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Interstate 580

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Routing Routing

  1. Inst 580 Seg 1From Route 5 southwest of Vernalis to Route 80 in Oakland via the vicinity of Dublin and Hayward.

    Suffixed Routings Suffixed Routings

    At one time, portions of this route were signed as I-5W (from near Piedmont to N I-80). All of this segment was tentatively approved as I-5W in 1947, and given full approval in 1958. The I-5W designation was dropped in 1964 (when California regularized route numbers to match legislative definitions, and started dropping all "lettered" alternates to Interstates).

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, I-580 was defined as "Route 5 southwest of Vernalis to Route 80 near Oakland via the vicinity of Dublin and Hayward."

    In 1966, the MacArthur Freeway portion of I-580 in Oakland was awarded a 1966 Special Award as the Most Beautiful Urban Highway in the US by Nationwide Parade Magazine. The plaque is located on Grand in Oakland near the theatre. See the "Naming" Section for a picture of the plaque (or see here).
    (Source: Christy Eiland in Oakland Highways on Facebook, 8/26/2018)

    In 1984, Chapter 409 extended the route by transfer from Route 17: "(a) Route 5 southwest of Vernalis to Route 80 near Oakland via the vicinity of Dublin and Hayward. (b) Route 80 near Albany to Route 101 near San Rafael via the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge."

    In 1990, Chapter 1187 clarified segment (a): "(a) Route 5 southwest of Vernalis to Route 80 in near Oakland via the vicinity of Dublin and Hayward."

    Note: There was once a proposal to connect I-580 with I-505 called the Mid-State Tollway. As some surmised the Mid-State Tollway might be a rerouting of Route 84, the Mid-State Tollway is discussed with Route 84.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    Tom Fearer notes that the first major highway over the present general corridor of I-580 was El Camino Viejo. The El Camino Viejo was an inland alternate route to the Spanish Missions between Los Angeles and San Francisco Bay that was in common usage by the 1780s. The route of the El Camino Viejo from Los Angeles traveled north through San Francisquito Canyon, Antelope Valley, Cuddy Canyon and San Emigdio to reach San Joaquin Valley. The El Camino Viejo in San Joaquin Valley followed the west shores of Tulare Lake and the San Joaquin River close to modern day Tracy where it picked up what is the general vicinity of the I-580 corridor. Rather than using Altamont Pass the route of the El Camino Viejo traveled west from modern day Tracy via Corral Hollow Pass to what is now Livermore. The route of Corral Hollow Pass has been incorporated into Signed County Sign Route J2.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog: Interstate 580 from I–205 west to CA 13)

    US Highway Shield The portion between the I-580/I-205 junction and I-80 was LRN 5, defined in 1909. This routing was at one time US 48. It was later renumbered (approximately 1935) as US 50.

    The portion of this route between Route 132 and the I-580/I-205 junction was LRN 110, defined in 1957. The short stub between Route 132 and I-5 along I-580 was added to LRN 110 in 1959.

    This includes the original four-lane Altamont Pass Road, which opened on 8/4/1938. On the eastern grade of the Altamont Pass, the eastbound and westbound I-580 lanes follow different alignments. The EB lanes are the original US 50 alignment. Between the I-580/I-205 split and the Business Route 205 split, most of the width of I-205 (both directions) was the old US 50. It was four-lane divided for some time before the Great Renumbering, and that section is quite a bit narrower than I-580. Of course this may not be original 1927 US 50, but it existed before I-580. US-50 (and possibly US-48) headed into Tracy via Grant Line Road and Byron Road. 11th Street in Tracy is still a divided road in some portions and has a number of old state traffic signals, signs, and lamp poles, including some with the original mercury vapor lamps still intact.

    As for the railroad trackage: one of the two lines in the area is the former right-of-way of the Southern Pacific Railroad. These rails were abandoned in 1986 when SP obtained trackage rights over the current ACE route from the Union Pacific Railroad. The SP line, which was constructed in 1869, was actually the final link in the true Transcontinental Railroad. As the ACE Train crosses over, then under, the eastbound and westbound lanes of I-580, there is an abandoned tunnel on the SP right-of-way. The next large cut was actually WP's Tunnel 3. It was daylighted for clearance reasons in the early 1990's.

    Status Status

    Note: I-580 is one of five routes in California that have "backwards" post miles: that is, the postmiles go from East to West, instead of the normal West to East. This is an artifact of the original segment of the route being S to N, and then being expanded to an E to W route.

    General

    No general items.

    In May 2016, the CTC approved $60,464,000 for a project near Livermore, on I-580 from the San Joaquin County line to the Greenville Overhead (PM ALA 0.1 to ALA R8.0); also on I-205 from Midway Road to the San Joaquin County line (PM 205 ALA L0.0 to 205 ALA 0.4); also near Castro Valley on Route 580 from Eden Canyon Road to Strobridge Avenue (PM ALA R26.1 to ALA 30.3); also in San Joaquin County near Tracy on Route 580 from Patterson Pass Road to the Alameda County line (PM SJ 13.5 to 15.3). Outcome/Output: Improve safety and ride quality by rehabilitating 54.6 lane miles of distressed mainline and ramp pavement and install signs, lighting, and vehicle pullouts. Also, install ramp metering at 12 locations.

    International Parkway (Mountain House Parkway) Interchanges (205 SJ 1.1/1.6; 580 SJ 13.3/13.8)

    International ParkwayIn January 2018, the City of Tracy submitted to the CTC request that a portion of the Central Valley Gateway Project be approved for Trade Corridor Enhancement Program (TCEP) funding. At the May 2018 CTC meeting, staff recommended, and the Commission approved, $12.78 million in Trade Corridor Enhancement Program funds for the right-of-way and construction components for the Central Valley Gateway project which includes the Route 205/International Parkway Interchange Project and the Route 580/International Parkway Interchange Project. Note that "International Parkway" is a renaming of Mountain House Parkway.

    The Central Valley Gateway Project is a trucking corridor along a City’s Surface Transportation Assistance Act of 1982 (STAA) network connecting with State’s Primary Freight Network (PFN) by way of 2 interchanges on the interstate freeway system. The scope of the Project includes elements along both the City of Tracy arterial network as well as both interchanges. While the area is referred to as ‘Cordes Ranch’, in reference to the name of the subdivision in which entitlements were granted by the City, the name has been changed to ‘International Park of Commerce’, or IPC. The overall Central Valley Gateway (CVG) Project consists of several infrastructure elements. These elements include:
    (Source: City of Tracy TCEP Application, 1/30/2018)

    1. International Parkway widening (est. $39.3 million)
    2. I-205/ International Parkway-Mountain House Parkway Interchange (est. $15.7 million)
    3. I-580/ International Parkway-Patterson Pass Rd Interchange, and (est. $8.9 million)
    4. City Traffic Management Center (TMC) (est. $1.6 million)

    In 2014, the City of Tracy nominated the I-205/ Mountain House Parkway and I-580/Mountain House Parkway interchange projects to their Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) (www.sjcog.org) for inclusion in their Regional Transportation Plan (RTP). The projects were included as 2014 RTP amendments for the “Environmental Only” phase. The scoping documents for the projects were completed in June, 2015 and the environmental phase of the projects were started in early 2017. The construction phases of work are now being included in the 2018 RTP(SCS) by SJCOG. The RTP update is projected to be approved at the November 2018 Board meeting of SJCOG.

    Note that the corridor is already home to an Amazon Fulfillment Center and a Costco meat factory.

    The SJCOG request noted that the construction of the Interchange and Parkway Improvements will improve freight and employee access to the International Park of Commerce (IPC), an industrial, retail and office park comprised of approximately 1,800 acres and located in the City of Tracy. The successful development of the Prologis IPC at the foot of the Altamont Pass is essential for economic sustainability and job creation in the Tracy/San Joaquin County Region. The initial request was for $5,000,000 for Plans, Specifications, and Cost Estimates (PSE’s) and/or right of way acquisition for (IPC) Interchange and Parkway improvements connecting I-205 and I-580 in Tracy, California. The total improvements to the interstate interchanges and connecting parkway will include:
    (Source: SJCOG International Parkway brochure)

    • Overcrossing Upgrade of I-205 and Mountain House Parkway
    • Overcrossing Upgrade of I-580 and Mountain House Parkway
    • Bridge and roadway widening of Mountain House Parkway at the Delta Mendota Canal
    • Bridge and roadway widening of Mountain House Parkway at the California Aqueduct
    • Widening of Mountain House Parkway of the local roadway to increase freight capacity

    In December 2018, Agenda Item 4.24 on the CTC agenda addressed this project, noting that the Trade Corridor Enhancement Program guidelines state that projects programmed with capital costs must file a Notice of Determination, in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act, within six months of program adoption, or the project will be removed from the program. Based on this requirement, a Notice of Determination for the Central Valley Gateway project was required to be filed by November 16, 2018. The City of Tracy did not meet this deadline, therefore, consistent with the Trade Corridor Enhancement Program guidelines, staff recommended (and the CTC approved) the removal of City of Tracy’s Central Valley Gateway Project.
    (Source: December 2018 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 4.24)

    In July 2008, Caltrans opened the I-580 truck bypass, separating slow-moving trucks from cars in the Altamont Pass. Two westbound truck-only lanes run for six miles from Mountain House Parkway to Grant Line Road (~ SJ 13.582 to ALA R1.491) on the right-hand side. This was added as part of widening I-205, and is part of the I-205 to I-580 transition. It permits trucks to make the transition at ground level and join the freeway on the right hand lanes, whereas the original flyover ramp joins the freeway in the left hand (fast) lanes.

    I-205 to I-680 (Altamont Pass, Livermore, Pleasanton)

    Greenville Truck Lanes (~ ALA R4.907R to ALA R8.254)

    In January 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Alameda County that will construct a truck climbing lane in the eastbound direction on I-580 from one mile east of North Flynn Road to Greenville Road Undercrossing (~ ALA R4.907R to ALA R8.254). The project is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. Total estimated project cost is $63,000,000 for capital and support. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to seven animal species that are listed as threatened or endangered will be mitigated through replacement habitat. In addition, potential impacts to an existing wetland in the project area will be mitigated by restoration of the affected wetland. In October 2012, the CTC amended the schedule due to permitting problems. The new schedule shows construction completing in April 2015.

    In March 2016, it was reported that Caltrans expects to open a truck lane on eastbound I-580 in Livermore between Greenville and North Flynn roads in June 2016. One more layer of asphalt needs to go in first.
    (Source: SJ Mercury News, 3/12/2016)

    In May 2012, the CTC authorized SHOPP funding on I-580, in Alameda County, 04-Ala-580 R8.4/R14.6 Near Livermore, from 0.1 mile west of Greenville Road to 0.2 mile west of San Ramon -Foothill Road. $16,400,000 to rehabilitate 51 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the road surface, minimize the costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

    Livermore HOV/Express Lanes (~ ALA R8.254 to ALA R21.435)

    Rte 580 TCRP 12.3TCRP Project #12.3 is studying improvements for the I-580 Livermore Corridor (~ ALA R9.347 to ALA 17.943). The project is to construct eastbound and westbound High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes on I-580 from west of Tassajara Road in Pleasanton to east of Vasco Road in Livermore, a distance of approximately 18 kilometers (11 miles). The total estimated cost of the project depends on selection of preferred alternative at the conclusion of the environmental clearance process, and ranges from $109,500,000 (minimum project alternative) to $200,500,000 (ultimate project). The selection of the preferred alternative will be made in coordination with the Route 580 Transit Connectivity Study (TCRP #12.3). Included in the Transit Connectivity Study are alternative alignments for transit along the Route 580 corridor.

    The minimum project alternative would add HOV lanes in the existing median. The ultimate project would include widening the median to 19.5 meters (64 feet) for future BART extension and 25.6 meters (84 feet) near Airway Boulevard for proposed West Livermore BART station. Widening of the freeway could be to the outside to accommodate shifting the existing lanes and construction of the new HOV lanes.

    As of 2003, the TCRP funding was anticipated to fully fund Phases 1, 2, and right of way services (Phase 3), and partially fund construction support (Phase 4). Of the total maximum $200.5 million required for ultimate project implementation, a total of $119.5 million is identified as committed or proposed funding. The remaining $81 million could be an unmet balance for which funding source(s) is/are yet to be identified. The currently identified $119.5 million committed and potential funding sources would allow for the development and construction of a minimum project alternative and meeting the project purpose and needs.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1653: Engineering, right of way and construction of HOV lanes on I-580 in the Livermore Valley. $9,600,000. (~ ALA R9.214)

    In 2007, the CTC recommended $72.2M from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) for an EB HOV Lane from Greenville Road in Livermore to Hacienda Drive in Pleasanton (~ ALA R8.254 to ALA 18.834), and $68M for a WB HOV Lane at the Isabel Ave (Route 84) interchange (~ ALA 14.15), and $101.7M for a WB HOV Lane from Greenville to Foothill Road (~ ALA R8.254 to ALA R21.435).

    In October 2008, a segment of HOV lanes in Livermore opened.

    In February 2009, the CTC amended the environmental work for the project. Specifically, on July 27, 2007, the CTC approved a resolution that revised the project schedule to show FY2008-09 as the completion date for Environmental portion of the project. At the same time, the CTC approved a resolution that allocated $3,000,000 for a Programmatic Environmental Impact Report (PEIR), which was proposed to be developed by December 2008. The purpose of the PEIR was to support the early acquisition of right of way along I-580 for a future transit corridor. However, the schedule required modification in 2009 as it was dependent on inclusion of a right of way preservation project-known as the “I-580 Transit Corridor”-in the regional transportation plan (RTP) currently being developed by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC). MTC is scheduled to adopt the Final Plan, EIR, and Conformity Analysis for the RTP on March 25, 2009. The amendment changed the completion date for the environmental phase to December 2009.

    In February 2010, the CTC approved allocating $8,000,000 in Traffic Congestion Relief Program (TCRP) funds for the Route 580 project to construct an eastbound HOV lane from Tassjara Road/Santa Rita Road to Vasco Road in Alameda County (TCRP 31).

    [PPNO 0112B]In April 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Alameda County that will construct a westbound HOV lane on a 13.4 mile portion of Route 580 near the city of Dublin. The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and includes federal and local funds. Total estimated project cost is $137,886,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. There is a concurrent baseline amendment request to split the project into three contracts. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope set forth in the proposed project baseline agreement.

    Overall, this project will construct a high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane from the San Ramon Road/Foothill Road Interchange to the Greenville Road Overhead; widen the inside and outside shoulders sufficiently to accommodate the HOV lane and allow for future conversion of the HOV lane to a high occupancy toll (HOT) lane; widen the existing bridge crossings over Tassajara Creek and Arroyo Las Positas Creek at various locations; and construct various westbound auxiliary lanes. It will also construct a westbound express bus ramp connection from the westbound HOV lane to the Dublin-Pleasanton BART Station; construct soundwalls as identified by the environmental document; and upgrade the drainage system in the freeway median to accommodate the HOV lane. In April 2010, the CTC approved amending the CMIA baseline agreement for the I-580 Westbound HOV Lane – Greenville to Foothill project (PPNO 0112B) to: (1) Update the project scope to eliminate the westbound I-580 express bus off-ramp to the Dublin-Pleasanton Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) Station, funded by 12 million Regional Measure 2 (RM2) funds; add a westbound auxiliary lane at two locations: a) From Vasco Road to First Street and b) From Airway Boulevard to Fallon Road, to be funded by local funds; (2) Update the overall project funding plan; and (3) Split the updated project into three roadway contracts. The westbound express off-ramp to the BART station is being elminated because both the BART and the Livermore Amador Valley Transit Authority opposed the inclusion of these improvements in the project scope on concerns relating to pedestrian safety in the vicinity of the BART Station; this provided a cost savings of $12M. The auxiliary lanes were added to the scope of the overall project for coordination purposes; these lanes were originally a local project. Combining these two auxiliary lanes projects with the HOV lane project for construction will reduce throw-away costs such as roadway drainage improvements, signings, and erosion control measures and also avoid unnecessary disruption to the traveling public.

    The overall project is proposed to be split into three segments.

    • Segment 1 (PPNO 0112B): In Alameda County in Livermore from Greenville Road to just east of Isabel Avenue. Construct a westbound HOV lane from the Greenville Overcrossing to Isabel Avenue Overcrossing. Widen the inside and outside shoulders sufficiently to accommodate the HOV lane and allow for future conversion to a HOT lane. Construct westbound auxiliary lanes from Vasco Road to First Street, from First to North Livermore Avenue, and from North Livermore Avenue to Isabel Avenue. Construct soundwalls as identified by the environmental document. Construct mitigation landscaping. Upgrade the freeway median drainage system in the freeway median to accommodate the HOV lane.

      Segment 2 (PPNO 0112F): In Alameda County in Livermore from just east of Isabel Avenue to just west of San Ramon Road/Foothill Road Interchange. Construct a westbound HOV lane from Isabel Avenue Overcrossing to San Ramon Road/Foothill Road Interchange. Widen the inside and outside shoulders sufficiently to accommodate the HOV lane and allow for future conversion to a HOT lane. Widen existing bridge crossing over Tassajara Creek. Construct westbound auxiliary lanes from Airway Boulevard to Fallon Road. Construct soundwalls as identified by the environmental document. Construct mitigation landscaping. Upgrade the freeway median drainage system in the freeway median to accommodate the HOV lane.

      Segment 3 (PPNO 0112G): In Alameda County in Livermore from just west of First Street Overcrossing to just west of Isabel Avenue Overcrossing. Widen existing bridge crossings over Arroyo Las Positas Creek in the eastbound direction (at two locations).

    In July 2010 it was reported that a 2.9-mile HOV lane segment opened in Livermore: EB from Airway Boulevard past Portola Road. Upon completion, the entire HOV lane will extend 11 miles from Hacienda Road in Pleasanton to Greenville Road in Livermore. It will eventually be turned into an express toll lane. The first lane segment from east of Portola Road to Greenville Road opened in October 2009. If construction continues as expected, the overall HOV project will open in Fall 2010, about one year ahead. In November 2010, it was reported that the second phase of the 11-mile carpool lane on eastbound I-580 between Pleasanton and Livermore was opened. The carpool lane is expected to ease traffic in the area, which currently sees more than 170,000 vehicles a day. The project cost $49 million, which is $23 million less than what had been budgeted, and was completed a year ahead of schedule. It was mostly funded by Proposition 1B, a $19.9 billion transportation bond that was approved by California voters in 2006. Transportation officials said the project was completed for far less than had been expected because of the highly competitive bidding market among contractors seeking business. The section that opened in November 2010 goes from Hacienda Drive in Pleasanton to Portola Road in Livermore. The first segment, which is from Portola Road to Greenville Road in Livermore, opened in October 2009.

    In August 2010, the CTC approved amending the CMIA baseline agreement for Segment 2 (Construct HOV Lane, from Portola to Hacienda [PPNO 0112D]) of the Eastbound I-580 HOV Lane project to update the project delivery schedule, noting that construction started later than originally expected.

    580 Express LanesIn April 2012, it was reported that construction on the $182 million-dollar HOV lane between Livermore and Dublin is scheduled to begin in August 2012 and be completed in mid-2015. Eastbound commuters -- who have benefited from an 11-mile carpool lane from Hacienda Drive to Greenville since 2009 -- will see the lane transformed into a combination carpool-toll lane. The cost to add the technology for the lane, which was $15 million to build, is $19 million, and it will open at the same time the westbound lane debuts.

    In February 2013, it was reported that Caltrans plans to convert HOV lanes on I-580 into HOT ("Express" or High Occupancy/Toll) lanes -- specifically, I-580 in both directions between I-680 and Hacienda Road in Livermore. Express lanes work by continuing to allow carpoolers free access to the fast lane but then selling unused capacity to drivers who wouldn't normally qualify to drive in them. Tolls are collected electronically using FasTrak transponders, and electronic systems are used to monitor traffic and set tolls at a rate designed to keep traffic in the lanes flowing at 50 mph or faster. As the lanes get more congested, tolls rise, and as gridlock eases, they drop. Toll rates for the network have not been set yet, but on the existing lanes they have varied from a 30-cent minimum to about $5 or $6.

    In mid-June 2013, A ceremony was held to mark the start of construction on the $145 million new HOV lanes between Greenville Road in Livermore and the Foothill Road over crossing in Dublin and Pleasanton. Completion is expected in late 2014, a year before the lane is to be converted into an express toll lane open to carpools for free and solo drivers for a toll. Contractors also will add an auxiliary lane on I-580 between Isabel Avenue and First Street in Livermore.

    In September 2015, it was reported that the opening of the I-580 HOT lanes along both directions of I-580 through Pleasanton, Dublin and Livermore would be delayed. The I-580 project, which began construction in June 2014, is converting the eastbound high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane and another lane into two express lanes from Hacienda Drive to Greenville Road in Livermore. For the westbound direction, a single express lane will run from Greenville to the San Ramon/Foothill roads overcrossing, creating the first HOV-specific lane on westbound I-580 through the corridor. New driving lanes were previously built in each direction as part of separate HOV and auxiliary lanes projects. The express lanes would be free to access for carpools, vanpools, public transit, motorcycles and eligible clean-air vehicles while other solo drivers could pay a toll to use the lanes from 5 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. The lanes would be open free-of-charge all other times. Express lane access will be nearly continuous, except for limitations eastbound between Hacienda and Fallon and El Charro roads and westbound between Hacienda and San Ramon Road. The project had construction delays on the civil infrastructure due to material shortages. Additionally, among the project components still to be completed is the adoption of a toll fee schedule. The agency will use dynamic pricing, with toll rates going up or down to help traffic move smoothly. Tolls will increase as express lane congestion increases -- in an effort to discourage solo drivers from using the express lanes. The logic is reversed when congestion eases. A motorists' toll rate is locked in as soon as they enter the lane, and the rate remains the same for the duration of their trip, regardless of any rate changes during that time. Drivers who enter the lanes will be required to use a FasTrak Flex reader, which offers adjustable settings based on one, two or three-plus vehicle occupants.
    (Source: Pleasanton Weekly, 9/25/2015)

    In February 2016, it was reported that HOT lanes on I-580 from Dublin to Livermore had opened. This marks the biggest expansion of using carpool lanes as express lanes in the region, with two lanes eastbound and one lane westbound for 12 miles or 36 miles in total. The express lanes will operate from 5 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays. At other times, they'll be open to all drivers. Minimum tolls will be in the $1.50 to $1.75 range. FasTrak will be required by all users even carpoolers. FasTrak Flex toll tags (i.e., the type used in Southern California) will be required. They can be set at one, two or three to indicate the number of people in the car and can be used anywhere FasTrak can be used, such as on I-680 through Fremont, Route 237 in Milpitas, and the HOT lanes on I-15 and I-10. Operated by the Alameda County Transportation Commission, these lanes were funded with federal, state, regional and local dollars, including a voter-approved sales tax. The toll lanes cost $55 million, but the overall cost to widen the freeway and add numerous merging lanes raised the final bill to $345 million.
    (Source: Mercury News, 1/22/2016, EastBay Times, 2/10/2016)

    In an AAroads post on the subject, additional informaton on the FasTrack Flex tag was provided. Joe Rouse (of m.t.r and AAroads fame) came up with the name, inspired by what the EZPass group on the East Coast did for their switchable tag for the express lanes on I–495 and I–95 in Virginia, with the special branding of EZPass Flex. The California Toll Operators Committee (CTOC) adopted it after some market research and approval by the Transportation Corridor Agencies (which owns the FasTrak trademark). The branding came about as a result of an issue with the I-10 and I-110 express lanes in Los Angeles. LA Metro offers only a switchable tag to its customers. It was branded as FasTrak. Yet there are a substantial number of older non-switchable tags in use in Southern California that were issued by TCA and OCTA, also branded as FasTrak. The pricing signs on the 2 express lanes in Los Angeles were displaying a message that HOVs with FasTrak didn't have to pay a toll. However, this was only applicable if you had the switchable tag. No switch - you'd still pay. A few people had caught on to this distinction, and there was concern that it could lead to legal action because the signs were conveying a misleading message. The toll operators saw this same risk and agreed that a separate brand would help. Guidance was developed on the use of the brand and one of the things that I made very clear was that the brand should only be used in messaging related to carpooling. For this reason, when you drive the I-580 express lanes, most signs only say "FasTrak". The FasTrak Flex brand is only displayed on messages pertaining to HOVs. The messaging on those signs was taken from the I–495 express lanes in Virginia. The Bay Area was the first region to adopt the FasTrak Flex branding. The express lanes in Los Angeles will adopt it eventually. A couple of media outlets reported that you could ONLY use the I-580 express lanes if you had the FasTrak Flex. That's not true because that would violate California's interoperability law. One final note: if you use a traditional toll facility like a toll bridge or toll road, the setting on the switch tag doesn't matter. The switch setting is tied in with one component of the tag that is typically not scanned by the overhead readers. The tag readers on the LA express lanes and the new express lanes in the Bay Area will scan that component. I'm not sure about the existing express lanes on Route 237 and I-680. Eventually both of those facilities will start requiring all users to carry a tag, though, and require the Flex tag for toll-free travel.
    (Source: Joe Rouse @ AAroads, 2/24/2016)

    In August 2016, it was reported that notorists took nearly 1.9 million trips on I-580's new express lanes in Alameda County in the first four months the lanes opened to vehicle traffic. The first full month of operation saw around 549,000 trips along the east- and westbound lanes, growing to 647,000 trips in May -- an 18 percent increase from March -- according to a report presented to the Alameda County Transportation Commission. Average hourly speeds in the express lanes are estimated to be between 10 and 33 mph faster than the average hourly speeds in general purpose lanes during the morning rush-hour commute.
    (Source: East Bay Times, 7/29/2016)

    In March 2017, it was reported that since the combination express and carpool lanes opened in February 2016 on I-580, along the main route between the Bay Area and the Central Valley, more than 7.6 million drivers have taken advantage of them, according to a report released in March 2017 by the Alameda County Transportation Commission, which operates the lanes. By paying an average toll of $1.62 westbound and $2.13 eastbound, drivers get to drive about 10 mph faster than those in the other lanes. On an average day, about 11 percent of the vehicles traveling on I-580 through the area use the express lanes. That’s about 30,000 cars and trucks a day. Looking at February alone, the figures show that of the estimated 30,000 vehicles to use the 580 Express Lanes daily, 52 percent paid a toll and 38 percent legally traveled toll-free under diamond lane rules. The percent of toll-lane cheats fell from about 30 percent when the lanes opened a year ago to 10 percent last month, the report said.
    (Source: SF Chronicle, 3/16/2017)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1218: Upgrade and reconstruct I-580/Vasco Road Interchange, City of Livermore. $2,000,000. (~ ALA 9.651)

    In May 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Livermore along Route 580 on Kitty Hawk Road and Portola Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities (~ 04-Ala-580-PM 13.2/14.3).

    Isabel Avenue Interchange (~ ALA 14.15)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #3493: Construction at I-580 and Route 84 (Isabel Avenue) Interchange. $2,000,000. (~ ALA 14.192)

    Isabel Ave InterchangeThere are plans to add a new interchange as Isabel Avenue in Livermore, but this was deferred in June 2008 because the cost and scope of ED is not consistent with cost and scope of CMIA baseline agreement.. The project is fully programmed for $153 million with Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) funds, federal Demonstration funds, and local funds. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2008-09.. There was a similar deferral of a project to construct roadway improvements on I-580 in the city of Livermore that would have extended out to I-205. The project is fully programmed for $154 million with Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) funds; State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) funds; State Highway Operation Protection Program (SHOPP) funds; Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) funds; Traffic Congestion Relief Program (TCRP) funds; and local funds. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2007-08.

    Isabel Ave InterchangeSpecifically, the project will construct a new interchange at Isabel Avenue (Route 84) and Route 580 in the city of Livermore. The project will also remove the existing partial interchange at Portola Avenue and I- 580. This new interchange at Isabel Avenue will provide a permanent and more efficient connection between Route 580 and Route 84. These improvements will result in a congestion relief in the Route 580/Route 680 corridors by establishing an alternative route for traffic between the Central/Tri-Valleys and the South Bay areas. In October 2008, the CTC considered amending the project plan to reallocate funding between tasks and to divide the project into three segments. This was due to an increase in right of way (ROW) acquisition costs of $3.1 million, due to the refinement of ROW costs that are now based upon actual appraisals, negotiated property acquisition compensations, and updated utility relocation estimates. This brought the total ROW costs to $24M. Additionally, construction estimates have also increased by $10.9M to $96.6M. That's just for Construction Capital! Construction support is another $8M (but that's a decrease of $8M from the original estimate). The amendment proposed that the work relating to the construction of three foundations for the Isabel Avenue Overcrossing (estimated cost $1.75 million) be transferred from this project to another CMIA project, the Route 580 EB HOV Lane project (PPNO 0112A, Segment 2 [EA 04-290831]). Similarly, widening of the Arroyo Las Positas Bridge (estimated cost $1.70 million) was to be transferred from the Route 580 EB HOV Lane project to the Isabel Avenue interchange project. They also proposed splitting the project into three construction contracts, allowing the City of Livermore to administer construction of the work that is within its own right of way, and thus better deal with traffic controls and circulation impacts on the city roads.

    So, the project will include (a) construction of a new interchange at Isabel Avenue (Route 84) in the Route 580 Corridor, replacing the existing temporary connection at Route 580/Airway Blvd; (b) construction of a new Portola Avenue overpass; (c) construction of eastbound and westbound auxiliary lanes between Isabel Avenue and Airway Boulevard, (d) removal of the partial interchange at Route 580/Portola Ave. for enhanced mainline operational efficiency and safety.; (e) widening and realigning of SR 84 south of Route 580, including relocation of utilities; (f) construction of new local roads necessary for the interchange operation north of Route 580; (g) widening an existing Route 580 bridge over the Arroyo Las Positas creek to accommodate the Route 580 EB HOV Lane project. The Arroyo Las Positas Creek Bridge widening was added from Route 580 EB HOV Lane project. Some foundation work in the median for the Route 580/Isabel Avenue Interchange project was deleted from this project and added to the Route 580 EB HOV Lane project. The three construction contracts are: (04-171311) Widen and realign Route 84 south of I-580, including relocation of utilities; (04-171321) Construct new local roads north of the I-580/Isabel Avenue Interchange, for proper operations of the interchange; and (04-171331) (a) Construct new interchange at I-580 and Isabel Avenue (Route 84) replacing the existing temporary connection at I-580/Airway Blvd; (b) construct a new Portola Avenue overpass; (c) construct eastbound and westbound auxiliary lanes between Isabel Avenue and Airway Boulevard; (d) remove the partial interchange at I-580/Portola Ave. (e) widen an existing I-580 bridge over the Arroyo Las Positas creek to accommodate the I-580 EB HOV project. The first two of these (171311 and 171321) would be done by the City of Livermore; the last by Caltrans.

    In January 2010, it was noted that construction near I-580 and Route 84 was progressing nicely. it's visibly becoming an interchange with approach embankments looking done on both sides. Completion is scheduled for February 2011.

    In August 2010, the CTC approved amending the CMIA baseline agreements for Segment 1 (Widen and realign SR-84/Isabel Avenue [PPNO 0115E]), Segment 2 (Construct new local roads north of I-580/Isabel Interchange [PPNO 0115F]) and Segment 3 (Construct new interchange at Isabel Avenue [PPNO 0115B]) of the I-580/ Isabel Interchange project to update the project delivery schedule for each project. All three segments received their allocations at the December 2008 Commission meeting. The contracts for Segment 1 and 2 were advertised on December 22, 2008. The Segment 3 was advertised in January 2009. But the bid openings had to be postponed because the Proposition 1B funding was suspended due to financial constraints of the State. For Segment 3, delay in bid opening was also caused by the issuance of three addenda. The contracts for Segment 1 and 2 were awarded in June 2009. The Segment 3 contract was awarded in July 2009. None of the changes affect the close-out dates, although the end of construction for Segment 1 is pushed out two months to March 2012.

    In October 2011, the CTC recieved a request to amend the CMIA baseline agreements related to a project in this area; specifically, for Segment 1 (Widen and realign State Route 84 south of I-580 interchange and relocate utilities, PPNO 0115E), Segment 2 (Construct new local roads north of the I-580/Isabel Avenue Interchange, PPNO 0115F), and Segment 3 (Construct new interchange at Isabel Avenue and a new Portola Avenue Overcrossing, PPNO 0115B) of the I-580/Isabel Interchange project to: • Transfer a portion of the scope of work from Segment 3 to Segment 1. • Shift $600,000 CMIA and $400,000 local funds in close-out savings from Segment 2 to Segment 1 in order to complete this transferred scope of work.

    In November 2011, Caltrans opened the new I-580/Route 84 ramps and the newly realigned Route 84 south of I-580 that will connect with the new interchange, and closed the westbound I-580 Portola Avenue onramp. The two new onramps will serve as new freeway access from Las Positas College and the businesses north of I-580. Commuters will be able to use the new interchange in lieu of cutting through downtown Livermore. Another project to widen Route 84 south of the interchange between Jack London Boulevard and Vallecitos Road is slated to begin in spring 2012.

    In April 2012, the CTC authorized SHOPP funding on I-580, in Alameda County, 04-Ala-580 R14.6/R21.6 Near Livermore, from 0.1 mile west of Greenville Road to 0.2 mile west of San Ramon-Foothill Road. $13,000,000 to rehabilitate 38.5 lane miles of pavement to improve ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the road surface, minimize the costly roadway repairs, and extend the pavement life.

    In June 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Pleasanton along Route 580 between Route 680 and Hopyard Road, consisting of collateral facilities. (4-Ala-580-PM 19.8/20.7)

    In April 2012, it was reported that construction had started on on a $2.4 million trail segment providing the first off-road trail for people to walk or ride under I-580 in the Tri-Valley area (~ ALA 20.568). The new segment will close a 784-foot-long gap between two trails that stop on opposite sides of I-580. On the Dublin side, there is the Alamo Canal Trail, which connects to the Iron Horse Trail leading the way to Martinez. On the Pleasanton side, the Centennial Trail runs parallel to I-680 and a flood-control channel and leads toward central Pleasanton. To build the trail, crews will cut a notch out of the creek bank under the interstate and the BART tracks. Caltrans insisted that the trail have a railing to prevent users from falling into the creek, while Zone 7 Water District officials worried that the railing would trap floating debris and aggravate flood risks during heavy storms. Trail designers came up with a compromise plan for a collapsible rail with posts that can be removed before waters rise. Several agencies -- including Dublin, Pleasanton, the Alameda County Transportation Commission and the regional park district -- contributed funding toward the trail, but the largest allocation was $1 million in federal transportation dollars.

    I-680 to I-238 (Dougherty through Castro Valley)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1371: I-580 Interchange Improvements in Castro Valley. $960,000. (~ ALA R30.597 to ALA M31.104)

    I-238 to Oakland (I-80/I-580 Junction)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following new Transportation Management item of interest: 04-ALA-580 PM 30.4/46.5 PPNO 1493N Proj ID 0416000099 EA 0K530. Route 580 in and near San Leandro and Oakland, from Strobridge Avenue to 0.7 mile west of San Pablo Avenue at various locations (PM 30.36/46.5L/R). Install and upgrade ramp meters and widen ramps to provide High-
    Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) bypass ramp lanes. Programmed in FY23-24, with construction scheduled to begin 11/1/2024, although construction and construction support phases were not authorized in the SHOPP. Total project cost is $49,254K, with $37,076K being capital (const and right of way) and $12,178K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.),
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    In May 2007, flames from an exploding gasoline tanker melted the steel underbelly of the I-580 bridge that carried EB traffic from the Bay Bridge to I-580, I-980, and Route 24 (~ ALA R047.53). The single-vehicle crash occurred on the lower roadway when the tanker, loaded with 8,600 gallons of unleaded gasoline and heading from a refinery in Benicia to a gas station on Hegenberger Road in Oakland, hit a guardrail. Caltrans fast-tracked the repair construction, which was expected to take 5-6 months. However, the contractor (C.C. Myers) actually completed the work in twenty-six days, opening the I-580 bridge on 8:40 PM on May 24, 2007. How was this done? Less than two days after the I-580 connector collapsed, demolition crews removed the mangled section. A day later, Caltrans engineers clambered over the charred section of I-880, drilling concrete core samples, X-raying parts of the structure and dragging chains over the roadway -- all tests to determine the extent of repairs needed. The results came back the next day -- the fourth day after the collapse. I-880 had suffered no serious structural damage to the concrete, Caltrans concluded. The freeway connector could be jacked up and supported with temporary braces while workers used a heat-straightening technique to repair warped steel girders underneath. Contractor ACC West completed the work quickly, and I-880 was reopened to traffic after being closed for just eight days. As for the I-580 overpass, Caltrans officials worked to speed the process by preparing a list of potential contractors it knew could do the work quickly and by streamlining its process, clearing as much red tape as possible. Then they drew up a contract offering a $200,000 bonus -- with a limit of $5 million -- for each day the work was done in less than 50 days and levying a $200,000 penalty for each day after that deadline. The bids were opened and the winner was the fifth bid, from C.C. Myers Inc., which came in at $867,075. The original Caltrans estimate was $5.2 million. Within hours of the bid award, Myers had workers on the site of the maze collapse. Meanwhile, in Lathrop (San Joaquin County), concrete fabrication firm ConFab started building what is essentially a big, rectangular concrete block. The block, filled with steel reinforcement bars and cables, is what's known to road builders as a bent cap -- a 243,750-pound beam that sits atop two columns and supports the frame of the elevated roadway. While the beam was being built, steel was being rushed from Pennsylvania and Texas to Stinger Welding, a steel fabrication firm in Arizona. Carl Douglas, president of Stinger, found in Pennsylvania the nation's only supply of the 2-inch steel plate needed to make the bottom flange of the steel girders. He found the half-inch and 1-inch steel needed for the rest of the girders in Texas. It was loaded onto trucks with two drivers in each rig so they could make the trips with fewer stops. Once the steel reached Arizona, Stinger crews began working two 10-hour shifts daily to get the girders built. Caltrans sent inspectors and engineers -- all authorized to make on-the-spot decisions -- to answer questions and ensure the quality of the fabrication. The first two girders were done on May 14 -- just four days after Stinger started working and seven days into C.C. Myers' contract -- and around noon they were put on trucks bound for the Bay Area. Stinger finished the girders in nine days -- a job that would normally have taken about 45. The first two girders arrived early on May 15 at ABC Painting, an industrial paint shop on the old Mare Island Naval Shipyard in Vallejo. Crews blasted the girders with steel grit to rough them up enough to hold a good coat of paint. Then they applied a zinc primer in "Caltrans gray," a sort of greenish gray. As the girders were painted, the massive concrete bent cap began making its way from Lathrop on an 18-axle truck. The load was so heavy that the truck wasn't permitted on I-580 over the Altamont Pass and had to use rural roads to get to the Tri-Valley. Still, the bent cap arrived about 15 minutes before Caltrans' scheduled 8 p.m. closure May 15 of the I-880 connector for the installation, and had to wait on the side of I-80 in Berkeley. Shortly after 8 p.m., the rig pulled onto the closed I-880 connector and parked at an angle beneath the two I-580 columns that survived the collapse and needed only minor repairs. After the beam was untied and hooked to lifting cables, a pair of cranes raised it at 8:50 p.m. and had it in place by 9 p.m. Crane operators then dropped large steel "pins" into holes in the bent cap and injected grout to secure the connection. After the first four girders were lifted into place, two more arrived each subsequent night, and they were put in place without difficulty. As soon as each pair was secured, workers swarmed the steel beams and started installing the wooden forms and steel-reinforcement bar for the concrete roadway. On a typical job, the contractor would wait until the girders were all installed before preparing for the concrete pour. After curing for 48 hours, the concrete poured on Sunday had already attained the required strength -- 3,500 pounds per square inch -- for the road deck. But Caltrans wanted it to cure -- beneath burlap and plastic blankets to keep it damp -- for at least 96 hours. For this job, C.C. Myers will collect $5 million in bonus money. The job is estimated to have cost the firm $2.5 million.
    (Source: SF Chronicle, 5/25/2007)

    The stretch of road that runs between the two segments of I-580 (starting at ALA 46.397R) has interesting trailblazers: West I-80 and East I-580 (or East I-80 and West I-580). You can find a picture of this here.

    MacArthur Maze Vertical Clearance Project – 80 (PM 2.8)/580 (PM 46.5R & 46.5L)/880 (PM 34.5L)

    Rte 580 Rte 80 Rte 880 MacArthur MazeIn March 2019, Caltrans started holding public hearings on the MacArthur Maze Vertical Clearance Project, whichwould to increase the vertical clearances at three locations within the MacArthur Maze Interchange (MacArthur Maze or Maze) in the City of Oakland, Alameda County. Two of the locations are along the connector from westbound (WB) I-80 to southbound (SB) I-880, as it crosses below the WB and eastbound (EB) I-580 overcrossings. The third location is along the connector from WB I-80 to EB I-580 as it crosses below the connector from WB I-580 to WB I-80. The existing vertical clearance at these three locations does not meet the current Caltrans standard of 16 feet 6 inches and impedes the safe and efficient movement of oversized vehicles and loads through the Maze. The project is proposed to increase the vertical clearance of the structures in the Maze to allow for more efficient travel of oversized vehicles.
    (Source: MacArthur Maze Vertical Clearance Project, Initial Study with Proposed Negative Declaration/Environmental Assessment, January 2019)

    The alternatives are Alternative A: Bridge Lowering, Alternative B: Bridge Raising, Alternative C: Partial Bridge Replacement, Alternative D: Partial Deck Reconstruction, and the No-Build Alternative. The project proposes to increase the vertical clearances at three locations in the MacArthur Maze interchange to the current Caltrans standard of 16 feet 6 inches in order to allow for freight and oversized vehicles to travel through these major connectors. At present, the connector from WB I-80 to EB I-580 has 14 feet 9 inches of vertical clearance as it passes under the WB I-580 to WB I-80 connector. The connector from WB I-80 to SB I-880 has a vertical clearance of 15 feet 3 inches as it passes under the WB I-580 to WB I-80 connector, and a vertical clearance of 15 feet 6 inches as it passes under the EB I-80 to EB I-580 connector. Currently, The WB I-80 to SB I-880 connector is a two-lane freeway built in 1998 with 4-foot-wide left and right shoulders. The WB I580 to WB I-80 connector is a three-lane freeway built in 1935 and widened in 2006 with 3-footwide left and right shoulders. The EB I-80 to EB I-580 connector is a three-lane freeway built in 1955 and widened in 1962 with 2-foot-wide left and right shoulders.

    • Alternative A consists of lowering the WB I-80 to EB I-580 connector and the WB I-80 to SB I-880 connectors. The WB I-80 to EB I-580 connector currently has a vertical clearance of 14 feet 9 inches below the WB I-580 to WB I-80 connector. Under this alternative, the WB I-80 to EB I-580 connector would be lowered 1 foot 9 inches to achieve the Caltrans standard clearance of 16 feet 6 inches. The segment of this connector that would need to be lowered is approximately 665 feet long. The connector from WB I-80 to SB I-880 has a vertical clearance of 15 feet 3 inches below the WB I-580 to WB I-80 connector. Under this alternative, the WB I-80 to SB I-880 would be lowered 1 foot 3 inches to achieve the clearance standard. This same connector also has a vertical clearance of 15 feet 6 inches below the EB I-80 to EB I-580 connector and would need to be lowered 1 foot to achieve the Caltrans clearance standard. The segment of this connector that would need to be lowered is approximately 1,515 feet long. The WB I-80 to SB I-880 connector would need to be lowered in both locations simultaneously. For this alternative the connector dimensions would not change as the structure is not being rebuilt
    • Alternative B consists of raising the EB I-80 to EB I-580 connector and the WB I-580 to WB I-80 connector. The EB I-80 to EB I-580 connector currently has a vertical clearance of 15 feet 6 inches above the WB I-80 to SB I-880 connector and would need to be raised 1 foot to achieve the Caltrans clearance standard of 16 feet 6 inches. The segment of this connector that would need to be raised is approximately 790 feet long. The WB I-580 to WB I-80 connector currently has a vertical clearance of 14 feet 9 inches above the WB I-80 to EB I-580 connector and would be raised 1 foot 9 inches to achieve the Caltrans clearance standard. The WB I-580 to WB I-80 connector also has a vertical clearance of 15 feet 3 inches above the WB I-80 to SB I-880 connector and would need to be raised 1 foot 3 inches to achieve the Caltrans clearance standard. This segment of the connector that would need to be raised is approximately 800 feet long. Both connectors would be slowly raised until the desired clearance is achieved. The existing deck of this connector would be repaved under this alternative. For this alternative the connector dimensions would not change as the structure is not being rebuilt.
    • Alternative C consists of partially replacing and realigning the EB I-80 to EB I-580 connector and the WB I-580 to WB I-80 connector . The EB I-80 to EB I-580 connector currently has a vertical clearance of 15 feet 6 inches above the WB I-80 to SB I-880 connector. Approximately 2,000 linear feet of this connector would be rebuilt to achieve the Caltrans clearance standard of 16 feet 6 inches. The WB I-580 to WB I-80 connector currently has a vertical clearance of 14 feet 9 inches above the WB I-80 to EB I-580 connector and a vertical clearance of 15 feet 3 inches above the WB I-80 to SB I-880 connector. Approximately 2,800 linear feet of this connector would be rebuilt to achieve the Caltrans clearance standard. The rebuilt connectors would each be 60 feet wide and would consist of three 12-foot-wide lanes, two 10-foot-wide shoulders, and two 2-foot-wide bridge railings. Rebuilding the connectors would result in 1.22 acres of additional impervious surface compared to existing conditions. The design, color, and aesthetic treatment for the new connectors and support columns would match the existing connectors and columns so as to be visually compatible and consistent with the existing structures.
    • Alternative D consists of partially reconstructing the bridge decks of the EB I-80 to EB I-580 connector and the WB I-580 to WB I-80 connector. The EB I-80 to EB I-580 connector currently has a vertical clearance of 15 feet 6 inches above the WB I-80 to SB I-880 connector. The EB I-80 to EB I-580 connector bridge deck is currently 4 feet 6 inches thick. Approximately 160 linear feet of the EB I-80 to EB I-580 connector bridge deck would be reconstructed to reduce the thickness of the deck to 3 feet 6 inches to achieve the Caltrans clearance standard of 16 feet 6 inches. The WB I-580 to WB I-80 connector currently has a vertical clearance of 14 feet 9 inches above the WB I-80 to EB I-580 connector and a vertical clearance of 15 feet 3 inches above the WB I-80 to SB I-880 connector. The deck of the WB I-580 to WB I-80 connector is also currently 4 feet 6 inches thick. To achieve the Caltrans clearance standard, the existing profile grade would be raised approximately 9 inches. Additionally, the thickness of the deck would be reduced from 4 feet 6 inches to 3 feet 6 inches. Approximately 293 linear feet of the bridge deck of this connector would be reconstructed to achieve the Caltrans clearance standard. For this alternative the connector width would not change.

    In April 2019, it was reported that a Caltrans plan to rebuild portions of the MacArthur Maze to accommodate larger trucks has hit a roadblock in the form of angry local officials and community groups who say the agency failed to tell them the project was coming and performed only a cursory study of its potentially far-reaching environmental effects. Caltrans announced in mid-April 2019 that it is "pausing" its planning for the project, a decision that came after hearing from Oakland and Emeryville officials and others who are questioning whether the project is even necessary. Local communities say that Caltrans' preliminary study of the project, which could lead to partial closure of parts of the Maze and shunt traffic onto streets in Oakland and Emeryville, fails to analyze a wide range of predictable impacts on traffic, air quality, pedestrian and cyclist safety, and local businesses. West Oakland, where Caltrans suggests many of the potentially detoured vehicles would be routed, already suffers disproportionate pollution impacts from highway, railroad and cargo ship traffic. Opponents note that the agency, which has suggested that high-load trucks are being diverted around the Maze to avoid the lower-than-standard overpasses there, presented no data on how many trucks might be involved or evidence that trucks have been striking the overpasses. The agency also conceded there are no structural concerns with the Maze that would require the proposed work. Neither the Port of Oakland nor the California Trucking Association were aware of the project, and it was not something they asked for. Further, the Caltrans proposal runs counter to a new state law, AB 617, that has created a new plan for cleaning up an area of the city long burdened by excessive pollution.
    (Source: KQED, 4/24/2019)

    Naming Naming

    W E (Brownie) Brown FreewayThe portion of this route between Route 5 and Route 205 (~ SJ 0.08 to ALA 0.317R) is named the "William Elton 'Brownie' Brown Freeway" (signed as "W E "Brownie" Brown Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 74, Chapter 127, in 1985. William Elton "Brownie" Brown, (1912-1995), a lifetime resident of Tracy, served for 6 years as the President of the Highway 33 Association, and was instrumental in having I-5 located on the far west side of the San Joaquin valley, thus saving valuable farm land.
    (Image source: AARoads)

    CHP Officer John P. Miller Memorial HighwayThe portion of this route from North Flynn Road in Livermore to Airway Boulevard (ALA 6.00 WB to ALA 14.98 EB) is named the "CHP Officer John P. Miller Memorial Highway" It was named in memory of California Highway Patrol (CHP) Officer John Paul Miller. Born on January 29, 1975, to Larry and Caroline Miller, in Stockton, California, Officer Miller graduated from Linden High School in Linden, California, in 1994, and attended San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton, California, where he was a respected athlete and earned his Associate of Arts degree. Officer Miller was employed by Cherokee Freight Line of Stockton as a mechanic and delivery driver prior to becoming a California Highway Patrol Officer. Officer Miller was married to his best friend, Stephanie Bianchi, on July 21, 2001, and had two wonderful children, Chandler on March 18, 2003, and Reese on March 14, 2005. Officer Miller continued his education by attending California State University, Sacramento and the University of Phoenix where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Business Administration in 2004. Officer Miller entered the California Highway Patrol Academy on September 18, 2006, and upon graduation, was assigned to the Dublin Area Office in April 2007, serving the Dublin area for seven months. On November 16, 2007, Officer Miller was killed in the line of duty while he was attempting to apprehend a drunk driver in the Livermore Valley. As Officer Miller was driving south on North Livermore Avenue, north of I-580, he was involved in a patrol car collision causing fatal injuries. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 78, Resolution Chapter 110, on 9/23/2009.
    (Image source: CHP Dublin on Facebook; Calif. Assn. of Highway Patrolmen)

    Arthur H. Breed Jr. FreewayThe portion of this route between Livermore and Castro Valley (~ ALA R8.197 to ALA R33.444) is named the "Arthur H. Breed Jr. Freeway". Elected to both the California Assembly and Senate between 1935 and 1959, Arthur J. Breed, Jr., was a tireless advocate for the development of a high quality highway system in California. This section was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 5, Chapter 73 in 1983.
    (Image source: Google Streetview; Online Archive of California)

    Sergeant Daniel Sakai Memorial HighwayThe portion of this route between East Castro Valley Boulevard and Strobridge Avenue (~ ALA R27.062 to ALA 30.37) is named the "Sergeant Daniel Sakai Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Daniel Sakai of Castro Valley. Born in April 1973, he grew up in Big Bear in San Bernardino County, where he developed a love for everything outdoors. Daniel Sakai moved to the San Francisco Bay Area to attend the University of California at Berkeley, where he received a degree in 1996 in forestry and natural resources and also worked as a community service officer. After graduating from the university, Daniel Sakai spent a year in Japan teaching English. Daniel Sakai attended the Oakland Police Department Academy, where he met his soulmate and future wife, Jennifer. Daniel Sakai quickly rose to the rank of sergeant of police and served the Oakland Police Department in various roles, including as a patrol officer, canine handler, patrol rifle and academy firearms instructor, and special weapons and tactics (SWAT) team member. Daniel Sakai was described as a "special young man who was clearly a born leader. He was committed to public service and making a difference in other people's lives". He was also described as a "person that everyone looked up to and wanted to be. He had the highest ethics". On March 21, 2009, Sergeant Daniel Sakai was killed, along with another SWAT team member, Sergeant Ervin Romans, when the SWAT team attempted to apprehend a suspect that had earlier in the day shot and killed Sergeant Mark Dunakin and mortally wounded Officer John Hege, both of the Oakland Police Department, during a traffic stop. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 79, Resolution Chapter 111, on 9/23/2009.
    (Image source: East Bay Times; East Bay Times)

    MacArthur Fwy AwardThe portion of this route from Route 238 in Hayward/Castro Valley to the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge distribution structure (a/k/a "the Maze") in Oakland (Route 80/Route 580/Route 880 interchange) (~ ALA R30.967 to ALA 46.487R) is named the "MacArthur Freeway". It is named for General Douglas MacArthur of WW II and the Korean War, as well as for MacArthur Boulevard which the freeway follows and was named for the general in the 1950's. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 27, Chapter 156, in 1968. Douglas MacArthur (1880-1964) was a brilliant and controversial five-star U.S. Army General. Strongly dedicated to country and duty, and gifted with superior command ability, MacArthur's military service included important command assignments in the both World Wars and the Korean War. During World War One, MacArthur commanded the 42nd "Rainbow" Division of the Allied Expeditionary Force in France. After the War, MacArthur was superintendant of West Point from 1919-1922. In January of 1930 he was promoted to full General, 4 stars and named the U.S. Army's Chief of Staff. MacArthur retired from the Army in 1937, one year after the President of the Phillipines, Manuel Quezon, appointed him Field Marshall of the Phillipine Army. In 1941 MacArthur was recalled to active duty as the U.S. prepared to enter World War Two. By 1942 MacArthur was Supreme Allied Commander of the Southwest Pacific theater. In January of 1945, MacArthur was promoted to the rank of five star General. On September 2, 1945 on board the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, MacArthur accepted Japan's unconditional surrender. In June 1950, with the beginning of the Korean War, MacArthur was appointed the Supreme United Nations commander. However, on April 11, 1951 he was relieved of his command by President Truman. This tunnel had been known as the "Presidio Tunnel".
    (Source: Information on General MacArthur from http://members.tripod.com/~DARTO/macarthur/macarthur.html; Image Source: Corco Highways; Biography.Com; Read the Plaque)

    • In 1966, the MacArthur Freeway portion of I-580 in Oakland was awarded a 1966 Special Award as the Most Beautiful Urban Highway in the US by Nationwide Parade Magazine. The plaque is located on Grand in Oakland near the theatre.

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Sergeant Mark Dunakin, Sergeant Ervin Romans,  Sergeant Daniel Sakai, and Officer John Hege Memorial BridgeThe Keller Avenue Bridge (Bridge 33-0340, ALA R037.80) that crosses I-580 in the City of Oakland is officially named the “Sergeant Mark Dunakin, Sergeant Ervin Romans, and Officer John Hege Memorial Bridge” (which is actually signed as the “Sergeant Mark Dunakin, Sergeant Ervin Romans,  Sergeant Daniel Sakai, and Officer John Hege Memorial Bridge”, adding Sakai, who already had a freeway segment named after him). According to the naming resolution, this structure was named in honor of Sergeant Mark Dunakin, Sergeant Ervin Romans, and Officer John Hege, who proudly served the Oakland Police Department for 18 years, 13 years, and 10 years, respectively. Sergeant Dunakin began his career with the department in May 1991. During his career, he was assigned to several units of the department, including the Patrol Division, the Crime Prevention Unit, the Robbery Section, and the Homicide Unit. In 1999, Dunakin was promoted to the rank of Sergeant of Police. While serving in the Homicide Unit, Dunakin acted as one of the lead investigators of the "Nut Cases" gang, a group that terrorized Oakland in a 10-week crime wave in 2002 and 2003. Dunakin's tireless work paid off when the gang was successfully arrested. Sergeant Ervin Romans started his career with the Oakland Police Department in 1996. Romans' sense of duty and commitment to the department never wavered; in 1999, he received the Medal of Valor, the department's highest honor, for evacuating endangered residents from a fire in West Oakland. Romans' expertise and attention to detail served the City of Oakland well when he become a Departmental Range Master, a position in which he trained hundreds of officers in the ethical and proper use of firearms and less lethal weapons. In 2005, Romans was promoted to the rank of Sergeant of Police. As a sergeant, he supervised one of Oakland's crime reduction teams and served as the entry team leader on the department's Tactical Operations Team. Officer John Hege started his career with the department as a volunteer reserve police officer in 1993. He was hired as a full-time police officer in 1999. Upon graduating from the Oakland Police Academy, he was assigned to the Bureau of Field Operations/ After patrolling the streets of Oakland for 10 years, Hege fulfilled a lifelong dream when he was transferred to the Traffic Operations Section and assigned as a motorcycle officer. Hege gave his heart, soul, and a seemingly limitless amount of time to the Oakland Police Department, yet he always made time for his family and friends. Sergeant Dunakin, Sergeant Romans, and Officer Hege dedicated their lives to the pursuit of safety and justice; and on March 21, 2009, Sergeant Dunakin was shot and killed and Officer Hege was mortally wounded during a traffic stop. Efforts to apprehend the suspect resulted in the death of Sergeant Romans. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 146, 8/17/2010, Resolution Chapter 91.
    (Image source: KPIX 5; Daniel Michael Jennings: My Journey to Oakland)

    Note: It appears the signmakers added Sgt. Daniel Sakai to the list of names on the sign, although it wasn't in the resolution. Sakai had the segment of I-580 between East Castro Valley Boulevard and Strobridge Avenue (~ ALA R27.062 to ALA 30.37) already named after him. It was named in memory of Daniel Sakai of Castro Valley. As noted in that resolution, Sakai was born in April 1973, and grew up in Big Bear in San Bernardino County, where he developed a love for everything outdoors. Daniel Sakai moved to the San Francisco Bay Area to attend the University of California at Berkeley, where he received a degree in 1996 in forestry and natural resources and also worked as a community service officer. After graduating from the university, Daniel Sakai spent a year in Japan teaching English. Daniel Sakai attended the Oakland Police Department Academy, where he met his soulmate and future wife, Jennifer. Daniel Sakai quickly rose to the rank of sergeant of police and served the Oakland Police Department in various roles, including as a patrol officer, canine handler, patrol rifle and academy firearms instructor, and special weapons and tactics (SWAT) team member. Daniel Sakai was described as a "special young man who was clearly a born leader. He was committed to public service and making a difference in other people's lives". He was also described as a "person that everyone looked up to and wanted to be. He had the highest ethics". On March 21, 2009, Sergeant Daniel Sakai was killed, along with another SWAT team member, Sergeant Ervin Romans, when the SWAT team attempted to apprehend a suspect that had earlier in the day shot and killed Sergeant Mark Dunakin and mortally wounded Officer John Hege, both of the Oakland Police Department, during a traffic stop.

    Oakland Police Officer James Williams, Jr.The I-580 overpass at 38th Street in Oakland (actually, McArthurs Street Separation, Bridge 32-0281, ALA 045.99) is named the "Officer James Williams Memorial Overpass". This overpass is named in memory of Oakland Police Officer James Williams, Jr., who died in the line of duty on January 10, 1999. The incident started when a shotgun was discarded onto the freeway by suspects who were fleeing from the police. Officer Williams was helping to locate the weapon and was assisting in its recovery when a sniper began firing at the responding officers from the southwest side of the 38th Avenue I-580 overpass in Oakland. Officer Williams was hit by the sniper's bullets and died of those injuries. Officer Williams had a wife, Sabrina, and three small children: ten-year-old Alexander, five-year-old Aaron, and four-year-old Ariana. He was formerly a police officer in New Orleans, had just graduated from the police academy and was still in training at the time of his death. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 82, Chapter 12, filed 1/28/2000.
    (Image source: SFGate)

    Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

    Double Fine Zones Double Fine Zones

    Although not specifically on Route 580, AB 348, Chaptered 9/21/2011 (Statute Chapter 290) designated (until January 1, 2017) the segment of county highway known as Vasco Road, between the Route 580 junction in Alameda County and the Walnut Boulevard intersection in Contra Costa County, as a Safety Enhancement-Double Fine Zone upon the approval of the boards of supervisors of Alameda County and Contra Costa County.

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.8] From Route 5 southwest of Vernalis to Route 80.

    National Trails National Trails

    De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.


    Lincoln Highway Sign This was part of the Lincoln Highway.

    Victory Highway Sign This portion of this segment from I-80 (former US 50) to I-205 was part of the coast-to-coast "Victory Highway".

    Interstate Submissions Interstate Submissions

    Approved as chargeable Interstate on 7/7/1947, later adjusted in 1955 and 1957. In August 1957, this was tentatively approved as I-5W. In November 1957, the designation I-72 was proposed as part of the first attempt to give urban routes numbers (there were no 3-digit routes at the time). The proposal went back to I-5W in August 1958, and it was finally approved as I-5W, and later renumbered as I-580.

    In August 1958, the designation I-580 was proposed by the department for what is now I-680.


  2. Rte 580 Seg 2From Route 80 near Albany to Route 101 near San Rafael via the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1984, Chapter 409 this segment was added by transfer from Route 17. The segment was originally submitted (1983) to have been I-180; however, state numbering rules changed it to be part of I-580. Before the transfer in 1984, the section from the junction of I-80 and I-580 ("McArthur Freeway" or "the Maze") to the interchange at Hoffman Blvd (approximately 3 miles), was signed as I-80 and Route 17.

    Before the completion of the freeway portion between the Hoffman Blvd/I-80 Interchange to the foot of the San Rafael Bridge, the Route 17 routing was as follows: Hoffman Blvd, to Cutting Blvd, to Standard Ave, and then to the foot of the Richmond-San Rafael bridge. This was signed as "Temporary I-580" until construction of the freeway I-580 was completed. Prior to 1959, this segment was part of LRN 69 between US 101 and US 40. It wasn't until 1959 that Route 17 was extended over the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge to meet US 101.

    The Richmond-San Rafael Bridge is a double deck truss bridge spanning 5.5 miles with a maximum clearance of 185 feet. The Richmond-San Rafael Bridge connects Richmond in Contra Costa County and San Rafael in Marin County. Construction on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge started in 1953 and was completed by 1956.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    The most recent freeway routing of I-580 appears to have been LRN 257, defined in 1959. A previous routing was LRN 69, and the San Pablo surface street routing was LRN 114. Both LRN 69 and LRN 114 were defined in 1933. This was cosigned US 40/US 50.

    Status Status

    Note: I-580 is one of five routes in California that have "backwards" post miles: that is, the postmiles go from East to West, instead of the normal West to East. This is an artifact of the original segment of the route being S to N, and then being expanded to an E to W route.

    Richmond-San Rafael Bridge to Richmond

    In December 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Richmond along Route 580 on Marina Bay Parkway, consisting of collateral facilities. (04-CC-580-PM R2.9)

    In August 2012, the CTC approved SHOPP funding of $18,459,000 on I-580 PM 5.5/6.1 near Richmond, at Scofield Avenue (Bridge #28-140L/R) and at Western Drive (Bridge #28-141R). Outcome/Output: Rehabilitate three bridges by replacing bridge decks to maintain structure integrity and reduce the risk to lives and properties.

    In December 2019, it was reported that state Assemblyman Marc Levine has started a new website — TheRichmondBridge.com — and social media campaign centered on replacing the 63-year-old bridge. The site provides a forum for residents to voice their views and submit suggestions. Terry Schanz, Levine’s chief of staff, said while the planning efforts are in their nascent stages, it’s important to get a head start on what will surely be a long and costly process. “We shouldn’t be waiting until an unforeseen disaster or another failure to start talking about a future bridge,” Schanz said. Some topics Levine is seeking the public’s input on include whether to increase vehicle traffic capacity, whether to include transit amenities such as rail service or rapid bus lanes, installation of a permanent pedestrian and bicycle lane and suggestions on the bridge design. Maintenance of the bridge may reach nearly $900 million in the next decade, Schanz said. Receiving input now will help inform Levine as the state considers how it should spend its transportation dollars as efficiently as possible, he said. Cost estimates on replacing the bridge have varied, with Caltrans estimating an $8.2 billion price tag in a recent proposal to the Metropolitan Transportation Commission.
    (Source: $$ San Jose Mercury News, 12/4/2019)

    Richmond-San Rafael Bridge (~ CC 6.235 to MRN 2.499)

    In April 2013, it was reported that deck replacement was about to begin on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge. The project will (a) Replace the concrete decks for three bridges; (b) refresh the eastbound and westbound Scofield Avenue Bridge Undercrossings; (c) refresh the Westbound Western Drive Bridge Undercrossing that approaches the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge Toll Plaza; (d) Strengthen structural steel bridge members; (e) Re-paint structural steel for corrosion protection; and (f) Replace bridge deck joints and seals.

    Richmond-San Rafael Bridge - Third Lane

    In September 2014, it was reported that BATA was considering a proposal to restore a third lane to the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge. Specifically, the BATA approved a contract with HNTB Corp. for up to $3 million to provide design services regarding the third lane. A bike path on the upper deck is also part of the design. Another lane would mean more traffic flowing onto the 4.2-mile span, helping clear the congestion on US 101 and Sir Francis Drake Boulevard. It would only be used for eastbound vehicle traffic during evening peak periods. No construction would be involved, because there were originally three lanes on each deck. Caltrans closed one lane in each direction for emergencies and maintenance. In the mid-1970s, the lane was used for a pipe that was stretched across the bridge to carry water from Contra Costa to parched Marin during the drought. The third lane idea has been discussed for years, but something is finally happening thanks to the transportation commission and the Transportation Authority of Marin. There are two elements to the design project. One is to provide an additional travel lane eastbound from the Sir Francis Drake onramp from San Quentin to the Marine Street offramp in Richmond. This mostly involves converting the right shoulder of the lower deck of the bridge to a lane . The second element is more complicated, and would use the right-hand shoulder on the upper deck for bidirectional bicyclist and pedestrian crossings. This would require the installation of a movable median barrier. It also requires developing a way to provide cyclists access from the east side of the bridge.
    (Source: Marin IJ, 9/21/2014)

    In June 2015, it was reported that plans to add an additional commuter lane and a bike-pedestrian path on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge are moving forward. The $74 million improvement project would be fully funded with Bay Area Toll Authority toll funds. Right now, the plan includes building a concrete barrier system on the upper deck of the span for a bicycle and pedestrian pathway. On the lower deck, the existing shoulder would be converted to a commuter lane, expected to relieve traffic congestion during peak periods. In August 2015, it was reported that Assembly Man Marc Levine believes that third eastbound lane on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge should be opened by the end of September 2015 at the latest, not in 2017 as Caltrans has proposed. He has introduced a bill, AB9, in an attempt to push the agency into action. Levine contends opening the third lane — which now is a shoulder — is a simple fix: just paint in a new lane. The bridge initially had three lanes when it opened in 1956, but when drought hit in 1977 a lane was closed so a pipeline could be laid across the span to bring water to Marin. When the pipeline was removed in 1978, the lane was converted to a shoulder given light traffic. “The lane is there, they are just pretending it’s a shoulder,” Levine said, adding the lane could be opened on a “temporary” basis until a permanent fix is achieved. Caltrans officials said simply painting in a new lane is not as easy as it sounds. Caltrans noted the shoulder reduces in width from 10 feet on the bridge to just over 2 feet on land in Richmond, which would create a bottleneck for cars. Caltrans also says the existing shoulder is currently used as a bike path as it comes off the bridge. That use would not be possible if the shoulder is widened for vehicle use. They are also working over water, and now have to do the required environmental planning. In October 2015, it was reported that the estimated completion was October 2017.
    (Source: KCBS, 6/24/2015, MarinI-J, 8/18/2015; SFGate, 10/31/2015)

    On October 10, 2015, the Governor signed AB 157 (Chapter 393, Statues of 2015). This bill, if the CTC and Caltrans develop a project to open the third lane on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge to automobile traffic on the eastbound level and to bicycle traffic on the westbound level, would authorize the lead agency to complete the design work for the project simultaneously with the environmental review conducted pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act.

    In July 2016, it was reported that a final design to open a third eastbound lane on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge to ease traffic has gone to Caltrans, clearing the way for a projected December 2017 opening. In the coming years the bridge will undergo major changes with the addition of a third vehicle travel lane on its lower deck and a bike lane on top. The two projects have a $74 million price tag. A contract for the project could be awarded as soon as September, with construction starting in October. But issues with moving utilities could cause delays. While opening the lane may sound simple, officials note a state and federal rules environmental analysis is required. In addition, new signs will have to go on the span and a retaining wall on the Contra Costa side must be set back to create added space for cars heading off the span. The added eastbound car lane would likely be open only during commute hours, allowing Caltrans to retain a shoulder for maintenance work during other times of the day. A second bridge project would bring a 10-foot-wide lane on the north side of the roadway on the top deck of the span. Bicyclists and pedestrians traveling east and west would use the space that would be separated from car traffic by a movable median barrier. It would open in March 2018 under the current plan. A movable barrier is needed to allow Caltrans to perform maintenance work on the span. The bridge initially had three lanes when it opened in 1956, but when drought hit in 1977 a lane on the top deck was closed so a pipeline could be laid across the span to bring water to Marin. When the pipeline was removed in 1978, the top and lower deck lanes were converted to shoulders because of light traffic. The Richmond-San Rafael is the third least-used of the Bay Area spans, ahead only of the Dumbarton and Antioch bridges. But between 2011 and 2016, traffic has increased about 13 percent as the economy has rebounded. The price tag for the lane is $30 million. The bike path is $29 million, and there is a $15 million contingency. Once built, the new configurations would be deemed a four-year pilot project and would be analyzed after that time.
    (Source: Marin I-J, 7/13/2016)

    In August 2016, it was reported that state officials finalized project approval and certified environmental documentation for the $73 million project spearheaded by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), Caltrans, the Transportation Authority of Marin (TAM) and the Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA). State approval clears the way for MTC this week to advertise a trio of construction contracts and keeps the $73 million initiative on track to begin construction this October, with the third eastbound lane slated to open in October 2017. The third lane on eastbound I-580 will extend from the Sir Francis Drake Blvd. on-ramp in Marin County to the Point Richmond exit in Contra Costa County. Project elements include reconfiguring the Main Street on-ramp from the San Quentin Village area of Marin County with a retaining wall to improve the traffic merge with the new third eastbound lane; replacing pavement on both the west and east sides of the bridge to accommodate heavier traffic loads; relocating a retaining wall on the south side of I-580 in Richmond to achieve safe sight distances for vehicles traveling in the new right lane; constructing a barrier-separated bicycle/pedestrian path on the north side of I-580 from Castro Street in Richmond to Point Molate; and adapting the right shoulder of the westbound Richmond-San Rafael Bridge deck for a bike/ped path that will become part of the Bay Trail network. To separate bicyclists and pedestrians from westbound traffic on the upper deck of the bridge, a moveable concrete barrier will be installed on the span. This will allow Caltrans to conduct bridge maintenance work during short closures of the path. The 10-foot-wide path will comply with Americans with Disabilities Act standards.
    (Source: Yahoo! Finance, 8/23/2016)

    In September 2016, it was reported that a final design to open a third eastbound lane on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge has been approved by Caltrans, clearing the way for a project to start once a builder is found. In addition to a third vehicle travel lane on its lower deck, a bike lane will go on top. The two projects have a $74 million price tag. While opening the lane may sound simple, officials note a state and federal rules environmental analysis is required. In addition, new signs will have to go on the span and a retaining wall on the Contra Costa side must be set back to create added space for cars heading off the span. The added eastbound car lane would likely be open only during commute hours, allowing Caltrans to retain a shoulder for maintenance work during other times of the day. Other project elements in Marin include reconfiguring the Main Street onramp from the San Quentin Village area with a retaining wall to improve the traffic merge with the new lane, and replacing pavement on the bridge approaches to accommodate heavier traffic loads, according to officials. In later September, it was reported that a key bay protection agency also gave its approval for the addition of an eastbound, third traffic lane on the lower deck and a bike lane on the upper deck of the span. The Bay Conservation and Development Commission reviews all projects that are built in or over the bay and its approval was needed to allow the commute relief plan to move forward.
    (Source: Marin I-J, 9/6/2016, 9/17/2016)

    In November 2016, it was reported that the Metropolitan Transportation Commission’s Bay Area Toll Authority Oversight Committee approved a $27.2 million contract to Berkeley-based O.C. Jones and Sons Inc. in mid-November to construct the third lane and associated work. It was one of five bids submitted. The committee also approved a $5.6 million contingency fund to cover any changes in the work that may be necessary. The third travel lane is slated for completion within 200 working days of the start of construction, likely Fall 2017.
    (Source: Marin I-J, 11/11/2016)

    In January 2017, it was reported that work on a project to create a third eastbound lane on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge to ease traffic has started and could be finished by fall 2017. The Metropolitan Transportation Commission approved a $27.2 million contract to Berkeley-based O.C. Jones and Sons Inc. to construct the third lane and associated work and that began the first week of January 2017. Early phases of the project will include tree removal work near San Quentin, and much of the initial work is occurring on the Contra Costa side, where a retaining wall and a bike lane will be moved to accommodate the third lane. Tree removal will also occur in that county as well. All trees will be replaced. The added eastbound car lane only will be open during commute hours, allowing Caltrans to retain a shoulder for maintenance work during other times of the day. Other project elements in Marin include reconfiguring the Main Street onramp from the San Quentin Village area with a retaining wall to improve the traffic merge with the new lane, and replacing pavement on the bridge approaches to accommodate heavier traffic loads, according to officials. A second bridge project would bring a 10-foot-wide lane on the north side of the roadway on the upper deck of the span. Bicyclists and pedestrians traveling east and west would use the space that would be separated from car traffic by a movable median barrier. The bike lane, a four-year experiment, will be separated from traffic by a $25 million movable barrier like the one separating the traffic lanes on the Golden Gate Bridge. That expensive movable barrier comes with a $1 million mover. They’ll have to rev up the mover every once in a while — to keep it in shape — and use it to move the movable barrier, so it won’t get too stiff. A movable barrier is needed to allow Caltrans to perform maintenance work on the span. So, once a month, the 4.5-mile barrier will be shifted and then put back in place, just to keep everything in working condition. It would open in March 2018 under the current plan. January uncovered one additional complication: Hummingbirds! A hummingbird nest was found on the Richmond side of the project, in one of about two dozen trees that were to be removed to widen the right-of-way on I-580, a half mile past the toll plaza. Construction workers built a rough fence around the tree, and it will stay in place until the egg they found in the nest hatches. The bridge initially had three lanes when it opened in 1956, but when drought hit in 1977 a lane on the top deck was closed so a pipeline could be placed across the span to bring water to Marin. When the pipeline was removed in 1978, the top and lower deck lanes were converted to shoulders because of light traffic.
    (Source: Marin I-J, 1/16/2017; SFChronicle, 1/30/2017)

    In July 2017, it was reported that Commuters might have to wait until March 2018 to see that third lane on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge open up. In January, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission approved a $27.2 million contract with Berkeley-based O.C. Jones and Sons Inc. to construct the third lane and associated work with a goal of opening the lane by November. But one element of the work — pushing a retaining wall on the Richmond side back 15 feet to create sight lines for drivers in a third lane — is proving more difficult than originally thought as crews carve away a hillside. The project is a lot more than just restriping. Electrical work needed to hang signs over the third lane has started. Signs will show a green arrow or red “X” to indicate whether the lane is open. Once open, the added eastbound car lane only will be available during commute hours, allowing Caltrans to retain a shoulder for maintenance work during other times of the day.
    (Source: Mercury News, 7/11/2017)

    In January 2018, it was reported that by April 2018, drivers weary of the eastbound crawl to and across the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge every evening should get relief with the addition of a new traffic lane. But bicyclists, who were supposed to get their own path on the upper deck at the same time, will have to wait, perhaps up to a year, and they might have to surrender the path to cars for a few hours each weekday morning. In 2015, the Bay Area Toll Authority, Caltrans and Marin and Contra Costa transportation agencies agreed to a $74 million project that would put the double-deck bridge’s wide shoulders to use. The lower deck, which carries eastbound traffic, would get a third lane of traffic while the upper deck would get a bike and pedestrian lane protected by a barrier that would be movable to permit critical maintenance. The additional lane for cars and trucks during peak afternoon and evening commute times will open by April. The plan is to open the lane only from 2 to 7 p.m. each weekday, though operators in Caltrans’ Oakland traffic control center will monitor cameras and lengthen the hours when it’s appropriate. A red X or a green arrow will be displayed over the lane to let drivers know when they can travel on it. For the time being, construction crews are completing work on the lane, including wiring and testing the network of cameras and inspecting cracks atop a retaining wall above the Richmond end of the bridge. Traffic has swelled by about 13 percent over the past five years, and backups have become common, especially with eastbound traffic in the evening. Morning congestion, heading west, has also worsened. So Marin transportation officials went to regional planners in January 2018 to consider using the movable barrier to transform the bike path to a car lane in the mornings to ease the backup. The Toll Authority is still committed to opening both the third lane and the bike lane. Both are experimental projects that have to be evaluated after four years. While the third lane of traffic is expected to open by April, the bike and pedestrian path is projected to open late this year or in early 2019. But changes could come to the bike path. The authority will study what it would cost, how much work would be involved and how long it would take for a project in which bikes and cars share the upper deck of the bridge.
    (Source: SF Chronicle, 1/27/2018)

    In March 2018, it was reported that the Bay Area Toll Authority’s Oversight Committee authorized spending $100,000 to study whether adding an additional WB traffic lane on the upper deck is feasible and what it would take to accomplish the work. A third traffic lane on the bridge on the bottom, eastbound deck, is set to open in April 2018 at a cost of $27 million. It’s designed to ease evening commute traffic. A third lane on the north side of the upper deck coming into Marin has been envisioned for bicyclists and pedestrians, separated from car traffic by a movable median barrier. That work has just started. However, Marin Supervisor Damon Connolly, who sits on the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and the Bay Area Toll Authority — the agencies behind the lane plan — said in January the space should also be used for westbound vehicles.
    (Source: Marin I-J, 3/9/2018)

    In April 2018, it was reported that the long-awaited eastbound third lane is planned to open April 20, 2018. Drivers still face stop lights along Sir Francis Drake Boulevard on the way to the span, but those signals have been modified to allow for better traffic flow. Marin and other Bay Area voters will be asked to approve a phased $3 toll increase in June 2018. Money from toll hikes would be earmarked to finance transportation expansion projects, including a connector between northbound US 101 and I-580 to the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge. But that project is years away and it’s hoped by transportation officials that the new traffic lane will provide some relief. The added lane will likely be available from 2 to 7 p.m. every day of the week, allowing Caltrans to retain a shoulder for maintenance work during other times of the day. Twenty overhead signs on the span will show a green arrow or red “X” to indicate whether the lane is open and a yellow “X” and arrow during the transition. Cameras to watch traffic on the span also have been added. Drivers should not be in the lane during off hours and face citations from the California Highway Patrol if they are caught.
    (Source: East Bay Times, 4/16/2018)

    In July 2018, it was reported that months before a planned bikeway on the upper level of the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge is scheduled to open, Bay Area transit officials and Marin County politicians are talking about taking the separated bike lane away during peak demand periods. Earlier in 2018, Marin County Supervisor Damon Connolly, who sits on the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and the Bay Area Toll Authority, brought up the possibility of converting the soon-to-be bikeway — previously a highway shoulder — into another vehicle lane during rush hour to help alleviate the hellish traffic congestion that plagues the bridge. In early March 2018, the commission's Bay Area Toll Authority Oversight Committee decided to study the idea and allocated $100,000 to the task. The bike and pedestrian pathway, a piece of infrastructure that cycling and walking advocates have anticipated for decades, is the second part of a four-year pilot project run by the Bay Area Toll Authority. The first phase of the pilot project was the addition earlier in 2018 of a third lane of vehicular traffic on the lower-level eastbound deck of the bridge. That project cost $53 million. The pilot aims to assess possible strategies for improving the Bay Area's transportation infrastructure. The 10-foot cycling-walking pathway is still set to open in early 2019, and the study is analyzing a scenario that would allow cyclists to continue using the bridge the majority of the time. Still, the oversight committee's willingness to consider excluding bicycles during commute hours worries some cycling advocates. They say granting vehicles access to the lane — even if only during peak commute times — interferes with the state-mandated project of a trail around the San Francisco Bay. The westbound bikeway is projected to cost about $28 million to install. The added car lane cost $53 million. Legislation enacted nearly 30 years ago requires the Association of Bay Area Governments to create and maintain a way for people to walk and ride bicycles around San Francisco Bay. Now, the San Francisco Bay Trail is mostly finished, with a few planned segments yet to be established. The long-awaited pathway across the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge will form a critical link in the trail.
    (Source: East Bay Express, 7/11/2018)

    In January 2019, it was reported that the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, or MTC, and its associated Bay Area Toll Authority intended for the new pedestrian-bike lane on the upper deck of the bridge to be a four-year pilot project. But the Transportation Authority of Marin is seeking to cut that trial period down to six months. Once the westbound bike lane opens, the Transportation Authority of Marin is requesting Caltrans and the toll authority collect data on how much it is used. The idea would be to open up the new bike lane to vehicle traffic only during the morning commute hours and then revert it back to a bike-pedestrian only path the rest of the day. The Transportation Authority of Marin states in its staff report that daily westbound traffic demand on the bridge has risen from 68,000 cars in 2013 to the current 82,000 cars. Peak delays in the morning commute are around 22 minutes or more, with that number expected to increase to at least 27 minutes by 2020, according to the authority. The authority states in a draft letter to the Bay Area Toll Authority that this increased congestion risks undermining its investments and plans to promote carpool, vanpools and other transit if a third lane is not added. In 2018, the MTC and Bay Area Toll Authority opened a third lane for eastbound commuters meant to relieve afternoon traffic congestion, which has been a great success. Westbound commuters have been calling for the same relief for some time. For westbound traffic, the emergency pullover lane is being converted to a bike and pedestrian path with a moveable barrier similar to that used on the Golden Gate Bridge. Work is ongoing by Caltrans and nearby agencies to accommodate this change. The project is expected to cost about $25 million, which is paid for using Bay Area Toll Authority toll bridge funds.
    (Source: Marin I-J, 1/22/2019)

    In February 2019, it was reported that the falling concrete on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge will delay opening the bicycle/pedestrian path. Contractors currently working on repairs to Richmond-San Rafael Bridge as a result of the falling concrete will remain for several months to make additional replacements to joints on the span’s upper deck. The added work means the opening of a bicycle/pedestrian path set for late spring will be delayed by at least two months, according to Caltrans. As of mid-February, crews were replacing the upper deck expansion joint responsible for the falling concrete and expect work to be finished by March 2. When that’s done, nearly identical work on 31 additional upper deck joints will start on March 4. To allow construction crews unfettered access to the joint repair sites, the installation of a four-mile long moveable barrier to separate bicyclists and pedestrians from auto traffic has been delayed. Once the barrier is installed, the bicycle/pedestrian path will follow in three to four weeks, Caltrans officials said. Inclement weather could extend the schedule of repairs.
    (Source: Napa Valley Register, 2/23/2019)

    In October 2019, it was reported that crews were starting construction to install the moveable concrete barrier that will separate the two westbound traffic lanes on the upper deck of the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge from a new bicycle/pedestrian path expected to open later in Fall 2019. The four-mile-long bridge path will connect to another new bicycle/pedestrian path that runs along the north side of I-580 in Richmond and is protected from freeway traffic by a permanent concrete barrier. Together, these bi-directional paths stretch for almost six miles from Castro Street in Richmond to East Francisco Blvd. in San Rafael, providing the first-ever route for bicyclists and pedestrians traveling between Marin County and the East Bay. These new paths are a key link in the planned 500-mile Bay Trail network. Both the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge barrier and a barrier-transfer machine (also known as a "zipper truck") were manufactured by, and will be installed by, Lindsay Transportation Solutions of Rio Vista, which also built and installed the roughly 2.5-mile-long moveable median barrier on the Golden Gate Bridge. Though conceptually similar to the 32-inch-tall Golden Gate Bridge barrier, each of the 3.28-foot-long segments of the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge barrier features a plastic attachment that raises its height to 42 inches to meet published standards for bicycle safety railings. The individual barrier sections weigh 1,575 pounds and feature rubber feet to prevent water from pooling at the barrier's base and to prevent damage to the concrete bridge deck. Once the barrier is fully installed, trained crews using the "zipper truck" will be able to quickly reposition it as necessary to allow crews working for Caltrans and the Bay Area Toll Authority (BATA) to complete bridge maintenance tasks during short closures of the bike/ped path. Performance of the new bike/ped path will be monitored and assessed continually as hard data becomes available on the use of the path by bicyclists and pedestrians, and operational adjustments will be made as needed. This evaluation will include a before-and-after study conducted by Caltrans and the University of California's Partners for Advanced Transportation Technology (PATH) program. BATA and Caltrans are now conducting a study of the bridge's load rating to evaluate the span's structural capacity for both current and future conditions. This study is slated for completion in the spring of 2020 and will include analysis of three westbound traffic lanes with the moveable barrier on the upper deck. TAM also has begun working on a corridor traffic analysis to identify improvements that may be needed on the Marin County side of the bridge to accommodate three lanes of westbound traffic across the span.
    (Source: PR News Wire/BATA, 10/1/2019)

    In November 2019, it was reported that the new bike and pedestrian path on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge has opened to the public. It’s 8 feet wide and 4 miles long, and it leads, depending on your point of view, either directly into the future, or directly to a grim prison on one side or to a pungent oil refinery on the other. The path was six years in the planning. It is a four-year “test project” to see if enough non-motorists use it. Motorists haven’t given up on dreams of their own to turn the bike lane into a third lane of traffic on the westbound upper deck, to go along with the new third traffic lane on the eastbound lower deck. Previously, the decks had two traffic lanes and one breakdown lane in each direction. Whether cyclists keep showing up will be closely watched by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and others who will decide on the path’s fate. The new path, with a blue line running down the middle, is separated from the two westbound traffic lanes by a row of gray traffic barriers. Getting across can take some doing. Wind and fog can challenge cyclists, and the undulating path requires them to climb from water level to heights of 185 and 135 feet. From either of the bike path’s end points near the Chevron refinery on the east and San Quentin prison on the west, considerably more pedaling is required to reach such traditional cycling hot spots as a park, a bakery or a coffee bar.
    (Source: SF Chronicle, 11/17/2019)

    Richmond-San Rafael Bridge - Concrete Chunks

    In February 2019, the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge over San Francisco Bay was shut down in both directions after football-sized chunks of concrete fell from the upper deck of the bridge onto the lower deck, authorities said. A driver called 911 around 10:30 a.m. on 2/6/2019 to report that pieces of concrete had struck a car, California Highway Patrol Officer Andrew Barclay said. The driver said the vehicle was damaged, but the traveler was on the way to the airport and kept on driving, Barclay said. Traffic was stopped in both directions after CHP officers saw that vibrations from vehicles on the upper deck were causing more chunks of concrete to fall onto the roadway below. It was likely that wear-and-tear caused the concrete to crack. The cracking occurred near an expansion joint that dates back to the bridge’s original 1956 construction. A heavy truck passing over the joint might have crushed the brittle and aged concrete near the antiquated joint, according to Caltrans District 4. Historically, there have been repeated problems with expansion and deck joints on the Richmond bridge, as well as other bridges with similar joints, said Andrew Fremier, the deputy executive director of operations for the Bay Area Toll Authority, which works with Caltrans to oversee maintenance of the Bay Area’s state-owned toll bridges. Holes popping up on the bridge prompted $50 million in emergency repairs in 2004, work that was added to the $795 million seismic retrofit, which included replacing 63 concrete deck sections and 700 expansion joints. In early 2006, just four months after the 2005 retrofit work was deemed complete, more holes in the concrete cropped up near joints on the bridge, prompting an additional $25 million in repairs. In the last five years, the toll authority has shelled out $46 million for various projects on the bridge, mostly joint repairs and painting, said John Goodwin, a spokesman for the authority. It’s also planning another $80 million in ongoing maintenance and replacement of the joints, along with other work, over the next 10 years. In the short term, Caltrans crews placed steel plates over the affected area, with plywood boards below the deck, to allow motorists to drive over the concrete without more pieces shaking loose and crashing onto the cars and trucks below. The concrete itself varies in thickness throughout the span but can be up to 10 inches-thick. It has a 3/4- to one-inch-thick protective coating that is periodically ground off and replaced. The coating is more durable than the concrete below and has grooves on it to provide better skid resistance and tire adhesion. Below the surface, however, sections of the concrete dates back to the original construction. It’s lightweight concrete, which makes it more prone to breaking off in small chunks.
    (Source: LA Times, 2/7/2019; EastBy Times, 2/8/2019)

    In later February, it was reported that permanent repairs to the bridge joint were delayed. Caltrans engineers made emergency fixes to an expandable joint on the bridge’s upper westbound deck to reopen all lanes Thursday evening. They decided overnight Saturday to swap out a temporary metal plate acting as a patch with a larger one to make for a smoother ride over the tolled east-west connector. Replacement of the joint — which expands or contracts from varying temperatures and weight loads — to ensure more chunks of concrete don’t break off was set to begin early this week. With heavy rain and strong winds expected, that work won’t start until at least Feb. 18. 2019. The anomaly was not cause for additional concern, according to the Bay Area Toll Authority, nor should there be worries among its daily 82,000 motorists about the bridge’s structural safety. The critical link between Marin and Contra Costa counties had an almost $800 million seismic retrofit in 2005, as well as a $74 million expansion to add a third lane on the lower deck that opened last year. In addition, the Bay Area Toll Authority spent $46 million on maintenance, including repair or replacement of some of the other hundreds of expandable joints, over the past five years. In the next decade, another $80 million is budgeted for similar work.
    (Source: Press Democrat, 2/11/2019)

    There is a bit more insight on the underlying cause of the concrete chunks from Abolhassan Astaneh-Asl, a UC Berkeley professor emeritus of civil engineering. Astaneh-Asl served on an advisory board for the 2005 seismic retrofit of the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge and said the concrete fell from an expansion joint above the lower deck. As the bridge is not a single continuous slab, it is held together every 100 feet or so by an expansion joint. These expansion joints expand and contract as temperatures rise and fall, but also receive the most wear and tear from vehicles, he said. “What damages the bridges are loads of trucks. When trucks are driving over the bridge and get to the expansion joint from one slab to the other slab, that impact causes stresses on the deck,” he said. As one of the leading engineering experts on steel, Astaneh-Asl also investigated the World Trade Center site after 9/11. The older lightweight concrete used at the World Trade Center was brittle and similar to the type used for the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge back in the 1950s. While lightweight concrete on the bridge’s upper deck puts less stress on the structure, it is also extremely fragile. Public highway bridges must be routinely inspected at least every 24 months for wear and tear, according to Federal Highway Administration spokesperson Nancy Singer. “Before this thing broke, there must have been some cracks,” Astaneh-Asl said. “If an inspector says the expansion joints need repair or replacement, this should have been prioritized.” An inspection last August found no flaws with the expansion joint responsible for dropping concrete, according to Caltrans.
    (Source: Golden Gate Express, 2/19/2019)

    In February 2019, it was reported that more than 60 joints like the one that failed earlier in February 2019 on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge will soon have to be replaced at a cost of more than $10 million. The $300,000 repair work on that failed joint has been completed as of late February 2019. Now, the plan is to replace the 30 remaining joints on the upper deck, followed by the 31 on the lower deck. The joint replacement work is being done as part of a $20 million fund that had been aside for targeted maintenance on the aging span, now more than six decades old. The bulk of 800 joints on the 5.5 mile bridge have already been retrofitted under work that was performed back in 2005. At that time, the bridge’s steel-to-steel joints were not considered at risk. Then in August 2018, Caltrans maintenance crews were dispatched to look at the underside of the upper deck after reports of loud banging and clanging noises at the spot where the joint ultimately failed. The type of joint is known as a steel to steel connection because it relies on two overlapping steel plates embedded into the end of concrete road deck sections with steel studs. The joints are designed to handle heat expansion and contraction between deck sections but apparently became undermined under the pounding inflicted by heavy trucks.
    (Source: NBC Bay Area, 2/22/2019)

    In March 2019, it was reported the joint repair was proceeding on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge after chunks of concrete hadfallen from an expansion joint. Officials blamed the mishap on a cracked expansion joint — one of the 36-foot steel bars that link sections of thebridge and allow it to move when the temperature changes. Sixty-one such bars on the bridge’s truss section date to the 1950s; Caltrans didn’ttouch them during a seismic retrofit in the mid-2000s, during which officials replaced 795 other joints. But after February’s concrete shower, and thenine-hour shutdown that followed, officials decided that the remaining joints had to be replaced. Craters and gashes in the roadway are a fairly commonoccurrence on the bridge, including some large enough to view the water below. The span, completed in 1956, has a thin deck that suffers constant batteringfrom cars and trucks.
    (Source: SF Chronicle, 3/20/2019)

    In April 2019, it was reported that state transportation agencies are set to kick off a $300,000 study next week to analyze the condition of the bridge decks. The study will be one part of a larger assessment headed by the Bay Area Toll Authority and Caltrans of several of the Bay Area’s state-owned bridges. The Richmond-San Rafael Bridge will be first in line following recent incidents of concrete falling from the upper deck. As part of the study, Colorado-based Bridge Diagnostics and Massachusetts-based Infrasense will use various technological surveying tools such as radar to penetrate deep into the bridge decks without damaging them. They will search for signs of degradation, cracking and more. The overall Richmond-San Rafael Bridge assessment is expected to cost about $800,000, which includes the deck condition study, and will be funded by toll revenue, Goodwin said. The completion date is set for March 2020. While the bridge has about $80 million in planned maintenance over the next decade, there isn’t funding planned beyond then, especially for a full deck replacement. The cost of replacing the decks could run into the hundreds of millions of dollars.
    (Source: Mercury-News, 4/20/2019)

    In April 2019, it was announced that the Metropolitan Transportation Commission has announced that each of the original joints on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge will be replaced with new joints. The original 31 joints were installed in the mid-1950s. To avoid cracking on the upper deck, the new joints will shrink and expand as the weather changes with a rubber seal, according to officials. Crews expect to have all joints replaced on the upper deck in July 2019.
    (Source: KRON 4, 4/29/2019)

    In July 2019, it was reported that the inital phase of repairs on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge (i.e., the joints on the upper deck) was completed. Opened in 1956, the bridge utilizes two decks to carry traffic across I-580 and connects San Rafael in the west to Richmond in the east. Commuters using the toll bridge were more than a bit upset on the morning of Feb. 7 when pieces of concrete, some as big as footballs, fell onto the lower deck of the structure. Some motorists were so agitated that they turned their vehicles around and drove against the traffic to get off the bridge. Experts quickly determined that spalling — concrete that flakes or breaks up, most likely due to the bridge's age and the Bay Area's often harsh weather — had caused the deterioration along an expansion joint near the bridge's eastern end. Other likely factors include the constant vibration and wear-and-tear on the grizzled old bridge. Each of the probable causes for this incident has done damage to the Richmond-San Rafael structure before. Shortly after the February accident, Caltrans announced that crews would immediately begin replacing a total of 31 joints on the upper deck of the structure, with a mid-summer completion, before replacing another 30 joints on the lower deck later in the year. According to Vince Jacala, a public affairs officer for Caltrans in nearby Oakland, contractors were dispatched to the site to perform a temporary joint repair, while also starting an emergency project to replace the broken bridge joint entirely. Rainy weather in late February and into March, though, delayed the start of concrete work on the Richmond-San Rafael bridge, but crews were able to make up for lost time and have stayed on track to finish the construction in July, as originally planned. O.C. Jones & Sons, the respected engineering contracting firm based in Berkeley, was chosen to make the needed fixes on the bridge, with Bridgeway Civil Contractors in Vacaville working as the subcontractor. For the emergency fix, an average of three full crews are working to install and weld the new joints onto the bridge. Light towers also are on hand to allow them to do their nighttime work, ably assisted by Kubota SSV75 skid steers to haul materials to where they're needed. Jacala estimated the contract for the joint replacements and repairs to be $8.3 million. The sliding plate joints are made up of a large "C" channel cast into each side of the concrete deck joint with a steel plate welded to the top of one of the "C" channels. These joints are designed for thermal expansion and contraction — a key engineering feature for any bridge in San Francisco Bay where winds and temperature changes are capricious.
    (Source: Construction Equipment Guide, 7/2/2019)

    After the last joint was replaced, there was still some work remaining. Rubber seals required placement on the last remaining joints. Sometime in 2020 crews will replace 30 of 31 joints on the lower deck, along with the surrounding concrete, as part of a larger rehabilitation project that will include painting and other work. That project has not yet been put out to bid and is expected to take three to five years.
    (Source: Mercury News $$$, 7/17/2019)

    In August 2019, it was reported that Caltrans has completed joint replacement work on the Richmond-San Raphael Bridge, more than six months after chunks of the aging structure fell into traffic. Each of the 31 joints that date back to the 1950s has been replaced by a new concrete joint with a rubberized seal designed to shrink and expand with changing temperatures, according to Caltrans officials. The new joints should prevent cracking of the surrounding concrete road deck. Next year, Caltrans will replace 30 joints on the lower deck of the bridge in conjunction with a bridge painting contract.
    (Source: Local News Matters, 8/21/2019)

    Richmond-San Rafael Bridge Makeover/Lower Deck Joints

    In August 2019, it was reported that the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge is set to get an $85 million makeover in 2020 with the help of nearly $20 million in state funds approved at the August CTC meeting. Caltrans plans to repaint the lower deck and towers to protect the steel and replace 30 expansion joints on the lower deck. The joints allow the bridge to adjust to changes in temperature and vibrations. This work follows a recently completed, multi-million emergency project that replaced 31 of the expansion joints on the upper deck. Structural issues surrounding an expansion joint were found to have caused at least two incidents of concrete falling on the lower deck between February and April. The California Transportation Commission voted unanimously on Thursday to allocate nearly $19.9 million in state gas tax dollars to the project as part of the gas tax’s local partnership program. Toll funds will cover the remaining $65 million, according to Metropolitan Transportation Commission representative Karin Betts. The Metropolitan Transportation Commission is estimating the expansion joint replacement project on the lower deck will cost about $10 million, which is about the same spent on the upper deck project. Other near-term projects are also in the pipeline for the bridge, one of which is repairing a portion of the bridge’s southern steel truss. The truss was impacted by a large truck and will be straightened and strengthened over September and October 2019. The truss repair will be followed by the installation of a movable barrier system on the upper deck shoulder to create a bicycle-pedestrian path. The path is scheduled to open later in 2019. Meanwhile, an $800,000 study by Caltrans and the Bay Area Toll Authority assessing the long-term health of the bridge is expected to be completed early in 2020.
    (Source: Marin IJ, 8/15/2019)

    Richmond-San Rafael Bridge Tolls

    In September 2019, it was reported that the Metropolitan Transportation Commission gave the green light on a $4 million contract with a consultant for an all-electronic tolling system for all bay area bridges, except the Golden Gate which is its own district and has already gone cashless.. Drivers must pay with FasTrak only. For those without FasTrak, cameras will capture your license plate and you'll get a bill in the mall. The commission said it will save drivers time and the agency money. Drivers won't have to slow down to squeeze through a toll booth. Toll booths will be removed. The commission anticipates realistically it could take up to five years for the system to go into effect. The Carquinez Bridge will likely be the first to go cashless. MTC said engineers say it's a good test bed to move faster on the others. The Bay Bridge will be likely be last since it's the busiest. The toll authority first authorized the move to all-electronic, open road tolling in December 2018. The consultants jsut approved will be responsible for developing the toll system’s specifications, providing oversight of the program’s implementation, reviewing design plans, and help to develop policies for all-electronic tolling. Bridges under the purview of the toll authority include the Antioch Bridge, Benicia-Martinez Bridge, Carquinez Bridge, Dumbarton Bridge, Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, San Mateo-Hayward Bridge and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge.
    (Source: KTVU, 9/1/2019; SFExaminer, 9/4/2019)

    Richmond-San Rafael Bridge to San Rafael

    In September 2010, the CTC proposed amending the CMIA baseline agreements for Westbound I-580 to Northbound US 101 Connector Improvements project (PPNO 0342M) to • De-allocate $200,000 CMIA savings from Right of Way (R/W). • Reprogram these $200,000 CMIA savings from R/W to Construction. This project is located at theUS 101/I-580 interchange in Marin County. The project scope includes • Widen connector from westbound I-580 to northbound US 101. • Extend Bellam Boulevard off-ramp from westbound I-580. • Modify Bellam Boulevard (~ MRN 4.51) on-ramp to northbound US 101. • Replace Bellam Boulevard undercrossing on westbound I-580. • Construct associated bicycle and pedestrian improvements along Bellam Boulevard and East Francisco Street in this area. This project, funded 100 percent with CMIA funds, was allocated $13,200,000 CMIA for construction capital in May 2009. When the bids were opened in September 2009, the lowest bid came $2,148,000 below the allocated amount. The project allotment was $11,052,000. These award savings were subsequently de-allocated by the Commission at its May 2010 meeting. The construction contract was awarded in November 2009 and construction began in December 2009. Although the construction contract acceptance (CCA) milestone is scheduled for March 2011, it is anticipated that all the major construction activities will be completed and the facility opened to traffic by October 2010. The project is located on a site that was originally on the edge of the San Francisco Bay and currently sits atop an abandoned railroad alignment. These factors added to the risks associated with differing sub-surface conditions. Furthermore, the project location also experiences heavy pedestrian and bicycle traffic that comes from a disadvantaged community adjacent to the project site and also from a number of critical crossroads of regional and local traffic access to Route 580.

    Commuter Lanes Commuter Lanes

    In Contra Costa County, HOV lanes once ran eastbound from Marine Street to W of Central Avenue, for a length of 4.5 mi. They ran westbound from E of Central Avenue to Marine Street for a length of 5.3 mi. They were opened in 1989, extended in 1992, and were closed through Richmond by February 2000.

    There is also a HOV exclusive lane on the Richmond/San Rafael Bridge. It opened in October 1989. It requires three or more occupants (two for two-seater vehicles) and operates during rush hour.

    Naming Naming

    John T. Knox FreewayI-580 from I-80 to the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge through Richmond (~ ALA 47.86 to CC 6.348) is named the "John T. Knox Freeway". John J. Knox., elected to the California Assembly in 1960, made important legislative contributions to the upgrade of I-580 to meet interstate freeway standards. John T. Knox was born in Sept. 1924 in Reno, moving the California at age 5. He got a bachelor of arts degree from Occidental College in Los Angeles in 1949, and a law degree from Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco in 1952. He set up a private law practice in Richmond soon thereafter. He joined the Assembly in November 1960, after a special election to replace S.C. Masterson, who had resigned. He represented District 11, which at that time represented most of West Contra Costa as well as parts of Orinda and other areas east of the Caldecott Tunnel. He was elected Assembly speaker for the first time in January 1976, and was re-elected each of the following three years, retiring in 1980. He served as the Assembly speaker pro tem for the last four years of that time.  He was a driving force behind the 1970 creation of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission in 1965. Because of CEQA,state and local agencies are required to identify and mitigate significant environmental impacts of development, construction or other actions. The BCDC’s mission is to enhance and protect San Francisco Bay and ensure responsible development along the water. His resume also includes authoring the Knox-Keen Health Care Service Plan, which regulated California’s health-maintenance organizations (HMOs). Knox’s son said creation of the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission may have saved the bay from a dramatic downsizing, as plans were afoot to fill in large parts of it, including most of the stretch between Richmond and Berkeley, where some sought to build an airport. There also was the Knox-NisbetAct of 1963, which helped establish Local Agency Formation Commissions through which cities now annex new lands. That allowed the construction of the 6½-mile stretch of I-580 between the I-80 interchange near Golden Gate Fields west to the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, which is formally called the John T. Knox Freeway. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 50, Chapter 78 in 1980. 
    (Image source: AARoads; East Bay Times)

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Richmond-San Rafael BridgeBridge 28-0100 (CC 006.22) is named the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge (named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 100 Chapter 243 in 1955) between Richmond and San Rafael in Contra Costa county. It was built in 1956.
    (Image source: Interstate Guide; Rails to Trails; Richmond Confidential)

    John F. McCarthy Memorial BridgeIt was officially renamed the "John F. McCarthy Memorial Bridge" in 1981. John F. McCarthy served in the California Senate representing Marin from 1950 to 1970, and was a former Republican Senate majority leader,. Not only did McCarthy sponsor the bill authorizing the construction of the bridge, he was instrumental in the creation of BART.  McCarthy and Arthur H. Breed Jr. of Oakland created and passed a bill for the formation of the Bay Area Rapid Transit District in 1957. Renamed by Senate Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 76 in 1981.
    (Image source: AARoads; Marin I-J)

    Interstate Submissions Interstate Submissions

    Approved as chargeable interstate in April 1978; originally numbered as I-180; the portion between Castro Street in Richmond and Route 101 is 139(a) non-chargeable mileage.


Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Alameda 580 10.22 10.82
Alameda 580 13.17 13.41
Alameda 580 14.97 15.63
Alameda 580 17.55 18.31
Alameda 580 18.54 19.12
Alameda 580 19.76 19.96
Alameda 580 20.14 20.39
Alameda 580 28.10 43.50
Alameda 580 43.63 46.09
Alameda 580 47.87 48.04
Contra Costa 580 0.00 0.03
Contra Costa 580 0.38 0.70
Contra Costa 580 1.25 R4.10
Contra Costa 580 R4.17 R4.37
Contra Costa 580 R4.49 R4.83
Contra Costa 580 R4.94 R5.67
Marin 580 3.76 4.78

Exit Information Exit Information

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Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 580:


Acronyms and Explanations:


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