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State Route 187

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

Rte 187(a) From Lincoln Boulevard to Route 10 via Venice Boulevard.

(b) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interest of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Los Angeles Route 187 within the city between the route’s western terminus at Lincoln Boulevard (approximately postmile 3.5) and its eastern terminus at Cadillac Avenue near Route 10 (approximately postmile 8.9), if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment:

(1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, Route 187 shall cease to be a state highway.

(3) Route 187, as relinquished under this subdivision, shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

SB 177, Chapter 106, 1988 contains special legislation to improve the traversable route.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

163 in Santa MonicaIn 1963, Route 187 was defined as the route "Route 1 at a point near Colorado Avenue in Santa Monica to Route 10 via Pacific Avenue and Venice Boulevard; provided that prior to the construction of any portion of this highway the City of Los Angeles shall furnish to the State of California without charge all right-of-way necessary for that portion and the City of Los Angeles and the County of Los Angeles shall enter into a co-operative agreement with the department wherein said city and county agree to pay one-half the cost of plans and construction."

Note that the grade separation here is part of the eastern-most portion of the Santa Monica pier.

In 1988, Chapter 106 deleted the Santa Monica portion of the route, retaining the conditions: "Route 1 at a point near Colorado Avenue in Santa Monica the South city limits of Santa Monica near Dewey Street to Route 10 via Pacific Avenue and Venice Boulevard; provided…"

In 1994, AB 3132, Chapter 1220 deleted the portion from the South city limits of the City of Santa Monica to Lincoln Boulevard, changing the origin to "Lincoln Boulevard". It is unclear why they did not identify Lincoln Boulevard as Route 1.

Note that the bridge log shows a junction with Route 1 at the McClure Tunnel. This dates back to the original 1964 definition of the route, and represents that Santa Monica Pier bridge.

In 2015, AB 810 (Chapter 561, 10/07/15) authorized relinquishment of a specified portion of Route 187 to the City of Los Angeles by adding:

(b) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interest of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Los Angeles Route 187 within the city between the route’s western terminus at Lincoln Boulevard (approximately postmile 3.5) and its eastern terminus at Cadillac Avenue near Route 10 (approximately postmile 8.9), if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment:

(1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, Route 187 shall cease to be a state highway.

(3) Route 187, as relinquished under this subdivision, shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

AB 810 (Chapter 561, 10/07/15) also deleted the special words regarding construction restrictions:

Note that, with respect to this routing, prior to the construction of any portion of this highway, the City of Los Angeles shall furnish to the State of California without charge all right-of-way necessary for that portion and the City of Los Angeles and the County of Los Angeles shall enter into a cooperative agreement with the department wherein the city and the county agree to pay one-half the cost of plans and construction. The title to that portion of the right-of-way acquired by the City of Los Angeles, and furnished to the State of California, for Route 187, but not needed for that route upon its construction, has been to the city.

In October 2016, the CTC authorized relinquishment of the right of way in the city of Los Angeles on Route 187 (Venice Boulevard) from Route 1 (Lincoln Boulevard) to Route 10 (Santa Monica Freeway/Cadillac Avenue), under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated September 1, 2016, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 561, Statutes of 2015, which amended Section 487 of the Streets and Highways Code. Furthermore, the CTC authorized 14,500,000 to be allocated from the Budget Act of 2016, Budget Act Item 2660-302-0042, to provide funds for relinquishment in lieu of rehabilitating the pavement with a Capital Preventative Maintenance pavement project. The construction capital for this project is currently programmed in the 2014 SHOPP for $10,500,000 as a Capital Preventive Maintenance pavement project. This allocation request of $14,500,000 is an increase of 38.1 percent above the programmed amount. The Department and the City of Los Angeles entered into a relinquishment agreement, under Resolution R-3958 to relinquish Route 187 to the City of Los Angeles, in lieu of implementing the programmed Capital Preventive Maintenance pavement project. The City of Los Angeles estimated the value of relinquishment of the facility as $21,500,000. The Department in negotiations with the City of Los Angeles mutually agreed upon with the amount of $14,500,000 for the relinquishment. The Department has concluded that relinquishing Route 187 to the City of Los Angeles is in the best interest of the State. The City of Los Angeles will assume full maintenance ownership responsibility, control and liability in perpetuity over the relinquished facilities.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This route corresponds to the 1961 definition of LRN 163, defined in 1933. It was not signed until 1988. Route 187 was not included in the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

Naming Naming

Maps based on the 1956 freeway plan show this route as the "Venice Freeway". It was named after the community of Venica, CA, founded by Abbot Kinney in 1904 as part of his Ocean Park tract, envisioning it as an imitation of Venice, Italy.

Status Status

Unsigned Not completely signed.


Venice Road Diet

Rte 187 Road DietSince 2015 a community outreach process facilitated by Councilmember Mike Bonin and the Great Streets Initiative has culminated in changes focused on making Venice Boulevard safer for people who travel the corridor and supporting local businesses. As part of Los Angeles’s Great Streets initiative, in May 2017 Venice Blvd was reworked to provide four new pedestrian crossings, a safer road design featuring protected and buffered bike lanes, and improvements at existing signalized intersections. This project reconfigured the stretch of road between Beethoven Street and Inglewood Avenue, reducing the number of automobile lanes from three to two in each direction. At the same time, the city’s transportation department added multiple turn lanes, high-visibility crosswalks, and protected bike lanes running the length of the corridor. According to the Great Streets website, the following is a summary of the other changes made (Venice Blvd Fact Sheet):

The changes were first instituted as part of a year-long pilot project aimed at cutting down on deadly crashes. Collision data gathered by the city show that between 2003 and 2016, 360 injuries and five traffic deaths were reported on the 0.8-mile segment of Venice Boulevard. A report on the pilot compiled by transportation consultant Fehr and Peers found that no serious injuries or deaths had occurred during the 12-month trial period. The report was released in December and soon after, the transportation department announced that the project’s lane reconfiguration would become permanent.

According to the Fehr and Peers report, travel times in the eastbound direction increased significantly after the project was implemented, though they came down after a left-turn lane was added at Centinela Avenue. In September, it took roughly 1 minute and 30 seconds longer to travel the eastbound route during peak afternoon hours than it did in 2015. Trip lengths before and after the project were much closer in the westbound lanes. Typical vehicle speeds also haven’t changed much. Drivers heading east traveled 1 mile per hour slower after the changes; those going west went faster by 2 miles per hour.

In March 2019, it was reported that Los Angeles City Council unanimously rejected an appeal Tuesday from critics of a polarizing streetscape project that’s transformed just under one mile of Venice Boulevard in Mar Vista. In the estimation of Councilmember Mike Bonin, who represents the area, the lane reductions and pedestrian safety measures implemented as part of the project have been a success. Opponents of the project see things differently. Mar Vista Community Council member Mary Hruska told the committee that the road reconfiguration had “ignited a feud which has riven our formerly placid and welcoming neighborhood apart.”
(Source: Curbed LA, 3/8/2019)

Santa Monica Pier

In December 2013, it was reported that the Santa Monica City Council was looking closely at the impact some of the plans to replace the “structurally deficient” concrete bridge, which connects Colorado Avenue to the historic Santa Monica Pier. There was particular concern that the new bridge allow people of all abilities equal access to the Santa Monica Pier. The future of the Pier Bridge, built in 1939 by the California Department of Highways, has been a topic of discussion for nearly 20 years in Santa Monica. Prior to August 2010, the plan was to rehabilitate the bridge; the decision to replace was made in August 2010. In a 2010 survey, the bridge received a 30.6 sufficiency rating on a 100-point scale. Caltrans says it has inadequate seismic strength, crumbling concrete and cracks in the deck. Also, the sidewalks are too narrow and it has steep curbs and substandard lane widths. The replacement project is eligible for nearly 90 percent federal funding. In the next step, City planners will move forward with environmental impact studies required by both State and national law, a process they said can last from 18 to 24 months.

In January 2018, it was reported that the Santa Monica City Council and Caltrans were holding meetings to discuss the replacement of the Santa Monica Pier bridge. The more than $8 million project comes after the California Department of Transportation deemed the bridge “structurally deficient” and “functionally obsolete.” The City had planned to rehabilitate the the bridge built in 1939, but decided in August 2012 to rebuild the structure after Caltrans said rehabilitation would not be cost-effective and did not qualify for federal funding. The Pier Bridge Replacement Project approved by the Council is eligible for nearly 90 percent federal funding. The project will replace the structure -- which received a 30.6 sufficiency rating on a 100-point scale from Caltrans -- with either a single bridge or two separate bridges. The Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Assessment (EIR/EA) for the proposed project explores the three following options:

To make the current bridge safer, in 2013 the City added a designated walkway that separates pedestrians from bike and vehicle traffic as part of $150,000 in improvements.
(Source: SM Lookout, 1/2/2018)

Later in January, it was reported that City of Santa Monica staff have recommended replacing the current 1939 pier bridge with two separate bridges: one for automobiles, and one for pedestrians and bikes. A new 40-foot bridge would connect pedestrians and bikers to the pier from Colorado Avenue. Emergency vehicles and delivery trucks may use the span during off-peak hours. A lower, second bridge would allow cars to access pier parking from Moss Avenue. The bridge would be span 150 feet over Ocean Front Walk where restaurants currently are located, with two vehicle lanes separated by barriers. The construction would be done in stages, so that the pier would always be accessible. All options would either construct an elevator for handicapped visitors, or a separate ADA walkway cantilevered from the side of the bridge.
(Source: SM Observer, 1/5/2018)

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 187:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the following routes to the highway system:

In 1935, these routes were added to the highway code with the following routing:

  1. [LRN 26] near Whitewater to Morongo Valley
  2. [LRN 26] near Whitewater to [LRN 64] near Indian Wells
  3. [LRN 26] near Indio via Mecca and the north shore of the Salton Sea to [LRN 26] near Brawley
  4. [LRN 26] near Brawley to [LRN 27] near Holtville
  5. [LRN 27] near Holtville to [LRN 202] near Bonds Corner

In 1959, Chapter 1062 extended segment a to "[LRN 43] near Lucern Valley via Monongo Valley", and corrected the spelling of White Water.

Signage on this route was as follows:

  1. LRN 26 (US 60/US 70/US 99; present-day I-10) near White Water to LRN 43 (Route 18) near Lucerne Valley via Morongo Valley.

    This is present-day Route 62 to Yucca Valley, and Route 247 to Lucerne Valley.

  2. LRN 26 (US 60/US 70/US 99; present-day I-10) near White Water to LRN 64 (US 60/US 70; present-day I-10) near Palm Desert.

    This is Route 111.

  3. LRN 26 (US 60/US 70/US 99; present-day I-10) near Brawley to LRN 27 (US 80; present-day I-8) near Holtville.

    This is Route 111 to Brawley, and Route 115 to Holtville.

  4. LRN 27 (US 80; present-day I-8) near Holtville to LRN 202 near Bonds Corners.

    This was Route 115 until 1973.


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 186 Forward Arrow Route 188

© 1996-2020 Daniel P. Faigin.
Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.