California Highways
www.cahighways.org

California Highways

Routes 249 through 256

 
powered by FreeFind


California Highways Home Page
State Highway Routes
Numbered County Highways
State Highway Types
Interstate Types and History
Highway Numbering Conventions
State Highway Renumberings
State Highway Chronology
Maps Trails and Roads Related WWW Links Site Change Log Sources and Credits

Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

249 · 250 · 251 · 252 · 253 · 254 · 255 · 256


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 249


Routing Routing

Rte 249From Route 2 north of La Cañada to Route 14 south of Palmdale.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

This route is as defined in 1963. This was originally planned as freeway, meeting up with Route 118 in the forest. This route runs through the Angeles National Forest. Although Route 249 did not change in 1966, note the changes in the routes around it -- in particular, Route 196 and Route 122. Route 196 was deleted, and Route 122 was changed not to go through the mountains, but to use Pearblossom Highway.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This routing was LRN 266, defined in 1959.

Status Status

Ells Tunnel, from 1969 mapUnconstructed It is currently unsigned and unconstructed. The traversable road is Angeles Forest Highway, Los Angeles County Sign Route N3. There are no plans for Caltrans to adopt this route, as it has insufficient tunnel clearances.

It appears that in 1953 there were plans to construct this as a tunnel. A toll tunnel was originally proposed in 1953 by a civil engineering consultant to El Monte, Joe C. Ells. At the time, newspaper reports quoted Ells as saying the route "would bring Palmdale to within . . . practically commuting distance of Los Angeles." He also said the tunnel would be a "new escape route" in the event of an enemy attack, not too farfetched for a city then possessed with building bomb shelters. Tolls could recover the tunnel's cost, then estimated at $200 million, Ells suggested. Critics, however, said it could take 10 to 15 years to complete.
(Source: Los Angeles Times, 7/29/2001)

Regarding the Ells Tunnel, Sparker noted on AAroads (my editorial observations are in italics):

I remember the "Ells" tunnel proposal, circa 1965-66 or so; it was intended to connect the upper reaches of the Arroyo Seco gorge at its south end (as pictured in the map above) with, again, the upper reaches of another mountain watershed, the Big Tujunga Canyon area (which drained the southwest portion of the national forest) [This appears to what eventually became the extension of Route 118 and Route 249]. Essentially the freeway, alternately dubbed Route 2 along its southern reaches or even Route 122 (the portion extending out into the desert) would stay on the surface (ridge or cliffside) until that became impractical, then tunnel to the next feasible surface segment, repeating until the range was surmounted. In most maps I've seen, the portion of Route 249 (this map looks like it was lifted from a Thomas Bros. regional atlas from that timeframe -- the style and font of the CA state shields give it away; this is definitely not a Division of Highways product!) connecting (after the interchange with the tunnel-laden corridor) to Angeles Crest Highway/Route 2 was designated as Route 196. Route 249 essentially followed the Angeles Forest Highway from Route 2 west of Mt. Wilson north to Route 14 near Vincent. The corridor with the Ells and other tunnels would have likely, if completed as planned, been part of Route 122, which descended to the desert between Palmdale and Pearblossom, crossed Route 138, and struck out NE into the desert, skirting the SE corner of Edwards AFB and terminating at Route 58 west of Hinkley. While the map above shows the Route 122 corridor as serving SE Palmdale by tracing Pearblossom Highway west of Route 138, the Division/Caltrans documents invariably show it several miles east of there. It was intended that after going through the first couple of tunnels, Palmdale-bound traffic would segue onto Route 249 at the mountaintop interchange, while traffic ostensibly heading for Barstow and points beyond would remain on the diagonal desert corridor. The concept here was simple -- central L.A. to Barstow via the most direct feasible route.

At some point surveyors and engineers had to get out into the field to get the "lay of the land", so to speak. [T]he San Gabriels make it exceptionally tough on anything with wheels getting from one side to another -- steep canyons on the south side all the way to the ridge point (averaging about 7500-8000') and, on the north side, a very rapid dropoff from that ridgeline down a couple thousand feet, and then a combination of rockpiles, sand dunes, and flash-flood-prone gorges down to the high desert floor (the saving grace being that while the rise from the south footing to the ridge averaged about 6000' or more, the north side was about half that simply because the high desert floor sat between 3000' and 4000' above sea level). But the entire mountain range is dominated by rocky outcroppings -- difficult for building conventional roads, much less 6/8-lane freeways. Let's just say that any surveyor or engineer coming back from the mountains not disabused of the notion that deploying massive facilities across or through them would be anything but a nightmare was only fooling themselves.

Eventually (early '80's on) a simplified freeway arrangement was proposed: one freeway (Route 2 & Route 249) from the La Canada area north to Route 14 near the Pearblossom Highway interchange and another (Route 122) from that same point on Route 14 diagonally across the desert; the Route 196 connection to Angeles Crest Highway bit the dust Only one other corridor was retained: an eastern extension of Route 118 up Big Tujunga Canyon to provide access to and from the San Fernando Valley. Like the first iterations, those were simply lines on a map; not one foot of San Gabriel Mountain freeway has ever been formally adopted much less considered for funding. And with the push to curtail urban sprawl, it's likely these routes will remain unbuilt.

Although not quite Route 249, there do appear to be plans to explore a Palmdale to Los Angeles tunnel that approximates the route that might have been used for Route 249. According to the LA Daily News, in 2004, Los Angeles County and Palmdale will spend $125,000 on the third study in five years into building a highway across the Angeles National Forest by tunneling through the San Gabriel Mountains. The last study, in 2002, looked at building the highway as a privately financed toll road and concluded that it could could cost $2.2 billion and was unlikely to pay for itself with tolls low enough to be acceptable to motorists. Previous plans have looked at creating a 21-mile-long highway that would branch off the Antelope Valley Freeway south of Palmdale and head south and a little west to the Foothill Freeway at its intersection with the Glendale Freeway.

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 249:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 249 as “[LRN 10] near Exeter to [LRN 17] near Roseville on a route along the easterly side of the San Joaquin Valley to be selected by the California Highway Commission, which route may include all or portions of any existing state highway route or routes”. This was a proposed freeway routing for Route 65 that ran roughly parallel to and east of Route 99.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 250


Routing Routing

Former Rte 250No current routing.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 250 was defined as “Route 5 near Orange County Hospital northerly to Route 91.”

In 1965, Chapter 1372 added a condition to the route definition: “This route will cease to be a state highway when Route 57 freeway is completed from Route 5 to Route 91.”

In 1981, Chapter 292 deleted this route.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 180, defined in 1933. It ran along State College Boulevard.

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 250 as “[LRN 104] near Forestville to [LRN 1]”. This is present-day proposed Route 181 from Route 12 near Forestville to US 101.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 251


Routing Routing

  1. Rte 251 Seg 1From Route 580 near Point San Quentin to Route 101 near Greenbrae.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    As initially defined in 1963, this segment was the entire route, and was defined as “Route 101 near Greenbrae to Route 17 near Point San Quentin.”

    In 1984, Chapter 409 reordered this segment and changed "Route 17" to "Route 580".

    Originally, this was to have been the "Point Reyes" Freeway. It was originally part of Route 17 from 1963 to the mid 1980's, when Route 17 was deleted in Marin County as part of the renumber of Route 17 to I-580 and I-880. The Pt. Reyes Freeway was one of many new routes created in the State Freeway and Expressway System, which was approved by the Legislature in 1959. This route has all but been killed by environmental concerns and costs. It would have connected with Route 37.

    In 2002, the Traversable Highways report showed this as "to be improved" in 5 years, but this appears to never have happened. The traversable route is Sir Francis Drake Road. There is a 4-lane section for 1.0 mile, and a 40' section for 0.5 mile. The existing underpass has only a 14' clearance. This is used as a cut-off between US 101 and the Richmond-San Rafael bridge.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment corresponds to pre-1963 LRN 251, defined in 1959. This is one of the few whose sign routes equals their pre-1963 legislative routes.

    Status Status

    This routing is unconstructed. For the US 101 to I-580 segment, the traversable route is Sir Francis Drake Blvd. The remainder of the traversable local routing includes Petaluma Pt. Reyes Road, and Nicasino Valley Road. These roads are not constructed to state standards. There are no plans for Caltrans to adopt this routing.


  2. Rte 251 Seg 2From Route 101 near San Rafael to Route 1 near Point Reyes Station.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1984, Chapter 409 added segment (b) as a result of a transfer from Route 17, giving: “(a) Route 580 near Point San Quentin to Route 101 near Greenbrae. (b) Route 101 near San Rafael to Route 1 near Point Reyes Station.”

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was a proposed (routing determined) segment of Route 17. It was part of LRN 69, defined in 1933. This appears to correspond to Francis Drake Blvd. There is an interchange with several flyover ramps at the junction with US 101; this may have been planning for a future freeway Route 251.

    Status Status

    This routing is unconstructed. For the US 101 to I-580 segment, the traversable route is Sir Francis Drake Blvd. The remainder of the traversable local routing includes Petaluma Pt. Reyes Road, and Nicasino Valley Road. These roads are not constructed to state standards. There are no plans for Caltrans to adopt this routing.


Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route; unconstructed. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Scenic Route Scenic Route

[SHC 263.8] From Route 37 near Nicasio to Route 1 near Point Reyes Station.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 251:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 251 as “[LRN 1] near Greenbrae to [LRN 69] near Point San Quentin.” This is one of the few routes that retained the same number post-1963. It is still Route 251.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 252


Routing Routing

Former Rte 252No current routing.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 252 was defined as “Route 5 to Route 805 near the north city limits of National City.”

This routing was deleted in 1994 by AB 3132, Chapter 1220.

Rte 252 Freeway RoutingThis was supposed to act as the north end of an I-5 bypass around National City and Chula Vista, utilizing I-805. According to Andy Field, the huge flyover and approach ramps at the I-805 43rd Street exit are the beginnings of this planned freeway, which was killed locally in 1980. A redevelopment project later resulted in a grocery store at the terminus of the off-ramp. Behind this shopping area lies abandoned right-of-way that not been developed. Overgrown with weeds, this swath of land clearly shows the path Route 252 would have taken across the Southcrest community to meet I-5. These ramps were built around 1974-75, long before the rest of the California 252 project would have been started. These ramps still show up as part of Route 252 in the CalTrans Photologs in 2001. Several widened bridges and ramps at the I-15/Route 15 junction clearly show that future expansion for the Route 252 connection was envisioned.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This was part of LRN 283, defined in 1959. It appears to have been near 8th Street.

Naming Naming

El Toyon Freeway, Southcrest Freeway

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Freeway Freeway

Originally to have been freeway; later deleted from SHC 253.1.

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1947, Chapter 1449 extended the definition of LRN 252 to include “the highway from San Leandro to Oakland via Alameda and the Posey Tube”, noting that this segment “is part of [LRN 252]”. However, the problem was that LRN 252 did not exist at the time. In 1949, Chapter 1422 repealed the erroneous section, and created the route as an extension of LRN 226.

The real LRN 252 was created in 1959 by Chapter 1062, with the definition “[LRN 69] near Nicasio to [LRN 1] near Novato”. This runs from present-day Route 251 to US 101, and is an unconstructed portion of Route 37.


State Shield

State Route 253


Routing Routing

Rte 253From Route 128 near Boonville to Route 101 near Ukiah.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

This route was added in 1963 by Chapter 2155 as “Route 128 near Boonville to Route 101 near Ukiah.”

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was not part of the state highway system before 1963. This is "Ukiah-Boonville" Road.

Status Status

In August 2011, the CTC approved $1.54 million to repair two slipouts near Boonville, from 4.1 to 4.3 miles east of Soda Creek Bridge, that occurred in the winter of 2005-2006 and to build a retaining wall.

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 253:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 253 as:

  1. [LRN 68] near the south city limits of San Francisco to [LRN 224] near the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge
  2. [LRN 68] near Alemany Boulevard to the route described in subdivision (a) of this section.

In 1959, Chapter 1841 added the condition “Construction on either portion of [LRN 253] described in subdivisions (a) and (b) may be commenced when the City and County of San Francisco has acquired all rights of way necessary for the construction of such portion and has conveyed these rights of way to the State of California for highway purposes.”

In 1961, Chapter 1010 reworded the construction amendment: “Notwithstanding the provision of Section 89 of Chapter 1062 of the Statutes of 1959, construction of any or all portions of [LRN 253] may be commenced at any time, if the City and County of San Francisco has has conveyed or does convey to the State of California, without charge, all real property presently acquired by it for the construction of such route or portion thereof.”

.

This route was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 68 (Route 1) near the S city limits of San Francisco to LRN 224 (former Route 480) near the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge.

    This is the I-280 "Southern Freeway" through San Francisco. At times it was considered an extension of the Embarcadero Freeway (Route 480)

  2. From LRN 68 (Route 1) near Alemany Boulevard to the route described in part (1).

    This is also part of I-280.


State Shield

State Route 254


Routing Routing

Rte 254A portion of the former Redwood Highway through and connecting a number of state park units, from Route 101 near the Sylvandale interchange to Route 101 south of Stafford.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

This route was added in 1963 by Chapter 890 as “the Avenue of the Giants, comprising a portion of the former Redwood Highway through and connecting a number of state parks, from Route 101 near the Sylvandale interchange to Route 101 near the Redcrest interchange.” A duplication section defining this was added by 1963 Chapter 901, but repealed by 1965 Chapter 155. Note that these chapters also added this route as LRN 296, but that definition did not take effect.

In 1967, Chapter 1331 extended the definition: “the Avenue of the Giants, comprising a portion of the former Redwood Highway through and connecting a number of state parks, from Route 101 near the Sylvandale interchange to Route 101 near the Redcrest interchange one-tenth of a mile north of Jordan Creek.” This change added the portion from the Redcrest interchange to one-tenth of a mile north of Jordan Creek.

In 1968, Chapter 282 relaxed the definition: “the Avenue of the Giants, comprising a portion of the former Redwood Highway through and connecting a number of state parks, from Route 101 near the Sylvandale interchange to Route 101 one-tenth of a mile north of Jordan Creek.

In 1990, Chapter 1187 clarified the definition: “the Avenue of the Giants, comprising a portion of the former Redwood Highway through and connecting a number of state park units, from Route 101 near the Sylvandale interchange to one-tenth of a mile north of Jordan Creek south of Stafford.” This change added the portion from one-tenth mile north of Jordan Creek to Route 101 south of Stafford.

In 1992, Chapter 1243 relaxed the definition: “the Avenue of the Giants, comprising a portion of the former Redwood Highway through and connecting a number of state park units, from Route 101 near the Sylvandale interchange to Route 101 one-tenth of a mile north of Jordan Creek south of Stafford.”

This route is a former segment of US-101 that has been bypassed by freeway.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This was part of LRN 1, defined in 1909.

Status Status

In August 2016, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project on Route 254 in Humboldt County that will upgrade the railings on four bridges on Route 254 near Humboldt Redwoods State Park. Specifically, this project in Humboldt County will upgrade the railings on Ohman Creek Bridge (HUM 000.88), Elk Creek Bridge (HUM 010.43), Bridge Creek Bridge (HUM 010.80), and Bear Creek Bridge (HUM 043.02). The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total programmed amount is $7,509,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

In July 2010, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Humboldt along Route 254 at 0.15 miles north of Trouble Lane near Miranda (~ HUM 6.585), consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes. The County of Humboldt was given a 90-day notice of intent to vacate, without protesting such action.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $729,000 in SHOPP funding to repair slipout and failed drainage facilities damaged by heavy rainfall near Redcrest, 1.7 miles north of South Fork Eel River Bridge and at 2.9 miles south of Bear Creek Bridge (~ HUM 022.34). They also approved $1,662,000 to reconstruct embankment, construct Tie- Back Slope Protection wall, repair drainage system and dewater and fill the voids in the roadway prism at 1 location to repair washed out embankment cause by heavy rain near Miranda, 0.6 mile south of Post Office.

Naming Naming

This segment is named the "Avenue of the Giants". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 10 in 1960

Scenic Route Scenic Route

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

Blue Star Memorial Highway Blue Star Memorial Highway

This route was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 61, Chapter 61 in 1996.

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 254:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 254 as:

  1. [LRN 235] to [LRN 75] near Orinda
  2. [LRN 75] near Orinda to to [LRN 69] in Richmond via San Pablo.

This was all signed as part of proposed Route 93.


State Shield

State Route 255


Routing Routing

Rte 255From Route 101 in Eureka to Route 101 in Arcata via the Humboldt Bay Bridge and the Samoa Peninsula.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Chapter 1898 defined Route 255 as “Route 101 in Eureka across Humboldt Bay to the Samoa Peninsula” (note: this act added the same route as LRN 294, but that change did not take effect)

In 1970, Chapter 881 extended the route: “Route 101 in Eureka across Humboldt Bay to the Samoa Peninsula to Route 101 near Arcata via the Humboldt Bay Bridge and the Samoa Peninsula” Chapter 1473 that year also redefined the route, but made no changes.

In 1994, Chapter 1220 clarified the routing: “Route 101 in Eureka to Route 101 in near Arcata via the Humboldt Bay Bridge and the Samoa Peninsula”

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This route would have been LRN 294.

Status Status

In mid-January 2012, residents of the community of Manila (~ HUM 2.048 to HUM R5.087) installed signage at both entrances to Manila off Route 255 urging motorists to drive safely. Route 255 divides Manila in half. The Pacific Ocean, the beach and dunes, community center, Manila Dunes Recreation Area, the Humboldt Coastal Nature Center and Family Resource Center lie west of the highway. Half of Manila’s population, two churches, the Manila Park and access to Humboldt Bay lie to the east. It is difficult to cross the highway safely because of the high rate of speed of oncoming vehicles and also because of the curves on Route 255 at the Dean Avenue/Pacific Boulevard and the Young Lane/north Peninsula Drive intersections. Manila residents have expressed their safety concerns to representatives of Caltrans at least since the 1970s.
(Source: Arcata Eye, 1/13/2012)

Eureka/Arcta Restoration Project for Mitigation (HUM 6.0 to 7.6)

The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate funding for PPNO 2389, 01-HUM-255 6.0/7.6, the Eureka/Arcta Restoration Project for Mitigation - 3 Parcels (an offshoot of PPNO 0072 on US 101). This is in the vicinity of Eureka & Arcata along Route 255. Construct a wetland restoration project including three parcels as off site mitigation for parent project PPNO 0072, including wetland restoration consisting of freshwater wetland expansion, muted tidal restoration of salt marsh habitat, or a full-tidal restoration of salt marsh habitat. This restoration project will serve as mitigation for the parent project, EA 36600, the US 101 Eureka to Arcata Corridor Improvement Project. The parcels are:

The 2018 increases the funding from $4,190K to $6,079K.

In March 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Humboldt along Route 255, at Jackson Ranch Road (~ HUM 6.03), consisting of a collateral facility.

Named Structures Named Structures

The "Humboldt Bay Bridge" (unofficial reference) consists of three separate structures: the "Eureka Channel Bridge" (04-0230, HUM 000.20), the "Middle Channel Bridge" (04-0229, HUM 000.67) and the "Samoa Channel Bridge" (04-0228, HUM 001.37). All three structures together were named the "Samoa Bridge" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 52, Chapter 47, in 1971. Individually, the structures have the following additional names:

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 255:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 255 as “[LRN 235] near Burton to [LRN 107] near Alamo”. This ran from Route 77 near Burton to Route 21 near Alamo. This is not currently part of the state highway system. It was 1963 Route 93 Segment (a), which has since been deleted.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 256


Routing Routing

Former Rte 256No current routing.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1965, Chapter 1372 defined this route as “Route 80 southwest of Roseville to Route 65 north of Roseville”

This routing was deleted in 1994 by AB 3132, Chapter 1220.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

US Highway Shield This was originally signed as part of Route 65. It was originally part of US 99E through Roseville. This was part of LRN 3, defined in 1909.

Freeway Freeway

Originally to have been freeway; later deleted from SHC 253.1.

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 256 as “[LRN 75] near Walnut Creek to [LRN 75] near Pittsburg.” This is the proposed freeway routing for Route 24. It follows Willow Pass road from Walnut Creek to just outside of Antioch.


Back Arrow
Highways 241-248
State Highway Routes
Return to State Highway Routes
Forward Arrow
Highways 257-264
© 1996-2018 Daniel P. Faigin.
Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.