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Routes 241 through 248

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

241 · 242 · 243 · 244 · 245 · 246 · 247 · 248


State Shield

State Route 241


Routing Routing

Rte 241Toll Road From Route 5 south of San Clemente to Route 91 in the City of Anaheim.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 241 was defined as the route “Route 11 near Adams Street to Route 11 near Elysian Park in Los Angeles.” Route 11 is present-day Route 110. This was to be the "East Bypass".

In 1965, Chapter 1372 repealed this routing.

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1968, Chapter 282 created a new definition of Route 241 as “…in San Francisco from Route 1 to Route 101 near Fell and Oak Streets.” This routing was the result of a transfer from Route 80. This was to be part of the Panhandle Freeway.

In 1972, Chapter 1216 deleted this definition of Route 241.

State Shield Toll Road Transportation Corridor In 1988, Chapter 1363 created a new definition of Route 241 as “Route 231 near the Cities of Tustin and Irvine to Route 5 south of San Clemente.”

In 1996, Chapter 1154 extended the route by transfer from former Route 231: “Route 5 south of San Clemente to Route 91 in the City of Anaheim Route 231 near the Cities of Tustin and Irvine”. This is part of the Orange County Transportation Corridor System

Route 241 consists of three transporation corridors: Eastern, Foothill North, and Foothill South:

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1965 incarnation of Route 241 (from 1964 Route 11 near Adams Street to 1964 Route 11 near Elysian Park) was a proposed LRN 222 that would have sliced through the heart of downtown Los Angeles running E of Main Street. It was never constructed, and is no longer part of the state highway system.

The 1968-1972 incarnation of Route 241 (from Route 1 to Route 101 near Oak and Fell Streets in San Francisco) was LRN 223, defined in 1947.

The post-1988 routing of Route 241 was not defined in 1963.

Status Status

Foothill South Completion (~ ORA 0.000 to ORA 14.545)

In the early 2000s, the Foothill South alignment had two possibilities under consideration: a locally preferred alignment east of the City of San Clemente and traversing the undeveloped San Onofre State Beach Park portion of the Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base, or an alternative alignment generally 2˝ miles westerly of the locally preferred alignment (near La Pata and Avendia Pico). Future interchanges include Oso Parkway, Crown Valley Parkway, Ortega Highway, Avenida Pico and Christianitos Road. It terminates at Interstate 5 in San Diego County just south of Basilone Road.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

Rejected 241 RouteIn December 2005, the Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor Agency released its final environmental impact report on the alignments. They chose a wilderness route for the Foothill South, which could be completed as early as 2010. The agency's chosen route, one of six possibilities outlined in May, traverse the habitat for at least 10 threatened or endangered species and cut a state park in half. The roadway would be raised on pillars near the coast and would be visible from the coastal side of San Onofre State Beach. Although toll-road officials say it would have no direct effect on surfing, species or habitat near the beach, activists say it would spoil coastal views and ruin the ambience of the state park's campground. A state parks commission recently called on state officials to fight the toll road. The toll-road board votes on the proposal Jan. 12, 2006. Then, the agency must gain permits from a variety of agencies, including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the state Department of Fish and Game, as well as the state Coastal Commission.

In late February 2006, the TCA selected the routing that traverses San Onofre State Beach. This created even more controversy, with bills being introduced in the state legislature to prohibit construction of toll roads in state parks. Specifically, in April 2007, AB 1457 (Huffman), which would ban a proposed toll road through San Onofre, was scheduled for a hearing before the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee, was put on a two-year track in order to provide time to grow support to get it through the Legislature. Supporters of the road include such groups as the Associated General Contractors of California, the Orange County Business Council, the Los Angeles-Orange County Building and Construction Trades Council and local elected officials.

There is some controversy on this routing. a coalition of environmental groups opposed to the project has released a pair of studies that question the accuracy of study. Several environmental groups have rallied to support the California Department of Parks in its opposition to the proposed route through two federally-owned parklands . Each possible route was judged by the number of homes and businesses to be seized by eminent domain. The also compared construction of the route to widening I-5.

In November 2006, the LA Times reported that new traffic studies contradict optimistic predictions that a proposed tollway through San Onofre State Beach would eliminate much of the congestion on I-5 in South Orange County. Most of I-5 in South Orange County will be "consistently congested" at rush hour by 2030 even if the controversial Foothill South toll road extension is built, according to the Orange County Transportation Authority's long-range transportation plan for 2006. The forecasts assume construction of the tollway, a carpool lane each way on the I-5 and some interchange improvements. If only the tollway is built, the study suggests, the situation will be even worse, with motorists on the interstate seeing "severely congested" conditions.

In May 2007, efforts to extend the route were dealt a setback when a congressional committee voted to eliminate legislation designed to expedite the highway’s construction--specifically, approved a defense bill amendment related to Route 241 that would overrule a 1999 decision by Congress that gave the Navy the power to grant tollway operators a 40-acre easement inside San Onofre (as the park is on leased land within USMC Pendleton). The amendment would also dismantle other federal legislation freeing Route 241 from regulations in the federal Transportation Act requiring road builders to exhaust all "feasible and prudent" alternatives before parkland can be used for a highway. During the summer this amendment stalled, but as of December 2007, it had passed all procedural challenges and made it into the defense authorization bill. Note that the project can't be built unless the state Coastal Commission grants a permit for its construction, and a commission staff report issued in September 2007 already has recommended that the permit be denied.

In February 2008, the California Coastal Commission denied the construction permit, and the OCTA began consideration of a new route.

In December 2008, the U.S. Commerce Department announced it would uphold the state Coastal Commission's rejection of the plan. Federal officials could only override the state's decision if the project had no alternatives or was necessary to national security, and the announcement said neither of those criteria was met. The California Coastal Commission rejected plans for the road earlier in 2008, saying that the six-lane road -- which would run from Rancho Santa Margarita to Basilone Road at Camp Pendleton -- violated the state's coastal management program. The toll road agency backing the plan "may pursue another route" consistent with coastal zone protections, according to the Commerce Department announcement.

In June 2009, it was reported that the toll road agency still wants to complete the connection to I-5, and is considering other routes. The agency has budgeted $11.9 million for "241 completion" in its fiscal year that begins July 1. The rejected route would have extended Route 241 by 16.9 miles, from its current terminus in the Rancho Santa Margarita area through San Onofre State Beach park to join I-5. Since the U.S. Commerce Department rejected the proposed route in December, the toll road agency's staff has reached out to supporters and opponents in dozens of meetings to see if agreement can be reached on an alternate route. While opponents say planners should look at options besides extending the toll road, the toll road agency feels a failure to extend Route 241 would force a "massive widening" of I-5 from the San Diego County line north to Laguna Hills.

In December 2009, San Clemente city council members said they expect to vote in January on a resolution opposing a toll road into San Clemente. This came about due to discussions that TCA had with federal officials about alternative routes that would cut through San Clemente. There are two potential routes of concern to the city: the Commerce Department's option, which would end at Avenida La Pata and Avenida Vista Hermosa, dumping traffic there, and a longer route that would connect with I-5 beside Avenida Pico. The TCA has declared the Commerce Department's option unfeasible, and with respect to alternative routes within Camp Pendleton, the Marines are on record as far back as 1990 stating that the route through the state park was the only one acceptable to the Marine Corps.

In May 2011, it was reported that TCA was attempting again to rally public opinion for construction of the route. The TCA is trying to re-establish a Route 241 proposal three years after the California Coastal Commission rejected a previous plan and the U.S. secretary of commerce rejected the TCA's appeal. TCA has run advertisements appealing for public support. The specifics of their alternate route have not been released.

In October 2011, the TCA voted to conduct a $3.9-million feasibility study for an addition that would run from Oso Parkway in Rancho Santa Margarita to the vicinity of Ortega Highway. If approved, construction could begin in early 2013. The study is expected to take a year, and will consider environmental effects, finances and engineering.

In November 2012, it was reported that the OCTA had approved more work on the extension of Route 241. Although there is still no movement regarding completing the extension to I-5, TCA is planning an addition that would bring the road's southern end to just north of Ortega Highway. The Tesoro extension is estimated to cost around $195 million, and TCA is working on attaining right-of-ways with Rancho Mission Viejo, which owns the land and is developing homes on the property. The project will go to a regional water board hearing in February 2013 and a community forum in March before a TCA board vote.

In April 2013, it was reported that due of the weakened financial condition of OCTA, a new study recommends that its leadership postpone a road project and stop borrowing money until state authorities can review the operation. In December 2012, SNR Denton, a Los Angeles law firm that helped stop the TCA from building a route through San Onofre State Park, disclosed documents that revealed a host of issues plaguing the agency. They included sagging ridership and revenue as well as mounting debts and declining ratings for bonds sold to investors. The institute’s report also coincides with plans by the California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission to assess the viability of a proposed refinancing of $2.4 billion in TCA bonds. The new study agrees with many of Denton’s findings, but it goes one step further in recommending that the TCA halt the refinancing and shelve a proposed tollway project in southern Orange County until the agency’s finances are vetted. Tollway officials said the issues raised by the new study are “old news regenerated by some of the same opposition groups” to TCA projects. They noted that the operation has a quarter million riders daily, earns about $200 million in annual revenue and has not missed a debt payment. The report states that to make its debt payments, the TCA has raised tolls so much that its debt per mile is now far higher than the national average for toll roads. The Foothill-Eastern’s is $64 million, while the San Joaquin’s is $136 million. The national average is $17.1 million, the study notes. Almost a quarter of the TCA’s total debt payments of more than $10 billion stem from capital appreciation bonds that delay principal and interest payments for years and can result in huge debt payments. As such, tolls for both corridors are now among the highest in the country, researchers said, causing many price-sensitive motorists to avoid them in favor of free public highways.
(Source: LA Times, 4/10/13)

In June 2013, it was reported that the San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board declined to issue a discharge permit to the Transportation Corridor Agencies in Irvine, the operator of 51 miles of toll roads in Orange County. The TCA sought the permit for the planned Tesoro Extension that would lengthen the Foothill tollway 5.5 miles from Oso Parkway in Rancho Santa Margarita to Cow Camp Road east of San Juan Capistrano. Board members who voted to deny the permit said the Tesoro Extension was not the project that should have been brought to them for a permit. They contended that the proposal was actually part of a broader TCA plan to lengthen the Foothill toll road 16 miles to I-5 around San Clemente.

In April 2014, it was reported that the TCA has announced that it has canceled environmental studies for a controversial extension project that was widely criticized and ultimately rejected by the California Coastal Commission in 2008. The Transportation Corridor Agencies rescinded two notices to proceed with federal environmental impact statements for the Foothill South extension, which would have connected the Route 241 tollway with the I-5 Freeway south of San Clemente.

In March 2015, it was reported that the San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board declined to issue the waste discharge permit that was needed before construction can begin on the controversial extension project. It was the second time since June 2013 that the water board has rejected a discharge permit for the planned Tesoro Extension that would add 5.5 miles to the Foothill tollway by extending it from Oso Parkway in Rancho Santa Margarita to Cow Camp Road east of San Juan Capistrano. Citing substantial evidence, the board asserted that the Tesoro was actually part of a broader TCA plan to extend the Foothill tollway 16 miles to the 5 Freeway around San Clemente. As a result, the board concluded that potential effects on water quality of the proposed extension were not adequately addressed and unmitigated effects could occur if the Foothill tollway is eventually built.
(Source: LA Times, 3/17/2015)

In November 2016, it was reported that Orange County tollway officials agreed in a legal settlement in November 2016 to preserve San Onofre State Beach and withdraw their approval of a six-lane highway through the popular park. The new agreement ends five lawsuits that targeted plans to lengthen the Foothill South toll road 16 miles to I-5 in north San Diego County, using a portion of the state beach, which includes wildlife habitat, campgrounds, Indian sites and heavily used surf breaks, including Trestles. The settlement also requires the Transportation Corridor Agencies in Irvine to rescind approval of the proposed 5˝-mile Tesoro Extension, which environmentalists called a possible attempt to resurrect the route through San Onofre. Agency board members voted 10-2 to end the lawsuits brought in 2006 and 2011 by the state of California, the California Parks and Recreation Commission, the Native American Heritage Commission and the Save San Onofre Coalition. The lawsuits claimed that the environmental impact reports for both projects were inadequate and that the Foothill South extension would damage valuable open space, a local land conservancy and one of the most popular parks in the state. The settlement will allow the corridor agency to consider a variety of transportation options, including a different Foothill South project, while protecting San Onofre, the San Mateo Creek watershed, the Richard and Donna O’Neill Conservancy and Indian sites, such as the ancient village of Panhe. Under the agreement, the agency can assess the environmental impacts of alternate routes for connecting the Foothill tollway to I-5 that avoid San Onofre, valuable open space, wildlife habitat and culturally sensitive areas. The settlement also calls for the agency to create a $28-million conservation fund that will help preserve the largely intact San Mateo Creek watershed that drains into the ocean at Trestles, one of the state’s best surfing spots.
(Source: LA Times, 11/9/2016)

Rte 241 S ProposalsIn September 2017, it was reported that the Mayor of San Clemente just realized that a toll road that the Transportation Corridor Agency is considering merging onto I-5 near Avenida Pico would fly over a former Carrows Restaurant that borders San Clemente High School. Mayor Kathy Ward, who represents the city on the TCA’s board of directors, said she was given a tour of potential south Orange County toll road routes that are part of a TCA mobility study. She said she was shocked to see how close an envisioned bridge onto I-5 would pass the high school. Ward said she had thought, based on a decade-old TCA environmental study, that a potential Route 241 alignment would hug a hillside below St. Andrews Methodist Church and descend to I-5 at the Pico interchange. Mike Chesney, chief strategy officer for the TCA, said Wednesday, Sept. 6, that the environmental process will need to vet any alignments that might be proposed as a result of the mobility study. But at this point he said it appears the potential alignment shown to Mayor Ward could be designed without physical impacts to the high school. San Clemente’s City Council has declared its opposition to any toll road slicing through the city. The city’s website states opposition to any toll road that would divide a community. The city and a homeowner association are suing the TCA, challenging a protective zone that was created in a lawsuit settlement the TCA reached in November 2016 with environmental groups. The city says the avoidance zone, designed to protect the area around Trestles Beach, cornered the TCA into trying to push Route 241 through one established community or another in south Orange County to connect to I-5. Mark McGuire, a San Clemente attorney who has questioned Route 241 dumping more traffic onto I-5 within established communities, told the City Council he was pleased to hear people in Ladera Ranch, Mission Viejo and San Juan Capistrano are advocating keeping Rancho Mission Viejo’s Los Patrones Parkway a free road. Los Patrones is an arterial highway being built by the ranch development to link Oso Parkway and Route 241 with Cow Camp Road, near Ortega Highway. McGuire said advocates want it to remain free and not be turned over to the TCA as an extension of the Route 241 Toll Road south of Oso.
(Source: OC Register, 9/6/2017)

In March 2018, it was reported that San Clemente officials releasing a study they said shows the project to extend a toll road through their city or adjacent wilderness areas would be a costly boondoggle that wouldn’t improve traffic. The Transportation Corridor Agencies, which operate four toll roads in southern and eastern Orange County, is exploring several options for a new north-south corridor that could ease congestion on I-5 by connecting drivers to the Route 241 toll road. The city already is challenging a lawsuit settlement the TCA reached in 2016 with environmental groups seeking to protect Trestles Beach, a popular surf spot just south of San Clemente. The $89,000, city-commissioned study concluded that if Route 241 is extended, by 2040 drivers would be traveling more miles and and experiencing more delays than if the project were not built. San Clemente officials disputed the idea the TCA is needed, aside from managing existing toll roads and paying off their debts. They felt that the time has come to ask for one transportation agency (OCTA) to control all transportation planning in this county.
(Source: OC Register, 3/1/2018)

In May 2018, it was reported that the battle over a proposed toll road extension in South Orange County may be fought next in Sacramento, after Assemblyman Rocky Chávez drafted a bill that would limit the powers of the agencies that operate a tollway system in the eastern and southern reaches of the county. Under the bill that Chávez, R-Oceanside, introduced, the Transportation Corridor Agencies would be barred from issuing new debt or forming a new entity to build additional toll roads. The bill if passed also would designate the Orange County Transportation Authority as the county’s sole traffic and transit planner. Officials in San Clemente, who support Chávez’s bill, have clashed with the TCA over proposed routes for extending the Route 241 toll road through or alongside their city to connect it with I-5. TCA officials continue to study possible extensions, but haven’t chosen a specific route and have not released cost estimates for the various options.
(Source: OC Register, 5/10/2018)

In March 2019, the LA Times reported on an investigation into the consulting firms used to wage a multimillion-dollar public outreach campaign to win public support for the toll road extension. Billing records reviewed by The Times show a consultant at one firm was paid for working 28 hours in a single day. Another consulting firm received nearly $230,000 for more than 1,300 hours spent reading “emails of news from transportation stories; evaluate reporter perspectives” at up to $185 an hour, the records show. Meanwhile, the authority paid yet another consultant more than $3,000 a month to compile news stories at $90 an hour, according to the bills. There was a $380,000 budget in one year to produce content for two small websites and social media accounts for the tollway authority, as well as marketing to specific audiences. Jeff Corless, chief executive and president of the firm that has received the most money, Venture Strategic Inc., said some costs were incurred from tracking and responding to misinformation put out by San Clemente and a flood of emails he said the city had encouraged people to send. “Their method is to tear down and destroy and spread misinformation and create confusion,” Corless said. The source of the problem appears to be an “antagonizing” campaign waged by San Clemente’s own consulting firm, Los Angeles-based Englander, Knabe & Allen, which had lost out to Venture Strategic in bidding for the tollway agency’s contract. The firm’s strategic proposal to San Clemente invoked Sun Tzu’s “The Art of War” in explaining how it would battle the toll road extension, and mentioned filing public records requests for consultants’ fees as one of its weapons. City records show the firm in late 2017 was paid nearly $100,000. Late Feb. 2019, after The Times asked about the spending, the Transportation Corridor Agencies announced that a “routine audit” had identified some double-billings, but that the lead consultant had actually underbilled, leaving the agency owing more than $4,500. The joint authority’s chief strategy officer, Mike Chesney, defended the consultants’ work as essential to “help us navigate” the controversies that have plagued the project. He said the firms have been effective in engaging the public in the agency’s planning.
(Source: LA Times, 3/11/2019)

Los Patrones Parkway

Los Patrones ParkwayIn September 2018, it was reported that the first section of the new Los Patrones Parkway opened after the morning commute on Wednesday, Sept. 12. The road gives residents of the growing Rancho Mission Viejo and nearby South County neighborhoods another route for accessing the Route 241 toll road and other major roadways out of the region. The first completed phase of the 4.5-mile parkway connects Oso Parkway to Chiquita Canyon Drive. A later segment, expected to open this year, will connect south to Cow Camp Road. Rancho Mission Viejo funded the construction of the road, but it will be owned by the county. Los Patrones Parkway is a free public road. It had been discussed at one point as an extension of Route 241, but the county reached an agreement with San Clemente in 2017 reiterating the road will be free to drive. But, a project started earlier this summer to turn Oso Parkway into a bridge over Los Patrones will make it so drivers can connect straight to the toll road without having to encounter the stop lights at Oso Parkway. That $30 million county project is expected to be completed in 2020. Construction of the four-lane parkway included two wildlife crossings that will let animals walk under the road. The crossings are more than 200 feet long and are expected to be used by deer, bobcats, coyotes and other animals. There are additional paths under the road for smaller animals. The fencing was also designed with a tighter weave at the bottom to keep out smaller animals and it’s tall enough to bar larger animals.
(Source: OC Register, 9/11/2018)

A project in the making since 2004, Los Patrones Parkway (LPP) (formerly named “F” Street) was approved by the Orange County Board of Supervisors as an arterial highway providing traffic relief for future proposed development within Rancho Mission Viejo Community Development, LLC. (RMV) and South Orange County. LPP will be a newly built arterial highway with four lanes (two in each direction) with connections at Oso Parkway, Chiquita Canyon Drive, and Cow Camp Road. RMV is leading the $103 million LPP Project with regulatory oversight from OCPW, environmental agencies, and Caltrans District 12 (for the Oso Parkway connection). Currently, OCPW, is providing inspection services and, together with Caltrans District 12, will provide compliance oversight. The contractor was hired by RMV and construction is being administered by RMV. Construction of the project began in 2015 and completion is planned in 2018. Project grading is nearly complete. Phase 1, from Oso Parkway to Chiquita Canyon Drive, is scheduled for completion to be open for traffic in Spring 2018. Phase 2, from Chiquita Canyon Drive to Cow Camp Road, is planned to be completed 2018.
(Source: OC Public Works, July 2017)

In support of this project, the Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) and Orange County Public Works initiated a project to a portion of Oso Parkway with a new bridge structure to provide motorists with a direct connection between Los Patrones Parkway and Route 241. The new bridge will improve traffic flow and enhance safety on Oso Parkway and direct access to the 241 Toll Road will support traffic flow in the area. Construction of the Oso Parkway Bridge began in August 2018. The Oso Parkway Bridge Project consists of constructing an overcrossing bridge structure for a portion of Oso Parkway to allow the connection of Los Patrones Parkway to Route 241. The future bridge will contain six lanes (three in each direction), sidewalks and dedicated bike lanes for public use. Pedestrian access to Tesoro High School will be improved with the construction of a new sidewalk on the south side of Oso Parkway. Los Patrones Parkway will terminate at Oso Parkway via a northbound off ramp and a southbound on ramp. The Oso Parkway Bridge project includes constructing the roadway to connect the north end of Los Patrones Parkway to the Route 241 Toll Road under the bridge structure. Construction began in August 2018 and is expected to last approximately two years. Construction work is scheduled weekdays, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. with limited night work. Two lanes will remain open on Oso Parkway at all times.
(Source: TCA: Oso Parkway Bridge page, 11/17/2018)

At the end of December 2018, it was reported that one of the projects planned in Orange County was the Oso Parkway Bridge, where a portion of Oso Parkway at Los Patrones Parkway near Las Flores is being converted into a bridge to allow drivers to connect directly between Route 241 and Los Patrones Parkway. Period: Completion by Fall 2020. Cost: $30 million.
(Source: OC Register, 12/31/2018)

Cow Camp Road

Cow Camp Road is designated on the County of Orange Master Plan of Arterial Highways as an east-west Major and Primary Arterial Highway. Cow Camp Road is also part of the County of Orange-approved 2004 SCRIP plan. Upon its completion, Cow Camp Road will begin at Antonio Parkway (north of San Juan Creek) and extend to the east, ultimately connecting to Ortega Highway (Route 74), near Caspers Wilderness Park. It will intersect with Los Patrones Parkway, an important north-south arterial highway, which will connect to Oso Parkway at the north. Upon its total completion to Ortega Highway, Cow Camp Road will be four miles long and will provide three lanes in each direction for a total of six lanes. In addition, Cow Camp Road will provide a parallel route to the two-lane Ortega Highway, thereby providing commuter traffic relief and creating an alternative route due to occasional Ortega Highway flooding, accidents and other causes of closures.
(Source: Rancho Mission Viejo Transportation Fact Sheet, 2/2018)

Cow Camp Road Segment 1 is approximately 1.5 miles and runs east from Antonio Parkway to the eastern border of Esencia village (just past Los Patrones Parkway) on Rancho Mission Viejo. Segment 1 includes the construction of the Chiquita Canyon Bridge which spans 1,420 linear feet over Chiquita Creek and rises 75 feet above protected open spaces of Chiquita Canyon. Cow Camp Road Segment 2 is divided into multiple phases, the first two of which will be 1.5 miles in length and run extending east from the edge of Esencia village (from Las Patrones Parkway) to the future Planning Area 3 (PA-3) and include the construction of the bridge that will extend about 1,400 linear feet over Gobernadora Canyon. The remaining phases will extend Cow Camp Road easterly to Ortega Highway and are also in engineering design. The cost of Phases 2-A and 2-B is anticipated to be approximately $42 million with funding provided by a grant from OCTA ($14.3 million) and the remainder in assessments collected through Community Facilities Districts encompassing Rancho Mission Viejo property owners. Construction of the first two phases is expected to commence in spring 2018 in anticipation of completion in 2020.
(Source: Rancho Mission Viejo Transportation Fact Sheet, 2/2018)

La Pata Road Extension

Rancho Mission Viejo is also working to extend La Pata Road. The extension of La Pata Road from Ortega Highway, south to Avenida Vista Hermosa established an important South Orange County parallel to the I-5 Freeway, allowing commuters to bypass the I-5 as they travel from as far north as Rancho Santa Margarita via Antonio Parkway, and south to La Pata and San Clemente where they can connect to the I-5 Freeway from Avenida Vista Hermosa. In addition, the construction of Los Patrones Parkway establishes a new toll road-to-freeway network, starting from the current terminus of the Route 241 toll road at Oso Parkway heading south along Los Patrones Parkway, to Cow Camp Road, and then south again along Antonio Parkway/La Pata Road to Avenida Vista Hermosa.
(Source: Rancho Mission Viejo Transportation Fact Sheet, 2/2018)

Route 241 to Route 91 Connectors 12-ORA-241 (PM 36.1/39.1)

Rte 241 Rte 91 ConnectorsIn November 2016, it was noted that the Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA), in coordination with Caltrans, is proposing to add a direct connector linking the northbound Route 241 Toll Road to the eastbound Route 91 Express Lanes and the westbound Route 91 Express Lanes to the southbound Route 241 Toll Road. The direct, median-to-median tolled connector would reduce traffic congestion in both directions, enhance safety by reducing weaving across lanes and improve access to toll lanes in Orange and Riverside Counties. The 60-day public comment period for the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement closed on January 9, 2017. The Project Development Team is reviewing and evaluating all comments received. Responses to these comments will be included in the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Record of Decision (FEIS/ROD) in approximately December 2017. (Note that as of March 2019, there were still no updates on this project).
(Source: District 12 Project Page)

According to the Draft SEIR, the Proposed Project, located at the junction of Route 241 and Route 91 in the cities of Anaheim, Yorba Linda, and Corona, and the counties of Orange and Riverside, would provide improved access between Route 241 and Route 91, and is proposed to be a tolled facility. The proposed median-to-median connector project encompasses 12-ORA-241 (PM 36.1/39.1), 12-ORA-91 (PM 14.7/18.9), and 08-RIV-91 (PM 0.0/1.5) for a total length of approximately 8.7 miles (mi). The improvements for the connector include 5.9 mi in the cities of Anaheim and Yorba Linda and unincorporated Orange County, from south of Windy Ridge Wildlife Undercrossing on Route 241 to Coal Canyon Undercrossing on Route 91. The remaining 2.8 mi of the Proposed Project include signage improvements (advance signage) in the cities of Anaheim (1.2 mi), Yorba Linda (0.1 mi), and Corona (1.5 mi) and unincorporated Orange and Riverside counties, with exact placement of the signage pending the Final Design process. The Proposed Project is mostly within existing California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) right-of-way, with one partial acquisition required adjacent to eastbound Route 91. Construction access and staging areas would occur within existing Caltrans right-of-way and the partial acquisition adjacent to eastbound Route 91 as noted above. The objectives of the Proposed Project are to implement the buildout of the Eastern Transportation Corridor (ETC), attain compatibility with the Route 91 mainline and 91 Express Lanes configuration, improve operations and traffic flow between the 91 Express Lanes and the Route 241 general purpose connectors, help achieve the Regional Mobility Plan goals of reducing emissions from transportation sources, and enhance the efficiency of the tolled system, thereby reducing congestion on the non-tolled system on Route 91. The Proposed Project is needed to provide a direct connection between Route 241 and the 91 Express Lanes to accommodate the buildout of the ETC as well as existing and future transportation demand. The proposed median-to-median connector is a later phase of the ETC project, previously approved in 1994. It was originally evaluated as a Route 241/Route 91 highoccupancy vehicle (HOV) direct connector in the 1991 ETC Draft Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement (Draft EIR/EIS), 1992 ETC Final EIR, and the 1994 ETC Final EIS (all of which studied a broader Project Area with improvements on Route 133, Route 241, and Route 261. There was only one build alternative and the no-build alternative.
(Source: Draft SEIR for Rte 241/Rte 91 Connectors, Project Alternatives Chapter)

The Build Alternative would construct a two-lane express lane median-to-median connector between Route 241 and Route 91, which would connect lanes from the median of northbound Route 241 to the existing eastbound median 91 Express Lanes and the reverse movement from the westbound median 91 Express Lanes to the median of southbound Route 241. The connector would be tolled. The Build Alternative would merge into the existing Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) 91 Express Lanes at Coal Canyon Undercrossing. The Riverside County Transportation Commission’s (RCTC) Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (CIP) will extend the express lanes on Route 91 east to I-15. The Build Alternative is compatible with the approved Route 91 CIP for both the initial and ultimate configurations, including the number and widths of the express lanes, express auxiliary lanes, and general purpose lanes.

In December 2017, it was reported that OCTA leaders have pushed for a delay on any plans for a $180 million ramp linking the Route 241 toll road and Route 91 Freeway Express Lanes (~ ORA R16.184) over fears the project could increase congestion on both the freeway and the tollway that runs along the middle of it. The 10-3 vote by the Orange County Transportation Authority’s board requests that the Transportation Corridor Agencies – the public agency that runs the Route 241 toll road and is the driving force behind the proposed connector – slow down on plans for an elaborate ramp connecting the paid traffic lanes. Instead, the OCTA board directed its staffers to work with the Riverside County Transportation Commission to come up with big-picture proposals on how to improve the chronically congested traffic lanes on Route 91. The vote follows a recommendation earlier this month by the OCTA’s Executive Committee. It is unclear if the project could proceed without the backing of the OCTA, which owns the 91 Express Lanes. Rush-hour commuters coming from south and central Orange County going to Riverside County who are willing to pay tolls to avoid as much congestion as possible must choose: Take Route 241 and endure the Route 91 freeway, because drivers can’t enter the Route 91 Express Lanes at that point. Or endure traffic before reaching the Route 91 Express Lanes. It takes a long leg in the middle to take both. The ramp would connect the tollways in both directions, although public debate has focused on the eastbound direction. The Transportation Corridor Agencies touts the Route 241/Express Lanes connector as key to decreasing congestion, creating more efficient toll lanes and improving safety for drivers who would no longer have to weave over multiple lanes of traffic to move between Route 241 and 91 Express Lanes at the county border. That is the first place motorists coming from Orange County can exit the Express Lanes; they can enter it there, too. OCTA’s staffers, however, disagree. They say the connector would lure more motorists to the overall corridor, and create more weaving at the Orange County/Riverside County line. Orange County Supervisor Shawn Nelson questioned why if Caltrans thought the current freeway setup was so dangerous its officials didn’t do something about it when Route 241 was first built.
(Source: OC Register, 12/11/2017)

In December 2017, it was reported that Orange County Transportation Authority staffers fearful of increased congestion on the Route 91 freeway and the adjacent 91 Express Lanes want Route 241 toll road leaders to pump the brakes on plans for a $180 million ramp linking Route 241 and the Express Lanes. Further, an executive committee, comprised of seven OCTA board members, backed that opposition, preferring that the Transportation Corridor Agencies, which manages Route 241, to defer any work on the planned connector. Leaders of the Riverside County Transportation Commission have raised similar concerns about the elaborate ramp increasing traffic and congestion. The project would create a clear shot from Route 241, which runs between south and north Orange County along its eastern side, to the 91 Express Lanes that roll along the middle of Route 91 into Riverside County, bypassing typical freeway traffic the entire route for those willing to pay tolls. Caltrans, which serves as owner and operator of state freeways, has approved the draft environmental plan for the connector, said Caltrans spokeswoman Lindsey Hart. The agency is still analyzing traffic data and public comments about the connector to “determine the potential traffic benefits of the project,” she added. The TCA was hoping to complete the final design of the connector in early 2018. If approved, construction could begin in early 2019 and take about two years to complete.
(Source: Orange County Register, 12/17/2017)

In April 2019, it was noted that concerns about the Route 241/Route 91 transition have prompted Transportation Corridor Agencies (TCA) officials to add increased signage, and double white lines in an attempt to deter drivers from cutting into the NB Route 241 to EB Route 91 transition at the last minute. But even an increased number of law enforcement officers issuing citations doesn't seem to be deterring drivers from illegally cutting across the double white lines. TCA is also considering both short-term and long-term fixes to this problem. One option includes installing pylons, also called delineators or channelizers, between the eastbound and westbound transition lanes. A feasibility study is currently underway, but TCA would not give a time frame on the project. Ultimately, the decision on whether to install channelizers up to Caltrans. Caltrans is in discussions with TCA about the potential use of delineators, centering around various items including who will maintain them, what benefit they will add, and if they are safe to place at this location. They want to ensure that the delineators are set up in a way that those who are maintaining them can do so safely, as well as understanding the impacts that delineators can have on weaving (merging) vehicles, the study of current traffic patterns, and what types of traffic management actions will be needed to maintain the delineators. As noted above, the long-term fix is the dedicated connector. Construction could begin in 2021, with completion in 2023.
(Source: ABC 7, 4/16/2019)

In May 2019, it was reported that Caltrans received a 23-page letter from Riverside County transportation officials about all the things they think are wrong with plans for bridges that would let toll road drivers bypass lanes of traffic to get between the Route 241 and Route 91 freeways. The state agency and toll road officials say they’re taking seriously those concerns – also shared by Orange County’s transit agency – as they decide whether to start designing the $180 million ramps, but “as of now we are moving forward with the project,” Caltrans spokesman David Matza said. Riverside and Orange county officials fear solving backups on the Route 241 toll road will make things worse on the Route 91 unless the fixes they’re planning on the Riverside Freeway are done first. They also question traffic study data they say is too old and inconsistent. The four agencies appear set for a turf battle: on one side are Caltrans, which owns the state highway system, and the Transportation Corridor Agencies, which manage Orange County’s toll roads; on the other, the Riverside and Orange county transit agencies, which have typically taken the lead on long-term planning and funding for new local freeway projects. Everyone agrees building a direct path between the Route 241 toll road and Route 91 express lanes ultimately would help clear backups and improve safety. Toll road officials want to solve congestion near the Route 241 Windy Ridge toll plaza, where northbound cars are funneled onto the eastbound Route 91. Using the existing medians, the proposed bridges would provide a direct route into the 91 express lanes; in the other direction, there’s currently no way to get from the westbound Route 91 express lanes to southbound Route 241. Orange and Riverside county transit officials want time to do three other projects intended to loosen choke points between I-15 and the Orange County line: building another westbound lane on Route 91 from Green River Road to Route 241; adding ramps to move cars from the Route 91 express lanes to the I-15; and replacing a hairpin-turn offramp from Route 91 east to Route 71 north with a flyover ramp that wouldn’t slow traffic as much. If TCA’s new ramps are built and opened first, they could dump hundreds more cars into the Route 91 express lanes at peak drive times, forcing some drivers into already crowded general purpose lanes, Orange County Transportation Authority spokesman Joel Zlotnik said. (Drivers would pay an additional toll to use the new bridges.) The timeline for at least one of the projects on Route 91 remains uncertain. The added westbound lane and I-15 connector project could be done in 2022, but officials don’t yet have funding for construction of the Route 71 interchange. Caltrans is nearly done with the environmental analysis, after which design can begin. A two-year construction schedule could wrap up in 2023.
(Source: OC Register (Paywall), 5/22/2019)

Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Orange 241 24.71 25.20
Orange 241 25.25 26.85

Commuter Lanes Commuter Lanes

There are plans for Route 241 to have HOV lanes.

Exit Information Exit Information

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Status Status

Under Construction Portions of the route are under construction, but most of the route is now open.

There are regional transportation improvement plans to do further widening of this route between I-5 and Oso Parkway.

Naming Naming

This is the "Foothill Transportation Corridor" and the "Eastern Transportation Corridor".

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 241:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 32 defined LRN 241 as “[LRN 2] near San Ysidro to [LRN 2] near the northwest boundary of the City of San Diego, easterly of existing [LRN 2]”. The urgency language noted that this was "north-south" belt-line route around the heavily populated portions of San Diego County, particularly the City of San Diego.

This is present-day I-805.


State Shield

State Route 242


Routing Routing

Rte 242From Route 680 to Route 4 north of Concord.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

This route remains as defined in 1963. It was not signed as Route 242 until the late 1980s.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 75 (defined in 1931). It was originally part of Route 24, but became Route 242 after a bypass route between Walnut Creek at Pittsburg was defined. It was first signed as part of Route 24 in 1935; the last state highway map showing it as Route 24 is in 1986. There are varying dates for the start of the Route 242 signage from 1989 to 1991. The bypass is LRN 256, defined in 1959.

By 1955, this segment (as Route 24) was shown as complete between the Ohmer Hill1 area of Concord (near Port Chicago) south to Concord Avenue, and "proposed" between there and the current I-680 junction in Pleasant Hill. Between Route 21 and the ending of the now-Route 242 freeway, Route 24 took Monument Boulevard, Galindo Street, and Concord Avenue.


1: Locality Naming Note: Ohmer Hill is a current site of a BART station, and used to be a stop on the Sacramento Northern RR. The namesake of the hill, Ohmer Fare Register Company, was a Ohio company that had incorporated back in the 19th century and was in the business of making taxi fare meters as well as those on the Sacramento Northern. The company was merged into NCR.

Status Status

242 improvements at clayton roadIn August 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding 04-CC-242, PM R0.1/R1.9 Route 242/Clayton Road Ramps Project. This project in Contra Costa County will modify and improve the interchange and on/off ramps at the Route 242/Clayton Road interchange in the city of Concord. The project is not fully funded. The estimated project cost is $65.7 million. $34.7 million is currently programmed in the Reginal Transportation Plan. The project start date will be determined when total funding is finalized. A copy of the ND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will result in less than significant impacts to the environment. As a result, an ND was completed for this project.

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Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Contra Costa 242 0.00 R3.40

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 242:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1382 defined LRN 242 as “[LRN 6] between Harbor Boulevard and the Yolo Causeway west of Sacramento to [LRN 3] near Watt Avenue”. This route ran from US 40 (present-day I-80) between Harbor Blvd. and the Yolo Causeway W of Sacramento to US 40 (present-day I-80) near Watt Avenue. This is the present-day freeway routing of I-80 N of the city of Sacramento.


State Shield

State Route 243


Routing Routing

Rte 243From Route 74 near Mountain Center to Route 10 near Banning.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 243 was defined as “Route 10 to Route 210 near Duarte.”

In 1968, Chapter 282 deleted this routing and transferred it to I-605. According to the September 1965 CalTrans planning map, Route 243 was to be freeway between I-10 and I-210 along what is now I-605.

State Shield In 1970, Chapter 1473 redefined Route 243 as “Route 74 near Mountain Center to Route 10 near Banning.”

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1968 incarnation of Route 243 was LRN 170.

The post-1970 incarnation of Route 243 existed in 1963, but was not part of the state highway system. It was Banning-Idyllwild Road.

Status Status

Winter 2018 Storm Damage (~ RIV 9.985 to RIV 16.937; Failed Culvert at RIV 15.6)

Storm Related ClosuresIn December 2018, it was reported that Caltrans was closing a three-tenths-mile section of Route 243, about one mile northwest of picturesque Lake Fulmor (~ RIV 15.5), to replace an aging drain pipe under the road. With waves of storms sweeping across Southern California, there is concern the pipe may not be able to handle runoff and that water could spill over the highway and damage it.
(Source: Press Enterprise, 12/6/2018)

In January 2019, the CTC received a report of the following emergency allocation: $1,150,000 Riverside 08-Riv-243 15.6. Route 243 Near Idyllwild, 1.1 miles north of Lake Fulmor Bridge. On September 11, 2018, field investigation determined a misaligned culvert had joint separation and caused pavement distress and embankment erosion. This project will replace the 36 inch Reinforced Concrete Pipe (RCP), restore embankment, and repair the distressed pavement.
(Source: January 2019 CTC Minutes Agenda Item 2.5f.(1) Item 8)

In January 2019, the CTC approved adding the following project into the SHOPP: 08-Riv-243 15.6 PPNO 3012Y. Proj ID 0819000024. EA 1K350. Route 243 Near Idyllwild, 1.1 miles north of Lake Fulmor. Bridge. Replace failed culvert. Total: $1,370,000.
(Source: January 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a(1) Item 7)

In February 2019, it was reported that an emergency contract for $8 million was awarded to Ames Construction to make the repairs to Route 243 and Route 74 near Lake Fulmor to repair roadway damage from the Winter 2019 storms. In mid-February, it was noted that there was a new collapse on Route 74, and Route 243 washed out about a mile from where a waterfall destroyed the road the day before, north of Lake Fulmor. The only way into Idyllwild is from Palm Desert along Route 74, known as the Palms to Pines Highway, Caltrans said. Even then, that path is open only to residents and business owners/employees. According to a Caltrans news release, a large hole formed underneath the road after heavy rains eroded the soil. As the rain poured down, the hole made way for a fast-flowing waterfall. The highway will be closed between I-10 Freeway and the city of Idyllwild for at least two months.
(Source: Press Enterprise, 2/15/2019; LA Times, 2/19/2019)

In March 2019, it was reported that it may be Summer 2019 before Route 74 and Route 243 completely reopen to the general public due to the extensive repair work required to restore the corridors, both of which were severely damaged during a mid-February storm event, Caltrans announced. "There are over 25 locations on Route 243 with damage, including two locations with complete road loss," according to a Caltrans statement. "Route 74 has over 40 locations that will require repairs. At this time, Caltrans is estimating at least four months before public access or reopening of both highways can take place." The worst of the damage was in the area of Lake Fulmor, between Pine Cove and Banning, where Route 243 completely collapsed and disappeared amid torrential downpours and mud flows on Feb . 14. Another segment of the two-lane, 30-mile corridor, which is the primary north-south artery through the southern half of the San Bernardino National Forest, also gave way south of Idyllwild. The entire highway is out of service between I-10 and Idyllwild, while the southern half between Mountain Center and Idyllwild is accessible to residents and business owners. A 15-mile segment of Route 74 is out of service because of the storm damage, which caused washouts and sinkholes. A portion of the highway at the Strawberry Creek crossing, roughly three miles west of Mountain Center, collapsed after it was compromised by runoff. The highway is closed from Valle Vista, just east of Hemet, to Mountain Center. As of March 28, 2019, it was reported that Ames Construction is continuing the $8 million emergency repairs to roadbeds, slopes, culverts and other items of work on both Route 74 and Route 243, working twenty-four (24) hour shifts to rebuild the routes. It was estimated that by May 2019, Caltrans will provide access to motorists on Route 74 under escort for three hours in the morning (4 a.m. to 7 a.m.) and three hours in the late evening (6 p.m. to 9 p.m.). In late April 2019, Caltrans expected to open Route 243 from Idyllwild to Lake Fulmor. The contractor will continue work to prepare for full access to motorists on Route 243 with flagging conditions in the coming months.
(Source: Palm Desert Patch, 3/12/2019; Caltrans District 8 Commuter Alert, 3/28/2019)

In April 2019, it was reported that a portion of Route 243 in Idyllwild was reopening on Mon 4/8/2019. Access from Idyllwild to Lake Fulmor on Route 243 will now be allowed. Additionally, the public will be able to access the Lake Fulmor Day-Use Area as well as Hall Decker Rd.
(Source: Caltrans District 8 Commuter Alert 4/8/2019)

In May 2019, it was reported that additional May rains that further damaged the already crumbling roadways shattered by heavy rains on Feb. 14. Caltrans officials said work on Route 74 was delayed at least two months and reconstruction on Route 243 has no time frame for completion. Initial estimates indicated Route 74 would reopen by Memorial Day and Route 243 perhaps by year's end.
(Source: Desert Sun, 5/30/2019)

In June 2019, the CTC approved the following amendment to the SHOPP: Major Damage Restoration Item 20: 08-Riv-243 0.0/28.0 PPNO 3013N ProjID 0819000058. Route 243 Near Banning, from Route 74 to 0.3 mile south of Wesley Street; also on Route 74 from Willowbrook Road to 0.1 mile east of Devils Ladder Road (PM R47.0/70.0). Repair roadway washouts, damaged pavement, embankment, guardrail, and culverts. PA&ED $200K; PS&E $200K; R/W Sup $10K; Con Sup $1,200K; R/W Cap $200K; Const Cap $7,950K; Total $9,760K.
(Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1) MDR Item 20)

In June 2019, the CTC was informed of the following emergency allocation: $32,650,000 for 08-Riv-243 0.0/28.0 PPNO 08-3013N. ProjID 0819000058. Route 243 Near Banning, from Route 74 to 0.3 mile south of Wesley Street; also on Route 74, from Willowbrook Road to 0.1 mile east of Devils Ladder Road (PM R47.0/70.0). On February 14, 2019 intense rainfall caused flooding, erosion, and undermining at various locations along Route 243 and Route 74. This project will excavate and backfill damaged roadway, remove debris, reconstruct slope embankment, and repair guardrail and damaged drainage systems. After the receding of flood water that then allowed assess to all damaged areas, supplemental funds became necessary to address expanded damaged locations. This supplemental is the same scope of work but is required to complete the project due to the increased magnitude of the damaged roadway. R/W Cap. $200,000. Const. $29,950,000 Const. Engr. $2,700,000.
(Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes Agenda Item 2.5f.(1) Item 21)

In June 2019, it was reported that Caltrans has said there’s no projection for when the heavily damaged Route 243 will reopen, and it could stay shut until next year.
(Source: KTLA, 6/25/2019)

Naming Naming

Route 243 is named the "Esperanza Firefighters Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of the five heroic firefighters of Engine Company #57, Mark Loutzenhiser, Daniel Hoover-Najera, Jason McKay, Jess McLean, and Pablo Cerda, who fought valorously to contain the fire while protecting lives and property fighting the wildfire known as the Esperanza Fire, which began at the Esperanza and San Gorgonio Wash in Riverside County on October 21, 2006, at 1:12 a.m., eventually consumed 40,200 acres. While unselfishly serving their community with great honor and dedication on October 26, 2006, these five firefighters were overrun by the flames of the Esperanza Fire. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 4, Resolution Chapter 99, on 7/12/2007.

Scenic Route Scenic Route

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

Interregional Route Interregional Route

[SHC 164.19] Entire route.

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Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 243:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 243 as “[LRN 89] south of Kelseyville to [LRN 49] near Lower Lake”. This route runs from Route 29 S of Kelseyville to Route 53 near Lower Lake. This is part of present-day Route 29.


State Shield

State Route 244


Routing Routing

Rte 244From Route 80 to Auburn Boulevard in Carmichael.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 244 was defined as “Route 80 to Route 65 near Fair Oaks.”

In 1965, Chapter 1371 extended the route from Route 65 to Route 50: “Route 80 to Route 65 Route 50 near Fair Oaks.”

In 1975, Chapter 244 deleted the portion from Fair Oaks Boulevard near San Juan Avenue to Route 50, leaving “Route 80 near Watt Avenue to Route 50 near Fair Oaks Boulevard near San Juan Avenue.”

The 1975 act also noted:

“The department and State Transportation Board shall cooperate with the County of Sacramento and the Sacramento Regional Area Planning Commission in the transportation corridor study conducted by the county and the commission on the adopted route for Route 244. Such cooperation by the state shall be limited to furnishing existing data.

The department shall not, prior to July 1, 1976, or such later date as adopted by the California Highway Commission, dispose of any real property acquired for the construction of Route 244 as a freeway from Auburn Boulevard to Fair Oaks Boulevard, except for such real property which, as mutually agreed by the department and the county, is not required for any transportation purpose. If, at such a date, the transportation corridor study indicates the other real property is required for any transportation purpose, the department shall not dispose of the real property prior to January 1, 1977.”

In 1984, Chapter 409 relaxed the definition: “Route 80 near Wall Avenue to Fair Oaks Boulevard near San Juan Avenue.”

In 1990, Chapter 1187 clarified the definition: “Route 80 to Fair Oaks Boulevard near San Juan Avenue in Carmichael.”

In 1994, Chapter 1220 deleted the portion from Auburn Boulevard to Fair Oaks Boulevard, giving: “Route 80 to Fair Oaks Boulevard near San Juan Avenue Auburn Boulevard in Carmichael.” This left the terminus as Auburn Blvd (the route is constructed as freeway for 0.6 mi from I-80 to Auburn Blvd). This left the meaning of Route 143 unclear, as it originally split off of Route 244 about 3/4 mi NE of the present Route 244 terminus. However, Caltrans maps show that the segment from Auburn Blvd to Route 143 is now part of Route 143.

Note that Route 244 could have formed the eastern half of a loop around Sacramento with present-day I-80 (former I-880).

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This was all originally part of LRN 288, defined in 1959.

Status Status

[244-parcel][Parcel Satellite]In August 2008, Caltrans listed for sale three acres of commercial property in the Foothill Farms area with prime freeway access, a location seen by thousands of motorists a day and a history that includes one of Sacramento County's most contentious times. The 3.27 acres were a portion of Route 244, which was supposed to connect I-80 and US 50 and which would have cut a swath through the heart of Carmichael. It was one of three freeways long planned to relieve congestion in the county's northern and eastern suburbs. After the state spent $10.6 million to acquire right of way for the routes, a series of volatile public hearings began in early 1972. The forums ended after fierce debate in mid-1976, when a split county Board of Supervisors abandoned plans for the 45.4 miles of freeways. The property is adjacent to what is today the Auburn Boulevard access to the Capital City Freeway and I-80. The section that's for sale is 1,100 feet long by 350 feet wide. It is a vacant lot generally level at street grade. Since it is next to four freeway access points, the only entrance allowed is along a 65-foot strip facing Auburn Boulevard. Minimum bid is nearly $1.18 million.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $7,000,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Sacramento, from Madison Avenue Overcrossing to Placer County Line; also on Route 244 from Route 80 to Auburn Boulevard, that will rehabilitate 61.2 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the traveling surface, minimize costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

Naming Naming

This is usally referred to as the "Auburn Boulevard Connector". Note that, according to Calnexus, it would be signed as Route 244.

Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Sacramento 244 0.00 0.68

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.8] From Route 80 to Auburn Boulevard. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. In 1975, the freeway portion from Auburn to Fair Oaks was deleted.

Exit Information Exit Information

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Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 244:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 244 as “[LRN 7] near Vacaville to [LRN 6] near Berryessa Reservoir”. This is present-day proposed Route 179.


State Shield

State Route 245


Routing Routing

Rte 245From Route 198 to Route 180 near the General Grant Grove section of Kings Canyon National Park.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 245 was defined as the route from "Route 5 near Los Angeles to Route 60 at the intersection of Downey Road." This may have been a temporary routing related to construction of the downtown interchanges.

In 1965, Chapter 1372 deleted that routing.

State Shield In 1972, Chapter 1216 redefined Route 245 as “Route 198 to Route 180 near the General Grant Grove section of Kings Canyon National Park.” This route was created as a renumbering of former Route 69. Rumor has it that the renumbering was due to continual theft of the Route 69 signs.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1965 incarnation of Route 245 was part of LRN 166.

The post-1972 incarnation of Route 245 was originally part of Route 65, and was renumbered as Route 69 when a new alignment was proposed for Route 65 in 1964. In 1972, it was renumbered again as Route 245. This was part of LRN 129, defined in 1933.

Note that, prior to 1940, Route 180 was along Dunlap Road, and thus Route 65 (now Route 245) terminated at Dunlap Road.

Status Status

Tulare Expressway (~ 065 TUL 29.619 to TUL 39.477, 245 TUL 0.0)

Tulare ExpresswayIn December 2012, the CTC reviewed a draft EIR regarding improvements on Route 65 and Route 245 in Tulare County to create the Tulare Expressway. The project will realign Route 65 and construct a two-lane expressway on a four-lane right of way for 9.3 miles from Hermosa Street in Lindsay to Avenue 300 on Route 245 northeast of Exeter. There would also be about 0.5 miles of improvements on Route 245 starting at Route 198. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost for capital and support is $102,711,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2018-19. In addition to the no-build alternatives, there are two alternatives being considered: Build Alternative 1 would parallel the east and west side of existing Spruce Avenue depending on location; Build Alternative 2 would project the west side of existing Spruce Avenue. The project is needed to provide a continuous expressway through the corridor. Existing Route 65 does not provide direct access to Route 245 for traffic wishing to continue NB. Currently NB traffic on Route 65 must turn E at the Route 65/Route 198 intersection, enter a left turn lane, and wait for a signal. Route 65 also passes through Exeter, resulting in traffic flow interruptions with local traffic and the use of Spruce Road (Road 204) as an alternative. This has increased the accident rate.

The following project was included in the final adopted 2018 SHOPP in March 2018: PPNO 6787. 06-Tulare-245 1.4. Route 245 Near Woodlake, at Yokohl Creek Bridge No. 46-0011 (PM 1.39); also at Kaweah River Bridge No. 46-0073 (PM 4.19). Replace bridges to upgrade to current standards, facilitate bike lane shoulders, and upgrade guard railing. Begin Con: 10/5/2021. Total Project Cost: $18,665K.

Caltrans is exploring creating a roundabout on this route at the intersection of Route 216/Route 245 in Woodlake (~ TUL 7.054). Other potential/planned roundabout locations in the San Joaquin Valley include Route 145/Jensen near Kerman, Route 168/Auberry Road in Prather, Route 43/Route 137 in Corcoran, Route 190/Road 152 east of Tipton, Route 190/Road 284 east of Porterville, and Route 155/Browning Road in Delano. A 2007 study of 55 roundabouts in the U.S. found a 35% reduction in accidents and a 90% reduction in fatal accidents when intersections with stop signs or signals were converted to roundabouts. It costs about the same to build a roundabout as to put up traffic signals, and they need significantly less maintenance than traffic signal intersections -- about 60% to 90% less, depending on how much landscaping work is required.

Naming Naming

The portion of Route 245 (Millwood Drive) from Avenue 364 to Avenue 398 near the town of Elderwood (~ TUL 10.47 to TUL 14.97), in the County of Tulare, is named the "Specialist Manuel Joaquin Holguin Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of United States Army Specialist Manuel Joaquin Holguin, born in 1984 in Visalia, California. Joaquin, as he was known to his family, grew up in the small foothill community of Elderwood, California, and attended public schools in Woodlake, California, graduating from Woodlake Union High School in June 2002. Joaquin was an athlete, playing soccer and baseball from the age of 5 years through high school. Living in the country, he also became knowledgeable in the use and safe handling of firearms and by the age of 12 years, he passed his hunter safety course and was proficient with a 12-gauge shotgun. In the fall of 2001, Joaquin decided to join the United States Army, following in the footsteps of his grandfather and uncles who had served in the United States Army during World War II and the Vietnam War. During his senior year of high school, Joaquin was admitted into the United States Army’s early enlistment program, officially enlisting upon graduation from high school for a three-year commitment on November 11, 2002, and was sent to Fort Benning, Georgia, for boot camp. Joaquin remained at Fort Benning, Georgia, for advanced infantry training, graduating in March 2003 with a designation as a mortarman. He also earned an award for being the highest marksman with a rifle in his platoon and would go on to continually score as an expert with a rifle and mortar. Joaquin was assigned as a gunner and driver to the 2nd Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade of the 1st Armored Division in Baumholder, Germany. His division left Germany for Iraq in April 2003 and was assigned to an area of southern Baghdad operating out of Camp Muleskinner, but also saw action in Karbala and Al-Kut. His division would remain in Iraq for 15 months before returning to Germany, during which time, in this his first tour of duty, Joaquin received the Combat Infantry Badge and earned the rank of Specialist. Joaquin received orders that his active duty commitment was being extended. In November 2005, his brigade was sent back to the area of southern Baghdad Iraq for a second one-year tour of duty, and Joaquin volunteered to be part of the advanced detachment whose job was to get things in order for the arrival of the remainder of the brigade. On July 15, 2006, his unit, doing mounted and foot patrols, responded to an explosion at a marketplace, set up a perimeter, and began to receive small arms fire. During the firefight, an improvised explosive device (IED) detonated, killing Joaquin and severely wounding another soldier. Joaquin died one month before his 22nd birthday and three months before his tour of duty would have been completed. Joaquin was awarded the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star Medals for his active military service in the United States Army for his actions, not only on that day, but for the entire time he spent in Iraq. Joaquin was also awarded the Army Commendation Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Army Good Conduct Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Army Service Ribbon, the Overseas Service Ribbon, the Iraqi Campaign Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, and the Presidential Unit Citation Award for his two tours of duty in Iraq. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 135, Res. Chapter 85, on July 7, 2014.

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Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 245:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 245 as “[LRN 232] near Catlett to [LRN 87] near Tudor”. This route runs from Route 24 (present-day Route 70) near Catlett to Alternate US 40 (present-day Route 99) near Tudor. This is part of present-day Route 99.


State Shield

State Route 246


Routing Routing

  1. Rte 246 Seg 1From current west city limits of the City of Lompoc to Route 1.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as “(a) Surf to Route 1.”

    In 1984, Chapter 1258 deleted the portion from Surf to Lompoc, giving: “(a) Surf Current west city limits of the City of Lompoc to Route 1.”

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was all LRN 149, defined in 1933. This was originally signed as Route 150; by 1957, it was signed as part of Route 154. It was renumbered as part of Route 246 in 1964. It is present-day Route 246 between Surf (10 mi W of Lompoc) and Route 154 near Santa Ynez.

    Status Status

    Lompoc Passing Lanes

    In August 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct passing lanes on a portion of Route 246 near the City of Lompoc. Based on the project map, the lanes will extend from Cebeda Canyon Road to near Santa Rita Road, a distance of about 8 miles (PM 11.8 to PM R20.9). The total estimated cost is $32,312,000. It is programmed in the 2014 STIP and construction is expected to commence in FY15-16.

    In October 2014, the CTC allocated $3,470,000 for the Route 246 Passing Lanes. These will be constructed near Lompoc, from Cebada Canyon Road to Hapgood Road.

    In June 2013, the CTC approved delayed construction for a year and adjusted the project scope for a project that would construct passing lanes in each direction from Cebada Canyon Road to Hapgood Road (west), including a four-foot median soft barrier, intersection improvements at Tularosa Road, Hapgood Road (west), and Santa Rita Road, profile improvements at Tularosa Road, and six wildlife crossings.

    In May 2016, it was reported that a safety project to construct passing lanes in both directions on Route 246 near Lompoc from Cebada Canyon Road to Hapgood Road (East) will continue with paving for a two-week period near Hapgood Road (East) beginning May 16, 2016. The contractor for this $14.9 million project is Papich Construction of Pismo Beach, CA. This project is fully funded by the Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (SBCAG) Measure A program. It is expected to be completed in late 2017.
    (Source: Edhat Santa Barbara, 5/13/2016)

    In October 2016, it was reported that the safety project to construct passing lanes in both directions on Route 246 near Lompoc from Cebada Canyon Road to Hapgood Road (East) continues with earthwork in various locations within the project area.
    (Source: Edhat Santa Barbara, 10/4/2016)

    In May 2017, the CTC allocated $1,779,000 be allocated from Budget Act Item 2660-001-0042, to provide Construction Support funds to complete construction of this project. A cooperative agreement amendment will be executed with the Santa Barbara County Association of Governments to provide additional $772,000 from the local tax measure to fully fund the Construction Support. The project is located near the City of Lompoc along Route 246 in Santa Barbara County. The scope of work includes constructing passing lanes in both directions of Route 246, improving sight distance by modifying the profile at Tularosa Road and constructing drainage improvements to increase capacity of cross drainage. In addition, left-turn channelization will be provided at local roads and driveways to separate turning vehicles from through traffic. The project will improve the operations of this segment of Route 246 and reduce traffic delays. The project was awarded on March 26, 2015, and the current capital cost estimate is $19,402,000. Construction Capital is funded through Santa Barbara County Tax Measure A. The project is 45 percent complete with 100 percent of the project area disturbed for construction of the improvements. To date, $2,809,702 has been spent on construction support, inspection and management. Construction Support is currently funded by the STIP ($3,470,000). However, an additional $2,551,000 is needed for the current estimate at completion of $6,021,000. Santa Barbara County Association of Governments has agreed to provide $772,000 in Santa Barbara County Tax Measure A funds. Therefore, an additional $1,779,000 in STIP is needed. The increase in the cost estimate for construction support is needed for the additional construction duration of 274 days, due to delays from the effects of winter weather and addressing unforeseen storm damage impacts from the recent winter rains, nesting birds, and change orders for unsuitable material. The construction contract allowed 400 working days (WD) to complete the work. The current estimate to complete the work is now 674 WD. The additional construction support will be spent on completing the construction inspection and management of the project to completion. This amount includes anticipated increases to labor rates over the remaining duration of the project.

    In June 2018, it was reported that Caltrans, local law enforcement and city officials celebrated the completion of the Route 246 passing lanes project. The road connects Lompoc and Buellton in northern Santa Barbara County. The project added passing lanes in both directions from Cebada Canyon Road to Hapgood Road East outside of Lompoc. Caltrans says the completion of the $14.9-million project now allows for safer passing opportunities for drivers.
    (Source: KSBY, 6/13/2018)


  2. Rte 246 Seg 2From Route 1 to Route 154 near Santa Ynez.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This route remains as defined in 1963.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was all LRN 149, defined in 1933. This was originally signed as Route 150; by 1957, it was signed as part of Route 154. It was renumbered as part of Route 246 in 1964. It is present-day Route 246 between Surf (10 mi W of Lompoc) and Route 154 near Santa Ynez.

    Status Status

    In June 2016, the CTC authorized $6,899,000 for a project on Route 246 in Santa Barbara County (R20.7/26.3) near Buellton, from 0.4 mile east of Santa Rosa Creek Bridge to Route 246/101 Separation. Outcome/Output: Rehabilitate 22.8 lane miles of roadway by grinding existing lanes and shoulders and overlaying with rubberized asphalt to improve the ride quality and extend the service life of the existing pavement. Ramp reconstruction to meet current ADA standards also included.

    In December 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Solvang along Route 246 at Skytt Mesa Drive (~ SB 28.539), consisting of a collateral facility.

    In February 2012, it was reported that the Alisal Bridge, which runs on Route 154 over the Santa Ynez River (Bridge 51-0079, SB R010.12, built in 1971) was determined by Caltrans after a recent inspection to be “structurally deficient,” with cracks and poor structural integrity, according to Solvang Public Works Director Matt van der Linden. The report estimated that the bridge, built in 1972, has about 10 years of viability remaining and recommended a seismic retrofit to reinforce the current structure before replacement. The concerns about the bridge led the Solvang City Council to shift its focus to replacing the Alisal Bridge and delay the improvement and widening project scheduled for the span on Route 246 near Alamo Pintado Road (Bridge 51-0130, SB 030.32, built in 1954, widened in 1972). The cost for replacing the 850-foot Alisal Bridge would be about $19.5 million, according to van der Linden, but it must have the seismic retrofit – a process that reinforces concrete and cabling – before it can receive federal funds. Van der Linden said that grant funding, if authorized by Caltrans, would be available to cover “approximately 88.5% of design and environmental processing costs, and 100% of the construction costs” of the estimated $650,000 retrofit, leaving Solvang on the hook for around $30,000.

    In August 2011, an editorial indicated that Caltrans is exploring a roundabout at the intersection of Route 246 and Route 154 (~ SB R34.548). The roundabout was later constructed and present as of May 2016.

    Naming Naming

    The portion of Route 246 from SB 9.56, the East Junction of Route 1/Route 246, in the City of Lompoc, to SB R13.65, La Purisima (Golf Course), east of the City of Lompoc is officially named the "Mayor Dick DeWees Memorial Highway" This segment was named in honor of Dick DeWees, who was elected Mayor of the City of Lompoc on November 3, 1998, and served six consecutive terms until he passed away on July 30, 2009. DeWees was born in 1948 in Mount Clemens, Michigan. DeWees conducted his undergraduate and postgraduate studies at Eastern Michigan University, majoring in dramatic arts. DeWees worked as an actor and director in over 60 plays and musicals, appeared on local television and radio programs, and was a voiceover artist in hundreds of commercials. DeWees served as master of ceremonies of, and performed with, the Lompoc Pops Orchestra for over a decade. DeWees served in a variety of positions in marketing, sales, and administration during 20 years in the broadcasting industry. DeWees started his own advertising consulting firm and received the Sam Walton Business Leader Award. DeWees taught public speaking at the Lompoc Valley Center of Allan Hancock College. Mayor DeWees served on a variety of boards and committees and represented the City of Lompoc on the Santa Barbara County Association of Governments and the Local Agency Formation Commission. Dick DeWees loved being Mayor of Lompoc, which he often said was the perfect job for him. Mayor DeWees led the City of Lompoc through many complex and significant achievements, including a settlement agreement with Cachuma contractors that brings more water releases to the Lompoc Valley, improving water and wastewater systems, stabilizing electric rates, extending the life of the city's landfill, increasing the police force, expanding parks, annexing the Wye area and entering into a cooperative agreement with Mission Hills to provide water and sewer services in the Wye area, building an award-winning aquatic center, opening a new community center, building a skateboard park, and successfully managing the potential computer risks referred to as Y2K. Mayor DeWees worked together with the Lompoc City Council to deal with illegal dumping, graffiti, congregate living, medicinal marijuana, truck parking, beach closures, fencing, budgets, labor contracts, reorganizations, low-income housing and housing in-lieu fees, development impact fees, utility rates, Community Development Block Grants, facilitating urban county status for Santa Barbara County, economic development, bus service, airport improvements, library funding, cable television franchises and public television, historic preservation, state and local ballot initiatives, WiFi, sidewalks, wineries, bikeways, energy conservation, water conservation, animal control, police dogs, and detox centers. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 165, 9/14/2010, Resolution Chapter 153.

    The intersection of Route 154 and Route 246 in Santa Barbara County (~ SB R34.548) is named the "Senior Investigator Laura Jean Cleaves Memorial Junction". It was named in memory of Laura Jean Cleaves, born on April 19, 1955, in Long Beach, California. In 1976, Ms. Cleaves joined the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, where she met her future husband, Deputy Stephen M. Cleaves, and they were married in 1978 and moved to northern California two years later, where she distinguished herself as the first female police officer for the City of Arcata. Relocating to Santa Barbara County in 1981, Ms. Cleaves accepted a position with the Santa Barbara Police Department and, in 1984, became an investigator with the Santa Barbara County District Attorney's Office where she excelled as a criminal investigator and was later promoted to senior investigator. She continually demonstrated honesty, integrity, professionalism, and leadership in all her varied assignments. An avid and accomplished horsewoman, Ms. Cleaves wrote articles on horse care, safety, and riding and provided riding instruction for those with a love of horses and, in 1988, she began sharing her expertise as a reserve deputy sheriff and instructor for the Sheriff's Mounted Unit. Ms. Cleaves had a passion for protecting others, and while on duty April 30, 2008, her vehicle was struck by a drunken driver and she suffered a fatal injury. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 147, Resolution Chapter 161, on 9/19/2008.

    National Trails National Trails

    De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.


Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 246:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 246 as “[LRN 238] near Elkhorn to [LRN 17] near Auburn”. This is present-day Route 102. It ran along Elkhorn Blvd and Greenback Lane to Folsom, and then N along Folsom Road into Auburn.


State Shield

State Route 247


Routing Routing

  1. Rte 247 Seg 1From Route 62 near Yucca Valley to Route 18 near Lucerne Valley.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    062/247As defined in 1963, this segment was the entirety of Route 247. It was originally planned to be a freeway between Route 62 and Route 18 ("Old Woman Springs Freeway").

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This routing was an extension to LRN 187 that was defined in 1959. It appears to not have been constructed before 1963.

    Status Status

    In May 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will construct 8-foot wide shoulders in each direction on a 7.8 mile portion of Route 247 near the town of Yucca Valley (08-SBd-247, PM 1.8/9.6). In addition to the shoulder widening, shoulder backing will also be installed. The project is fully funded in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $19,504,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The project will involve construction activities in the habitat of the Pallid San Diego pocket mouse, the Desert tortoise, and the Northern red-diamond rattlesnake. All three species are State listed species of special concern.

    In August 2015, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will construct shoulders at various locations and place rumble strips on the existing and proposed shoulders on Route 247 in the community of Landers (08-SBd-247, PM 9.6/20.3). The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $29,281,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    In December 2018, the CTC received an information report of an allocation of $1,808,000 for the following project: San Bernardino 08-SBd-247 20.3/76.8 PPNO 08-3006K. Route 247 In and near Barstow, from 0.1 mile north of Boone Road to 0.7 mile south of Rimrock Road. Outcome/Output: Construct ground-in shoulder and centerline rumble strips. This safety project will reduce the number and severity of collisions.
    (Source: December 2018 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5f(3) Item 3)

    In August 2018, the CTC approved $1,625,000 in SHOPP funding for San Bernardino 08-SBd-247 39.5/40.0 Route 247 Near Lucerne Valley, from 0.1 mile south to 0.4 mile north of Camp Rock Road. Outcome/Output: Improve safety by constructing shoulders and installing shoulder and centerline rumble strips. This project will reduce the number and severity of collisions.
    (Source: August 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.5f.(3) Item 13)

    Naming Naming

    "Old Woman Springs" Road

    The segment between Route 62 and the town limit of Yucca Valley (~ SBD 0.000 to SBD 5.136), in the County of San Bernardino is named the "Deputy Greg A. Gariepy Memorial Highway." This segment was named in memory of Deputy Greg A. Gariepy. Born July 2, 1965, Gariepy was a man of high integrity and devotion, whose life of dedication and sacrifice began at a young age. In 1983, he joined the Marine Corps, embarking on a 20-year career that included such assignments as drill instructor, sniper, and antiterrorism expert, and during which he attained the rank of E7, Gunnery Sergeant, and was awarded 24 medals, commendations, and ribbons. Upon his retirement from the Marine Corps on September 30, 2003, he chose to serve his community by joining the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department, and he graduated from the academy with class No. 153 in December 2003. During his career with the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department, he worked at the West Valley Detention Center, the Morongo Basin Station, and, finally, the Twentynine Palms station. On June 22, 2005, while on patrol and en route to assist a fellow deputy, he was involved in a fatal traffic accident in the town of Yucca Valley. Deputy Gariepy is remembered by his colleagues in the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department as a "warrior" who led by example, who was not afraid to volunteer for the most difficult of duties, and who was a humble leader who understood that true leadership is characterized by action, not position. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 20, Resolution Chapter 65, on 7/3/2007.

    The portion of Route 247 in the County of San Bernardino, beginning at Camp Rock Road at SBD 39.598 and continuing to the intersection of Route 247 and Allen Way at SBD 44.366 is named the "Sergeant Brian Walker Memorial Highway". Sergeant Brian L. Walker was born and raised in San Bernardino County’s high desert region. He attended Lucerne Valley High School, where he was an officer in the Future Farmers of America program. Sergeant Walker served as a military policeman in the United States Army assigned to the 425th Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division. Six days after arriving for his second deployment in the Middle East, Sergeant Walker was tragically killed in Afghanistan on May 13, 2012, when a vehicle under his command was hit with an improvised explosive device, killing him and the driver of the vehicle, Private First Class Richard L. McNulty III. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 180, Res. Chapter 162, Statutes of 2016, on September 1, 2016.


  2. Rte 247 Seg 2From Route 18 near Lucerne Valley to Route 15 in Barstow.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1970, Chapter 1473 split the route and added (b): “(b) Route 18 near Lucerne Valley to Route 15 near Barstow.”

    In 1994, Chapter 1220 clarified the routing: “(b) Route 18 near Lucerne Valley to Route 15 near in Barstow.”

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This routing was not in the state highway system before 1963, although it appears to have been constructed.

    Naming Naming

    "Barstow" Road between I-15 and Route 18. Barstow refers to the city of Barstow, which was named in 1886 by the Santa Fe Railroad for its president, William Barstow Strong.


Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Scenic Route Scenic Route

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 247:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 247 as “[LRN 4] near Elk Grove to [LRN 246] near Antelope.” This is Route 143, originally planned to run along Elk Grove Florin Road and Watt Avenue.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 248


Routing Routing

No current routing.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

Former Rte 248Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 248 was defined as “Route 134 near Pasadena to Route 210 near Monrovia.”

In 1965, Chapter 1372 added a condition: “This route will cease to be a state highway when Interstate Route 210 freeway is completed and the commission relinquishes that portion of present Route 210 in the County of Los Angeles and the Cities of Pasadena, Arcadia, and Monrovia.”

In 1986, Chapter 928 truncated the route: “Route 134 near the east limit of the City of Pasadena to Route 210 near Monrovia.”

In 1992, the remainder of Route 248 was deleted by AB 3090, Chapter 1243.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This appears to have been the surface street routing of Colorado Blvd. It corresponded to LRN 161, defined in 1933.

Status Status

The Caltrans bridge log indicated that this route was signed in its entirety as Route 66.

Historical Route Historical Route

Former route 248 is signed as part of "Historic Highway Route 66", designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 6, Chapter 52, in 1991.

National Trails National Trails

Arrowhead Trail Sign Former route 248 (Colorado Blvd) was part of the "Arrowhead Trail (Ocean to Ocean Trail)". It was named by Resolution Chapter 369 in 1925.

National Old Trails Road Sign Former route 248 (Colorado Blvd) was part of the "National Old Trails Road".

National Park to Park Highway Sign Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway Sign Former route 248 (Colorado Blvd) appears to have been part of the "National Park to Park Highway", and the "Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway".

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 248 as “[LRN 238] near Sacramento to [LRN 247] south of [LRN 54]”. This route ran from present-day I-5 near Sacramento to Elk Grove Florin Road south of Route 16. This is present-day Route 148 between I-5 and Route 143.


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