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State Route 12

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

  1. Rte 12 Seg 1From Route 1 near Valley Ford to Route 121 near Sonoma via Santa Rosa.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    The segment was defined in 1963 by Chapter 385.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, the original signed Route 12 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 1 near Jenner to San Andreas, via Santa Rosa, Rio Vista, and Lodi. This corresponds to what LRN 104 between Jenner and Sebastopol, and LRN 51 from Sebastopol to San Andreas. After the 1963 definition of Route 116 and the transfer of the Sebastapol to Jenner portion to Route 116 in 1964 (and the redefinition of signed Route 12 to include the extension to Route 1 near Valley Ford), Route 12 was planned for the LRN 51 extension between Sebastopol and Valley Ford.

    • Until 1964, between Jenner and Sebastopol, present-day Route 116 was signed as Route 12, and was LRN 104, defined in 1933.
    • In the 1964 renumbering, Route 12 was realigned along an extension of LRN 51 defined in 1959 between Route 1 near Valley Ford and Sebastopol.
    • Between Route 116 near Sebastopol and US 101, this was an extension of LRN 51, as defined in 1933. It was signed as Route 12.
    • Between US 101 and Route 121, this was the original portion of LRN 51, defined in 1919. This was signed as Route 12.

    On AARoads, Scott Parker explained why Route 116 was created: It seems that the 1964 decision to replace Route 12 from Jenner to Sebastopol with Route 116 was because the Bodega Bay-Sebastopol route -- part of the Freeway & Expressway System additions -- as a LRN 51 western extension dating from the system's original 1959 iteration -- was considered to be the more direct and favorable route to reach the coast, as well as serving Bodega Bay, considered to be a more popular tourist destination than Guerneville or Jenner. The avoidance of a Route 12/Route 116 "bump" at Sebastopol was a prime consideration as well, along with the periodic flooding of then-LRN 104 through the Guerneville-Monte Rio area along the lower Russian River canyon. So the renumbering took place and Route 12 signage terminated at CA 116 as it does today -- but plans were afoot to bring the county road (Bodega Highway), which intersected Route 1 near the small community of Bodega, into the state system in short order. But residents in the western part of Sebastopol voiced objections to the state assuming maintenance and signing the road because of the potential for increased traffic through their neighborhoods, preferring (at the time) a realignment to the south. The Division of Highways didn't demur to that request, and Sonoma County elected to not cede the existing route to the state. That situation, dating from around 1970, has never been resolved, and Route 12 continues to terminate in Sebastopol as a result.
    (Source: SParker on AARoads, "Re: CA 116", 1/23/2020)

    From Schellville easterly to Napa, the route was cosigned as Route 12/Route 37 (now Route 12/Route 121), and was LRN 8. This is now technically part of Route 121; LRN 8 dates back to 1909.

    Railroad Square in Santa Rosa refers to a neighborhood bounded by; Third Street, Davis Street, Sixth Street and Santa Rosa Creek. The creation of Railroad Square can be directly attributed to LRN 1 (signed as US 101 after 1926) being moved to a limited access roadway. With the passage of the 1909 First State Highway Bond Act, LRN 1 was plotted from the Oregon State Line to San Francisco Bay. LRN 1 headed northbound traversed Santa Rosa using the following alignment: (1) Santa Rosa Avenue to Old Courthouse Square; (2) Old Courthouse Square to Mendocino Avenue; (3) Mendocino Avenue north out of Santa Rosa. During the 1919 Third State Highway Bond Act, LRN 51 (signed as Route 12 after 1934) was added to the Highway System. LRN 51 as originally defined was aligned between Santa Rosa east to Shellville. The original alignment of LRN 51 east of LRN 1 branched away via 4th Street from Mendocino Avenue. In 1933, LRN 51 was extended west through Santa Rosa to Sebastopol. LRN 51 multiplexed US 101/LRN 2 along Mendocino Avenue, Old Courthouse Square, and Santa Rosa Avenue before splitting west along Sebastopol Road. The opening of the 4.3 mi "Santa Rosa Freeway" (in today's parlance, an expressway) route of US 101/LRN 1 on May 20th, 1949 altered the routes of US 101 and Route 12. US 101/LRN 1 moved to the Santa Rosa Freeway routing, and the route of Route 12 westbound was altered north of downtown, moving off of 4th Street approaching downtown to meet US 101/LRN 1 via College Avenue. US 101/Route 12 multiplexed on the Santa Rosa Freeway south to Sebastopol Road where Route 12 split west. For a time the former surface route of US 101/LRN 1 in Santa Rosa was signed as US 101A. An unintended consequence of the Santa Rosa Freeway was that it divided what is now Railroad Square from the rest of downtown Santa Rosa.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog "Railroad Square Historic District, US Route 101, California State Route 12; Santa Rosa, California")

    On January 24, 1957, the California Highway Commission (CHC) adopted a resolution declaring LRN 51 (now Route 12) to be a freeway between the city of Sebastopol through Santa Rosa to the unincorporated community of Kenwood in Sonoma County. In general the adopted freeway alignment followed the existing Route 12 alignment from the east city limits of Sebastopol to Farmers Lane. At this location a new alignment was adopted to the east following Hoen Avenue through Spring Lake Park rejoining existing Route 12 at Melita Road. It then follows the present highway routing to south of Kenwood. Following this adoption, the Department executed freeway agreements with the city of Santa Rosa on August 20, 1958 and May 5, 1959; and with Sonoma County on September 29, 1958 and July 14, 1959. The Department acquired approximately 65 parcels for construction of the adopted Route 12 east extension along Hoen Avenue from the late 1950’s to the early 1970’s. The estimated current market value as of August 2014 was between $17.5 and $25 million. In 1977 the freeway declaration on Route 12 from east of Melita Road through Kenwood continuing to Route 121 was rescinded. From Sebastopol to US 101 and from US 101 to Farmers Lane in Santa Rosa, Route 12 has been constructed as a freeway.

    One correspondant noted that the freeway from Farmers Lane to Melita Road was deleted, after one of the overpasses over Farmers Lane was built, to provide better access from Hoen Ave. This resulted in "To Route 12" signage for those traveling eastbound approaching Farmers Lane.
    (Source: Email from Nick Karels, 7/30/2019)

    012 ExtensionIn September 2013, a report was issued suggesting the state is willing to part with the two-mile ribbon of land that had been designated for the extension of the freeway routing of Route 12. The draft report on the future of the Route 12 corridor clearly states that the State Department of Transportation has no plans to extend the freeway east of Farmers Lane over Spring Lake and therefore doesn't need the 50 acres long set aside for the project. The report outlines long-range planning issues facing the stretch of highway between Sebastopol and Sonoma. But the state's formal acknowledgment that the project is dead is crucial because it allows CalTrans to declare the property surplus and transfer it for other uses. The 300-foot-wide strip of open space runs from Farmer's Lane, past Montgomery High School, crosses Yulupa Avenue and Summerfield Road before it turns northeast and climbs the hill to the edge of Spring Lake Regional Park.
    (Source: Press-Democrat, 9/3/2013)

    In May 2014, the CTC proposed rescinding the freeway adoption near Santa Rosa. There is a lack of community support to construct a freeway on a new alignment by extending existing Route 12 through Spring Lake Park east of the city of Santa Rosa. This proposed freeway extension remains unconstructed. Consequently, the Department rescinded the freeway route adoption along the unconstructed portion of Route 12 from Farmers Lane to Melita Road. Once the route rescission is approved, the Department's responsibility is to dispose of the excess land. The unconstructed route segment is not needed for route continuity. Currently, Route 12 is a fourlane conventional highway north along Farmers Lane and then east towards Kenwood. The Department's Transportation Concept Report (TCR) for Route 12 was finalized and signed in January 2014. The 25-year corridor concept was developed by incorporating planning principles of Caltrans Smart Mobility Framework (SMF). SMF provides tools and strategies to meet the goals of Assembly Bill 32 and Senate Bill 375 on climate change and CO2 emissions reduction. The nominal 25-year facility concept for Route 12 remains a conventional highway. There is no local agency support for the proposed freeway extension of Route 12 east of Farmers lane in Santa Rosa. The proposed extension is not included as part of the Sonoma County General Plan and is no longer included as part of the city of Santa Rosa General Plan. During the public comment period, the Department received a total of 59 comments - 56 comments from the public and 3 comments from local agencies. Fifty-four comments were in support of the rescission, one was in support if certain contingencies were met, one did not specify support or opposition, and three were against it.

    Status Status

    Unconstructed *Route* Unconstructed from Route 1 to Route 116. Constructed to freeway standards for 2 miles in Santa Rosa. The traversable local routing is Valley Ford Road and and Bodega Highway. In 2002, it was noted that 1.3 mi were widened to 40' in 1975, and the remainder is inadequate.

    Laguna de Santa Rosa Bridge (SON 009.63)

    In September 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Sonoma County that will replace the Laguna de Santa Rosa Bridge (SON 009.63) on Route 12 in the city of Sebastopol. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $19,213,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The project will require construction activities in sensitive riparian habitat including wetlands. Studies concluded that the project will not have impacts to any resources in the project area.

    In June 2015 Caltrans began construction on Route 12 at the Laguna de Santa Rosa bridge. Over two construction seasons Caltrans will replace the existing Laguna de Santa Rosa Bridge on Route 12 with a new two-lane bridge that complies with the current Caltrans roadway standards of 12 ft. lanes and 8 ft. shoulders. In addition, there will be 7 ft. sidewalks on both sides of the highway (on the bridge). One-half of the bridge will be constructed in one season; traffic will be shifted to the new bridge; demolition will take place on the old bridge; then the final portion will be built in the second construction season. The majority of the work will take place during the day, but residents may notice increased noise from construction and mandatory backup alarms. Construction is expected to be complete in 2017. The existing Laguna Bridge is being replaced because of underwater scouring and erosion. The 220-foot bridge, which spans the Laguna de Santa Rosa, was built in 1921 and widened in 1949. The bridge replacement is a $9 million project. More than 23,000 vehicles cross the span on an average day. The construction season is limited to between June 15 and Oct. 15 because of environmental regulations related to the Laguna’s sensitive wildlife habitat.
    (Source: Caltrans, Press Democrat, h/t AAroads)

    Route 12/Fulton Road Interchange (~ SON R12.946)

    In June 2019, it was reported that Santa Rosa City Council voted to ask county transportation officials to reroute $9.5 million in regional sales tax revenue toward rebuilding the Hearn Avenue (~ 101 SON 18.474) crossing over US 101 in south Santa Rosa, a $28 million project that would double the number of lanes on the bridge and include new turn lanes, bike lanes and sidewalks. The money, which comes from a 20-year county sales tax voters approved in 2004, is currently set aside for converting the intersection of Route 12 and Fulton Road (~ 012 SON R12.946) into a full highway interchange — a $45 million project that has yet to begin. The decision to move the money will be up to the Sonoma County Transportation Authority, which is likely to consider the matter in September. There is no guarantee SCTA would assent to Santa Rosa’s request — the money will return to a general funding pool and wouldn’t be a direct transfer — but Hearn is clearly a priority for the city of Santa Rosa, and SCTA is eager to deliver critical Measure M projects. Santa Rosa has been unable to secure full funding for each of its three Measure M projects: the Hearn Avenue bridge, the Fulton Road interchange, and the $47.5 million dollar extension of Farmers Lane between Bennett Valley Road and Petaluma Hill Road along the city’s southeastern edge. Moving the Fulton money toward Hearn — except for $500,000 that will be used for study — reflects the city’s desire to prioritize a bigger Hearn highway crossing without totally abandoning the west side project. The move also preserves several million dollars in Measure M funding for the Farmers Lane extension. Previous efforts to secure grants for Hearn Avenue were unsuccessful, in part because Santa Rosa didn’t put up enough local dollars to draw down matching funds. Bolstering the city’s plans with extra cash could improve its chances. A city spokeswoman said the two-year construction process for Hearn Avenue could begin in January 2021 if Santa Rosa is able to secure full funding by the middle of 2020.
    (Source: Press Democrat, 6/12/2019)

    State Route 12 Bridge Scour Mitigation Project (04-Son-12, PM 25.82/33.31)

    In December 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project located in Sonoma County on Route SR 12 near Kenwood at the Sonoma Creek Bridge (No. 20-0027) and at the Hooker Creek Bridge (No. 20-0030) near Glen Ellen (04-Son-12, PM 25.82/33.31). The project proposes to address the scour condition of both bridges and restore them to serviceable conditions. The scour mitigation involves replacing both bridges to protect their structural integrity for highway safety. The proposed project is estimated to cost approximately $25.3 million. This project is currently funded and programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for approximately $15.8 million. Construction is estimated to begin in 2020. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
    (Source: December 2018 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    Rte 12/121 interchangeIn 2012, the intersection of Route 12 and Route 121 was reconfigured (~ SON 41.347). Prior to 2012, the intersection had a number of angular junctions. After reconstruction, the intersection of Route 12 and Route 121 was a traditional T-interchange, with nearby Fremont road being turned into a westbound only spur. The changes were prompted by an higher-than-average accident rate at the intersection. The cost of the project is $2.4 million.

    Naming Naming

    The portion of this route constructed to freeway standards is named the "Sebastopol Freeway". This is because the freeway replaced Sebastopol Road.

    Historically, this route is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). A portion of this route has officially been designated as part of "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1707, Chapter 739, on October 11, 2001.

    Valley of the Moon Scenic RouteThe portion of this route running through Sonoma County is called the "Valley of the Moon Scenic Route". "Valley of the Moon" was the name Jack London, resident of Glen Ellen, coined for this area. The first such sign with this name is when the Farmers Lane portion ends in Santa Rosa. Another name for this portion if the Sonoma Highway.
    (Image source: Flikr)

    Luther BurbankRoute 12 from Sebastopol (~ SON 9.243) to Santa Rosa (~ SON R15.87) is named the "Luther Burbank Memorial Highway". Luther Burbank (1849-1926) was a famous horticulturist who developed more than 800 strains and varieties of plants, including 113 varieties of plums and prunes, 10 varieties of berries, 50 varieties of lilies and the Freestone peach. Born in Lancaster, Massachusetts, Burbank was brought up on a farm and received only an elementary education. At age 21 he purchased a 17-acre tract near Lunenberg, Massachusetts, and began a 55-year plant breeding career. In 1871 he developed the Burbank potato, which was introduced in Ireland to help combat the blight epidemic. He sold the rights to the Burbank potato for $150, which he used to travel to Santa Rosa, California. In Santa Rosa, he established a nursery garden, greenhouse, and experimental farms that have become famous throughout the world. Burbank carried on his plant hybridization and selection on a huge scale. At any one time he maintained as many as 3,000 experiments involving millions of plants. In his work on plums, he tested about 30,000 new varieties. It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 4, Chapter 11 in 1940.
    (Biographical information on Luther Burbank from the National Inventors Hall of Fame; Image source: Wikipedia)

    Deputy Frank Trejo Memorial InterchangeThe US 101 interchange at Route 12 (~ SON R16.122) in the City of Santa Rosa is named the "Deputy Frank Trejo Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Deputy Frank Trejo of the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office. Deputy Trejo served the residents of Sonoma County faithfully as a deputy sheriff for 15 years, until March 29, 1995, when he was shot and killed in the line of duty while investigating a suspicious motor vehicle in his beat west of the City of Santa Rosa. Deputy Trejo was posthumously awarded the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office highest award, the Gold Medal of Valor, for his sacrifice. Deputy Trejo loved being a law enforcement officer, protecting the public, and serving his community. He was a career lawman with a career spanning 35 years, serving as a police officer for the Cities of Lompoc and Tiburon prior to joining the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office. Deputy Trejo was affectionately known as the "old man" in the sheriff's office and is credited with mentoring many younger officers over the course of his 35-year career. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 34, Resolution Chapter 93, on September 15, 2011.
    (Image source: Sonoma Sheriff on FB; Officer Down Memorial Page)

    South of the town of Sonoma, Route 12 is called Broadway until it intersects Route 121 near Schellville (~ SON 41.211). Route 12/Route 121 to Napa County is called alternately "Fremont Drive" or "Carneros Highway." The latter term continues into Napa County.

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Parker B. RiceIn Santa Rosa is the "Parker B. Rice Memorial Bridge" (just east of Route 101, ~ SON 16.80). It was named in memory of Parker B. Rice, a native Californian, World War II veteran, newspaperman, prominent leader in veteran's and service organizations, as well as devoted husband, father, and grandfather. Following his enlistment at the age of 18, Parker Rice served as an Army Air Corps aircraft mechanic and saw action throughout the South Pacific, while rising to the rank of Master Sergeant. Wounded in action during the landing of American forces in the Philippines, he was honorably discharged in 1946; and then embarked on a 41-year career with the Santa Rosa "Press Democrat," beginning as an apprentice stereotyper, and rising to production manager. In 1951, Parker B. Rice joined the Disabled American Veterans (DAV) Chapter 48, Santa Rosa, an affiliation that was to last 43 years, until his death on February 15, 1995, at the age of 71. During his long tenure with the Disabled American Veterans, Mr. Parker served as Commander of the California Department from 1955-56, and for 15 years served on the prestigious Claims and Service Commission, chairing the commission for 10 years. At the national level, Mr. Rice served as a member of the 16th District National Executive Committee, and held National Junior and Senior Vice Commander positions. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 68, Chapter 74 in 1996.
    (Source: Newspapers.Com)

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 1 near Valley Ford to Route 101 at Santa Rosa; from Route 101 near Santa Rosa to Melita Road near Santa Rosa. Note: the entire segment was defined as part of the F&E; system in 1959; in 1969, the portion from Melita Road to Route 29 was deleted from the F&E system by Chapter 726.

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.3] From Route 101 near Santa Rosa to Route 121 near Sonoma.

    Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Sonoma 12 R14.89 T17.10


  2. Rte 12 Seg 2From Route 29 in the vicinity of Napa to Route 80 near Cordelia.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is as defined in 1963 by Chapter 385.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    Circa 1935, the first two segments of this routing were continuous.

    In 1934, Route 12 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 1 near Jenner to San Andreas, via Santa Rosa, Rio Vista, and Lodi. Route 12 was dual-signed with Route 37 (now Route 121) between Sonoma and Napa, and with Route 29 from Napa for a short distance S of Napa. The portion that was cosigned with Route 29 is present-day Route 221.

    US Highway Shield From Napa, signed Route 12 continued southerly to Cordelia in two segments: one stretch signed as Route 12/Route 37 (now Route 12/Route 121, and another stretch signed only as Route 12. This was also LRN 8; defined in 1909. In 1931, this was signed as (temporary) US 40.

    Status Status

    SR 12/29/221 Intersection Improvements (PPNO 0376) (NAP 0.0/0.7)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to change the allocation for this project from $6.3M to $12.819M (Caltrans + Napa TPA), with R/W acquisition and PS&E occuring in FY19-20. This project is at the intersection of Route 12, Route 29, and Route 221. Partial grade separation improvements

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which increased the programmed funding for PPNO 0376 Rt 12/29/221 Soscol intersection separation (SB1), from $9,819K to $29,819K, with the bulk being in FY21.22.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    Jameson Canyon Widening (High Priority Project #1081) (~ NAP 0.086 to SOL R2.559)

    TCRP Project 157An EIR has been prepared regarding conversion of the existing two-lange highway known as Jameson Canyon Road into a four-lane divided expressway. (January 2002 CTC Agenda 2.2a.(2)). This is actually TCRP Project #157, which will do congestion relief improvements from Route 29 to I-80 through Jamison Canyon. In March 2006, it was reported that environmental studies and preliminary engineering have been delayed due to inability to hire a consultant to complete the technical studies. The United States Fish and Wildlife Services (USFWS) is requiring additional surveys to determine the impacts on the Red Legged Frog and Fairy Shrimp within the project limits. The USFWS is now requiring that the survey of the Red Legged Frog be conducted over a two-year period, instead of the previous one-year requirement. For the Fairy Shrimp, a one-year survey during both wet and dry seasons must be conducted, when previously such a survey was not required. Estimated completion is now September 2010. In 2007, the CTC recommended using $73.99M from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) for phase 1 of the Jameson Canyon Widening. In October 2009, recieved information the Caltrans plans to:Redistribute environmental phase programming not attributable to the CMIA Phase 1 project to a new Phase 2 project (PPNO 0367H).Make minor adjustments to the project post miles of the CMIA Phase 1 project to more accurately reflect the actual project limits. Split the CMIA Phase 1 project into two roadway contracts and one follow-up landscape contract.The rationale is that the project environmental document, approved in January 2008, environmentally cleared the construction of the ultimate 4-lane conventional highway with a 3.6 meter median. This scope was found to be too large to fund and construct at once, so plans were made to phase implementation of the overall improvement project. Phase 1, the CMIA project, will construct two new lanes adjacent to the existing roadway. However, Phase 1 does not include funding to fully update all horizontal and vertical curve deficiencies of the existing roadway. Phase 2, therefore, will upgrade the existing facility to current standards when full funding becomes available. Since the environmental studies were initiated prior to identification of a phased project, and prior to selection of Phase 1 for CMIA funding, the full programmed budget and expenditures for environmental work were attributed to what has become Phase 1. The proposed redistribution of the costs for environmental between Phase 1 and Phase 2 will serve to better align budgets and expenditures attributable to each of the two projects. The outcome is the creation of a new project to represent Phase 2 (PPNO 0367H) and a shift of $2,190,000 from Phase 1 environmental to Phase 2 environmental. The specific segments under the redivision are:Segment 1 (PPNO 0367D): On Route 12 in Napa and Solano Counties, from 0.5 mile west of Napa/Solano County Line to Red Top Road in Solano County. Construct two lanes, add a median barrier and a median opening. Segment 2 (PPNO 0367I): On Route 12 in Napa County, from Route 29 junction to 0.1 mile west of Napa/Solano Line. Construct two lanes and add a median barrier.Segment 3 (PPNO 0367J): On Route 12 in Napa and Solano Counties, from Kelly Road (Napa) to Red Top Road (Solano). Construct replacement landscaping.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1081: Widen Route 12 to four lanes through Jamieson Canyon (between I-80 and Route 29) for safety concerns and economic growth. $6,400,000.

    In January 2007, the CTC considered a request to amend the funding plan for TCRP Project #157 on Route 12: Congestion relief improvements from Route 29 to I-80 through Jamison Canyon. The goal of the project is to widen Route 12 from a 2- lane highway to a 4- lane expressway. Estimated completion is FY 2012/2013. In July 2008, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the Route 12 Widening and Route 29/Route 12 Interchange projects. The projects are being planned in three phases. Phase 1 consists of two new 12 foot-wide lanes for eastbound traffic on Route 12 for the entire limits of the existing facility, as well as the construction of retaining walls (PPNO 0367D). Phase 1 is programmed for $139,500,000 with corridor mobility improvement account (CMIA) funds, traffic congestion relief program (TCRP) funds, federal demonstration funds, regional surface transportation program funds, regional improvement program funds, and interregional improvement program funds. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. Phase 2 will upgrade Route 12 to current standards and is estimated to cost $77,300,000. Phase 2 is not fully funded. Phase 3, the Route 29/Route 12 Interchange project (PPNO 0373) (PM 4.2/5.4), is also not fully funded. The project is programmed for environmental for $1,500,000 in regional improvement program funds in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated project capital cost is $73,137,000.

    In January 2011, the CTC reviewed a proposal (approved in March 2011) to amend the CMIA baseline agreement and the 2010 STIP for the Segment 1 (PPNO 0367D) and Segment 2 (PPNO 0367I) of the Route 12 Jameson Canyon Widening — Phase 1 (TCRP 157) project as follows: 1. Reprogram $4,100,000 Interregional Improvement Program (IIP) funds from Construction Capital for Segment 1 to Construction Support for Segment 1 ($2,750,000) and Segment 2 ($1,350,000). 2. Update the project delivery schedule. The three segments are (1) Segment 1 (PPNO 0367D): On Route 12 in Napa and Solano Counties, from 0.5 mile west of the Napa/Solano County line to Red Top Road in Solano County. Construct two lanes and add a median barrier and a median opening; (2) Segment 2 (PPNO 0367I): On Route 12 in Napa County, from the State Route 29 junction to 0.1 mile west of the Napa/Solano County line. Construct two lanes and add a median barrier; (3) Segment 3 (PPNO 0367J): On Route 12 in Napa and Solano Counties, from Kelly Road (Napa) to Red Top Road (Solano). Construct replacement landscaping. In an effort to avoid approximately $20 million in potential utility relocation costs, the roadway alignment at selected locations was modified during the design phase. The design work has been completed for both segments. This shift in alignment, along with refinement of contract unit prices for structures items, has resulted in a reduction of approximately $8 million in the Construction Capital estimate for the Segment 1. Out of these savings, $4,100,000 is proposed to cover a shortfall in Construction Support for Segment 1 ($2,750,000) and Segment 2 ($1,350,000). The remaining savings are proposed to remain with Segment 1 at this time. This was approved in March 2011.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $130 million in funds left over from other highway projects to Jamieson Canyon. The project had come to a screeching halt in March 2011 when the state put off selling highway construction bonds because of California’s budget crisis. Caltrans is splitting the project into two contracts. Work in Napa County, where the terrain is mostly flat, is to take 18 months and cost $46 million. The Solano section, requiring nine retaining walls, including one almost 100 feet tall, is to take 30 months and cost nearly $90 million.
    (Source: Napa Valley Register)

    In December 2011, Caltrans received a number of lower-than-expected bids for the Jamieson Canyon widening. For the 3.1-mile Napa County segment, the apparent low bidder was Synergy Project Management of San Francisco, who bid $19.9 million or 23% below engineers— estimates. For the 3.2-mile stretch in Solano County, the apparent low bidder was Ghilotti Construction Inc. of San Rafael, bidding $35.6 million—nearly $12 million or 24% less than the Caltrans estimate. The California Transportation Commission is expected to award contracts for Jameson Canyon widening early next year, allowing for construction to begin in the spring 2012. The Napa County segment should be finished by late 2013, with the Solano half completed in 2014.
    (Source: Napa Valley Register)

    In February 2012, the CTC adjusted the project funding.

    In April 2012, it was reported that the ground-breaking for the Jamieson Canyon widening project had occurred. By 2015, the roadway will be expanded from two lanes to four and a center barrier will be installed to prevent the higher-than-average frequency of head-on collisions the roadway has seen in recent decades. The work is split into two parts. The first, on the Napa County side of the roadway, is expected to be completed by late 2013. Officials hope the Solano County work, complicated by excavation through hillsides and construction of a retaining wall, will be complete by 2015 (note that this is a year later than the December 2011 estimate).

    In April 2013, it was reported that construction was progressing well. In Jamieson Canyon, Caltrans is transforming this major link between Solano and Napa counties from a narrow, two-lane road to a four-lane road with wide shoulders and a median barrier. A mile-long section of new lanes east of the Solano/Napa line should be ready for traffic by late April 2013. Eastbound and westbound motorists will use these two new lanes while workers start doing work on the existing two lanes of Route 12. Meanwhile, workers continue to carve away the massive hill just west of the truck scale lanes and I-80. They are working from the point of the future retaining wall and moving toward the highway, with huge amounts of earth over time just appearing to melt away. The entire four-lane version of Route 12 could be finished by mid-2014. The section in Napa County could be finished by then end of 2013. Additionally, cars exiting I-80 for eastbound Route 12 leading to Suisun City will have a new off-ramp, an elevated route that will ultimately let them pass over trucks leaving the new scales. These new truck scales could open to trucks as early as late June or early July 2013. Then such work as adding landscaping and demolishing the existing eastbound truck scales will take place. The entire project could wrap up by October 2013.
    (Source: Daily Republic, 4/14/13)

    In May 2013, the CTC allocated an additional $2,000,000 in State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) funds and amend the Proposition 1B Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) baseline agreement to update the project funding plan for Segment 2 (Napa County contract) of the Route 12 Jameson Canyon Widening – Phase 1 project in Napa and Solano Counties. As of May 2013, construction is about 50 percent complete and is expected to be finished by December 2013. However, an additional $2,000,000 is needed to complete construction. This increase is proposed to be proportionally funded with IIP and RIP (Napa and Solano County) funds. The cost increase was due to design inconsistencies (design risk due to aerial surveys vs. ground surveys), waterline conflicts (the project plans provided to the City mistakenly omitted the waterline location on the roadway cross section plans), and construction delays and work inefficiencies.

    In January 2014, it was reported that work was progressing well on the Jameson Canyon project for Route 12: the Napa County side is 90 percent finished and the Solano County side is 70 percent finished. Over 2013, workers on the Solano County side have carved away a large chunk of a hill that stood in the way of the widening. They’ve put two new lanes on a terrace along what’s left of this hill, some 20 feet above the existing two lanes at the highest point and extending for about a half-mile. Some of the new lanes were scheduled to open in January 2014. It was estimated that the final project completion could be as early as August 2014.

    In August 2014, it was reported that the Jameson Canyon widening project should be complete by September 5, 2014. In mid-July, crews wrapped up paving work on the new, two-lane eastbound stretch on the Solano County side of the project. Finishing touches on sculpting for the retaining walls were completed the week of July 21. Finally, the crews in early August installed a concrete median separating the eastbound and westbound lanes in that stretch.

    In September 2014, it was reported that the Jameson Canyon widening project was officially completed.

    In July 2015, it was reported that Jameson Canyon Road, a stretch of Route 12 between Route 29 and I-80 once known as “Blood Alley,” is safer in 2015 than it was in 2014, thanks to a barrier in the median and an expansion from two lanes to four. However, the incidents of speeding have increased. Before the improvements, the highest speed he recorded had been about 75 mph. Today, the CHP regularly catches speeders going into the 80s and even 90s, which could negate the new safety efforts. The posted speed limit on the highway has always been 55 mph. Still, despite the increased speed of many drivers, the road is safer thanks to the extra lanes and median barrier. Most collisions on the previous highway were the result of someone crossing into oncoming traffic, which pretty much can’t happen anymore.
    (Source: Napa Valley Register, 7/15/2015)

    Reconstruction of the Route 12 / I-80 / I-680 Interchange Complex (High Priority Project #1812) (~ SOL R2.559)

    The California Transportion Commission, in September 2000, considered a Traffic Congestion Relief Program proposal to reconstruct the I-80/I-680/Route 12 interchange; it would be a 12-interchange complex constructed in seven stages. The proposal was $1 million for stage 1; the total estimated cost was $13 million. As of December 2001, this was still on the agenda (TCRP 25.2/25.3). This is TCRP Project #25, requested by the Solano Transportation Authority.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1812: Upgrade and reconstruct the I-80/I-680/Route 12 Interchange, Solano County. $17,480,000.

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed constructing the I-80/I-680/Route 12 Interchange Complex, including HOV Connector Lanes. He also proposed widening the route to a 4-lane expressway in Napa.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Solano County that will rebuild and relocate the eastbound truck scales facility, build a four lane bridge across Suisun Creek, and construct braided ramps from the new truck scales facility to eastbound I-80 and eastbound Route 12 ramps. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund and the Traffic Congestion Relief Program and includes local funds. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. Total estimated project cost is $100,900,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the proposed project baseline agreement. Resources that may be impacted by the project include; water quality, paleontology, cultural resources, visual resources hazardous waste, air quality, and noise. Potential impacts associated with the project can all be mitigated to below significance through proposed mitigation measures. Because of the sensitivity of the resources in the project area, a Final Environmental Impact Report was prepared for the project.

    Rte 80/Rte 680/Rte 12 ProjectIn January 2013, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Solano County that will improve the I-80/I-680/Route 12 Interchange, including the relocation of the westbound truck scales facility on I-80. For the preferred full-build alternative, the current total estimated cost for capital and support is $1,348,400,000. The project is not fully funded and will be developed in phases. Only Phase One of the full-build alternative is included in the financially constrained Regional Transportation Plan (RTP). Within Phase One, the first construction contract's total estimated cost for capital and support is $100,400,000, which is funded by the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), the Trade Corridor Improvement Funds (TCIF) and local funding. The scope of the first construction contract includes the reconstruction of the I-80/Green Valley Interchange and construction of a two lane westbound I-80 to westbound Route 12 Connector with a new bridge over the I-80 Green Valley Road onramp. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2013-2014. The scope of the preferred alternative is consistent with the scope of the first construction contract that is programmed in the 2012 STIP and the TCIF.

    In May 2013, it was reported that the funding outlook for the updated I-80/I-680/Route 12 interchange was improving. The required permit from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was obtained, and the Solano Transportation Authority had done what it is supposed to do to get the project ready for construction. The project is designed to improve traffic flow near the I-80 / I-680 interchange. It involves renovating the nearby Green Valley interchange and building ramps to sort traffic entering westbound I-80 from the Green Valley interchange from traffic exiting I-80 for Route 12 in Jameson Canyon. Construction work is to cost $60 million. The $24 million at risk is to come from Proposition 1B, the transportation bond passed by voters in 2006. The potential obstacle stems from the Buy America provisions, which requires that projects that receive federal dollars be built with materials made in America. Revisions in the 2012 federal transportation bill extend these provisions to contracts, including utility agreements, associated with the projects.

    In August 2013, it was reported that Solano County and the state Department of Transportation are once again asking the California Transportation Commission for $24 million to help rebuild the Green Valley interchange. The $24 million has been tied up for several months because of problems stemming from new, federal Buy America provisions. Pacific Gas & Electric Co. has been unable to comply with the provisions for related utility relocations and that put the money and project at risk. The long-standing Buy America provision states that transportation projects involving federal money must use materials made in America. A 2012 addition to Buy America includes utilities doing relocation work for the projects. But PG&E officials have said that, though they want to, they cannot comply with Buy America for relocations needed for the Green Valley interchange project. A gas pipeline valve needed for the project is only manufactured outside the United States.

    In April 2014, it was reported that significant overhead work was recently completed on the I-80/I-680/Route 12 interchange project, marking a major milestone in the first phase of construction. In particular, preliminary overhead structures were installed earlier this month for the new Green Valley Road overcrossing over I-80. Ground was broken for the first phase of the project in June 2014. About 75% of the work should be complete by the end of the year, a Caltrans engineer estimated in March. The first phase should be complete by December 2016 or a little sooner depending on the weather, he said.
    (Source: Daily Republic, 4/23/2015)

    In October 2015, the CTC again approved for future consideration of funding a project that will improve the I-80/I-680/Route 12 Interchange, including relocation of the westbound truck scales facility on I-80. For the preferred fullbuild alternative, the current total estimated cost for capital and support is $2,166,000,000. The project is not fully funded and will be developed in phases. Only Phase One of the full-build alternative is included in the financially constrained Regional Transportation Plan. Within Phase One, the first construction contract’s total estimated cost for capital and support is $100,400,000, which is funded by the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program, the Trade Corridor Improvement Fund and local funding. Contract 1 of Phase One is currently under construction. The design phase of Contract 2 of Phase One is 35% complete. The scope of the first construction contract includes the reconstruction of the Interstate 80/Green Valley Interchange and construction of a two-lane westbound I-80 to westbound Route 12 Connector with a new bridge over the I-80 Green Valley Road onramp. The scope of the preferred alternative is consistent with the scope of the first construction contract that is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program and the Trade Corridor Improvement Fund. It was received again because an Addendum had been completed due to changes in the project since Commission approval of the Final Environmental Impacts Report (FEIR) in 2013.

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to have allocated $9M in FY19-20 for PS&E for PPNO 5301X I-80/I-680/Route 12 Interchange - Package 2A

    In May 2018, it was reported that the California Transportation Commission approved $53 million for a project designed to help eliminate the Route 12/Jameson Canyon bottleneck at I-80. Construction to create a two-lane ramp from eastbound Route 12 to eastbound I-80 could begin in 2020, Solano Transportation Authority Executive Director Daryl Halls said. He estimated the project will cost about $70 million, with the remaining money coming from other sources. Caltrans in 2014 finished widening Route 12 from two to four lanes along the six-mile Jameson Canyon segment. But the two eastbound lanes squeeze down to one lane at the interchange ramp, causing backups that commuters say can top a mile.
    (Source: Napa Valley Register, 5/17/2018)

    In June 2020, the CTC approved a STIP amendment to reprogram $16,700,000 in Regional Improvement Program (RIP) funds from the Solano I-80 Managed Lanes project (PPNO 0658L) to the Solano I-80/I-680/Route 12 Interchange – Package 2A project (PPNO 5301X) in Solano County. The I-80/I-680/Route 12 project will replace the existing single-lane eastbound Route 12 to eastbound I-80 connector structure with a new two-lane structure that meets the operational requirements for the ultimate configuration of this interchange. The project will also construct direct ramps to Green Valley Road that will improve safety by eliminating the existing weaving conflicts.  The construction funding plan for the project consists of Senate Bill (SB) 1 - Trade Corridor Enhancement Program (TCEP) and Regional Measure (RM) 2 funds, and construction is currently programmed in Fiscal Year 2019-20. The project is being delivered using the Construction Manager/General Contractor (CMGC) method of delivery. However, based upon the latest cost estimate, the construction capital cost has been revised from $50,300,000 to $67,000,000; which is an increase of $16,700,000. This increase is due to the following reasons: (1) Geotechnical (Earthwork and structural section): $8 Million — After the constructability review was conducted, an extensive redesign was needed that resulted in significant changes in quantities and upward revisions to unit prices. These designchanges have increased the cost of the structural section by $6,000,000. An additional $2,000,000 increase has resulted from more extensive soil stabilization requiring longer piles and wick drains to consolidate the unforeseen expansive and unstable soils at the abutment locations. (2) Drainage: $4.2 Million — Based upon the final design, new drainage system components are needed to better drain the flat gradients surrounding the new roadway and to avoid conflicts with the existing drainage systems. This includes two drainage crossings under the I-80 that require an open trench on the west end and micro-tunneling at the east end. (3) Traffic staging: $1.0 Million — The original design details did not fully anticipate detour complexity and resulting traffic staging challenges which require more extensive construction signing/striping and traffic handling measures. The revised estimate for temporary and permanent striping and staging requirements has resulted in a cost increase of $1.0 million. (4) Specialty items: $3.5 Million — To address the revised trash capture requirements from the Regional Water Quality Control Board, a large bioswale will be constructed adjacent to the Green Valley Road off-ramp. Additional erosion control measures are also needed to stabilize the embankments and cut sections. Finally, the cost of median barrier has gone up as a result of revised quantities and increase in unit prices.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1b.(1))

    The STA has been working with the Metropolitan Transportation Commission to secure Regional Measure (RM) 3 funds to cover the cost increase. However, because of still-unresolved litigation of RM3 funds, those funds are not available at this time. Therefore, the STA is proposing to cover this funding shortfall by re-programming $16,700,000 RIP funds from the Solano I-80 Managed Lanes project (PPNO 0658L). The Solano I-80 Managed Lanes project is currently programmed in the 2020 STIP with $710,000 RIP for Right of  Way and $33,290,000 RIP for Construction; all funds programmed in 2021-22. The construction phase of this project is not fully funded at this time. The STA and the Department are planning to seek SB 1 funds during the upcoming cycle of SB 1 funding. The STA is committed to fully fund this project using RM3 funds once the litigation has been resolved. There are also minor changes in the project limits, with the new limits being 04-Sol-80 11.4/12.8.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1b.(1))

    In May 2012, it was reported that Caltrans has started the $20.5 million Route 12 Operational Improvements Project, which will create a “Smart Corridor” using Intelligent Transportation System elements in Solano, Sacramento and San Joaquin Counties on Route 12, and on I-5 in San Joaquin County. These elements include: Changeable Message Signs, Highway Advisory Radio, Extinguishable Message Signs, Closed Circuit Televisions and Traffic Monitoring Stations. The project will improve operations by realigning Tower Park Way; add and extend existing turn lanes and acceleration lanes at various intersections between I-5 and Tower Park Way; and expand the existing Park and Ride at Thornton Road. The contractor for this project is De Silva Gates Construction and is currently in construction. 

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] Entire portion. Defined as part of the F&E system in 1959.

    National Trails National Trails

    Lincoln Highway Sign According to an article in April 2017, the portion of Route 12 through Jameson Canyon near I-80 was part of the "Lincoln Highway". The somewhat tangled tale of how Napa County belatedly secured a section of the Lincoln Highway has its roots a century ago with a bespectacled man in Indiana named Carl Fisher. Fisher owned the Prest-O-Lite headlight company and helped establish the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. In 1912, he and other auto enthusiasts plotted a transcontinental route from New York’s Times Square to San Francisco’s Lincoln Park. This original, Napa-less coast-to-coast route for the most part stitched together existing roads. A 1916 Lincoln Highway guidebook said motorists should be able to make an enjoyable cross-country trip in 20 to 30 days, as long as rain didn’t bog them down on the unpaved sections. The westernmost section of the original Lincoln Highway went from Sacramento to San Francisco by way of Stockton and the Altamont Pass to avoid water barriers (i.e., former US 50). But in 1916, the completion of the Yolo Causeway west of Sacramento removed one of those barriers. Napans began hoping a more direct route might pass through the city of Napa, where tourists would stop and spend money. By 1923, efforts to create an alternate Lincoln Highway route focused on Vallejo, taking the city of Napa out of the picture. That alternative route became a reality after the Carquinez Bridge was completed in 1927 to take motorists over the Carquinez Strait. This alternative Lincoln Highway segment extends west from Sacramento using the same route as long-gone US 40. It goes through Davis, Vacaville and Fairfield, and then through Jameson Canyon on today’s Route 12, where it enters south Napa County. Until a few years ago, most of this Jameson Canyon section was two lanes and narrow and still had the ambiance of the old Lincoln Highway. Safety and traffic congestion concerns led to the road being widened to a four lanes in 2014. From Jameson Canyon, the Lincoln Highway heads south along what is now Route 29 past the county industrial center and city of American Canyon. Then, at American Canyon Road, it swings up to Broadway Street and heads past today’s Veterans Memorial Park to enter Vallejo and Solano County. Some in the Lincoln Highway Associate dispute that the alternate Lincoln Highway route through Yolo, Solano and Napa counties is legitimate. But Kinst said Gail Hoag, an official with the Lincoln Highway Association, in 1928 authorized Boy Scouts to erect markers along it. Napa County’s moment of Lincoln Highway sun soon faded, for all practical purposes. The state in 1933 began building a new US 40 route that went through the hills between Fairfield and Vallejo, creating a much more direct route than the local Lincoln Highway. That route became today’s I-80.
    (Source: Napa Valley Register, 4/1/2017)


  3. Rte 12 Seg 3From Route 80 near Fairfield to Route 99 near Lodi via Rio Vista.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined by Chapter 385 to be "(c) Route 80 near Fairfield to Route 84 at Rio Vista. (d) Route 84 near Rio Vista to Route 99 near Lodi."

    In 1976, Chapter 1384 made sections (c) and (d) contiguous, and the definition read "Route 80 near Fairfield to Route 99 near Lodi via Rio Vista." The portion from Route 84 at Rio Vista to Route 84 [Former Route 160] near Rio Vista was transferred from Route 84.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 12 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 1 near Jenner to San Andreas, via Santa Rosa, Rio Vista, and Lodi. This segment was LRN 53. The portion between I-80 near Fairfield and Rio Vista was defined in 1919; the remainder (Rio Vista to Route 99 near Lodi) was defined in 1921.

    County12At some point, this may have been a county route -- a photo at CalTrafficSigns.com clearly shows a (temporary) County Highway 12. It could also have been an error by the Auto Club of Northern California. This picture was supposedly taken at the intersection of Route 12 and Route 24 (now Route 160) near Rio Vista.

    The original (1934) alignment of Route 12 (LRN 53) east of Rio Vista took a far different path than Route 12 does today. The original alignment of LRN 53 from the Sacramento River and Sacramento County Line eastward to Lodi was as follows:
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog on Rte 12, 11/19/2018)

    • Modern Route 160 on River Road along the Sacramento River to Isleton and Isleton Road.
    • Isleton Road along the Sacramento River over Georgian Slough to Walnut Grove and River Road.
    • River Road/County Sign Route J11 to Walnut Grove-Thorton Road.
    • Walnut Grove-Thorton Road/County Sign Route J11 to the Mokelumne River and San Joaquin County Line to Walnut Grove Road.
    • Walnut Grove Road/County Sign Route J11 to Thorton and Thorton Road.
    • Thorton Road/County Sign Route J8 to Stockton Street.
    • Stockton Street to Midsection Street.
    • Midsection Street to Kile Road.
    • Kile Road to Peltier Road/County Sign Route J12.
    • Peltier Road/County Sign Route J12 to Devries Road.
    • Devries Road to Turner Road.
    • Turner Road to Sacramento Street in Lodi
    • Sacramento Street in Lodi to Lockeford Street in Lodi.
    • Lockeford Street in Lodi to LRN 4 at Cherokee Lane.

    By 1940 a new proposed alignment of Route 12/LRN 53 can be seen on the State Highway Map. The new alignment of Route 12/LRN 53 carried the route east out of Isleton on:
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog on Rte 12, 11/19/2018)

    • From Route 24; A Street to 4th Street.
    • 4th Street to Jackson Boulevard.
    • Jackson Boulevard to Jackson Slough Road.
    • Jackson Slough Road to Terminous Road.
    • East over modern Route 12 over Bouldin Island and Mokelumne River to Lodi at US 99/LRN 4.

    The new Route 12 bypass route south of Isleton first appears on the 1959 State Highway Map.

    Tom Fearer, in the Gribblenation Blog California Ferry Routes; CA 84 over the Real McCoy II Ferry and CA 220 over the J-Mack Ferry, gives some good history of the Rio Vista Bridge:

    The Rio Vista Bridge is a vertical lift span which was gradually built upon the site of an earlier bascule bridge between 1943 and 1960. The Rio Vista Bridge is 2,890 in length and has a 135 foot clearance when it's vertical span is raised. The Rio Vista Bridge is infamous for long delays due to freight shipping traffic on the Sacramento River and averages about 20,000 vehicles a day. Various studies have been conducted to research a replacement span but none have had much viability or much public support.

    Status Status

    Route 12 General

    During the period from 1997 to 2007, the collision and fatality rate on Route 12 has increased from 60% to over 100% of the statewide average for similar routes. Since 2001, there have been 802 collisions, 494 injuries, and 21 fatalities on Route 12, including three fatal accidents in 2006 and already three fatal accidents in 2007. The California Highway Patrol has prioritized Route 12 as one of its top requests for safety corridor project funding for 2007-08. Caltrans is in the process of constructing 12.7 miles of horizontal and vertical curve corrections, shoulder widening, median and shoulder rumble strips, and pavement rehabilitation along Route 12. In addition, the Solano Transportation Authority, in partnership with the Department of Transportation, is evaluating the long-term need for a concrete median barrier along that route.

    Route 12 Transportation Study (~ SOL L2.005 to SOL 026.24)

    In October 2001, a study was published of this section of Route 12 between I-80 and Rio Vista. The goal of the study was to identify the physical improvements and management practices necessary to appropriately serve future travel demand in the study corridor. The study corridor includes the potion of Route 12 between I-80 and the Rio Vista Bridge. Route 12 is an important east-west route connecting Sonoma, Napa, Solano, Sacramento, San Joaquin and Calaveras Counties. A two to four-lane roadway in the study area, Route 12 contains a mixture of freeway, two-lane highway, expressway and arterial sections. There were six packages of recommendations ranging from No Build (Package 1), Transportation Demand Management (Package 2), Safety Improvements (Package 3), Near-Term Traffic Improvements (Package 4), Passing Lane Installation (Package 5), and Long-Term Improvements (Package 6). The Alternatives Evaluation identified that Alternative Package 1, the No-Build Alternative, would not adequately serve near or long-term traffic levels in the study corridor, nor would the package remedy the existing identified accident problems. Alternative Package 2, the Transportation Demand Management Alternative, was also not found to adequately serve near or long-term traffic levels forecast to prevail on Route 12 from I-80 to the Sacramento River. While Alternative Package 3, Safety Improvements, would not provide the necessary additional capacity in the study corridor, it would eliminate the existing accident problems identified by the study. The implementation of Alternative Package 4, Near-Term Traffic Improvements, would result in adequate operating conditions in the study corridor to the year 2010; however, post-2010, additional capacity enhancements are expected to be required. Alternative Package 5, Passing Lane Installation, was not found to adequately serve near or long term traffic conditions in the study corridor. Finally, only Alternative Package 6, Long-Term Traffic Improvements would result in adequate operating conditions under year 2025 traffic volumes. In the near term, Transportation Demand Management (Package 2), Safety Improvements (Package 3), and Near-Term Traffic Improvements (Package 4) were recommended. These packages included:

    • 2a. Carpooling Program with Park and Ride Construction
    • 2b. Local Shuttle Program
    • 2c. Transit Service
    • 3a. Advance Overhead Flashers at Beck/Pennsylvania
    • 3b. Left Turn Lanes & Accel/Decel Lanes at Lambie/Shiloh with Realignment
    • 3c. Traffic Signal at Route 113/Route 12
    • 3d. Left Turn Lanes & Accel/Decel Lanes at Church Road with Realignment
    • 3e. Advance Flashers at Summerset Road
    • 3f. Acceleration and Deceleration Lanes at Railroad Museum
    • 3g. Acceleration/Deceleration Lanes at Beck Avenue
    • 4a. Geometric Improvements at Pennsylvania Avenue
    • 4b. Traffic Signal and Improvements at Lambie/Shiloh
    • 4c. Traffic signal at Route 113/Route 12

    In the long term, the study recommended adding the following to the above packages:

    • 6a. Widen to Four-Lanes Rio Vista City Limit to River Road
    • 6b. Widen to Six-Lanes from I-80 to Webster/Jackson
    • 6c. Install Median Barrier and Shoulders from Walters Road to Rio Vista City Limit
    • 6d. Grade Separation at Pennsylvania Avenue
    • 6e. Left Turn Lanes at Lambie/Shiloh
    • 6f. Traffic Signal at Church Road
    • 6g. Rio Vista Bridge

    I-80 near Fairfield to Rio Vista

    Fairfield Roundabout (04-Sol-12, PM 19.2)

    In May 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Solano County that proposes to improve safety for vehicles at the intersection of Route 12 and Route 113 (04-Sol-12, PM 19.2) by installing a single lane roundabout, light poles and advance warning signs. This project is programmed into the 2016 SHOPP for $7,122,000 in Construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in 2018. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    In May 2018, it was reported that Caltrans expects to hire a contractor to construct a roundabout at Route 12 and Route 113 in September 2018, with work starting as early as December. The estimated cost for the entire project is $7.1 million, of which $4.67 million is construction costs, Caltrans reports. It is funded through the State Highway Operation and Protection Program.
    (Source: Solano Daily Republic, May 2018)

    In August 2018, the CTC approved approved an allocation of $7,398,000 for the SHOPP Roadside Safety Improvement project (PPNO 8060A) on Route 12 and Route 113 in Solano County. This is a safety project which will reduce the number and severity of collisions at the existing highspeed and high-truck traffic intersection of Route 12 and Route 113 near the city of Rio Vista in Solano County. Route 12 is a major east-west corridor between I-80 and I-5, and intersects with Route 113/Birds Landing Road, forming a four-legged intersection controlled by two-way stop signs. The project is within an environmentally sensitive area, with creek crossings on both Route 12 and Route 113, requiring an Incidental Take Permit (ITP) for the California Tiger Salamander (CTS) from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW).

    The California Department of Fish and Wildlife issued the Incidental Take Permit (ITP) for the project in June 2018 with the condition of a security deposit as funding assurance to ensure successful completion of mitigation and any follow-up compliance activities. The mitigation also includes 10 years of “off-site” habitat management, monitoring and reporting on the status of compensatory habitat. Caltrans is legally precluded from transferring funds “in trust” to another entity as security. On August 10, 2018, after extensive negotiations with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, it was agreed that the ITP’s security deposit condition would be satisfied by a separate mitigation “child” project to be split from this “parent” project at the time of allocation.

    Both Route 12 and Route 113 belong to the Terminal Access Network, under the Surface Transportation Act of 1982, which is a highway network that accommodates trucks longer than California standard legal length. Route 12 is also a major Department of Defense truck route that serves as a key corridor for shipments in and out of Travis Air Force Base. Route 12 has an 11 percent truck volume and an Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) of 15,000 vehicles, which current traffic data indicates is significantly greater than the statewide average accident rate.

    This project features a single-lane roundabout with an approach to splitter islands, center truck apron, aesthetically treated center island, and advance flashing beacons. The Department conducted the Intersection Control Evaluation (ICE) and determined the single-lane roundabout alternative to be more effective operationally than the signalized intersection design. An independent consultant was hired by the Department to further review the design to ensure the safety of the high-speed traffic of the roundabout. The consultant’s recommendation was to modify the design to a larger roundabout utilizing additional safety measures.

    The needed construction capital cost increase is due to modifying the initial standard roundabout to a larger roundabout footprint within the existing right-of-way, as recommended by the consultant, and the additional safety traffic design measures associated with the larger roundabout. The needed construction support cost increase is due to the additional working days needed to accommodate construction staging and to address environmental permit requirements.
    (Source: August 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.5d.(1))

    In October 2018, the CTC amended the following project into the 2018 SHOPP: 04-Sol-12 19.2/19.4. PPNO 8060B. Project 0419000066. EA 4G561. Route 12 Near Rio Vista, at the intersection of Route 12 and Route 113; also on Route 113 from PM 0.0/0.2. Environmental mitigation for safety project EA 4G560. Note: Split off environmental mitigation work to provide funding assurance to California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) for EA 4G560/PPNO 04-8060A.
    (Source: October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Item 11)

    In April 2019, it was reported that construction of the roundabout at Route 12 and Route 113, between Suisun City and Rio Vista, would begin at the end of April 2019.

    In September 2019, it was reported that there are increased concerns about the new roundabout under construction at Route 12 and Route 113, between Suisun City and Rio Vista. The concerns relates to crashes during construction, specifically a recent crash where, according to Solano CHP, an 80-year-old man driving a silver Toyota Prius was traveling westbound on Route 12 at an undetermined speed Wednesday, when he collided head-on with the raised concrete portion of the new roundabout, killing him and his 79-year-old female passenger. The worry is that the speeds on the highway (55 mph) would lead to more accidents. According to Caltrans, roundabouts on highways do make sense and are a proven way to cut down on traffic collisions. Caltrans statistics show that “roundabouts reduce the number of crashes by 37% and injury crashes by 75%”. Additionally the shape of the roundabout also results in lower speeds, generally 15-20 mph less. This does mean that the roundabout will likely cause a bit of a traffic backup during peak commute times but slower moving traffic means it's doing its job. Despite the statistics, locals also think the roundabout was made too narrow for the big rigs and farm equipment that travel the highway, many of them now using the curb to navigate the counterclockwise turns of the circle.
    (Source: KRCA 3, 9/20/2019)

    Azevedo Road to Liberty Island Road (~ SOL 22.679 to SOL R23.723)

    Rio VistaAccording to the CTC minutes, another project near the town of Rio Vista approved for future funding will widen shoulders on Route 12 from Azevedo Road to Liberty Island Road, and construct left turn pockets at Currie, McCloskey and Azevedo Roads. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $16,821,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14.

    In March 2013, it was reported that there were concerns that a long-planned, $12 million project west of Rio Vista to widen the shoulders of the narrow highway from Azevedo Road to Summerset Road, a distance of a mile, and to add left turn lanes at Currie, McCloskey and Azevedo roads doesn’t go far enough. Caltrans needs right of way from a rural industrial park owned and operated by Robert Cattey and his brother to move forward. Cattey wants the project modified to ease what he sees as safety and flooding issues affecting his property. Specifically, Cattey wants a left-turn lane on westbound Route 12 at Cattey Lane leading into the industrial park. The park is home to a variety of tenants, ranging from a crane and rigging company to an equipment yard to a heating and air conditioning business. Large cranes turn left from westbound Route 12 into the industrial park daily. They wait for a gap in eastbound traffic and back up traffic, creating a safety hazard. The problem is that Cattey Lane is a private road. Public funds are not typically used to pay for left-turn lanes into private property. Also, a September 2012 traffic assessment showed no congestion or operational problems there. Cattey would also like a culvert enlarged or a new culvert created to ease flooding problems. Caltrans responded that the project won’t make flooding worse and is designed to address safety, not flooding issues. This project is the last of a series of Route 12 safety projects. Others included the widening the highway and smoothing out of “roller coaster” hills near the Western Railway Museum in 2009 and 2010.

    Church Road Intersection Improvements (04-Sol-12, PM 24.3/25.2)

    In October 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project located northwest of the city of Rio Vista in Solano County (04-Sol-12, PM 24.3/25.2), proposes to construct turn lanes and road shoulders on Route 12, a two lane highway. The project funding will come from local sources estimated at $4.6 million, which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right -of -Way (capital and support). The project is not programmed. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2018-19.
    (Source: October 2017 CTC Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate $1.939M for construction and construction support in FY19-20 for PPNO 2251A, Rt 12/Church Rd, intersection improvements. (~ SOL 24.82)

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, adjusted the programming for PPNO 2251A Rt 12/Church Rd, intersection improvements to move the programmed funds from FY20-21 to FY21-22.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    Helen Madere Memorial Bridge (Rio Vista Bridge) in Rio Vista (04-Sol-12, 026.24, Bridge 23-0024; 03-Sac-12 0.0/0.4)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route: High Priority Project #1414: Rio Vista Bridge Realignment Study & Street Sign Safety Program. $560,000.

    The state is currently exploring several proposals to alleviate the traffic backups that result whenever the Rio Vista Bridge is raised to allow boat traffic to pass. The long-term project would involve moving or replacing the drawbridge that spans the Sacramento River and widening Route 12. The source of funding will determine whether the approaches under consideration move forward. The problem is that because the lift bridge is so close to the surface of the water, the operator must raise its spans nearly every time a vessel needs to get to the other side, which can be as often as 10 times a day. Raising and lowering the spans takes about 10 to 25 minutes depending on the size of the craft, causing vehicles to back up in each direction: As many as 440 vehicles have been stopped when a large boat is passing through. In June, an engineering firm that Rio Vista hired to delve into the matter presented its findings in a report that also outlined alternatives to the status quo. The possibilities include widening the section of Route 12 that transects the city and replacing the Rio Vista Bridge with a taller, wider one, to bore a four-lane tunnel under the Sacramento River or build an equally broad bridge that's 50 feet above the water's surface, to divert Route 12 to Airport Road, widen that route, and construct a bridge where it currently dead ends at the river—that bridge would be 145 feet tall, providing sufficient clearance for any oceangoing tanker. Based on public comments received, the preference was a four-lane tunnel along the path of the existing Route 12—a project that estimates peg at $1.8 billion.

    In June 2016, it was reported that Caltrans had scheduled informational meetings to discuss two projects on the Helen Madere Bridge (formerly the Rio Vista Bridge, renamed in 1998) near Rio Vista and how that work will affect motorists and river navigation. The first phase of the work would be cleaning and repainting the steel Route 12 bridge, which crosses the Sacramento River. The existing coating system on (the bridge) is deteriorating in different locations. There are rust spots along the truss, tower and floor system members, and rusting around many of the truss gusset plate nuts and bolts. The work is scheduled to begin in the fall of 2017 and be completed in the spring of 2022. The cost is $37 million. The second project, with a $19.2 million budget yet to be approved, proposes to “maintain the operation and structural integrity of the drawbridge by replacing the mechanical and electrical systems." Two elevators also would be replaced and a 4-inch sewer line will be installed. If the funding is approved, the second project would begin in 2022 and be completed the next year.
    (Source: Daily Republic, 6/17/2016)

    In February 2018, it was reported that work was starting on the Rio Vista Bridge project. The project will preserve the Rio Vista Bridge over the Sacramento River by cleaning the surface, removing the old paint and then repainting all steel surfaces. The work is expected to take two to three years to complete. The drawbridge will remain open to traffic throughout the project. However, one of the two lanes on the bridge will be closed during the overnight hours on weekdays and some weekends to accommodate crews. Bicycle and pedestrian access will remain open. Motorists can expect delays because of the one-way traffic controls.
    (Source: Caltrans District 3 Press Release, 1/30/2018)

    In August 2018, the Helen Madere Memorial Bridge in Rio Vista got stuck in the “up” position above Route 12, leaving no way for cars to cross the Sacramento River and stalling traffic. At the time, Caltrans said engineers were working on a “mechanical problem” that was expected to be fixed by that evening. Later, it tweeted that its electrical team estimates repairs would take until the next morning. They eventually got it fixed, but then the bridge got stuck in the down position, preventing large ships from entering and exiting the Port of West Sacramento. Caltrans officials then expected it would take an additional 30 days for the repairs to be made as they've had to ship out the broken gearbox to the East Coast be fixed. In September, ongoing, intermittent repair work on the Rio Vista Bridge let to major backups and numerous detours for drivers on Route 12, I-5, I-80 and surrounding roads. The mechanism that raises and lowers the Rio Vista Bridge has been damaged since Aug. 9. Repair work has forced closures of the bridge off and on since then.
    (Source: Sacramento Bee, 8/9/2018; KCRA, 8/14/2018; Sacramento Bee, 9/7/2018)

    In October 2018, the CTC amended the 2018 SHOPP to include the following project: 03-Sac-12 0.0/0.4 PPNO 5962. Project 0319000026. EA 4H690. Route 12 Near Rio Vista, at the Sacramento River (Rio Vista) Bridge No. 23-0024. Repair electrical, mechanical, and structural damaged components of bridge. Total Est. Cost $3,900,000. Est. completion: FY19.
    (Source: October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Item 7)

    In the Summer 2019 Mile Marker, it was reported that two director’s orders also have been approved to repair, replace and upgrade electromechanical components on the Rio Vista Bridge totaling about $10 million. The span that now stands, built in 1944, is getting a major overhaul. (The original Rio Vista bridge opened in 1919, but no part of it remains.) As part of the Rio Vista Bridge Preservation Project, a massive cleaning and repainting job is now underway, a $20 million effort scheduled to continue through spring 2020. Upgrades of the bridge’s core working components are planned next, while deck and rail improvements and other roadway fixes, including ADA upgrades, will be the focus of another project scheduled for 2022. Rio Vista is one of the few vertical lift bridges in the system (Three Mile Slough on Route 160 and the Tower Bridge, Route 275, are the others), and sees 24,000 daily vehicle trips.
    (Source: Mile Marker, Summer 2019)

    In January 2020, the CTC was informed of the following supplemental allocation: $20,350,000 for PPNO 5962, ProjID 0319000026, EA 4H690, 03-Sac-12 0.0/0.4. Route 12 Near Rio Vista, at the Sacramento River (Rio Vista) Bridge No. 23-0024. Repair electrical, mechanical, and structural damaged components of bridge. This supplemental is needed to complete additional work to repair and replace additional deficient electrical and mechanical equipment and systems and replacement of the lift-span deck to support mechanical component resiliency and long-term operation. Initial G-11 Allocation 08/21/18: $3,800,000. Supplemental G-11 Allocation 09/26/18: $8,000,000. Supplemental G-11 Allocation 12/11/19: $20,350,000.
    (Source: January 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5f.(1) #6)

    There was once a project to close a gap in this route near Kettleman Lane (near the Mokelumne River). This was removed from the STIP in early 2004.

    Mokelumne River Bridge Improvements (SAC 000.01)

    In September 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project on Route 12 in San Joaquin County that will rehabilitate the existing Mokelumne River Bridge and control house near the town of Rio Vista. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $5,425,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to cultural resources to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to cultural resources in the project area will be mitigated by compliance with the Secretary of the Interiors Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties. A record of the bridge’s historic features will also be developed. As a result, a MND was completed for this project.

    In November 2015, it was reported that the Mokelumne River Bridge Project on Route 12 was complete.This $14 million project replaced the existing concrete bridge deck, removed and replaced existing electrical components, and increased the vertical clearance of the control house. The bridge, constructed in 1942, is one of only 21 remaining swing-truss bridges in California. The project, slated to take two years to complete, was completed in only one year. Caltrans along with local residents, business owners, Coast Guard and levee districts worked collectively to create a construction schedule that minimized impact to local businesses, residents, and the motoring and marine public. In addition, the hard work by the contractor Myers & Son’s Construction allowed for six full weekend closures of Route 12 to be reduced to only four.
    (Source: ThePineTree.Net, 11/16/2015)

    In the Summer 2019 Mile Marker, it was noted that the Mokelumne River Bridge along Route 12, a busy recreational opening to the Delta, saw the most boat traffic in 2017, with 1,399 openings and 1,829 vessels passing through — almost 90 percent of them were personal craft.
    (Source: Mile Marker, Summer 2019)

    In June 2016, the CTC added the following to the SHOPP: 03-Sac-12 0.4/0.9 Route 12: Near Rio Vista, at Route 160. Intersection improvements. $6K (R/W) $2,468K (C) $2,000K (Support) PA&ED: 08/01/2018 R/W: 09/01/2019 RTL: 09/15/2019 BC: 03/15/2020

    Rte 12 - Bouldin Island Project (SJ 0.1 to SJ R4.654)

    Rte 12 Bouldin Island ProjectIn March 2013, the CTC authorized $32,589,000 to replace 8.6 lane miles of existing roadway near Terminous on Bouldin Island, from Mokelumne River Bridge to Potato Slough Bridge (SJ 0.1 to SJ R4.654) with a new structural section to the south including wider shoulders and concrete median barrier in order to reduce pavement maintenance cost and frequency, and improve traffic safety.

    The Bouldin Island Project will construct a new roadway section of Route 12 in San Joaquin County on Bouldin Island from the Sacramento County line from the Mokelumne River Bridge to Potato Slough Bridge. The project will construct two 12-foot lanes with standard 8-foot outside shoulders and 5-foot inside shoulders and a concrete median barrier. This project began construction in the spring of 2014. The purpose of this project is to improve the structural section at various locations that have deteriorated due to the underlying oiled sand and to improve safety by widening shoulders and installing rumble strips. This project is needed because the existing shoulder width does not meet current standards and because the structural section contains oiled sand under the asphalt pavement, which led to settlement and cracking of the pavement at several locations within project limits. The project is funded by the State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) and 201.120 Roadway Rehabilitation 3R Program, with a total project cost of $58,870,000.

    Project completion is planned for October 2018.

    In November 2018, it was reported that Caltrans recently completed the $62.3 million Route 12 Bouldin Island Rehabilitation Project, which made improvements to the roadway and enhanced safety elements for motorists traveling through the San Joaquin Delta corridor. This project improved structural sections of Route 12 between the Mokelumne River Bridge and Potato Slough Bridge, east of the city of Lodi, due to soil instability under the asphalt pavement that cracked the road surface. The project also improved traffic safety as motorists traveling on this section of Route 12 will now enjoy newly constructed 12-foot travel lanes, 8-foot outside shoulders and 5-foot inside shoulders, as well as the installation of rumble strips and a center median barrier to help prevent cross-over traffic collisions. A new elevated section of Route 12 was also constructed to allow for the movement of farming vehicles and equipment to pass safely underneath the highway. Route 12 is a key piece of the transportation system within San Joaquin County as it sees an average of more than 15,000 vehicles, including more than 2,000 commercial trucks, on the highway each day. The project was awarded to O.C. Jones & Sons Inc., of Berkeley. Work began in spring 2014 and was completed on October 31, 2018.
    (Source: Caltrans District 10 FB Post, 11/8/2018)

    Potato Slough Bridge Improvements (SJ R4.741 to SJ 10.112)

    Click image for larger mapIn July 2011, it was reported that two projects were planned to improve safety in this section of the route. One is roughly $25 million in improvements from Potato Slough Bridge to I-5. Among other things, it would install left-turn pockets and acceleration lanes for vehicles entering the highway. Cameras would also be used to monitor traffic conditions and provide real-time information on new electronic signs along Route 12. A roughly $50 million project would add shoulders to the road and a permanent concrete barrier in the median along the four-and-a-half mile stretch from Mokelumne River to the Potato Slough bridges (see above).
    (Source: Recordnet.Com)

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $11.5 million toward improvements of a section of Route 12 west of I-5 that has long been notorious for deadly accidents. A key improvement will reroute Tower Park Way under Potato Slough Bridge to connect with Glasscock Road. That will allow cars traveling to and from Tower Park Marina to enter and exit the highway without crossing traffic. New cameras and sensors monitor the area and will signal problems and alert motorists using signs posted in locations along Route 12, including to the east of I-5. The project also will expand a park-and-ride lot that already exists at Route 12 and the interstate.

    In September 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to rehabilitate the Little Potato Slough Bridge on Route 12 near the city of Lodi and the Route 120 Connector Overhead at I-5 near the town of Mossdale. The project will replace bearing pads and joint seals. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $4,585,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to wetlands and other biological habitat to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to existing wetlands in the project area will be mitigated by restoration to pre-construction conditions. In addition 36 willow trees will be planted in the project area. Preconstruction surveys will be conducted for active nests with work windows being adjusted as necessary. As a result, an MND was completed for this project.

    There is a project to construct passing lanes on Route 12 near Terminous from the Sacramento County line to Route 5 (~ SJ 0.221 to SJ 9.969). The environmental process for this project has increased in scope and complexity due to concerns that the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) had regarding independent utility, geotechnical issues of the Delta soil and a proposed reservoir in the project vicinity that could change environmental conditions. The FHWA concerns have been addressed by a corridor analysis that was recently completed. The corridor analysis resulted in a reevaluation of scope for the project to focus on improvements to Route 12 between Bouldin Island and Route 5. The reevaluation of the scope also addressed the geotechnical issues and the changes in environmental conditions of the proposed reservoir. Therefore, the environmental phase of this project needs to be completed and a preferred alternative selected before proceeding with subsequent phases of the project. These changes place construction beyond FY 2010-11, the last year of the 2006 STIP.

    In May 2015, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 12 between West Terminous Drive (~ SJ M4.98) and Guard Road (~ SJ 8.837), consisting of newly constructed county roads. This area is near Terminous and E of Bouldin Island.

    Double Fine Zones Double Fine Zones

    Between the intersection of Walters Road in Suisun and the intersection with Lower Sacramento Road in Lodi. Authorized by Senate Bill 155, Chapter 169, on July 23, 1999.

    Between I-80 and I-5. Authorized by Assembly Bill 112, Chapter 258, on October 1, 2007.

    Naming Naming

    Hale HumphreyThe portion of Route 12 between Pennsylvania Avenue (~ SOL R4.073) and Marina Boulevard (~ SOL 5.16), near the south end of Union Avenue and the north end of Main Street, in the County of Solano (seemingly near Fairfield), is named the "Solano County Deputy Sheriff Hale Humphrey Memorial Highway". Hale Humphrey grew up in the New Boston area of eastern Texas prior to enlisting in the United States Navy. After completing his naval service, Hale Humphrey settled in Fairfield, initially working for the Fairfield Police Department before becoming a deputy sheriff with the Solano County Sheriff’s Office. Deputy Humphrey was active in social activities in Solano County, becoming a member of the local Elks Lodge and eventually its exalted ruler. On March 15, 1963, following a robbery at a service station, one of the fleeing suspects killed a California Highway Patrol officer, and Deputy Humphrey, who was at a roadblock set up to apprehend the suspects, was killed in the line of duty when the suspect vehicle rammed the roadblock. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 177, Res. Chapter 135, Statutes of 2016, on August 23, 2016.
    (Image source: Officer Down Memorial Page)

    In Suisun City, near Denverton Road off Route 12, there is an "Old Route 12" (somewhere near ~ SOL 12.512).

    David Frank LamoreeThe portion of Route 12 between Olsen Road (~SOL R17.168) and Route 113 (~ SOL 19.149) is named the "Officer David Lamoree Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Officer David Frank Lamoree, who, while driving to his Fairfield home on October 21, 2005, was hit head-on by a car on Route 12, west of Route 113, on a portion of Route 12 that is only two lanes and that has become increasingly congested and dangerous. He was taken off of life support on Octber 23, 2005 (his 26th birthday). Officer David Lamoree was born in Vallejo, California, on October 23, 1979, and decided on a police career at 10 years of age. He graduated from Will C. Wood High School, and earned criminal justice degrees from Solano Community College. He attended the police academy in Contra Costa County. A police officer for six months at Solano Community College, Officer Lamoree served on the San Pablo Police Department for a few years before relocating to the Rio Vista police force. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 7, Resolution Chapter 121, on 9/12/2007.
    (Image source: Find a Grave; SFGate, 10/24/2005)

    Charles SorensonThe portion of Route 12, between Route 160 (SAC .57) and Brannan Island Road (SAC 5.84) in the County of Sacramento is named the "CHP Officer Charles “Chuck” Sorenson Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Charles H. Sorenson, who was born September 6, 1930, to Earl and RoseMae, in Petaluma, California. In 1957, Officer Sorenson, badge number 2341, graduated from the CHP Academy. He was assigned to the El Centro area and later transferred to the Sacramento area. Officer Sorenson was a hard-working, dedicated officer who loved his job and enjoyed the people he worked with. He was known for his honesty, fairness, and dedication, and for being a loyal father and family man. In his spare time, he enjoyed spending time with his family, playing golf, and building his 18-foot inboard jet boat named “10-4”. On March 15, 1963, Officer Sorenson was killed in the line of duty while pursuing a suspect in his vehicle. During the chase, the suspect lost control of his vehicle, crashed, and continued to flee on foot. When Officer Sorenson got out of his car to continue pursuit, a second suspect, of whom he was unaware, ambushed Officer Sorenson and fired two shots with a stolen handgun at point blank range. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.
    (Image source: Officer Down Memorial Page)

    Dana CowellThe portion of Route 12 between Potato Slough Bridge (~ SJ R004.44) and Route 5 (~ SJ 010.17), in the County of San Joaquin, is named the "Dana Cowell Memorial Highway". Named in memory of Dana Cowell, who passed away on January 21, 2012. Cowell was a distinguished California resident and devoted civic leader, whose good deeds earned him the respect and admiration of his colleagues and the countless individuals whose lives he touched, brought immense sorrow and loss to people throughout the State. Dana Cowell, who brought credit and distinction to himself as Deputy Director of the San Joaquin Council of Governments (SJCOG), enjoyed a lifetime of remarkable success in every avenue of his endeavors, inspiring others through his professional achievements, support of the community, and strong devotion to family. Dana Cowell joined SJCOG in 2006 after serving in a number of key transportation posts over the course of 26 years with the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). In 2011, Cowell was named Transportation Manager of the Year by the California Transportation Foundation for his dedication to overcoming obstacles to transportation projects. Among Dana Cowell's recent notable accomplishments are critical safety improvements and construction along Route 12 through San Joaquin County that began construction in 2012. Dana Cowell led a partnership with Caltrans to develop intersection upgrades between Route 5 and Potato Slough Bridge highlighted by the complete redesign of the Route 12 Tower Parkway Glasscock Road intersection, and the construction contract for this $20 million project was awarded in early January 2012. Projects on Route 5, Route 99, Route 205, and Arch Road in Stockton all benefitted from Dana Cowell's commitment to transportation. Dana Cowell also worked with Sacramento and Bay Area transportation leaders to craft the Northern California Trade Corridor Projects, directed SJCOG's organization of the Valley Wide State Transportation Improvement Program, and initiated SJCOG efforts to advance modeling techniques and planning tools in response to Senate Bill No. 375 of the 2007-08 Regular Session (Ch. 728, Stats. 2008), which requires reductions of greenhouse gas emissions. Dana Cowell was well known and respected by transportation planners throughout the state, and his significant knowledge and contributions, dedication, and warm friendship will be missed in the profession. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 85, Resolution Chapter 103, on August 29, 2012.
    (Image source: California Transportation Foundation; Recordnet 1/25/2012)

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Helen Madere BridgeThe Rio Vista Bridge (SOL 026.24) is officially named the "Helen Madere Memorial Bridge". Ms. Madere was a former vice-mayor of Rio Vista, who was a key force behind the safety improvements that established a safety enhancement-double fine zone between Lodi and Suisun City on Route 12. It was named in memory of Helen Madere, the former Vice-Mayor of the City of Rio Vista, who is remembered for her efforts to improve the safety of driving on Route 12. As President of the Highway 12 Association, Ms. Madere was a key force behind the safety improvements outlined in House Resolution 45 (by Assembly Member Hannigan) of the 1993-94 Regular Session of the Legislature, and Assembly Bill 827 (by Assembly Member Thomson, Ch. 709, Stats. 1997) which established a "Safety Enhancement-Double Fine Zone" between the City of Lodi and the City of Suisun City on Route 12. As Rio Vista's representative to the Solano County Transportation Authority, Ms. Madere was known as an advocate for advancing regional transportation projects. Ms. Madere, who had an accounting background and owned a tax preparation business, was instrumental in helping Rio Vista recover from a financial crisis during the 1980's. She was also an active participant in many civic and community activities in Rio Vista since moving there in 1959. She was also a member of the Rio Vista City Council. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Chapter 124, in 1998.
    (Image source: AAroads)

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] Entire portion; constructed to freeway standards from Route 80 to Fairfield.


  4. Rte 12 Seg 4From Route 99 near Lodi to Route 88 near Lockford.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is as defined in 1963.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 12 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 1 near Jenner to San Andreas, via Santa Rosa, Rio Vista, and Lodi. This segment was LRN 24 between US 99 and Route 88. It was defined in 1909.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] Entire portion. Defined as part of the F&E system in 1959.

    Naming Naming

    Donald Mark LichliterThe portion of Route 12 from the intersection with Rout 99 to a length of five miles to the east (~ SJ 18.144/23.144), in the County of San Joaquin, is named the "Donald Mark Lichliter Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Donald Mark Lichliter, who was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and resided there until he joined the United States Air Force at 18 years of age. The Air Force brought Donald to the Sacramento area, and from that time forward he called California home. Donald was a member of Chapter 263 of the American Legion Riders, and enjoyed golfing, motorcycling, hunting, and fishing. Donald was a devoted and hard-working public servant, who worked for Caltrans for over 27 years. Donald met his wife, Mandy, in 1987 and they were married in 1988. Each Tuesday, Donald and Mandy met with their church congregation where they worked to feed the homeless. On July 23, 2009, Donald was working as a Caltrans tree maintenance leadworker when he was struck by a truck as he worked next to his vehicle, and was killed in the line of duty. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.
    (Image source: Caltrans "In Remembrance" Page)

    Double Fine Zones Double Fine Zones

    Between I-80 and I-5. Authorized by Assembly Bill 112, Chapter 258, on October 1, 2007.


  5. Rte 12 Seg 5From Route 88 near Clements to Route 49 near San Andreas.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined to be "Route 88 near Clements to Route 49 at San Andreas."

    In 1965, the definition was relaxed to be "near San Andreas".

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 12 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 1 near Jenner to San Andreas, via Santa Rosa, Rio Vista, and Lodi. This segment was LRN 24. It was defined in 1909.

    Status Status

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following new Bridge Preservation item of interest: 10-Calaveras-12 PM 17.3 PPNO 3288 Proj ID 1013000008 EA 0X740. Route 12 Near San Andreas, at North Fork Calaveras Creek Bridge No. 30-0007. Replace bridge. Programmed in FY23-24, with construction scheduled to start in Oct 2024. Total project cost is $14,250K, with $8,702K being capital (const and right of way) and $5,548K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.),
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] Entire portion. Defined as part of the F&E system in 1959.


Exit Information Exit Information

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Interstate Submissions Interstate Submissions

Route 12 was not submitted to the Interstate system. The designation I-12 was proposed in December 1957 for what is now I-10, based on a recommendation from Arizona, but this was rejected by AASHTO. Sometime prior to that, the designation I-12 was proposed for what is now I-210.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 12:

Interregional Route Interregional Route

[SHC 164.11] Entire route.

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The routing that would become LRN 12 was first defined in the 1909 First Bond Act to run from San Diego to El Centro. It wasn't extended again until 1933, when the segment "[LRN 2], Atlantic Street, San Diego to old Spanish Lighthouse, Point Loma" was added. By 1935, the route was codified into the highway code as being from:

  1. San Diego to El Centro
  2. [LRN 2] on Atlantic Street, San Diego to Old Spanish Lighthouse, Point Loma

The portion from San Diego to El Centro was considered a primary highway.

In 1953, Chapter 1856 combined these two sections into one, making the definition “Point Loma to El Centro via San Diego.”

There were two segments:

  1. Starting at Cabrillo National Monument in Point Loma, the routing, signed as US 80 (now Route 209) ran northerly to US 101 (LRN 2).
  2. From US 101, LRN 12 turned easterly, and continued signed as US 80 to El Centro. The present day signage for this route is approximately I-8.

At El Centro, LRN 12 ended, but US 80 continued easterly as LRN 27.


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 11 Forward Arrow Route 13

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