trail.

    Business Routes Business Routes

    • Ridgecrest: Signed on China Lake Blvd. and Inyokern Ave. This is cosigned with Route 178, except for S China Lake Blvd..

      Note that Business Route 395 in this area never was US 395. It was also never a State highway south of Ridgecrest Blvd.
      (Source: Michael Ballard on AAroads, 9/5/2016)
    • Riverside: Back when US 395 ran through Riverside (partially co-signed with US 60), it had a business routing along University Avenue, west on Mission Boulevard (current Business Route 60), north on Market Street (former US 91), and east on Columbia Avenue back to US 395 (current I-215).

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.8] From Route 14 near Little Lake to Route 89 near Coleville.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.8] Entire portion.


  2. U.S. 395 Seg 2From the Nevada state line northwest of Reno to to the Oregon state line near New Pine Creek via Alturas.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963 as the original (c).

    The portion of this route between Alturas and a point 6 mi W (i.e., between the two US 395/Route 299 junctions) is cosigned as US 395/Route 299, although it is legislatively US 395.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    The segment from the Nevada state line northwest of Reno to Route 36 near Johnstonville (Susanville) was part of LRN 29, and was signed as US 395. It was a 1919 extension of the 1909 LRN 29, which ran as (signed) Route 36 between Red Bluff and Susanville (in 1933, LRN 29 was extended further to run, still as Route 36, between Route 3/Route 36 [LRN 35] to US 99 [LRN 3]).

    The segment from Alturas to the California-Oregon state line near New River was LRN 73, added in 1931. This was also signed as US 395. California Highways and Public Works, April 1931, noted that the justification for the addition what that it established a connection between the Oregon State Highway System and the Redding-Alturas lateral ([LRN 28]) of the California State Highway System. The project was considered a necessary link on an east of the Sierras routing. It was a designated Federal aid route. It had been recommended for inclusion in the State highway system by the Highway Advisory Board in 1925. At the time, Oregon was improving its roads from Klamath Falls, from Bend and from Burns territory (the Yellowstone cut-off) to the state line at New Pine Creek Oregon, with State and Federal funds, and had practically completed a surfaced road from the Columbia River and also from Klamath Falls to New Pine Creek. As of 1931, the unimproved condition of the California extension was withholding from the public the potential value of these routes. Within California the project will coordinate with the Redding-Alturas highway, and through the Alturas-Susanville route, with the Red Bluff - Susanville - Reno lateral [LRN 29]. There was also a contemplated connection from Lake Almanor to the Feather River road that would extend recreational traffic further south. The route qualified as an interstate connection, as the 1931 California Highway system lacked a connection to eastern Oregon.

    The last segment addition occured in 1933, and was the segment between Susanville and Alturas (more formally, between LRN 29 (Route 36/US 395) and LRN 28 (Route 299)).

    Status Status

    Currently built to expressway standards for a stretch of 8 miles between the Nevada Border and Route 70.

    At the end of May 2017, it was reported that Caltrans Dictrict 2 is developing a 20-year plan to make improvements to US 395. This process started by hosting workshops —four are planned—in cities along the road—seeking citizens’ comments. Caltrans even went so far as to bring homemade brownies (something that is above and beyond!). The workshop in Alturas was attended by 15 local residents—including elected and agency officials—was chockfull of happily-relayed comments as the group studied the road, north from near Susanville to New Pine Creek, at the California-Oregon border. In the workshop, three basic questions were asked: What works well? What works not-so-well? How can it be improved? Among improvements needed, according to the locals are:

    • Consistent width to the roadway in parts north of Alturas. The road widens and constricts and widens again, without notice, and this is a hazard for motorists.
    • More web-accessible cameras to show highway conditions—especially at the higher elevation mountain passes like Sugar Hill north of Davis Creek, and Sage Hen Summit, south of Likely.
    • Signs that denote what services are available and where.
    • The old-fashion “cinders” used on icy spots—rather than whatever Caltrans is using nowadays.
    • Rest stops with bathrooms that have water—not the smelly “vault” toilets—and are open year-round. There is only one rest stop in 203 miles—chemical toilets located on a downgrade that’s not very safe, participants said.
    • Warnings for motorists that they are passing through “open range”—where the cows have the right-of-way. “People hit them and have died,” noted one participant.
    • Signs that indicate where people can access the rail trail—the alignment of the NCO Railroad from Susanville to near Likely that has been turned into recreation asset.
    • In Alturas, 25 MPH signs through downtown, as traffic has a tendency forget the speed limit.
    • Red zones at downtown Alturas intersections so it’s easier for cross traffic to see oncoming autos on the highway.
    • More pedestrian-activated crossing signals and well-marked crosswalks. These could even be solar powered as in other parts of the state.

    One little bit of information eeked out—from a participant and was augmented by Caltrans staff: There is a longstanding plan to transform the US 395 alignment from the Arizona-Mexico border to the Washington-Canada border into a super highway akin to I-5. It even has a name: I–11. “Not going to happen in our lifetime,” was the general consensus from the group. Still, the idea of a full-bore interstate knifing through Eastern California creates wild surmise, and the Caltrans representative will include a notation about I–11 that “the proposal is out there” in the new report being created.
    (Source: aNewsCafe.com, 5/30/2017)

    Sierra / Lassen Widening

    In March 2016, the CTC authorized additional funding on US 395 in Sierra and Lassen Counties, from Nevada State line (apx 395 SIE R0.0L) to one mile north of Route 70 (395 LAS R5.215). Rehabilitate pavement. This project is located in a remote location and requires significant lab and materials support. A structures maintenance review identified bridgework that was not originally in the scope, which requires additional lab support and services. In addition, there is increased support needed for the superpaving methodology. This increase is consistent with the required work for a CAPM and adds $412,000 to the cost of the project.

    In August 2016, the CTC approved $11,512,000 in funding for US 395 in Sierra (PM R0.0/R3.1) and Lassen (PM R0.0/5.6) Counties, from Nevada State line to 1 mile north of Route 70; also, on Route 70 from PM 3.5 to 3.9. Outcome/Output: Rehabilitate 34.2 lane miles of pavement to extend pavement service life and improve ride quality. Project will overlay pavement, upgrade nine culverts, install approach slabs at eight locations, rehabilitate four bridges with polyester concrete overlay, install one intelligent transportation system (ITS) monitoring device, and make ADA and drainage improvements at the Agriculture Inspection Station.

    In October 2017, the CTC authorized vacation of right of way in the county of Lassen along Route 395, between Janesville Grade and Lake Crest Road (02-Las-395-PM 52.3/52.6), consisting of stock trail easements no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In March 2013, the CTC provided advance authorization for $2,995,000 to rehabilitate 12.0 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the road surface, minimize the costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life on the segment in and near Johnstonville, from 0.1 mile north of Sunnyside Road (apx 395 LAS 56.437) to 0.3 mile south of Route 36 (apx 395 LAS R60.693).

    In May 2008, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of Alturas, at Court Street (apx 395 MOD 22.884), East Street, East A Street, and East B Street, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets.

    Naming Naming

    Deputy Sheriff Jack Hopkins Memorial HighwayThe portion of US 395 from the South Fork Pit River Bridge to a portion of the Modoc National Wildlife Refuge (~ MOD 16.523 to MOD 20.000) in the County of Modoc is named the "Deputy Sheriff Jack Hopkins Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Deputy Sheriff Jack Hopkins, who was born in Livermore, California, in August 1985, and was named after his grandfather, Jack L. Hopkins, who was the first mayor of Rolling Hills Estates, California. Hopkins was raised on a cattle ranch in the rural Shasta Valley and baptized in the Shasta River. Jack Hopkins attended Grenada and Big Springs Elementary schools and graduated from Yreka High School in 2004. Hopkins, who learned a great deal of discipline and respect from Mitch Klier, of Klier’s Martial Arts, earned a black belt in karate and won a world championship karate title in 2001. Hopkins went on to pursue multiple associate of arts degrees at Butte College, then returned to Butte College to attend the police academy with his older brother, Officer Sam Hopkins, and graduated in 2013. Hopkins was known for being the type of person whose handshake was his “word,” a happy, good-natured guy with a great personality, and a big smile who laughed often. Jack Hopkins began his law enforcement career with the Alturas Police Department and transferred to the Modoc County Sheriff’s Office. Jack Hopkins was killed in the line of duty on October 19, 2016. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 29, 8/30/2017, Res. Chapter 130, Statutes of 2017.
    (Image source: KOBI-5; Girdner Funeral Chapel)

    Named Structures Named Structures

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Honey Lake, in Lassen County, 7.7mi N of Milford. (~ LAS 49.556)
    • Secret Valley, in Lassen County 12 mi S of Ravendale. (~ LAS 96.891)

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.8] From the Nevada state line northwest of Reno to Route 36 near Johnstonville and from Route 36 near Termo to the Oregon state line.


Historical Route Historical Route

As of March 2008, the California Transportation Committee unanimously approved the designation of former US 395 as a historic route from San Diego to the Oregon border. It is still pending approval by the legislature and the governor. However, anticipating approval, San Diego County Supervisor Bill Horn approved $4,000 for the 31 signs that now mark old 395 in his district -- from Vista to the Bonsall Bridge, through downtown Fallbrook, to Rainbow.

On July 8, 2008, Resolution Chapter 79 officially designated specified sections of former US Highway Route 395 as Historic US Highway 395. The resolution noted that former US 395 was a scenic stretch of highway that ran through historic areas of the County of Riverside and provided the only direct route from San Diego to the Lake Tahoe region and northern Nevada, before heading back into California on its way north to Oregon and all the way into Canada. While former US 395 remains largely intact through the Counties of Inyo, Mono, Sierra, Lassen, and Modoc, only sections of former US 395 still exist in portions of the County of San Diego and the high desert area of the County of San Bernardino; most of the former highway route has been replaced by I-15 and I-215 in the Counties of San Diego, Riverside, and San Bernardino. US 395, which remains as I-15 and I-215, was the major and most significant connection between San Diego, the Inland Empire, and the eastern Sierra Nevada region. US 395 was known as the Cabrillo Parkway (and later the Cabrillo Freeway) in San Diego, now Route 163, it was the first freeway to be constructed in San Diego and opened to traffic in 1948. Part of the original routing of former US 395 in northern San Diego County includes the old Bonsall Bridge, one of the earliest automotive crossings over the San Luis Rey River, later becoming part of Route 76. The portion of former US 395 between Temecula and Lake Elsinore was part of the Butterfield Overland Mail route, the first major overland delivery service to southern California, established September 16, 1858. After its realignment eastward, former US 395 became the first major expressway and freeway system in the southern portion of the County of Riverside in the early 1950s, servicing the Cities of Temecula, Murrieta, Menifee, Sun City, and Perris. Today this is I-215. The portion of former US 395 between the Cities of San Bernardino and Hesperia, near modern US 395, traverses the Cajon Pass with old US 66 and old US 91, most famously used by the Mormons in 1851 in their crossing into the valley where they subsequently founded the modern Cities of San Bernardino and Riverside. The heritage in the regions through which former US 395 passed was greatly diminished when the former highway was replaced by suburban streets and I-15 and I-215.The Legislature hereby recognizes the remaining segments of US 395 for their historical significance and importance in the development of California, and designates those segments as Historic State Highway Route 395. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 98, Resolution Chapter 79, on 7/3/2008.

In January 2016, it was noted that more cities were signing historic US 395. Moreno Valley will be the latest Inland city, joining others from Riverside to Temecula, to rediscover the US 395 and put up brown signs along the route of the once-vital artery. The city and Moreno Valley Historical Society dedicated the 2-mile section of the 395 between Eucalyptus and Cactus avenues on Memorial Day with a weekend of activities. Though US 66, another U.S. highway, is considered the mother road connecting the nation east to west, the 395 is its lesser-known north-south counterpart. The 1,400-mile road was known as the Three Flag Highway because it went from the Mexican border through several Western states to the Canadian border, said Jeffery Harmon, founder of the Historic Route 395 Association. It was officially designated U.S. Highway 395 in 1939 after passage of federal legislation. However, it had existed as a series of dirt roads from San Diego to the Cajon Pass for decades. During World War II, at the urging of the military, the highway was improved to provide a better link between San Diego’s Navy base, a weapons depot in Fallbrook and March Field in what later became Moreno Valley. The route was nicknamed the Cannonball Highway because of its military importance. The highway faded into obscurity after years of rerouting and the development of other north-south routes, I-15 and I-15E (now I-215), in the 1970s. By the 1980s, US 395 had been decommissioned in Riverside and San Diego counties, though it continues to run from Hesperia in San Bernardino County along the eastern Sierra Nevada and north to Canada. In recent years, several cities have begun efforts to commemorate US 395. In San Diego and other cities in San Diego County, signs were put up along the route. Communities such as Fallbrook, Rainbow, Temecula, Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Perris and Riverside did the same. In Riverside, city officials put up 36 signs on downtown streets, including Market Street and University Avenue, which still has roadside hotels that are a remnant of when it was part of the highway, said Steve Lech, president of the Riverside Historical Society.
(Source: Press-Enterprise, via AAroads)

ACR 26 requested the Department of Transportation, upon application by an interested local agency or private entity, to identify any section of former U.S. Highway Route 6 that is still a publicly maintained highway and that is of interest to the applicant, and to designate that section as Historic U.S. Highway Route 6. Chaptered July 3, 2007. Resolution Chapter 67.

National Trails National Trails

Three Flags Highway All of original US 395 (i.e., current Route 395 plus parts of I-15, I-215, and Route 163) was part of the "Three Flags Highway".

Exit Information Exit Information

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Blue Star Memorial Highway Blue Star Memorial Highway

This route (post-1964 US 395) was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 112, Ch. 143 in 1984.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for US 395:


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 380 Forward Arrow Route 399

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Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.