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State Route 36

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

Rte 36Route 101 near Alton to Route 395 near Johnsonville passing near Forest Glen via Red Bluff and Mineral, via the vicinity of Morgan Summit, and via Susanville.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 36 was defined as "(a) Route 101 near Alton to Route 5 near Red Bluff passing near Kuntz and Peanut. (b) Route 5 at Red Bluff to Route 395 via Mineral, via the vicinity of Morgan, and via Susanville. (c) Route 139 north of Susanville to Route 395 near Ravendale." Later that year, Chapter 1698 changed Kuntz to Mad River and Ravendale to Termo. In 1968, Chapter 282 changed the wording again, this time adjusting "Mad River" to "Forest Glen". Then, in 1984, Chapter 409 changed "Morgan" to "Morgan Summit".

Note: See Route 172 for some history of the former routings of Route 36.

Scott Parker (Sparker) on AAroads provided some additional information on the proposed segment (c), Route 139 N of Susanville to Route 395:
(Source: Scott Parker (Sparker) on AAroads, "Re: CA-36: Proposed ending in Ravendale?", 3/26-28/2019)

The various iterations of the California Freeway & Expressway System, starting back in 1959, proposed a new-terrain Route 36 extension from Route 139 near Eagle Lake ENE to US 395 near Ravendale. US 395 was part of the system north of the future Route 36 junction (all the way to the OR state line) -- but not south of there to present Route 36 near Johnstonville. Also, Route 139 was part of the system between its southern terminus at Route 36 in Susanville and where the Route 36 extension diverged at Eagle Lake; all of the original Route 36 plus US 395 south of Route 36 all the way to the NV state line was also included in the system. This leads one to surmise that the ultimate plans were to reroute US 395 into Susanville, subsuming the eastern end of Route 36 and the southern end of Route 139, and returning to its original alignment via the new Route 36 extension. Whether the portion of US 395 between the old and new CA 36 alignments would have been retained in the state highway system or simply designated with a new number isn't determined [ -- and the segment was later deleted from the system.] The portion of US 395 between the two iterations of Route 36 (Johnstonville, Ravendale) would have been, absent any legislative action, part of the state highway system. That segment, however, was never included in the state "freeway & expressway" network; the local N-S through route on that network included US 395 north to Johnstonville, where the designated expressway continued west on Route 36 to Susanville, north on Route 139 to near Eagle Lake, and then over the new-terrain Route 36 extension back to US 395 at Ravendale. [It is possible that] the Route 36 number as applied to the extension was a "placeholder" so US 395 could continue on its then (and current) alignment pending the completion of the new extension. If and when that extension was completed, it's more than likely US 395 itself would have been rerouted over the expressway-designated section as described above. The Johnstonville-Ravendale original US 395 segment could receive a new designation. At that point Route 139 would terminate (south) at US 395 near Eagle Lake, Route 36 would terminate at US 395 in Susanville, and the bypassed US 395 section would receive a new numerical designation (unless Caltrans extended Route 36 over it, which would produce a pretty awkward alignment!).

In 1988, the first two segments were combined into a new segment (a): "Route 101 near Alton to Route 395 near Johnsonville passing near Forest Glen and Peanut via Red Bluff and Mineral, via the vicinity of Morgan Summit, and via Susanville." In 1990, the reference to "Peanut" was deleted.

Lastly, in 1998, the remaining segment (b) "from Route 139 north of Susanville to Route 395 near Termo" was deleted by AB 2132, Chapter 877, signed September 26, 1998. That segment was LRN 20 to US 395 (LRN 73), and was defined in 1959. That section was never constructed; the traversable local roads included S. Grasshopper Road, Westside Road, and Fillman Road. Those roads were not on a proper alignment for construction as a state highways, and there were no plans for a freeway or expressway.

The route between Route 36 near Deer Creek Pass and Route 36 near Morgan Summit is cosigned as Route 36/Route 89, although it is legislatively Route 36.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 36 was signed along the route from Jct. US 101 near Scotia to Jct. Route 7 (later US 395) E of Susanville, via Red Bluff. The route had the following legislative routes:

  1. Between Alton (US 101; LRN 1) and Mad River, this route was LRN 35, defined in 1933.
  2. Between Mad River and Peanut (Route 3), this was LRN 35 (defined in 1909).
  3. Between Route 3 and I-5 in Red Bluff, this was LRN 35 (1907).
  4. Between I-5 and Route 99, near Red Bluff, this was LRN 3 (1909).
  5. Between Route 99 and Route 172 near Mineral, this was LRN 29 (1909).
  6. Between Route 172 near Mineral and Route 89 near Morgan Summit, this was cosigned as Route 86 (1933).
  7. Between Route 89 and Route 172 near Morgan Summit, this was cosigned as Route 83 (1933)
  8. Between Route 172 near Morgan Summit and Susanville, this was cosigned as Route 29 (1909)
  9. Between Susanville and US 395, this was cosigned as Route 29 (1919)
  10. Between Route 139 N of Susanville to Route 395 near Termo, this was LRN 20 (1959).

Status Status

US 101 near Alton to Route 3

Rte 36 Improvements Near AltonIn March 2019, the CTC approved the California Department of Transportation’s (Department) request for an additional $451,000 for the State Highway Operation Protection Program (SHOPP) Collision Severity Reduction project (PPNO 2379) on Route 36, in Humboldt County, near Fortuna, from Route 101 to River Bar Road (~ HUM 0.00 to HUM 2.374). to supplement the pre-construction component support cost (COS) for Project Approval and Environmental Document (PA&ED). The project will construct two 12-foot wide lanes, two 5-foot wide shoulders, install center-line and shoulder rumble strips, and place an Open-Graded Friction Course (OGFC) pavement throughout the project limits. The project also includes a grade reduction on two short vertical curves to improve sight distance. The project was programmed in the 2016 SHOPP, and in June 2017, the Commission approved support cost funds in the amount of $1,005,000 for the Project Approval and Environmental Documentation (PA&ED) pre-construction phase. The total current allotment for the PA&ED phase support cost is $1,305,500, including Department delegated G-12 funds. The original estimate for the PA&ED support cost was developed prior to 2017, and it was based on the staff support and resources needed to obtain required permits and Right of Way (R/W) certifications as identified in the Project Initiation Document (PID). The original scope was to widen shoulders on both sides of the roadway; however, the Department changed strategies to widen the roadway on one side only due to the discovery of unstable slope conditions on one side of the roadway. This slope stability condition was discovered during geotechnical studies conducted after the project programming phase. The COS was calculated based on identified tasks needed to complete the PA&ED and on information and data available prior to the discovery of the soil stability condition. The additional widening on one side also resulted in a greater impact to a wetland that was not factored in the original COS estimate. To construct this project, and to provide an adequate area for the roadway shoulder and recovery zone, the Department had planned to acquire R/W from an operational truck and logging mill site. However, the planned R/W acquisition did not include an existing, private property used as a wood waste berm. The berm location within the private property was recently changed to an area that encroaches on the planned project site. This change occurred after the original COS estimate was completed, and will require additional, unanticipated site investigation. Because of the expanded wood waste berm, the Department will be required to conduct additional studies to evaluate new hazardous waste contamination. The additional analysis, which will require subsurface drilling and soil sampling, will also require additional support costs to re-evaluate the property’s possible contamination under the recently changed condition. The increased support cost is also needed to account for staff work associated with obtaining or updating all required permits to complete the PA&ED phase, and to conduct additional R/W negotiations associated with obtaining temporary permits to enter property that was not included in the original studies.
(Source: March 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5e.(1))

Carlotta Curve Correction 01-Hum-36 10.5/10.8

Carlotta Curve Correction 01-Hum-36 10.5/10.8The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 2415. 01-Humboldt-36 10.5/10.8. On Route 36 Near Carlotta, from 0.1 mile east of Riverside Park Road to 0.4 mile east of Riverside Park Road. Curve correction. Begin Con: 7/1/2020. Total Project Cost: $5,074K.

In June 2019, the CTC approved the following scope amendment to the SHOPP: 01-Hum-36 10.5/10.8 PPNO 2415 ProjID 0115000076. Route 36 Near Carlotta, from 0.1 mile east of Riverside Park Road to 0.4 mile east of Riverside Park Road. Curve correction. Note: Original design would have unknowingly severed access to a private timber road. Cost and schedule changes are required to account for a new strategy to raise the profile of the roadway, decrease grade differential, and improve sight distance. More time and resources are required for archeological surveys, cultural review, coordination with permitting agencies, and to redesign the project. Updated total cost: $6,063K Updated const. FY20-21.
(Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Scope Item 1)

The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Collision Reduction item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 01-Humboldt-36 PM 10.5/10.8 PPNO 2415 Proj ID 0115000076 EA 0F160. Route 36 near Carlotta, from 0.1 mile east of Riverside Park Road to 0.4 mile east of Riverside Park Road. Curve correction. Programmed in FY20-21, with construction scheduled to start in Sept 2021. Total project cost is $6,063K, with $2,990K being capital (const and right of way) and $3,073K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.),
(Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

In August 2011, the CTC approved $9.5 million in SHOPP funding for repairs near Carlotta, from 1.7 miles east of Route 36/US 101 Junction to Van Duzen River Bridge (HUM 012.78); also near Bridgeville, from Van Duzen River Bridge to 1.7 miles east of Little Larabee Creek Bridge (~ HUM 023.57). This project will rehabilitate 37.2 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the traveling surface, minimize costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life. They also approved $1,365,000 for a project that will repair slipouts and slope failures at four locations damaged by heavy rainfall on Route 36 near Bridgeville. The project limits are from 0.7 mile west of Bridgeville Post Office to 0.3 mile east of Little Larabe Creek Bridge.

Emergency Repairs near Bridgeville: 01-Hum-36 19.0/44.0

Rte 36 near Bridgeville In May 2017, the CTC approved $1.85M in SHOPP funding for emergency repairs near Bridgeville, from 0.3 mile west of Jaymar Lane to 1.7 miles west of Trinity County line (01-Hum-36 19.0/44.0). Beginning on January 7, 2017, a series of storm events caused multiple slides, sinkholes, slipouts, and distressed pavement. Responding day and night to the damages, Department forces were inundated beyond the Department's capacity. The project will remove and dispose of slide debris and hazardous trees, support ongoing geotechnical investigations, and repair roadway. This work is necessary to stabilize storm damaged slopes and embankments prior to subsequent rain events, prevent lane closures, and restore safe passage for the traveling public. They also approved an additional $1.125M in overlapping emergency repairs near Bridgeville, 1.3 miles west of McClellan Mountain Road to 0.3 mile west of McClellan Mountain Road (01-Hum-36 29.0/30.0). On January 7, 2017, a storm event caused a slipout of a steep roadway embankment with a 60 foot by 40 foot scarp remaining and surface tension cracks in asphalt. As per geotechnical recommendations, the project will repair slipout, place rock slope protection to strengthen embankment armament, minimize surface drainage, and repair roadway. This work is necessary to halt the degradation of embankment and prevent lane loss or road closures. This is a critical route for travel between north coast and inland communities given the ongoing long-term closure of Route 299.

In August 2018 the CTC received a report of $1,200,000 in SHOPP funding for Humboldt 01-Hum-36 19.0/44.0: Route 36 Near Bridgeville, from 0.3 mile west of Jaymar Lane to 1.7 miles west of Trinity County line. Beginning on January 7, 2017, a series of storm events caused multiple slides, sinkholes, slipouts, and distressed pavement. Responding day and night to the damages, Department forces were inundated beyond the Department's capacity. The project will remove and dispose of slide debris and hazardous trees, support ongoing geotechnical investigations, and repair roadway. Supplemental work that consists of temporary shoring, excavation, guardrail repair, and construction of Hilfiker Welded Wire retaining wall is needed to address additional slides (PM 3.0 and PM 15.8) that are in proximity to existing work limits. Additional supplemental work necessary to complete drainage work at PM 16.21, 16.24, and 43.42. This supplemental will also allow for the completion of work while maintaining the route open to traffic at PM 31.4. This has been subject to a series of allocations:
(Source: August 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.5f.(1) Item 1)

In October 2018, there was additional emergency funding of $12,200,000 for this effort.
(Source: October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.5f(1) Item 1)

In September 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Humboldt along Route 36 near Bridgeville at Kneeland Road (~ HUM R23.91), consisting of superseded highway right of way.

Dinsmore Realignment (1-Hum-36 36.6/39.9)

Rte 36 Dinsmore RealignmentIn October 2015, the CTC approved the following SHOPP funding: 1-Hum-36 36.6/39.9 Route 36 Near Dinsmore, from west of Burr Valley Road to west of Buck Mountain Road. Widen to make lane and shoulder widths standard, realign curves, and improve roadway cross-slope. PAED: 10/01/2015 R/W: 07/01/2016 RTL: 07/15/2016 CCA: 12/01/2018. $231K (R/W) $7,441K (C) Completion FY16/17. Support costs: PA & ED $90K; PS & E $75K; RW Sup $150K; Con Sup $40; Total $355K

In June 2016, the CTC amended the SHOPP funding for a project on Route 36 In and near Dinsmore, on Route 36 (Forest Highway 4). PM 36.1/40.5. Roadway improvements. Increases to support are due to unanticipated increased land surveys, Right of Way capital, Right of Way support, and environmental mitigation staff work to complete the project and coordinate with the Federal Lands partnership to construct the project. Right of Way capital increases are caused by increased utility relocations. These changes add $2,372,000 to the cost of the project. Additionally, there was also an amendment to a parallel project near Dinsmore (PM 36.6/39.9), from west of Burr Valley Road to west of Buck Mountain Road. Widen to make lane and shoulder widths standard, realign curves, and improve roadway cross-slope. Right of Way support cost has increased due to unplanned additional survey work to monument the new state right of way and to record maps in accordance with State law. Previously this work was assumed to be addressed by Federal Lands participation on project. This change in responsibility adds $510,000 to the cost of the project. The two projects were also going to be combined for construction.

In October 2016, the CTC approved the following SHOPP allocation: 01-Hum-36 36.1/40.5 | Route 36 Near Dinsmore, from west of Burr Valley Road to Buck Mountain Road. (Forest Highway 4). Outcome/Output: Improve highway operations and mobility along 4.4 miles by realigning, widening, upgrading geometrics and providing long term roadway stability. $6,142,000. It also approved the following SHOPP allocation: 01-Hum-36 36.6/39.9 | Route 36 Near Dinsmore, from west of Burr Valley Road to west of Buck Mountain Road. (Forest Highway 4). Outcome/Output: Widen to make lane and shoulder widths standard, realign curves, and improve roadway cross slopes. This project will improve safety by reducing the number and severity of collisions. $7,481,000

In November 2016, it was reported that in mid-October, the California Transportation Commission approved a resolution which allocated the state’s share of the money for the Route 36 project (01-Hum-36, PM 36.1/40.5), along with 13 other State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) projects throughout California. Specifics of the project near Dinsmore include realigning and widening Route 36, making the lanes and shoulder widths standard, realigning curves, and improving roadway cross slopes. This will be the last section of Route 36 to become a conventional two-lane highway. The project is expected to begin in the summer of 2017. The Route 36 project is a partnership between Caltrans and the Federal Highway Administration (FHA) with the FHA contributing a greater share of the funding. It’s estimated that the FHA will put in more than $20 million, with the State of California paying more than $13 million for the project. The construction project will improve an approximately 4-mile section of Route 36 from Burr Valley Road to Buck Mountain Road.
(Source: Humboldt Beacon, 11/2/2016)

In April 2018, it was reported that work was progressing on the Route 36 widening, and that there was a website providing updates on the construction. That website describes the project as follows: "The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and the Federal Highway Administration, Central Federal Lands Highway Division (FHWA -CFLHD), in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, Six Rivers National Forest, are improving California State Route 36 (SR 36) in southeastern Humboldt County approximately 12.3 miles east of the community of Bridgeville (Humboldt County mile post 36.0 to 40.4). Improvements include realigning and widening SR 36 to attain two, 12-foot wide travel lanes with 4-foot wide paved shoulders. In addition, new signing, pavement markings, guardrail, and wetland restoration are included in the project. CFLHD is the lead agency for compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Caltrans is the lead agency for compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA)." It also provides links to the EIR.
(Source: Route 36 Website)

Forest Glen Realignment

Rte 36 Forest Glen In January 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will realign the roadway and construct a bridge on Route 36 near the community of Forest Glen (02-Tri-36, PM 26.7/27.1) (roughly from east of Post Mountain Road to the intersection with Route 3). The project will result in less than significant impacts to the environment after mitigation. The following resource area may be impacted by the project: biological resources. Avoidance and minimization measures will reduce any potential effects on the environment. These measures include, but are not limited to, sound generated by construction activity will be limited to 90 decibels within 1,320 feet of northern spotted owl nesting areas during the period from February 1 to July 9, a qualified biologist will be on site during clear water diversion activities to monitor for western pond turtles and foothill yellow-legged frogs.

In June 2018, the CTC was informed of the following SHOPP allocation: 2.5f(3) Item 1: $8,345,000. 02-Tri-36 26.7/27.1. PPNO 3526. On Route 36 Near Forest Glen, from 0.6 to 0.1 mile west of Route 3. Outcome/Output: Improve safety by reducing the number of curves from five to two, and by providing standard lane width and 4 foot shoulders. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions.
(Source: CTC Agenda, June 2018 Agenda Item 2.5f(3) Item 1)

In October 2018, the CTC approved a request for an additional $3,608,000 for the State Highway Operation Protection Program (SHOPP) Safety Improvement project (PPNO 02-3526) on Route 36 in Trinity County, to award the construction contract. This project is located on Route 36 in Trinity County near Forest Glen. The total accident rate is 17 times higher than the statewide average for similar routes. The project will improve the roadway safety by realigning this portion of highway, significantly improving the horizontal alignment by constructing a bridge to eliminate several compound and reversing curves with radii as small as 110 feet. The project will widen lane and shoulder widths to 12 feet and 4 feet respectively. Super elevation transitions, vertical and horizontal sight distances will also be improved. The contract award status is pending approval of this request for supplemental funds by the Commission. If the Commission approves this request, construction, would begin in November 2018, and would take 190 working days to be completed in November 2021. Since June 2018, the Department has been experiencing higher bids on contracts that include bridge work throughout Northern California due to the limited pool of contractors bidding on Department and other non-Department contracts. In addition, there has been a decreasing number of subcontractors available to prime contractors for specialized construction items. Out-of-region contractors bidding on these projects charge higher prices due to mobilization, equipment, material hauling, and overhead. Some of the complex items on this contract include constructing the bridge’s 80-foot-tall piers and support falsework due to the bridge’s remote location and shortage of material. Additional problems included the fact that this type of embankment cannot be constructed using standard embankment equipment, which would damage the geosynthetic fabric. Furthermore, the contractor states that this operation is labor intensive and has a low production rate because of the use of smaller equipment to avoid fabric damage, and due to hand laying of the fabrics.
(Source: October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.5e.(4))

Route 3 near Peanut to I-5 near Red Bluff

Curve Improvements near Plantina

In December 2016, the CTC added the following project to the SHOPP: 2-Tri-36 R34.7/R35.3 | Route 36 Near Platina, from 3.7 miles to 3.0 miles west of Hayfork Creek Bridge. Curve improvement. Allocation: $52K (R/W), $5.280MM (C), Support (PA & ED $760K / PS & E $1.13MM / RW Sup $130K / Con Sup $1.68MM / Total $3.7MM). FY 19/20.

The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 3653. 02-Trinity-36 R34.7/R35.3. Route 36 Near Platina, from 3.7 miles to 3.0 miles west of Hayfork Creek Bridge. Curve improvement. Begin Con: 7/15/2020. Total Project Cost: $9,032K.

In May 2020, the CTC was informed of the following SHOPP Safety Allocation that occurred in March 2020: $8,230,000 02-Tri-36 R34.8/R35.4. PPNO 02-3653 ProjID 0216000093 EA 2H050. Route 36 near Platina, from 3.6 miles to 2.9 miles west of Hayfork Creek Bridge. Outcome/Output: Improve safety by realigning curves and correcting cross slope, widening lanes and shoulders, installing guardrail, and increasing clear recovery zone. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions. (As part of this allocation request, the Department is requesting to extend the award of the construction contract an additional 6 months beyond the 6 month deadline.) Allocation Date: 03/05/20.
(Source: May 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5f.(3) #4)

Curve Improvements near Red Bluff (TEH 12.6/13.1)

In June 2016, the CTC amended a project into the SHOPP: Route 36 near Red Bluff, from 2.3 miles east to 2.8 miles east of Dry Creek Bridge. Curve improvement. Estd. completion around 2020.

The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 3640. 02-Tehama-36 12.6/13.1. Route 36 Near Red Bluff, from 2.3 miles east to 2.8 miles east of Dry Creek Bridge. Curve improvement. Begin Con: 11/29/2019. Total Project Cost: $5,156K.

In October 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP Safety allocation: 02-Teh-36 12.6/13.1. PPNO 3640 Proj ID 0216000051 EA 1H970. On Route 36 Near Red Bluff, from 2.3 miles east to 2.8 miles east of Dry Creek Bridge. Outcome/Output: Improve safety by realigning curves and correcting cross slope, widening lanes and shoulders, installing guardrail, increasing clear recovery zone, and placing Rock Slope Protection (RSP) along the creek bank. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions. $3,708,000.
(Source: October 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5f.(3) #2)

Curve Improvement W of Basler Road (02-Teh-36 26.6/27.6)

The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 3663. 02-Tehama-36 26.6/27.6. Route 36 Near Red Bluff, from west of Basler Road to east of Diamond Star Road. Curve improvement. Begin Con: 7/14/2020. Total Project Cost: $7,141K.

In May 2020, the CTC was informed of the following allocation, which took place in April 2020: $4,893,000 02-Teh-36 26.6/27.6. PPNO 02-3663 ProjID 0216000156 EA 2H630. Route 36 near Red Bluff, from 0.3 mile west of Basler Road to 0.1 mile east of Diamond Star Road.  Outcome/Output: Improve safety by realigning curves and correcting cross slope, widening lanes and shoulders, increasing clear recovery zone and sight distance, and replacing drainage systems. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions. (As part of this allocation request, the Department is requesting to extend the award of the construction contract an additional 6 months beyond the 6 month deadline.) Allocation Date: 04/01/20.
(Source: May 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5f.(3) #3)

In July 2020, it was reported that Caltrans District 2, in conjunction with Tullis Inc., has begun work on the Diamond Star Curve Project on Route 36 in Tehama County. The $2.3 million project is realigning the highway approximately 14 miles west of Red Bluff, from just west of Basler Road to just east of Diamond Star Road. Road connections at Basler Road, Easterbunny Drive, and Diamond Star Road will be reconstructed to conform to new alignment in the area. Other work includes: (·) Reconstruction of drainage facilities; (·) Construction of new four-foot paved shoulders and shoulder backing; and (·) New traffic delineation in area.
(Source: Redheaded Blackbelt, 7/25/2020)

In December 2008, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Tehama along Route 36 east of Cannon Road near Red Bluff (2-Teh-36-PM 29.0/T29.0), and west of Kinney Avenue near Red Bluff (2-Teh-36-PM 37.7/38.1), consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

In February 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of Tehama, at Kinney Avenue (~ TEH R38.39), consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads.

In October 2016, it was reported that Caltrans presented their ideas and plans to rework Route 36 near the northern tip of Red Bluff to the Red Bluff City Council. The work would realign Route 36 between where it and Main Street split in north Red Bluff and where it intersects with Baker Road (~ TEH 39.72 to TEH R41.196), said Clint Burkenpas, project manager with the California Department of Transportation in Northern California. Caltrans presented four alternatives for what the highway would look like to the Red Bluff City Council as Burkenpas' team prepares the plan for state approval. They are looking to replace the highway, one of four north of the Bay Area that reach the coast, because its current route doesn't have wide enough shoulders and needs improved intersections to meet modern standards. They also want to make the currently diagonal railroad crossing shoot straight across. The options for the new highway are similar, though some differences do exist — some call for the old roadway to be used as a bike and pedestrian path parallel with the new flatter, straighter highway.
(Source: Redding Record-Searchlight, 10/31/2016)

In December 2008, the CTC relinqished 2-Teh-5-PM R27.5; 2-Teh-36-PM L40.3 Right of way in the city of Red Bluff on Adobe Road between Route 5 and Route 36, consisting of a reconstructed and relocated city street.

I-5 near Red Bluff to Route 89 near Mineral

In July 2017, it was reported that the CTC has approved $5.6 million for the Route 36 East sidewalk and transportation project in Red Bluff spanning from the East Sand Slough Bridge to 0.6 mile east of Stice Road (~ TEH 42.027 to TEH 45.404). As part of the project on Route 36, there will be work on the pavement including rehabilitation by grinding roadway, performing dig-outs in localized areas of failure and overlaying with rubberized asphalt to extend its service life and improve ride quality. There will be upgrades done to existing Americans with Disabilities Act curb ramps. The new sidewalks will be constructed and a bicycle lane will be added with pavement markings through funding from the county’s Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality account by the Tehama County Transportation Commission, which previously committed $800,555 for the project.
(Source: Red Bluff Daily News, 7/6/2017)

In August 2016, the CTC approved $14,000,000 for Tehama 02-Teh-36 R75.1/78.4 Route 36 near Mineral, from Little Giant Mill Road to 0.7 mile west of Diamond Road. Outcome/Output: realigning highway curves, improving drainage facilities and clear recovery zone, increasing shoulder widths, and installing guard rail to reduce the number and severity of collisions.

Lassen Lodge Safety Improvement Project (~ TEH 83.181)

Rte 36 Lassen LodgeAs reported in the Summer 2018 Mile Marker, Caltrans District 2 and contractor Tullis Inc. rebuilt the section of Route 36 in Tehama County near the community of Mineral. The Lassen Lodge project began in May 2017 and was completed that November, before the end of the construction season when weather typically closes in on the area. Construction took only 121 days, considered quite a feat since 200,000 cubic yards of rock and soil were moved. The project was designed to reduce the frequency and severity of accidents by straightening some of its curvy features and strengthening the roadbed. The total accident rate along this stretch of highway was more than three times higher than the statewide average for similar routes. This three-mile-plus segment of roadway consisted of a series of tight curves with designated speeds as low as 20 mph. The project features an alignment that now meets current federal large truck design standards (although the California Legal Truck length designation will not change until several other issues are addressed along the corridor). The improved roadway geometrics, and wider shoulders (four feet to eight feet) increase sight distance and provide a larger recovery area for motorists. Other project benefits include increased sun exposure to help melt snow and ice, improved culverts and drainage facilities, and new guardrail. Native materials were used to reduce potential erosion and improve overall stability of the embankments in the steep terrain. Available rocky material from specified cuts was used to fortify embankments. The contractor crushed rock on site for all rock slope protection and drain rock material. In addition, old asphalt was recycled into roadway base rock, and mulch derived from vegetation removed for the project was spread over the flatter slopes to reduce surface erosion. Processing materials on site had the added benefit of reducing truck trips and emissions. The $9.5 million project was paid for with state and federal funds.

Morgan Summit Project / Curve Improvement Near Mineral (TEH 87.8/89.1)

In May 2016, the CTC approved additional SHOPP funding on Route 36 near Mineral, from 0.1 mile to 1.2 miles east of Route 89 for curve improvement.

The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 3641. 02-Tehama-36 87.8/88.8. Route 36 Near Mineral, from 0.1 mile to 1.2 miles east of Route 89. Curve improvement. Begin Con: 10/15/2019. Total Project Cost: $7,606K.

In June 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP scope amendment: 02-Teh-36 87.8/88.8 87.8/89.1 PPNO 3641 ProjID 0216000052. Near Mineral, from 0.1 mile to 1.2 1.5 miles east of Route 89. Curve improvement. Increase R/W capital to fund a separate service contract for early tree removal. Increase construction capital to reflect the most recent trends in bid price item increases to traffic control, asphalt, drainage, and stormwater items. This project will combine with minor project EA 2H140 for construction, and the post mile refinement will allow limits for the projects to match. Updated total cost: $8,581K.
(Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Scope Item 20)

In August 2019, the CTC approved the following SHOPP Safety allocation: 02-Teh-36 87.8/89.1. PPNO 3641 Proj ID 0216000052 EA 1H740. On Route 36 Near Mineral, from 0.2 mile to 1.5 miles east of Route 89. Outcome/Output: Improve safety by realigning curves, widen lanes to 12 feet, pave shoulders to four feet, and improve sight distance and clear recovery zone. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions. $6,949,000
(Source: August 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5f.(3) #3)

In April 2020, it was reported that Caltrans District 2/North Region Construction and Steve Manning Construction was beginning construction of the Morgan Summit Project. The approximately $6.4 million curve realignment project will improve Route 36 near the town of Mineral, from 0.10 miles to 1.50 miles east of Route 89, near the south entrance to Lassen Volcanic National Park. It will take an estimated 95 working days to complete. This project will improve the roadway alignment, sight distance and clear recovery areas as well as roadway safety, rideability and sustainability. The current alignment will be improved by reducing the number of curves from 14 to 6 and by widening shoulders in both directions. New guardrail, drainage systems, roadside signs, markers, delineators, and striping will also be installed.
(Source: Plumas News, 4/10/2020)

In January 2013, the CTC approved SHOPP funding for reports on the Mill Creek Bridge in Tehama County near Mineral (~ TEH 091.46). Work there will replace rock slope protection at the abutment and pier to prevent further scouring and maintain structural integrity.

Route 89 near Mineral to US 395 near Susanville

In August 2008, the CTC vacated right of way along Route 36 in the county of Tehama, between 0.1 and 0.3 miles northwest of the intersection with Route 32 (~ TEH 99.68), consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

County Sign Route A13 Roundabout ( 02-Plumas-36 PM R13.6/R14.2)

The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Collision Reduction item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 02-Plumas-36 PM R13.6/R14.2 PPNO 3759 Proj ID 0219000145 EA 0J640. Route 36 near Chester, from 0.3 mile west to 0.3 mile east of County Sign Route A13. Construct roundabout. Programmed in FY22-23, with construction scheduled to start in August 2023. Total project cost is $8,658K, with $4,988K being capital (const and right of way) and $3,670K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.). Note that this was amended into the 2018 SHOPP at the May 2020 meeting as well.
(Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020; May 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1a) #25)

In May 2020, the CTC approved the following support allocation: 02-PLU-36  R13.6/R14.2. PPNO 3759 ProjID 0219000145. EA 0J640. Route 36 Near Chester, from 0.3 mile west to 0.3 mile east of County Road A13. Construct roundabout. Allocation: PA&ED $940,000.
(Source: May 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(2) #2)

Goodrich Creek Bridge (02-Las-36 7.2/7.4)

Rte 36 Goodrich BridgeThe following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 3512. 02-Lassen-36 7.2/7.4. On Route 36 Near Westwood, at Goodrich Creek Bridge No. 07-0048. Replace bridge. Begin Con: 1/24/2020. Total Project Cost: $7,915K.

In June 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project: 02-Las-36, PM 6.0/14.6 Goodfred Bridge Replacement and Roadway Rehabilitation: Project Replace existing bridge and construct roadway improvements on Route 36 in Lassen County. (MND) (PPNO 3468) (SHOPP). This project is located on Route 36 near Westwood in Lassen County. The project proposes to replace the Goodrich Creek Bridge (No. 07-0048) and rehabilitate 8.5 miles of Route 36. The proposed project will also include roadway realignment, upgrading and/or installation of culverts, inlet/outlet treatments at approximately 57 locations, and shoulder widening. The project is programmed for both the roadway rehabilitation and bridge replacement, and to be delivered in different fiscal years. This proposed project is estimated to cost a total of $42.2 million. The project is currently programmed in the 2018 SHOPP for approximately $29.9 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). The project is estimated to begin construction in 2020. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2018 SHOPP.
(Source: CTC Agenda, June 2018 Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

In June 2019, the CTC approved the following scope amendment to the SHOPP: 02-Las-36 7.2/7.4 PPNO 3512 ProjID 0213000006. Near Westwood, at Goodrich Creek Bridge No. 07-0048. Replace bridge. Increase to R/W capital for higher mitigation costs due to additional wetland and riparian involvement that was not recognized prior to receiving the detailed wetland delineation. Updated total cost: $8,048K.
(Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) Scope Item 18)

In January 2020, the CTC approved the following financial allocation: #3. 02-Las-36 7.2/7.4. On Route 36 Near Westwood, at Goodrich Creek Bridge No. 07-0048. Outcome/Output: Replace bridge with a new single span pre-cast bridge, install new bridge rails, and place Rock Slope Protection (RSP).  Allocation: $5,601,000. (Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-18-88; June 2018.) (EA 4F560/PPNO 02-3512 combined with EA 4E460/PPNO 02-3468 for construction under EA 4E46U/Project ID 0216000122.)
(Source: January 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5b.(1) #3)

In September 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way at LAS PM 25.1 in the City of Susanville, at Foss Street, consisting of a road connection.

Skyline Road

Rte 36 Skyline RoadIn June 2018, the CTC approved a new public road connection: 02-Las-36-PM R26.9, New Public Road Connection to Route 36 at Skyline Road in the county of Lassen. The City of Susanville, County of Lassen (County) and Lassen County Transportation Commission (LCTC) propose to construct a new public road connection to Route 36 at Skyline Road. The new connection would complete the extension of Skyline Road from Johnstonville Road in the city of Susanville to Route 36 in the county of Lassen. The new connection will improve traffic circulation by providing an efficient, alternate route for local and interregional trips on the State Highway System, thereby reducing traffic congestion along central urban arterials. Development in the northeast area of the city of Susanville has increased traffic congestion through central Susanville. Forecasted growth will add to the congestion on Route 36, Route 139 and local roads. The 2012 SR 36 Transportation Concept Report supports the project, which is consistent with the Lassen County Regional Transportation Plan. Route 36 through the project limits was adopted as a freeway by the California Highway Commission on July 20, 1960. Caltrans denominated this segment as a controlled access highway on March 15, 1977. Through the project limits, the facility is a two-lane expressway with 12-foot traveled ways and 8-foot shoulders. The route predominantly serves local and regional traffic, with some longer interregional trips.

The Skyline Road project was initiated in the early 1990’s as a corridor project. The “Skyline Corridor” included three phases: Skyline Road East (Route 139 to Johnstonville Road), Skyline Road Extension (Johnstonville Road to Route 36) and Skyline Road South (Route 36 to Richmond Road). This corridor project would connect Route 139, Route 36, and Richmond Road just outside the city of Susanville. All three phases were programmed for funding beginning in the 1998 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). Environmental work began on all three phases and project alternatives were determined for Skyline Road East and Skyline Road Extension. The County decided to proceed with Skyline Road East and Skyline Road Extension but Skyline Road South was delayed. Both Skyline Road East and Skyline Road Extension have been top priorities for the LCTC and the community. Skyline Road East and Skyline Road Extension both proceeded through environmental clearance simultaneously in 1999. Due to funding restraints, the County determined that it was not feasible to continue both projects simultaneously so it was decided to complete Skyline Road East first while still moving forward with Skyline Road Extension. The Skyline Road East phase was completed in July 2008. Once Skyline Road Extension phase is completed, the LCTC will seek funding and proceed with Skyline Road South. The Skyline Road Extension would lengthen Skyline Road from Johnstonville Road and connect to Route 36 at PM R26.9 with an at-grade three-way signalized intersection, about 0.2 miles southeast of the Susan River Bridge (Br. No. 07-0033). The Skyline Road Extension will construct a two-lane undivided roadway with 12-foot lanes, 8-foot shoulders and an adjacent paved Class I Bikeway. Route 36 will be widened to accommodate an eastbound left-turn lane and a westbound right-turn lane to the new Skyline Road. The estimated project cost for this road connection is $1,680,000 utilizing STIP and local funding. Upon completion of the Skyline Road Extension, interregional and local traffic from communities south of Susanville will be able to use Skyline Road as an expedient route to reach destinations north of the city of Susanville. Trucks and recreational vehicles travelling between Reno, Nevada to Klamath Falls, Oregon would also have an alternate route instead of traveling through central Susanville.
(Source: CTC Agenda, June 2018 Agenda Item 2.3b(2))

Historical Route Historical Route

A small portion of this segment in Red Bluff is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993.

Named Structures Named Structures

Robert F Fisher BridgeBridge 04-0089 over Yager Creek in Humboldt county (HUM 004.96) is named the "Robert F. Fisher Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1968, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 151, Chapter 282, in 1969. Robert F. Fisher, elected to the California Assembly by the people of Humboldt County in 1926, 1928 and 1930, was the last remaining Spanish-American War veteran in Humboldt County. Robert Fisher was born in Plymouth, Devon in February 1879 and emigrated to America in 1885 with his parents, Charles Ponsford Fisher and Harriet Oyns Fisher. The family settled in the mountains outside of San Diego, California. In 1898, Fisher enlisted in the Army during the Spanish–American War and served 13 months in the Philippines with the Third Artillery. After the war, he returned to the Philippines and ran a ligterage company for 12 years. He met his future wife, Bess Hayne Dawson, in Manila; they came back to the United States to be married in August 1912. The young couple took over management of his family's newly purchased ranch near Carlotta in Humboldt County, California. Fisher was the first president of the Humboldt County Farm Bureau and an early member of the Fortuna Rotary Club. Fisher ran for state Assembly in Humboldt County the first time in 1926, won the seat and retained it for the next two elections in 1928 and 1930, serving until 1932. He was a member of the Republican party.
(Image source and additional information about Robert Fisher: Wikipedia)

J Dwight O'DellBridge 04-0093 over the Van Duzen River in Humboldt county (HUM 012.78) is named the "Dwight O'Dell Bridge". It was built in 1965, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 16, Chapter 49, in 1981. Dwight O'Dell was the publisher and editor of the Humboldt Beacon & Fortuna Advance. He was instrumental in the formation of the Highway 36 Association in 1951.
(Image source: Times Standard 1/24/2019)

The bridge over the Van Duzen River in Humboldt county* is named the "Bernard A. Hemenway Bridge" . It was constructed in 1984, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 102, Chapter 53, in 1986. Bernard A. "Bernie" Hemenway (b. 1907) was a 40 year Caltrans employee. He served two years in the Army in WWII in the Philippines and New Guinea. His work with the department involved maintenance in Humboldt Mendocino Del Norte and Lake Counties and he spent many long after floods opening roads and repairing slides. He owned property on the Van Duzen River, and as an avid hunter and fisherman he traveled Route 36 as often as he could.The original California State Employee Association (CSEA) Crab Feeds began in backyard with he and some friends catching the crab Trinidad and cooking them.
(*: The naming resolution said PM HUM 13.7; the closest bridge of the SEVEN crossing the Van Duzen River is 04-0094 at PM HUM 013.370)

Bridge 04-0129, over the Van Duzen River in Humboldt county (HUM 040.45), is named the "William J. C. Dinsmore Bridge". It was built in 1981, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 10, Chapter 49, in 1987. William J.C. "Will" Dinsmore, (1933-1994), a lifetime resident and rancher in Sonoma county, worked as a foreman on the construction of Route 36 from Dinsmore to Forest Glen. William J.C. Will Dinsmore was born in Stewart's Point Sonoma County on September 2 1877 and lived in and attended school in Grizzly Bluff Humboldt County in the 1880's. He joined the Alaska Gold Rush when he was 21 years of age in 1898 and returned to Humboldt County in 1900 and purchased with his father and brothers a ranch which is now known as Dinsmore on Route 36. From 1913 until 1922, in addition to ranch operations, he was employed by the California Division of Highways as a foreman and worked on the section of Route 36 from Dinsmore to Forest Glen. Mr Dinsmore continued the operation of his ranch until his retirement in 1945 and resided in Fortuna until his death on June 21 1951.

Bridge 04-0284 (HUM 17.94) , over the Van Duzen River in Humboldt county**, is named the "Silvio 'Botchie' Santi Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1985, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 103, Chapter 54 in 1986. 1 Silvio Botchie Santi immigrated to America from Italy when he was 19 years old and spent his life in Humboldt County. He worked in the quarry at Essex in the woods for the Arcata Barrel Factory and later owned the Fields Landing Hotel.He started Botchie's Crab Stand in Fields Landing in 1928, selling the finest quality Humboldt crab and the reputation of the business continued to grow. He was affectionally known as Botchie by generations of Humboldters and was one of the most known and respected individuals of Humboldt.He hunted the McClellan McGowan and Ranches bounded by Route 36 for years and left a lasting mark on the history of County. This bridge, of reinforced concrete box girder design, bypassed the Lower Blackburn Grade Bridge, which was the only reinforced concrete through arch build during the project along a bypassed segment of Route 36, which featured other notable bridges near Carlotta and in Bridgeville. The bypassed the Lower Blackburn Grade Bridge over the Van Duzen River is one of five bridges designed by John B. Leonard along the Fortuna-Red Bluff Highway (Route 36) from 1923 to 1925. The bridge was built as part of a highway realignment project under taken by Humboldt County. The highway had a treacherous grade known as Blackburn Grade in which dangerous curves, steep grades and natural hazards had taken many lives and caused a need for a realignment project.
(**: The original designation had PM 18.3. This is the closest postmile, and the only bridge built in 1985)
(Information on Lower Blackburn Grade Bridge: Bridgehunter)

Bridge 08-0021, at the south fork of the Cottonwood Creek in Tehama county (TEH R025.54), is named the "John R. Trainor Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1969, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 80, Chapter 355, the same year. John R. Trainor served as the Mayor of the City of Red Bluff and Chairman of the Highway 36 Association until his death in 1968. Trainor was killed in a helicopter crash while attending a mayors and councilmen's institute at Disneyland. At the time, he was starting his fifth term as mayor and his thirteenth year on the Red Bluff City Council and was a director of the League of California Cities. Trainor, who served as a B 29 pilot in World War II, was born in Sacramento in 1921 and moved to Red Bluff 18 years ago where he owned the Red Bluff Tallow Company. He had been active in the Red Bluff area with cattle ranchers; was president of the Highway 36 Association; was a member of Elks Lodge No 1250, Rotary Club and Knights of Columbus; and was former disaster chairman for the American Red Cross.

This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

National Trails National Trails

trvolcanic.png This route is part of the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway All American Road.

Scenic Route Scenic Route

[SHC 263.3] From Route 101 near Alton to Route 3 near Peanut; and from Route 89 near Morgan Summit to Route 89 near Deer Creek Pass.

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.3] Route 36 from Route 5 at Red Bluff to Route 395. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. Note that this includes the portion that ran from Route 139 north of Susanville to Route 395 near Termo that was deleted by AB 2132, Chapter 877, signed September 26, 1998.

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 36:

Blue Star Memorial Highway Blue Star Memorial Highway

This route was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 36, Ch. 104 in 1983.

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The routing that became LRN 36 was first defined in 1907 by Chapter 116, which authorized ""...location, survey, and construction of a state highway from a point known as the Mt. Pleasant Ranch on the road between Quincy and Marysville thence in a SE-ly direction by a place called Eureka to Downieville, Sierra Cty..." This is roughly a routing from Oroville to Downieville, which appears to go near Collins Lake. This was codified in the 1935 highway code as the following:

From Mount Pleasant Ranch on the road between Quincy and Marysville, in a southeasterly direction via Eureka to Downieville, Sierra County.

In 1963, this was changed to read "From [LRN 25] near Downieville to Eureka Mine Road near Saddleback Mountain", however this definition was repealed when Chapter 385 became operative that year. However, that definition was used for Route 194.

In a discussion on AARoads, NE2, Sparker, and Max R provide more history of LRN 36: LRN 36 was part of the original state highway system and terminated at Saddleback Mountain. Apparently LRN 36 was meant to service the mining district north of Downieville which is odd considering the town had long since declined well before the 1930s. LRN 36 was briefly renumbered to CA 194 in 1964 before being deleted from the state highway system which is first reflected on the 1966 state highway map. Route 194 was deleted in 1965 along with several other short routes and urban connectors, including the original Route 215 along Garey Ave. in Pomona. Ironically, when I-15E was commissioned in 1973, Caltrans re-used the CA 194 designation as a "placeholder" for the suffixed route -- and 9 years later both designations (signed suffix and legally defined state highway) were dropped in favor of I-215. The original intended purpose of LRN 36 was to connect Downieville to Mount Pleasant on the old road between Quincy and Marysville (Port Wine Ridge Road), giving Downieville another outlet to the rest of the world. But Port Wine Ridge Road was never taken over by the state, and neither was much of LRN 36. The concept of LRN 36 intersecting a route to Quincy (originating in 1907) was laid to rest two years in 1909 later when a subsequent state bond issue authorized LRN 30, which took a more northerly route beginning in Oroville rather than Marysville. Part of that route is the easternmost portion of present Route 162, which terminates east of Lake Oroville. LRN 30 itself was short-lived; the Division of Highways opted to extend LRN 21, then simply a Richvale-Oroville connector, up the Feather River canyon via what was mostly the then-WP service road, as LRN 30 featured severe grades and treacherous canyon-side perches, whereas the Feather River alignment more or less mimicked the rail line's relatively benign 1% gradient. LRN 30 was deleted by the 1930's and its alignment east of Quincy subsumed by an extended LRN 21; the entire route east of Oroville was signed as Route 24 and redesignated as Alternate US 40 in 1954-55 after a couple of severe winters caused long closures of US 40 over Donner Pass. Another factor in why LRN 36 really never was fully completely was the plunge in population in Sierra County in the 20th Century. Sierra County would have had about 4,000 residents between 1900 to 1910 and only somewhere in the neighborhood of 2,500 by the time the Signed State Highway era began in the 1930s. Given the population barely moved from that point through the rest of the 20th century really would have put LRN 36 low on the totem pull considering the diminishing stature of Sierra County after the mining heyday was long over. Really though, Yuba Pass and Route 89 turned out to be a very viable route to get to Quincy from Downieville not to mention that now there is also the Gold Lake Highway which cuts out some mileage northbound. According to rail historians, much of the labor force that built the WP line up the Feather River and across northern Nevada was composed of former miners laid off from played-out diggings in the northern Sierra; their experience with often dangerous underground situations paid off when the line had to tunnel through obstacles. One particular problem was the long (a bit over a mile) Spring Garden tunnel, which bored beneath a ridge separating two branches of the upper Feather River between Quincy and Blairsden. Since tunnel construction, even in the early 1900's, was still a labor-intensive (dig, blast, clear, repeat) process, problems that may have vexed the line's engineers were "old hat" to many of these former miners -- the Spring Garden dig encountered several underground streams that had to be either diverted or channeled -- usually the latter, where the tunnel was made wide enough to accommodate "gutters" on each side of slightly raised track bed to deal with the runoff (a common practice in Sierra gold mines and adapted for this purpose). That tunnel is still in service today -- significantly enlarged to handle double-stack container traffic that won't fit under Donner snowsheds -- but still experiences occasional water issues during very rainy seasons. LRN 36 remained in the state system until the widespread deletions of 1965, although its purpose had essentially evaporated over the previous half-century. LRN 36 was always a bit of an "outlier" in the network; but for a long time there were recurring local rumblings about the need for a direct route north to Quincy and the upper Feather River area independent of a ridge-bound E-W facility; these kept the concept on "life support" -- but after decades of inaction, the Division of Highways finally decided to pull the plug and delete the successor Route 194.
(Source: AARoads Discussion, June 2017)


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 35 Forward Arrow Route 37

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