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California Highways

Routes 305 through 440

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

305 · 330 · 371 · 380 · 395 · 399 · 405 · 440


Interstate Shield X-Ed Out

Former Interstate 305



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Route 305 was never legislatively defined. However, there is a portion of a route that is known to AASHTO as I-305 for funding purposes. This segment, from the Route I-80/US50 interchange in West Sacramento to the Route 99/US50 interchange was originally part of I-80. It was redesignated as chargeable I-305 in May 1980 (and that designation remains on the books at AASHTO). Later in 1980, it was reassigned to US 50. It is currently signed as US50/Business Loop 80 until reaching jct with Route 99/US50/Business Loop 80 on east side of Sacramento.

Note: Although I-305 is not signed, and is not a state highway, the portion of the original I-305 (present-day US 50 between Route 99 to the former I-80/I-880 junction in W Sacramento) is still on the books as Federal-Aid Interstate 305. The FHWA log shows it as 8 miles.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was part of LRN 7 and LRN 3.

 

Other WWW Links


State Shield

State Route 330



Routing

From Route 210 near Highland northeasterly to Route 18.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1972, Chapter 1216 defined Route 330 as “Route 30 near Highland northeasterly to Route 18” via a transfer from Route 30.

The start of the route was changed to Route 210 by AB 1650, Ch 724, 10/10/99.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was part of LRN 207, defined in 1937.

 

Status

In December 2010, major storms resulted in the washout of a section of Route 330 at the Postmile 35, just about 6 miles north of Highland Avenue. Repairs were estimated to be finished in late 2011 or early 2012. Work will be divvied up into three phases across the approximately 15-mile highway. The $6 million first phase to fix several smaller washouts and prepare the roadway will allow larger equipment to reach the worst-hit area.

In March 2011, it was reported that the road was reopened for commuter traffic only. Drivers will be able to drive downbound between Live Oak Road and Highland Ave in the morning between 6am and 8am. In the afternoon and evening, they will be able to drive upbound from Highland to Live Oak between 4 and 6. Traffic will only be one direction during commute times and motorists will need to use the proper lane. CHP says that they may close the road at anytime if there’s bad weather or reckless driving that endangers the safety of the construction workers.

In June 2011, it was reported that Caltrans now is targeting the full reopening for the July 4th holiday weekend.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Bernardino 330 R28.70 R29.78

 

Naming

Route 330 in the County of San Bernardino is named the "Steve Faris Memorial Highway" This route was named in memory of Battalion Chief Steve Faris of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. In 1998, Battalion Chief Faris helped establish in the Inland Empire the Mountain Rim Fire Safe Council, which was the first of more than 14 councils that are now active in the Counties of San Bernardino and Riverside. He was instrumental in bringing together the fire safe councils to form the Inland Empire Fire Safe Alliance. In 2002, Battalion Chief Faris was intimately involved in the establishment of the Mountain Area Safety Taskforce (MAST), which brought local, state, and federal agencies together to address the critical fire situation presented by the bark beetle-drought tree mortality issues. The consolidated efforts of MAST and fire safe councils contributed significantly to the safe evacuation of more than 60,000 people during the Old Fire of 2003. Battalion Chief Faris was a friendly, giving, and passionate person who included everyone and found a way to work with anyone interested in his efforts to save lives and establish defensible space for properties in the mountains. Battalion Chief Faris died in an automobile accident in September 2006. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 12, Resolution Chapter 72, on 7/14/2009.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


A stub of this route, for about 1 mile going up City Creek, is built to freeway standards.

Overall statistics for Route 330:

  • Total Length (1995): 15 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 8,500 to 9,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 13; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 2.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 15 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 2 mi; Minor Arterial: 13 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Bernardino.


State Shield

State Route 371



Routing

From Route 79 near Aguanga to Route 74 east of Anza.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1974, Chapter 537 defined Route 371 via a transfer from Route 71: “Route 79 near Aguanga to Route 74 east of Anza.” It runs along Cahuilla Road.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was the eastern end of Route 71. It was LRN 277, defined in 1959.

From the junction was LRN 78 (present-day Route 79), Route 71 continued to the W to Temecula, signed as Route 71. A short portion was cosigned as Route 71/Route 79 (the portion between the present-day Route 79/Route 371 junction and Riverside County Route R3. Route 79 continued N along present-day Riverside County Route R3, while Route 71 continued to the W. In 1966 (although historical information leads one to believe this happened in 1974), County Route R3 was defined, and Route 79 continued cosigned with Route 71 all the way to US 395 (now I-15). In 1974, that segment was resigned as Route 79 only. Route 71 then turned N, continuing up what is now I-15 to Route 91. It was cosigned briefly with Route 91 to Corona, and then continued N to Pomona. This latter segment is all that remains of Route 71.

 

Status

The intersection of Route 371 and Route 79 has demonstrated itself to be a high source of accidents, with four deaths occuring in the period from July 2001 to July 2002. As a result, the intersection is being redesigned. Two-lane Route 79 is the main link between Temecula and the Warner Springs and Santa Ysabel areas of San Diego County. Two-lane Route 371 is a well-traveled back road between Southwest County and Palm Springs. Currently, the two roads converge in Aguanga where an oddly configured intersection contributes greatly to the accident count. Westbound traffic on Route 79 must stop at the intersection, while eastbound traffic on Route 79 and traffic coming down a steep curvy grade from Anza on Route 371 proceed without stopping. Beginning in Summer 2003, work started to reconfigure the intersection to force drivers heading toward Temecula to stop and turn either left of right at a "T" intersection with Route 371. Turning left would take them quickly back to Route 79. Long-term improvements will include a merger lane from Route 371 to Route 79. As of April 2008, construction had been completed: It is now a standard T intersection with 3-way stop signs. Traffic leaving Route 371 is forced to turn, while travellers on Route 79 can proceed straight through. Most of Route 371 has been newly repaved as well. Most of the mile markers on Route 371 are very weathered (similar to the section of Route 74 between Route 371 and Route 111) but are marked with mileage between PM 57 (at the south end) and PM 78 (at the north end).

 

Naming

"Cahuilla" Road

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 

National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

 


Overall statistics for Route 371:

  • Total Length (1995): 21 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 2,950 to 3,950
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 21; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 21 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 21 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Riverside.


Interstate Shield

Interstate 380



Routing
  1. From Route 1 near Pacifica to Route 280 in San Bruno.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1969, Chapter 294 defined Route 380 via a transfer from Route 186 as “(a) Route 1 near Pacifica to Route 280 in San Bruno. (b) Route 280 in San Bruno to Route 101 in the vicinity of the San Francisco International Airport. (c) Route 101 in the vicinity of the San Francisco International Airport to Route 87.” This segment remains as defined in 1963. In 1970, Chapter 1473 deleted segment (c)

    This segment would have been signed Route 380, as it was never planned to be part of the Interstate system. It would have curled through the hills, crossed Route 1, and continued slightly west before curving south to meet Route 1 again. Terrain and seismic problems (the route would cross over the San Andreas Fault) are what killed this segment of freeway. There has been talk in times past of extending 380 to Skyline Blvd, but no serious proposal has come forth for that.

    According to Chris Sampang, the Sneath Lane/San Bruno Avenue exit off of I-280 (both southbound and northbound) has several signs of the planned interchange to Route 380 west:

    1. Long ramps in both directions. The ramps to Route 380 would have fed off what currently functions as a collector/distributor between Sneath and San Bruno; the whole exit complex, which crosses under Route 380 on the northbound side, is about ½ to ¾ of a mile long north/south.

    2. On both sides, there is room on the exit sign for Sneath Lane/San Bruno Ave for a shield—it is covered in greenout. Also, advance guide signs off of I-280 north point out the I-380 exit. Underneath the 380 shield, is a protruding state shield.

    3. There is some grading of the planned Route 380 west of the interchange for about ¼ mile; however, there's barely any pavement as the road fades into the trees.

    4. The sign gantry for the Route 380 ramps westbound into I-280 is very wide; this is to cover both the ramps heading to 280 and the mainline carriageway that would've gone into Pacifica.

    Through analysis of maps, Chris has identified a possible routing: I-380 would've continued west of the current Y interchange with I-280 first through a path between Claremont Drive and Crestmoor Drive headed to Skyline Boulevard (Route 35). Route 380 would've met near the San Bruno Avenue and Skyline Boulevard junction; most of the possible ROW is currently either forested or parkland. West of Route 35, Route 380 would've crossed the San Bruno City Limit and straddled it on the south side, following trails in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in Sweeney Ridge as it entered Pacifica. It would follow some paved trails to the junction of Mori's Point Road, Bradford Way, and Route 1; this just also happens to be the current south end of the Route 1 freeway (and may imply that this south end of the Route 1 freeway was to have been directly connected into Route 380). Past Route 1, Route 380 would head southwest at a 20 degree angle or so away from Mori Point but towards the coast; at the coast, the freeway would make its southward turn back to Route 1. Another map that illustrates this quite well can be found here.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was LRN 229, defined in 1947.

     

    Naming

    The Caltrans "Naming" document indicates that this section is named the "Portola" Freeway. Gaspar de Portola was California's first Spanish governor. In 1769 marched north from San Diego in command of the first party of Europeans to see San Francisco Bay. This expedition also discovered the Golden Gate and Carquinez Straits. He founded the presidio at Monterey and aided in establishing Mission San Carlos. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 113, Chapt. 217 in 1970.

     

    Status

    Unconstructed Part (1) is unconstructed. According to the Traversable Routing Report, the traversable local streets are San Bruno Avenue and Sharp Parks Road, but no local roads adequately fit the description of a state highway. The freeway routing was rescinded effective 3/29/1979. The city of Pacifica was to improve Sharp Park Road but the proposed improvements do not meet state standards.


  2. From Route 280 in San Bruno to Route 101 in the vicinity of the San Francisco International Airport.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1969, Chapter 294 defined Route 380 via a transfer from Route 186 as “(a) Route 1 near Pacifica to Route 280 in San Bruno. (b) Route 280 in San Bruno to Route 101 in the vicinity of the San Francisco International Airport. (c) Route 101 in the vicinity of the San Francisco International Airport to Route 87.” This segment remains as defined in 1963. In 1970, Chapter 1473 deleted segment (c)

    This segment was authorized for interstate construction by the December 1968 Federal Aid Highway Act, which provided $31.2 milllion for construction of the 1.6 mile segment.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was LRN 229, defined in 1947.

     

    Naming

    Interstate 380 from Route 101 to Interstate 280 is named the "Portola" Freeway. It is named for Gaspar de Portola, California's first Spanish governor. He was first European to discover San Francisco Bay. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 113, Chapter 217 in 1970.

    I-380 in San Mateo County is also signed as the "Quentin L. Kopp Freeway". Quentin L. Kopp represented the City and County of San Francisco in the California Senate from 1987 to 1997.

     

    Status

    "Southern Crossing"

    [Southern Crossing]This map shows the proposed Southern Crossing. This would have been an additional crossing S of the Bay Bridge, terminating in Oakland (two approaches in Oakland: one along Alameda and one along Doolittle to the I-880/Hegenberger interchange). The history of the Southern Crossing goes back at least to 1948, when the state department of public works prepared a report on additional toll crossings of San Francisco Bay. This report noted "Because of the increasing congestion on the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, the California Toll Bridge Authority, on Oct 30, 1945, directed the Department of Public Works to make comprehensive studies for another bay crossing between SF and the East Bay cites. On Jan 31, 1947, the department recommended construction of an additional bridge just north of and parallel to the existing bridge—a plan which is now known as the Parallel Bridge." This report provided an estimated cost for the Parallel Bridge of $155,014, 000, and an estimate for the Southern Crossing of $178, 421, 000. The original concept of the Southern Crossing is illustrated to the right. There's an extensive discussion of the Southern Crossing and the Parallel Crossing in the November-December 1947 issue of California Highways and Public Works .

    In 1954, it was reported that the plan for the Southern Crossing had changed again. The western terminus would be in the vicinity of Third and Army in San Francisco, and the eastern terminus would be on Bay Farm Island in Alameda County. In 1954, the State Dept of Public Works applied to the Army Corps of Engineers for permission to construct the crossing. Approval was granted 4/8/1954 to construct a causeway-tube crossing on an alignment bowed southwards. The plan was for a six-lane tube 7.7 mi in length. Starting in San Francisco, there would be a trestle viaduct approx 5,300' long to a sand island, where traffic would enter one of three 5,800' tubes. They would emerge at another sand island, continue across a low concrete trestle viaduct 22,000' long and then to a 6,000' earthen mole to the SW shore of Bay Farm Island. The route would connect on the Western side with the Bayshore (US 101) and Embarcadero (I-280) freeways. The east bay side would connect with the Posey and Webster Street Tubes (Route 260). It was estimated that the project would take 65,000 tons of reinforcing steel; 1 million cubic yards of concrete; 1.5 million barrels of cement; 10,000 tons of structural steel; and 14 million cubic yards of sand. In 1957, it was reported that a study showed that the crossing would not be financially feasible at a toll rate of 25c, and that it would not be possible to finance construction.

    There were later Southern Crossing proposals, for example, one in 1996 proposed extending Route 238 to Daly City. One author indicates this as I-980; the only record I have is of a rejected proposal for a Southern Crossing and approaches (25mi), with no number stated. The University of California, Berkeley, has an online library exhibit that contains a lot of information about this unbuilt crossing; you can find it at http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/news_events/bridge/ . This would have come approximately from the Route 82/Route 87 junction It is possible that Route 87 may have been the Southern Crossing.

    Note that the Southern Crossing isn't dead yet. In July 2001, the California Transportion Commission was funding a study regarding to the feasibility of a Southern Crossing. However, this later version would have run from I-380 at the top of the San Francisco International Airport to the bottom of the Oakland Airport, for a much longer crossing.

    The San Francisco Bay Crossings Study, dated June 2002, had construction of a new Mid-Bay Bridge (mistakenly called by some the "Southern Crossing", but the actual proposed Southern Crossing was further north) as Alternative 4. This bridge would have connected I-380 to Route 238 in the East Bay. This alternative assumed a connection between I-380 on the west end, just N of San Francisco International Airport, and Route 238. The connection would cross at one of the widest points in the San Francisco Bay. The overall length of the structure would be 13.5 miles, and be the 6th longest bridge, just behind Florida's Sunshine Skyway Bridge. It the main span was connected as 850 feet as proposed in the study, it would be the 5th longest orthotropic steel box girder span in the world.

    The crossing itself would consiste of the bridge structure from the East Toll Plaza to the apporaches at the I-380 interchange. There would be an east and west causeway, and a High Bridge spanning the shipping channel. The causeways would be trestle structures similar to the existing San Mateo Bridge. The SFO Airport Obstruction Clearance Line and glide path would preclude a cable-stayed, suspension, or extradosed type bridge; hence, the High Bridge would be comprised mostly of long-span precast concrete segmental box girders. These would have to be lightweight, as the girder structure would be at the maximum span range (750-850 ft) for this type of bridge in a high seismic region. The causeways would be approximately 12.1 miles long, with the high bridge being approximately 1.1 miles long. The capital cost estimates for this are phenominal: costs for the alternative, including the crossing, approach, right of way acquisition, and transit bus rolling stock, would run from $6.646 billion to $8.245 billion dollars, with operation and maintenance costs of $35 million annually.

    In September 2002, the CTC had on its agenda TCRP Project #11, requested by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), to fund $1.8M for completing the feasibility and financial studies for the new crossing alternatives. The TCRP allocated $5,000,000.

    In November 2010, the "Southern Crossing" proved itself the proposal that wouldn't die. In early November 2010, saying its mission is to look at long-term options for traffic relief, the Bay Area Toll Authority's oversight committee considered authorizing a $400,000 study on the Southern Crossing Bridge between I-238 in San Lorenzo and I-380 in San Bruno. The odds of the bridge are low: There was no clamor to build the bridge after a study in 2002 estimated the price tag at $8.2 billion. The money for the study would come from tolls collected on seven state-owned toll bridges in the region. Planning consultants hired by the authority would take about six months to update technical information about the Southern Crossing bridge and alternatives for reducing traffic congestion. The toll authority will use the study findings to decide whether to conduct a second, more detailed study with recommendations on whether to build the new bridge. The bridge study would examine the feasibility of developing express bus lanes or rail service on the bridge in addition to lanes for car traffic. Plans for a new bridge spanning the bay have been considered, and rejected for environmental and other concerns, at least five times since 1947. They range from a mirror-image twin of the Bay Bridge to an eight-lane highway and BART bridge from San Leandro to San Bruno and a two-legged bridge shaped like the letter "Y" with one leg to Alameda, the other to San Leandro. Information on this study can be found here.

    Other Status

    The interchange with Route 280 is "beefier" than usual because of the original planned continuation to Pacifica.

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Mateo 380 4.71 6.22
San Mateo 380 6.37 6.62

 

Interstate Submissions

Approved as chargeable interstate in December 1968; Freeway.

In October 1958, the designation I-380 was proposed for the Embarcadero Freeway, which was later approved as I-480, downgraded to Route 480, and ultimately relinquished and destroyed.

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for I-380:

  • Total Length (1995): 3 miles traversable; 4 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 113,000 to 131,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 1; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 6.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAI: 3 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 3 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Mateo.


US Highway Shield

US Highway 395



Routing
  1. From Route 15 near Cajon Pass to the Nevada state line passing near Little Lake, Independence, Bridgeport, and Coleville.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, Route 395 was defined as "(a) San Diego to Route 10 near San Bernardino via Temecula and passing near Riverside. (b) Route 15 near Cajon Pass to the Nevada state line passing near Little Lake, Independence, Bridgeport, and Coleville. (c) Nevada state line northwest of Reno to the Oregon state line near New Pine Creek via Alturas."

    In 1969, Chapter 294 transferred the routing that was (a) to other routes. The portion from San Diego to Route 103 [which became Route 15 in 1969] was transferred to Route 163; the portion from Route 103 (present-day Route 15) to Route 71 (present-day Route 15) was transferred to Route 15; and the portion from Route 71 (present-day 15) to Route 31 (present-day Route 15) was transferred to Route 215.

    Thus, the current segment (a) is the original 1963 (b).

    There are unconstructed but adopted portions from 3 mi S of Route 18 to 7 mi S of Route 58, and from the San Bernardino County line to 8 mi S of Route 178, for 44 miles parallel to the existing traversable route.

    Another planned freeway adoption was US 395 between the McGee Maintenance Station south to Crowley Lake Dam Road, adopted at the same time before the 1964 renumbering. This was built as an expressway (with one interchange); Old US 395 became "Crowley Lake Road".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Before 1964, US 395 had the following legislative routes and signing:

    1. Between US 101 (present-day I-5) in San Diego and a point just S of the Mirimar Naval Air Station: This is present-day Route 163 and was LRN 77, defined in 1931. Route 71/US 395 started at US 101 near present day University of San Diego. It followed Linda Vista Road to current Route 163, then followed Kearney Villa Road to roughly the present day I-15/Route 163 interchange. Although the original plan was to sign this as Route 71, by October 1935, it was signed as part of US 395.

      In 1934, the route of LRN 77 was changed. After the change, LRN 77 went down Fairmount and terminated at Route 12 on El Cajon Blvd. US 395 was contiguous with US 80 along LRN 12 until the terminus at Market St and 12th. LRN 12/US 395 was later extended west to Pacific Highway (in 1943) . A 1935 map showing routes to the California-Pacific Exposition in Balboa Park clearly shows several US 395 shields along Fairmount, El Cajon Blvd, and Park Blvd (the last two with US 80 shields also). The State Highway map of 1930 does not show Fairmount Blvd at all, but the State Highway map of 1934 does show Fairmount. Some route US 395 along Fairmont as late as 1948. At the time of this change, the start was also moved to have it start (with US 80) at US 101 in downtown San Diego, later the starting point for Route 163 (more information on this historical portion may be found under Route 163). It headed north on Park Blvd with US 80, then headed east on El Cajon Blvd. It split from US 80 at Fairmont Ave, heading north on Fairmont. It crossed the San Diego River just east of current I-15, then ultimately followed that routing north to Miramar Rd / Pomerado Rd. Thus, it appears (based on input from Steve Varner and Cameron Kaiser) that from 1934-1948, US 395 went north along 12th (Park) with US 80 from Market St and then cut over on A St and north on Park "again" to El Cajon, then left US 80 north on Fairmount (potentially meaning that the "interchanges" on Fairmount were originally part of US 395).

      Around 1942, US 395 appears to have been routed on Fairmount from Camino Del Rio, up what looks like the old Ward Rd, and then along Murphy Cyn Rd. Around 1948, it was routed to the current Route 163, with the freeway constructed in 1948.  

    2. Between a point just S of the Mirimar Naval Air Station and 2 mi N of Temecula: This is present-day I-15, and was LRN 77, defined in 1931. It was signed as Route 71 between Mirimar (Miramar) and Temecula between 1934 and 1935, when US 395 was first signed. US 395 followed what is now Pomerado Road from a point 3 miles north of the I-15/Route 163 interchange to the interchange of Pomerado Road/I-15 at a point just south of the Lake Hodges / San Dieguito River crossing near the southern city limits of Escondido.

      In Escondido until 1948-49, US 395 was routed 2 blocks to the east of Centre City Parkway along Escondido Blvd. Note how Escondido Blvd has many old motor court style motels from the 20s as well as art deco buildings from the 30s. Note that in the 1950s, US 395 followed four-lane Centre City Parkway. There is still a US 395 mile marker near the downtown area on Centre City Pkwy. Many 1950s era Googie-style cafes remain on this stretch of old highway. Lastly, note that Escondido Blvd (pre-1949 US 395) was actually called San Diego Blvd at the time, as noted on this page from the Escondido Historical Society.

      One correspondent notes that in 1939 & 1942, US 395 entered Escondido along Escondido Blvd; thence northeast along Grand Ave; thence northwest along Broadway; thence southwest along Mission Ave (old name Grant Ave) and out of Escondido toward Vista. The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers Escondido Quadrangle 1942 edition shows Escondido Blvd north of Grand as only a dry weather road, and California Highways and Public Works magazine September 1939 page 10 has a small scale map that shows US 395 entering Escondido along a street that is probably Escondido Blvd, then going east to another street that is probably Broadway, then north again.

      US 395 headed west along Mission Ave (former Route 78, now San Diego CR S14), which turns into South Santa Fe Ave west of San Marcos. It continued to travel E/W along South Santa Fe Ave, and then turned north on Vista Way (San Diego County Route S13) to the current junction with Route 76, following it east. Just to the north of this junction there is a beautiful bridge over the San Luis Rey River (Bonsall Bridge), built in 1925 that was supplanted by a modern crossing in the late 1980s. US 395 followed the current routing of Route 76 to Bonsall, where it diverged from the state route, heading north on Mission Ave (San Diego County Route S13). There is another old US 395 bridge on the south side of Fallbrook that was bypassed with road improvements to South Mission. You can find a description here. Not far south of this bridge there is an old alignment of US 395 (between Fallbrook and Bonsall) that was bypassed called Hellers Bend. The road still has that name.

      In Fallbrook, US 395 appears to have followed the current routing of CR S13 through town and made its 90 degree turn at the same place as Mission Ave does today. It then followed County Route S13 to a point less than 1/4 mile east of I-15. It rejoined what is now known as "Old Highway 395" in this area. Note that the current route of Mission Ave changed in the not-too-distant past. Today, Mission Avenue heads north into Fallbrook as "South Mission" Ave. Main Street splits from Mission, heading straight north, while South Mission jogs west, then heads north along what was once Hill Ave. After crossing Alvarado it becomes "North Mission." It currently makes a 90° turn to the east and becomes "West Mission" until crossing Main again after which it is "East Mission", and heads east to the I-15. According to online maps like those on Yahoo, this is the path of County S13. However, if you look on Topozone at the 7.5 minute map, this routing does not exist on the 1968 Morro Hill quad. Instead, from both the topo map and historical descriptions from the Fallbrook Historical Society that are online, it appears that US 395 followed Mission north until it became Main Street, it then turned 90° east on what the topo calls Juniper St (now East Mission). It then jogged north, then east as Mission Road, following that east to the current "Old 395" near the I-15.

      Much of "Old 395" is still drivable. According to one contributor who lives in that area, Old Highway 395 in that area is still well traveled (and mostly well maintained), functioning mostly as a bypass around the border patrol checkpoint for local traffic. It parallels the southbound side of Route 15 for many miles (well before Route 76) then at/with Mission Road (Fallbrook) crosses over Route 15 to the North side of the freeway (via 2 90 degree turns), parallels I-15 for a few more miles until the Rainbow Valley Blvd exit. where it diverges somewhat and becomes a narrow windy mountain road (with some great vantages over the City of Temecula). Once everything levels out, it runs into Pala Road (sometimes "Pechanga Parkway") about 1/8 mile south of Route 79. South of Route 76, stretches are a narrow mountain road. The abandoned 40-foot Ostrich Creek Bridge in downtown Fallbrook is another relic of old US 395.

      US 395 diverged again to the south of the grade to Temecula Creek, following Rainbow Canyon Road, where it ultimately joined with current Route 79 (formerly Route 71). The current routing of I-15 was originally a four lane bypass of town, opened in 1949. A relic of the old routing are the two tiny country gas stations on Rainbow Valley Boulevard, their pumps long gone.

    3. Between 2 mi N of Temecula and Riverside: This is present-day I-215, and was LRN 78, defined in 1931. For a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982. Note that, until 1950, US 395 was routed along the route of present-day I-15 from Temecula to the junction with present-day Route 74, then along present-day Route 74 to "D" Street in Perris, and then up "D" Street along present-day I-215. This is shown on some of the older maps. US 395 signage started in 1935 for the dogleg route. The US 395 designation was moved to the I-215 direct routing in 1952-1952, upon completion of construction of the new highway. The older dogleg routing through Elsinore remained as Route 71 (eventual I-15) and Route 74. Note that the routing from Perris to Riverside was originally signed as part of Route 740.

    4. Between Jct US 60/US 91 and Jct US 60/US 395 (i.e., through Riverside): The route was cosigned as US 60/US 395, and was LRN 19 (defined in 1909). This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982.

    5. 1944 MapBetween Riverside and San Bernardino: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 395, and was LRN 43 (defined in 1931). This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982. As the 1944 map shows, US 395 entered into Colton, where the routing dropped the cosigning with Route 18, and continued N along Waterman as LRN 31.

    6. Between San Bernardino and Devore: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 66/US 395, and was LRN 31 (defined in 1915). This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982. The portion between former US 66 and Route 14 (former Route 7) was originally part of state signed Route 95, defined in 1934, renumbered to US 395 upon the definition of US 395.

    7. Between Devore and 7 mi SW of Victorville: The route was cosigned as US 66/US 91/US 395, and was LRN 31, defined in 1915.

    8. Between 7mi SW of Victorville and the vicinity of Inyokern. The route was signed as US 395, and was LRN 145, defined in 1933. This is part of present-day US 395. The portion between former US 66 and Route 14 (former Route 7) was originally part of state signed Route 95, defined in 1934, renumbered to US 395 upon the definition of US 395 around 1935.

    9. Between the vicinity of Inyokern and Bishop. The route was cosigned as US 6/US 395 (and was formerly Route 7). This was LRN 23, defined in 1909. This is part of present-day US 395. The signage as part of US 395 occurred around 1935.

    10. Between Bishop and the vicinity of Topaz Lake. The route was signed as US 395, and was LRN 23, defined in 1909. This is part of present-day US 395, and was originally part of state signed Route 7. The signage as part of US 395 occurred around 1935.
    11. From Topaz Lake to the Nevada state line. The route was signed as US 395, and was LRN 95. This is part of present-day US 395, defined in 1933, and was originally part of state signed Route 7. The signage as part of US 395 occurred around 1935.

    East of the Route 203 interchange, "Old Highway" takes a routing paralelling Mammoth Creek for a bit and crossing it a bit northeast of the current US 395 expressway. It serves as a connection to several local roads, including a forest route along Antelope Springs Road. However, it is unclear if Old Highway dirrectly connects with existing US 395 (Mapquest shows it as doing so; MSN's map service does not).

    An "Old State Highway Road" parallels Route 120/US 395 from south of West Portal Road on the east side of Grant Lake all the way north to Oil Plant Road south of Lee Vining. (This is shown on Mapquest and on Compass's maps.)

     

    Status

    In November 2011, the first workshop for the "Historic Highway 395 Corridor Study" project, also known as the Jefferson Avenue Corridor project, was held in Murrieta. The 16-mile arterial corridor is proposed to parallel the west side of I-15 where old US 395 used to travel. It would extend from Rancho California Road along Jefferson Avenue through the cities of Temecula and Murrieta, continuing along Palomar Street and Mission Trail through the cities of Wildomar and Lake Elsinore, and continuing along East Lakeshore Drive to Main Street in Lake Elsinore. Additional information may be found at http://www.highway395corridorstudy.org/.

    In August 2003, the CTC considered relinquishment of the county road and frontage road portion of Route 395 between PM 90.9 and PM 99.6 (i.e., between South Fish Springs Road and Big Pine Dump Road) in the County of Inyo. Also considered was vacation of the right of way in the County of Inyo, between North Fish Springs Road and 0.25 mi S of the Town of Big Pine, that is a right of way superseded by construction on a new alignment. In September, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of Mono (County), at Utility Road (County Road No. 3203), consisting of reconstructed and relocated county road.

    In January 2011, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Inyo along Route 395 at the Manzanar National Historic Site, consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    There are currently plans to realign US 395 near the cities of Oak Hills, Hesperia, Victorville, Adelanto and incorporated areas of San Bernardino County. This is based off of a draft EIR. The plan is to realign US 395 from the I-15/US 395 interchange to Farmington Road. The proposed US 395 Realignment Freeway/Expressway corridor to be evaluated is located either on existing US 395 or west of existing US 395, through the cities of Oak Hills, Hesperia, Victorville, Adelanto and incorporated areas of San Bernardino County. The entire proposed project length is approximately 45.0 miles long. There are four alternatives currently being considered:

    • Alternate A: No Build. This Alternative consists of no change to existing facilities along the proposed project portion of the US 395 corridor.

    • Alternative D: Existing Alignment. The Existing Alignment Alternative follows the existing alignment or a slightly offset alignment throughout the project limits.

    • Alternative F: Realignment West of Existing Corridor. This Alternative proposes to realign the corridor from the I-15/US 395 interchange to Farmington Road. This realignment heads northwest in the vicinity of the Oak Hills Community and the Union Pacific Railroad, and then continues in a northerly direction just west of Caughlin Road within San Bernardino County limits and traversing the western portions of the City of Adelanto, where it converges back to paralleling the existing US 395 alignment for the remainder of the project limits.

    • Alternative G: Realignment West of Existing Corridor along Oro Grande Wash. This alternative consists of a realignment detaching from existing the I-15/US 395 interchange, where immediately crosses the Union Pacific Railroad within the first 1½ miles heading northeast along the Oro Grande Wash. the realignment continues northeasterly throughout the western portions of the Cities of Hesperia and Victorville and follows in a northerly direction just west of Cuaghlin Road within San Bernardino County limits and traversing the western portions of the City of Adelanto where it converges back to paralleling the existing US 395 alignment for the remainder of the project limits.

    Adelanto Rumble StripsIn May 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will widen the median and shoulders along US 395, install rumble strips, resurface the roadway, and widen the following intersections to accommodate the new width of US 395: Colusa Road. Desert Flower Road. Purple Sage Street, Shadow Mountain Avenue, Sun Hill Ranch, and Princess Pat Mine. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $55,460,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 SHOPP.

    In October 2004, the CTC considered adoption of 2.6 kilometers (1.6 miles) of Controlled Access Highway for Route 395 from 2.9 kilometers (1.8 miles) south of Mazourka Canyon Road to 0.3 kilometers (0.2 mile) south of Mazourka Canyon Road in Inyo County. Currently, this segment of Route 395 is a two-lane conventional highway crossing generally level terrain. Cross-section consists of two standard 3.6 m (12 ft) lanes with predominantly non-standard 1.2 m (4 ft ) shoulders, where 3 m (8 ft) is standard. At the southern limit of the adoption, the route will connect to the recently approved Manzanar four-lane divided section (Resolution HRA-04-02 approved August, 2004). This segment south of Independence was not included in the Manzanar adoption, as it was an integral part of a possible Independence bypass alternative and subject to various alignment considerations. This bypass alternative had less than a 3% approval at public hearings and was ultimately rejected for the recently approved 4-lane improvement project through Independence. Current and twenty year projected Level of Service (LOS) for the existing facility is ‘D’, congested. The current and twenty year LOS for the proposed project is ‘A’, free flowing. The majority of the property through which this segment of the route passes is owned by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, with little development adjacent to the existing or proposed right of way south of Independence. The route adoption proposes a controlled access highway on predominantly existing alignment from the northern end of the Manzanar four lane section adopted in August, 2004, to a point 0.3 kilometers (0.2 miles) south of Mazourka Canyon Road, at Independence. Construction is currently scheduled for FY 2007-08, based on programming in a 2004 STIP. ([PDF] ref)

    In California City, there is a proposal for a new road that would run from Muroc Junction following the alignment of Rosamond Boulevard at the Edwards Air Force Base north gate. The road would curve to connect with California City Boulevard at the curve just south of the city. It would then proceed north to connect with 20 Mule Team Parkway, which would be paved all the way to its current connection with US 395. This will provide a faster connection between Edwards AFB and the Naval Air Weapons Center.

    The four lane project between Lone Pine and/through Independence is nearly completed as of August 2010. The last portion is around Manzanar where a new bridge is being completed for the southbound alignment; the northbound alignment is pretty much intact. The new alignment in Manzinar leaves a stretch of the old alignment as a frontage road, and the only connection from the new US 395 to the frontage road is at Manzanar Reward Rd. This means all of US 395 from Inyokern to Conway Summit is four-lane expressway except for the piece through Olancha which is unlikely to be upgraded anytime soon. The segment was completed in October 2010.

    In 2007, the CTC did not recommend funding construction of the Olancha and Cartago Expressway ($107,600K total cost; $59,000K requested) from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA). However, the minutes from the 11/08 meeting of the Inyo County Local Transportation Commission discussed the five options for US 395's realignment (either expansion or a movement west). The main problem is the proximity of the LA Aqueduct.

    In July 2007, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Hesperia, at Outpost Road, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city street. The City, by relinquishment cooperative agreement dated April 16, 2007, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    In October 2006, agentsteel53 (Livejournal) posted about an "old" US 395 at the original junction of Route 76 and US 395; information is available in his journal.

    In Independence, Caltrans is attempting to widen US 395. However, trees are in the way, according to an article in the LA Times. Specifically, Caltrans engineers say 100 trees are standing in the way of plans to widen a stretch of the route in Independence from two to four lanes and line it with about 400 feet of sidewalks. The project, they say, would improve safety and the flow of vehicles on the rural fringe of the community. The issue has its roots in Caltrans' decade-old proposal to widen US 395 to four lanes between Ridgecrest and Mammoth Mountain. The mile-long stretch, edged with dirt shoulders, is among the last to be expanded.

    [Bishop Bypasses]In 2003 the Inyo County Local Transportation Commission, with the support of the City of Bishop and Inyo County, requested that Caltrans District 9 conduct a Bishop Area Access and Circulation Study. This study was published at http://inyoltc.org/pdfs/baacs.pdf. The basic goal was to develop a plan and alternatives to (1) Improve circulation and safety for all modes of transportation in the downtown area. (2) Accommodate commercial truck traffic for US 395 and US 6. (3) Plan for downtown improvements (i.e. landscaping, parking, pedestrian facilities, etc.) along with the rerouting of truck traffic. (4) Facilitate ground access improvements to the airport and its associated development improvements. (4) Keep services in Bishop visible for through-traffic on any route and have easy on/off connections. The plan notes that a bypass of the Bishop business district was considered in 1966 (see http://www.ca-bishop.us/Misc/07_1009_BAACS_Appendix.pdf) but traffic didn't justify it; the alternatives from that plan are no longer practical as the land is either privately owned and developed, or tribal lands. The basic recommendations of this study (which has not been adopted yet by the CTC) are:

    1. A two-lane eastern alternative truck route beginning somewhere between Gerkin Road and Schober Lane and connecting back to US 6 and US 395 at the Wye Road location. This new route should be developed as a City/County road to Caltrans standards in order to allow the City and County the option to exchange this route for Main Street/US 395 at sometime in the future.

    2. Improved access between the City and the housing areas to the west (i.e. South Barlow, Manor, McLaren, Highlands/Glenwood, Meadow Creek, Bishop Reservation, etc.). This recommendation includes the development of new local roads to provide options other than Route 168/West Line Street and US 395/North Sierra Highway to get into town.

    3. Improved City street alternatives to Main Street/US 395 that accommodates north/south movements of local traffic on either side of Main Street.

    Some other interim recommendations from the report include: better alignment of the Wye Road/US 6 intersection and the eventual reconfiguration of the US 6/US 395/ Wye Road intersection; the aligning of side streets off of Main Street/US 395 to create at least one more full four way intersection; extending See Vee Lane north of US 395; signalizing the See Vee/US 395 intersection; and defining access along the North Sierra Highway corridor with sidewalks and driveways.

    As of May 2009, Cameron Kaiser reports that most of the pass closure signs have been replaced with automated flashers, including the Caltrans-erected one in the Carson Valley, but there is still an old clapboard sign south of Route 89. There have also been significant widening projects. There seems to have been some widening and four-laning in the Antelope Valley, mostly between Topaz Lake and Coleville. The route is still one-lane-per-direction between Devils Gate and Coleville, and of course a fair bit south of Bridgeport and around Mono Lake. Repaving is taking place on the Sherwin Grade, as well as a big resurfacing project north of the Bishop city limits. The 4-lane project for Inyo is proceeding but in several distinct phases. The first phase from Black Rock to Elna Rd is apparently complete but now they're repaving the original (NB) lanes, so everyone uses the new southbound lanes. The rest area isn't done. There is a second phase from Black Rock to Independence which has some asphalt and grading work on its new NB lanes but is not nearly as complete. Independence's street widening project is in full swing. All of the sidewalks have been torn up and the traffic lanes shifted over while work is done on the original NB side. No paving or concrete yet but the entire new section(s) are fully graded in preparation for moulds. The final phase is from Independence to Lone Pine via Manzanar. This only looks just started; there is only grading existing on the new NB lanes, no asphalt and no bridgework (several of the channels will need culverts or bridges).

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #624: Begin construction of a road from US 395 west towards Route 14. The specifics of this aren't given, but it could relate to the High Desert Corridor and the Cross-Valley Connector (see Route 138), which when combined with the I-5 to Route 14, and US 395 to I-15 segments, would complete the Metropolitan Bypass Freeway. The funding, however, is insufficient to complete this. $800,000.

    • High Priority Project #1342: Construction of new freeway between I-15 and US 395, including new interchange at I-15. This is the last part of the High Desert Corridor (see Route 138). This will provide new highway access to the Southern California Logistics Airport. $4,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #2427: US 395 Realignment and Widening Project. $400,000.

     

     

    Naming

    The portion of this route that was cosigned with US 6 (i.e., from US 6 in Bishop to Route 14) was named the "Grand Army of the Republic Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 33, Chapter 73, in 1943.

    The portion of this route from Route 108 to Bridgeport was named the "Sonora and Big Meadows Wagon Road" by Senate Bill 289 in 1901. It was also named the "Sonora and Mono Wagon Road" by Resolution Chapter 11 in 1901, and extended by Resolution Chapter 510 in 1919.

    Historically, the portion of this route from Route 14 to Bridgeport was part of "El Camino Sierra" (Road to the Mountains).

    The segment of US 395 from the southern city limits of Bishop to its intersection with Warm Springs Road in Inyo County is named the "Police Officer Richard Perkins Memorial Highway". Named in honor of Officer Richard E. Perkins of the Bishop Police Department, who was killed in the line of duty on August 15, 2001, when a truck struck his patrol car as he was making a turn in order to assist another law enforcement agency in pursuit of a possible drunk driver. Officer Perkins was an 11-year veteran of the Bishop Police Department, was highly respected in the community he served, and is survived by his wife Cheryl and three children, Andrew, Pauli, and Kati. He was the first police officer to die in the line of duty in the City of Bishop's 100-year history. He was dedicated to family, friends, church, and the community, and was known for his work with the Bishop Mural Society and as one of the founding members of the Bishop Police Mounted Unit. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 46, Chapter 53, May 5, 2004.

    Just off of US 395 is the community of Bodie. Bodie has been designated the Official State Gold Rush Ghost Town. Bodie was founded by Waterman S. Body in 1859, and rose to prominence due to mining in the nearby Comstock Lode. At its peak in 1879, Bodie boasted a population of 10,000 citizens and had a reputation for its wicked climate as well as its clientele. By 1882, the big strikes were mostly gone and with them the need to stay in Bodie. One hundred twenty years later, in 2002, Bodie is one of the largest and best-preserved ghost towns in the West. Designed by Assembly Bill 1757, Chapter 365, 9/5/2002.

    The segment of US 395 from the junction with Route 190 to Gill Station Coso Road in the County of Inyo is named the "Paul H. Pino Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officer Paul H. Pino, badge number 9735, who was killed in the line of duty during the morning of December 30, 2003. Paul H. Pino was issuing a citation on US 395 south of Olancha in the County of Inyo when an impaired driver collided into his patrol vehicle killing the officer; he succumbed to his injuries as a result of the collision. Officer Pino was born on August 26, 1955, in The Hague, Holland. He immigrated to the United States in 1960 and subsequently relocated to Carson, California. He attended and graduated from Carson High School in 1973; from Los Angeles Harbor College with a degree in Police Science in 1977; and joined the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department as a Deputy Sheriff in 1977 and served in that capacity for three years. He joined the California Highway Patrol in August, 1980. After successfully completing his academy training, he reported to the South Los Angeles Area as an officer on January 8, 1981. Paul H. Pino made significant contributions to traffic safety and assisting the motoring public while assigned to the South Los Angeles, Barstow, and Bishop Area offices; in total, he served 23 years as a sworn peace officer for the California Highway Patrol and was known by his fellow officers for his dedication to the department and to the protection of the citizens of our state. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 55, Resolution Chapter 50, on 5/9/2006.

     

    Named Structures

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Coso Junction, in Inyo County, 17 mi S of Route 190.
    • Division Creek, in Inyo County, 10 mi N of Independence.
    • Crestview, in Mono County, 1.6 mi S of Crestview.

    Additionally, there is a memorial marker at Post Mile 66.0 (San Bernardino County) in memory of CHP Officer Larry J. Jaramillo. California Highway Patrol Officer Larry J. Jaramillo died in the line of duty in a traffic collision on Route 395 at the Kern County San Bernardino County line, while returning from court in Inyo County on June 22, 1993. Officer Jaramillo joined the Department of the California Highway Patrol in 1985, after successfully completing training at the patrol academy where he received the outstanding athlete award for his class, and, upon graduation, he reported to Morongo Basin, as a state traffic safety officer in December 1985. In 1989, Officer Jaramillo tested and qualified with the department to become a fixed wing pilot and was assigned to the Inland Division Air Operations Unit stationed in Daggett, California. On December 8, 1992, Officer Jaramillo received the second highest award that the department may bestow, the Special Act Award, for his rescue of two young men stranded in the snow-covered mountains of Kern County during which Officer Jaramillo continued his search for the young men despite warnings of adverse weather conditions, endangering his life to continue the search until the men were found. Memorial authorized by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 173, Resolution Chapter 142, September 18, 2000.

     

    National Trails

    Midland Trail Sign The portion of this segment between Route 14 and US 6 was part of the "Midland Trail.

     

    Business Routes
    • Ridgecrest: Signed on China Lake Blvd. and Inyokern Ave. This is cosigned with Route 178, except for S China Lake Blvd..

    • Riverside: Back when US 395 ran through Riverside (partially co-signed with US 60), it had a business routing along University Avenue, west on Mission Boulevard (current Business Route 60), north on Market Street (former US 91), and east on Columbia Avenue back to US 395 (current I-215).

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.8] From Route 14 near Little Lake to Route 89 near Coleville.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.8] Entire portion.


  2. From the Nevada state line northwest of Reno to to the Oregon state line near New Pine Creek via Alturas.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963 as the original (c).

    The portion of this route between Alturas and a point 6 mi W (i.e., between the two US 395/Route 299 junctions) is cosigned as US 395/Route 299, although it is legislatively US 395.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    The segment from the Nevada state line northwest of Reno to Route 36 near Johnstonville (Susanville) was part of LRN 29, and was signed as US 395. It was a 1919 extension of the 1909 LRN 29, which ran as (signed) Route 36 between Red Bluff and Susanville (in 1933, LRN 29 was extended further to run, still as Route 36, between Route 3/Route 36 [LRN 35] to US 99 [LRN 3]).

    The segment from Alturas to the California-Oregon state line near New River was LRN 73, added in 1931. This was also signed as US 395. California Highways and Public Works, April 1931, noted that the justification for the addition what that it established a connection between the Oregon State Highway System and the Redding-Alturas lateral ([LRN 28]) of the California State Highway System. The project was considered a necessary link on an east of the Sierras routing. It was a designated Federal aid route. It had been recommended for inclusion in the State highway system by the Highway Advisory Board in 1925. At the time, Oregon was improving its roads from Klamath Falls, from Bend and from Burns territory (the Yellowstone cut-off) to the state line at New Pine Creek Oregon, with State and Federal funds, and had practically completed a surfaced road from the Columbia River and also from Klamath Falls to New Pine Creek. As of 1931, the unimproved condition of the California extension was withholding from the public the potential value of these routes. Within California the project will coordinate with the Redding-Alturas highway, and through the Alturas-Susanville route, with the Red Bluff - Susanville - Reno lateral [LRN 29]. There was also a contemplated connection from Lake Almanor to the Feather River road that would extend recreational traffic further south. The route qualified as an interstate connection, as the 1931 California Highway system lacked a connection to eastern Oregon.

    The last segment addition occured in 1933, and was the segment between Susanville and Alturas (more formally, between LRN 29 (Route 36/US 395) and LRN 28 (Route 299)).

     

    Status

    Currently built to expressway standards for a stretch of 8 miles between the Nevada Border and Route 70.

    In May 2008, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of Alturas, at Court Street, East Street, East A Street, and East B Street, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets.

    In March 2013, the CTC provided advance authorization for $2,995,000 to rehabilitate 12.0 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the road surface, minimize the costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life on the segment in and near Johnstonville, from 0.1 mile north of Sunnyside Road to 0.3 mile south of Route 36..

     

    Named Structures

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Honey Lake, in Lassen County, 7.7mi N of Milford.
    • Secret Valley, in Lassen County 12 mi S of Ravendale.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.8] From the Nevada state line northwest of Reno to Route 36 near Johnstonville and from Route 36 near Termo to the Oregon state line.

Historical Route

As of March 2008, the California Transportation Committee unanimously approved the designation of former US 395 as a historic route from San Diego to the Oregon border. It is still pending approval by the legislature and the governor. However, anticipating approval, San Diego County Supervisor Bill Horn approved $4,000 for the 31 signs that now mark old 395 in his district -- from Vista to the Bonsall Bridge, through downtown Fallbrook, to Rainbow.

On July 8, 2008, Resolution Chapter 79 officially designated specified sections of former US Highway Route 395 as Historic US Highway 395. The resolution noted that former US 395 was a scenic stretch of highway that ran through historic areas of the County of Riverside and provided the only direct route from San Diego to the Lake Tahoe region and northern Nevada, before heading back into California on its way north to Oregon and all the way into Canada. While former US 395 remains largely intact through the Counties of Inyo, Mono, Sierra, Lassen, and Modoc, only sections of former US 395 still exist in portions of the County of San Diego and the high desert area of the County of San Bernardino; most of the former highway route has been replaced by I-15 and I-215 in the Counties of San Diego, Riverside, and San Bernardino. US 395, which remains as I-15 and I-215, was the major and most significant connection between San Diego, the Inland Empire, and the eastern Sierra Nevada region. US 395 was known as the Cabrillo Parkway (and later the Cabrillo Freeway) in San Diego, now Route 163, it was the first freeway to be constructed in San Diego and opened to traffic in 1948. Part of the original routing of former US 395 in northern San Diego County includes the old Bonsall Bridge, one of the earliest automotive crossings over the San Luis Rey River, later becoming part of Route 76. The portion of former US 395 between Temecula and Lake Elsinore was part of the Butterfield Overland Mail route, the first major overland delivery service to southern California, established September 16, 1858. After its realignment eastward, former US 395 became the first major expressway and freeway system in the southern portion of the County of Riverside in the early 1950s, servicing the Cities of Temecula, Murrieta, Menifee, Sun City, and Perris. Today this is I-215. The portion of former US 395 between the Cities of San Bernardino and Hesperia, near modern US 395, traverses the Cajon Pass with old US 66 and old US 91, most famously used by the Mormons in 1851 in their crossing into the valley where they subsequently founded the modern Cities of San Bernardino and Riverside. The heritage in the regions through which former US 395 passed was greatly diminished when the former highway was replaced by suburban streets and I-15 and I-215.The Legislature hereby recognizes the remaining segments of US 395 for their historical significance and importance in the development of California, and designates those segments as Historic State Highway Route 395. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 98, Resolution Chapter 79, on 7/3/2008.

 

National Trails

All of original US 395 (i.e., current Route 395 plus parts of I-15, I-215, and Route 163) was part of the "Three Flags Highway".

 

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Other WWW Links

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

This route (post-1964 US 395) was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 112, Ch. 143 in 1984.

 


Overall statistics for US 395:

  • Total Length (1995): 557 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,050 to 16,600
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 549; Sm. Urban: 8; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 557 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 557 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Sherwin Summit (7000 ft); Deadman Summit (8041 ft); Conway Summit (8138 ft); Devils Gate (7519 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: San Bernardino, Kern, Inyo, Mono, Sierra, Lassen, Modoc.


US Highway Shield X-Ed Out

Former US Highway 399



Routing

No current routing.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Until July 1, 1964, the following route was signed as US 399:

  1. Present-day Route 33 between US 101 [LRN 2] in Ventura and Route 166 (LRN 57) 7 mi N of Ventucopa. This segment was LRN 138, defined in 1933.

  2. Present-day Route 33/Route 166 (previously cosigned as US 399/Route 166) between 7 mi N of Ventucopa and Maricopa. This segment was LRN 57, defined in 1919.

  3. Present-day Route 33 between Maricoa and Taft (previously cosigned as US 399/Route 33). This was LRN 138, defined in 1933.

  4. Present-day Route 119 between Taft and US 99 (present-day Route 99). This was LRN 140, defined in 1933.

Signage of the route as US 399 dates back to around 1935. Note that, as of 1942, US 399 actually north cosigned with US 99 to end at US 466. This portion of US 399 was later relegated to Business Loop status in 1962, and became BR 99/Route 204 in 1964. However, the portion of former US 399 south of Brundage Lane (current parallel street to Route 58, the replacement for US 466) was removed from the state route in 1978; only the portion of former US 99 on Union Avenue from Golden State Avenue/Sumner Street south to Route 58 remains in the state system as Route 204. All of the route remains part of Business Route 99.

 

Other WWW Links


Interstate Shield

Interstate 405



Routing

From Route 5 near El Toro to Route 5 near San Fernando.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This segment remains as defined in 1963.

The first section of I-405 opened in 1957, signed as Route 7. One of the earliest sections was in West Los Angeles, from Bellagio Rd to Santa Monica Blvd. The part west of I-605 was done before 1965; the newest section, near the southern junction with I-5, opened in 1969.

The following freeway-to-freeway connections were never constructed:

  • NB I-405 to SB I-5 (Northern Merge). Rationale: Illogical Reverse Move. The angle between the two freeways is too acute.

  • SB I-4055 to NB I-5 (Southern Merge). Rationale: Illogical Reverse Move. The angle between the two freeways is too acute.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

New Newhall RoutingThis routing was LRN 158. The portion from I-5 in Orange County to Route 710 was defined in 1951; the portion from Route 710 to Route 90 was defined in 1947; and the portion from Route 90 to I-5 in San Fernando was defined in 1933. Before the freeway was constructed, LRN 158 also applied to pre-1963 Route 7 between the US 99/US 6 junction and Route 107.

Interesting historical note: In the May/June 1928 issue of California Highways and Public Works, there is a discussion of the routing of the Newhall Highway from Saugus to San Fernando. The article notes: "From a point on the south roadway near the Cascades it is proposed to extend a new highway south through the San Fernando Valley and the Santa Monica mountains to the west coast; there to connect with the state coast highway extending from Oxnard to San Juan Capestrano"

The I-405/I-605 interchange was designed by Carol Schumaker.

[Reece at 405-10]The I-405/I-10 interchange was designed by Marilyn Jorgenson Reece, who was the first woman in California to be registered as a civil engineer. She died in May 2004. A South Dakota native who earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1948, Reece moved to Los Angeles with her parents shortly after graduation. The same year, she went to work for the State Division of Highways, which later became Caltrans, as a junior civil engineer in Los Angeles. In 1954, after six years of required experience to sit for the Professional Engineer's Exam, Reece became the state's first fully licensed female civil engineer. In 1962, she received the Governor's Design Excellence Award from Gov. Pat Brown for the San Diego-Santa Monica freeway interchange. Shortly after, Reece became the Division of Highway's first woman resident engineer for construction projects. The three-level San Diego-Santa Monica freeway interchange, which opened in 1964, was the first interchange designed in California by a woman engineer. Reece told The Los Angeles Times in 1995 that she put her "heart and soul into it" and that she designed the interchange with aesthetics in mind. "It is very airy. It isn't a cluttered, loopy thing," she said, adding that specifications to keep traffic moving at high speeds necessitated the long, sweeping curves. The image to the right, excerpted from One Hundred Years of Progress, shows Reece and Thomas McKinley. However, the book referred to Reece as an Associate Engineer, with McKinley as a Resident Engineer, but did indicate that Reece supervised the I-405/I-10 interchange project. The view in the photo is looking N from what is roughly the National offramp on the I-405; you can see a sign for the Route 26 Olympic Blvd NB offramp that was removed as part of the project (likewise, the SB National offramp was removed). A nice profile of Ms. Reece may be found on the LA Daily Mirror blog.

Construction on I-405 (the "Sepulveda Freeway") begin 1954. CHPW noted in November-December 1953, "Los Angeles County, structures on the route of the Sepulveda Freeway, between Waterford Street and Casiano Road in West Los Angeles, $800,000 (first construction on the Sepulveda Freeway)." Construction started with the original bridges at Sunset Blvd. The name San Diego Freeway started being used in 1955. (Note: Prior to 1955, the portion of US 101 S of the junction with Route 7 (e.g., present-day I-5 S of the I-5/I-405 jct.) was called the Santa Ana Freeway. The first segment of I-405 opened was the two-mile section of the San Diego Freeway from Ohio Street to Casiano Road. The first plan work on the San Diego Freeway was started by the Engineering Bureau Department of Public Works of the City of Los Angeles under City Engineer Lloyd C. Aldrich in 1939 when it was known as the "Sepulveda Parkway."

In the improvement of the San Diego Freeway through the Veterans Administration Center, it was necessary to acquire property in the name of the County of Los Angeles for the realignment of Wilshire Boulevard and for the widening of Federal Avenue, the reconstruction of which has been carried out by the State Division of Highways. The necessary grants of property from the Federal Government were secured under the provisions of Section 17 of the Federal Highway Act of November 9, 1921, as amended, 42 Statutes 216. The Federal Government transferred a total of 54.2 acres of which 46.6 acres was to the State of California for the San Diego Freeway, and 7.6 acres was to County of Los Angeles for the improvement of Wilshire Boulevard and Federal Avenue. The State and county received from the Federal Government for this project land worth well in excess of $2,000,000. The State, in return, has carried out considerable construction and relocation work for the benefit of the veterans' facility. The grant to the County of Los Angeles provided for the vacation of San Vicente Boulevard by the County of Los Angeles through the Veterans Administration Center whereby 6.6 acres would be added to the usable area of the veterans' facility.

A November 2010 briefing on the I-405 HOV construction in the Sepulveda Pass included these wonderful photos of the construction of the original Mulholland Bridge. More photos can be found at the LA Times.

Mulholland Construction Images

A Metro article on the same bridge noted that the bridge was completed on April 4, 1960. The main portion of Mulholland Drive—westward from the Cahuenga Pass in Hollywood past the Sepulveda Pass—opened in 1924 under a different name: the Mulholland Highway. It was built by a consortium of Hollywood Hills landowners. Their goal was to bring development to the Hollywood Hills and make a few dollars for themselves. In May 1958, the State Division of Highways—this preceded the creation of Caltrans—called for bids on a $10-million highway construction project. Besides closing a 4.1-mile gap in US 101 and funding other work on the San Diego Freeway, the 1958 contract required the relocation of 1.1 miles of Mulholland Drive south. Once moved, Mulholland Drive would cross a new 579-foot-long bridge: Mulholland Drive Bridge. When completed, relocating Mulholland Drive and building Mulholland Drive Bridge cost $1,824,000. In June 1960, bids were opened for a $14-million contract to extend the San Diego Freeway 7.4 miles from Brentwood to Valley Vista Bl in the San Fernando Valley. Mulholland Drive Bridge would finally span a freeway. The original bridge was torn down starting in July 2011.

The segment of I-405 between West Los Angeles and the Valley opened to traffic on December 21, 1962. When it happened, San Fernando Valley realtors took out a full page ad in the Santa Monica Evening Outlook heralding the effect in travel savings and increased accessibility between the valley communities and West LA. Public response to the new freeway was instantaneous as 82,000 motor vehicles diverted from parallel mountain roads to the new facility in the first full day of operation. The Average Daily Traffic on Sepulveda Blvd dropped from 42,000 to 3,000! Peak travel time was cut in half, from 14 minutes to 7 minutes (and many people in 2013 would be ecstatic about a travel time of 15 minutes for the pass!).

According to the LA Times, I-405 in the Sepulveda Pass was a bypass for Sepulveda Boulevard (former Route 7), opened in 1935 and was hailed in the Los Angeles Times as a "new and wondrous highway" over the mountains, vastly superior to the overcrowded Cahuenga Pass and Laurel Canyon. The pre-405 Sepulveda Blvd consisted of numerous hairpin curves, which claimed 65 lives during the 1950s alone. More than 40,000 vehicles a day passed through the tunnel under Mulholland Blvd. Northbound traffic routinely backed up to Sunset Boulevard. The Sepulveda Pass project begin in August 1960. Statistics on the project included: Eighteen million cubic yards of earth removed! Ninety thousand cubic yards of concrete poured! Six million pounds of steel holding it together! A 30-story building could be hidden within the depths of the so-called Big Cut. It was opened on December 21, 1962.

Pictures of the construction of I-405 in the San Fernando Valley may be found here. An article on the geology of the Sepulveda Pass may be found here.

Both sections in the San Fernando Valley (from Burbank to Nordhoff, and from Nordhoff to I-5) opened to traffic on April 19, 1963.

 

Status

San Fernando Valley

In September 2000, the California Transportation Commission considered a proposal (TCRP Project 51) to add an auxiliary lane and widen the ramp through the I-405/US 101 freeway interchange in Sherman Oaks. For phases 1 and 2, the request was for $4 million, with a total estimated cost of $34 million. The phase 3 request was $4.2 million. Phase 1 added a northbound auxilliary freeway lane from Mulholland Drive to Greenleaf Avenue, and was completed around January 2003. The third phase was completed in 2004 and widened the eastbound connector to the US 101 to two lanes. The third phase involves permanently closing the ramp that loops motorists from eastbound Ventura Boulevard onto the northbound I-405 near the Sherman Oaks Galleria. The reconstructed approach routes motorists onto southbound Sepulveda Boulevard and onto Greenleaf Avenue, where they will either drive through a tunnel under the freeway and onto the NB I-405, or stay in the right lane and connect to US 101. It was completed in late 2007.

[SB 405/101 IC]There is also work afoot to address another problem at that interchange -- specifically, the connector between southbound I-405 and the northbound US 101. This might involve construction of an elevated two-lane connector. There are five options currently under consideration, some of which could affect nearby homes or take out part of the Sepulveda Basin wildlife refuge. The connection between two freeways is now just one lane and often backs up on I-405. The project would build a two-lane connector across the Sepulveda Dam spillway, and could possibly include changes to southbound I-405 and the southbound US-101 interchange, and the Burbank Boulevard on-and-off-ramps. Built in the 1950s, the freeway connector was designed to handle up to 1,500 vehicles an hour but now has been swamped with 1,790 autos per hour by 2008. By 2015, morning rush hours are expected to draw up to 2,075 vehicles per hour to the freeway connector as the state population increases. One of the three possible alternatives reconstructs the Burbank Boulevard on-ramp to southbound I-405 to pass beneath the new two-lane connector, at an estimated cost of $86.4 million. However, Burbank Boulevard would lose access to both directions of US 101. As a result, the Los Angeles Department of Transportation opposes the plan. Closing that freeway access will send traffic farther down to Van Nuys Boulevard or through the congested intersection of Sepulveda and Burbank boulevards, said Ken Husting, a senior transportation engineer with LADOT. With this alternative, LADOT engineers want to see other roadway improvements to increase mobility, such as building a full interchange at Hayvenhurst Avenue to US 101. The other alternatives stretch into the 225-acre Sepulveda Basin wildlife refuge - home to various species of birds, from burrowing owls to red-tailed hawks and Canada geese - within the Sepulveda Flood Control Basin. A second proposal, estimated at $117 million, maintains access to US 101 from Burbank Boulevard, but it requires a new loop on-ramp that encroaches on 2.64 acres of wildlife refuge sitting north of Burbank Boulevard and west of I-405. The plan also requires reconstruction of the bridge between Burbank Boulevard and I-405. A third alternative, costing about $88.8 million (and supported by Homeowners of Encino) leaves access to US 101 open from Burbank Boulevard but takes 2.92 acres of the wildlife refuge. This plan excludes reconstructing an existing overcrossing between Burbank Boulevard. The Army Corps of Engineer oppose the 2nd and 3rd alternatives, as do environmental groups. The plans will be discussed at the June 2008 CTC meeting.
[Source: LA Daily News], May 8, 2008; Project EIR]

In September 2008, the CTC considered the above project for future consideration of funding. The cover information noted that the project will replace the existing connector by constructing a new connector/bridge over the Sepulveda Dam. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program with regional improvement program shares for $7,010,000 for environmental. The total estimated project cost is $165 million. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14, depending on the availability of funds.

In April 2012, it was reported that widening and retrofitting of the Sepulveda Overpass was going to begin in May 2012. For about a year, left turns from Fiume Walk and the Southbound Valley Vista off-ramp onto northbound Sepulveda will be restricted, and left turns from northbound Sepulveda onto Fiume Walk will also be restricted. Additionally, the left turn pocket onto the southbound Valley Vista on-ramp will be shortened and Sepulveda will go to two lanes in each direction near the overpass. Meanwhile, two crosswalks will be eliminated—the crosswalk across Sepulveda at Fiume Walk and the crosswalk across Fiume which, along with sidewalk on the west side of Sepulveda, will close three months after the start of construction.
(Source: Zev Yaroslavsky's Blog, 4/27/2012)

Sepulveda Pass

In January 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of Way adjacent to Route 405 in the city of Los Angeles at Dickens Street, consisting of a collateral facility.

In June 2012, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Los Angeles along Route 405 on Dickens Street, consisting of a collateral facility.

I-405 HOV mapNorthbound, there are plans to add an HOV lane between I-10 and US 101. In September 2000, the California Transportation Commission considered a proposal (Traffic Congestion Relief Program Project 39) to add the northbound HOV lane over Sepulveda Pass, from I-10 to US 101. Phase 1 of the proposal was estimated to cost $15 million, with a total cost of $336 million. This is TCRP Project #39, and has an estimated completion date sometime in the year 2016, with construction starting in 2006. The desired goal is 6 mix-flow and 2 HOV lanes in each direction, but initially there will be one HOV lane and five mixed flow lanes. It was requested by the LA County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

The project will provide a continuous HOV system on Route I-405 by closing a gap in the current system. Estimates to add the HOV lane range from $500 million to $750 million. Work on the environmental phase of the project began in Fiscal Year 2000-01. Severe fiscal crises in the following years resulted in the temporary suspension of various transportation funding sources, including TCRP. Due to the prospective lack of funds to proceed beyond the Environmental phase, the Department delayed work on this project. However, with the appropriation of Proposition 42 funds, and $130,000,000 in new federal earmark funds (SAFETEA-LU), the environmental phase began. During this phase, the Department identifies individual segments for construction. The Federal earmark funds of $130,000,000, along with the remaining un-programmed $75 million of TCRP funds will be used to deliver one or more these segments. The schedule and funding plan are for environmental only. This phase is scheduled to complete in July 2008.

A 2006 bond measure provided additional funding for completion of the northbound HOV route system. This has gone through a lot of funding hurdles, especially in relation to funds from the 2006 Corridor Mobility Improvement Account. Originally, the project was not recommended because it was believed construction would start too late. The decision was later rescinded, and the project was approved for $730 million in funding. The total cost of the project is $950 million. As of March 2007, Caltrans had five proposals for this construction:

  1. Alternative 1: No Build
  2. Alternative 2: The widening of the existing facility to add a northbound HOV lane.
  3. Alternative 3: The widening of the existing facility to add a northbound HOV lane and restore southbound freeway lane and shoulder widths to current design standards.
  4. Alternative 4: The widening of the existing facility to provide for four HOV lanes (two each, both northbound and southbound) on an elevated viaduct, within the freeway median
  5. Alternative 5: Transit Enhancement Alternative. This would involve design features that would facilitate increased transit use in the corridor.

Many of these alternatives are engendering quite a bit of controversy, especially Alternative 3, which would involve the taking of a significant amount of property, including churches, hotels, and multi-family residences in an affulent area. Specifically, Caltrans has noted that the most extensive plan (Alternative 3, about $911 million) takes up to seven Sherman Oaks homes and thirty Brentwood properties. This alternative is present because the narrower SB lanes have a higher accident rate. Alternative 2 (about $649 million) would still take the seven Sherman Oaks homes, and portions of about forty, and leave the southbound side of I-405 unchanged.
(Ref: Los Angeles Times)

In July 2007, Caltrans released a modification to the plan that appeared more acceptable. This modification would add a mixed flow lane SB between Skirball Center and Waterford St., close the SB I-405 on-ramp from EB Sunset Blvd, reconfiguring the intersection to direct traffic to use the SB entrance just N of Sunset Blvd., and realigning portions of Sepulveda Blvd. There would also be realingment of the Skirball Center ramps.There would also be relocation of the Valley Vista ramps SB. The option would also move I-405 east, permitting a simple narrowing of Church Lane, instead of relocation (and thus saving a lot of properties). In August 2007, the CTC approved programming $27,000,000 in new TCRP funds for Plans, Specifications and Estimates (PS&E) for this project, and changed the Phase 2 completion date to FY10/11. Without widening, traffic on I-405, described as one of the worst in the nation, is forecast to increase 46% from 2005 to 2031.

In February 2008, it was announced that Caltrans had decided on a plan that will result in only a few homes being taken, in the vicinity of Valley Vista Blvd. This appears to be the less-severe option (the July 2007 modification), which itself has had a few modifications.
[Source: LA Daily News, 2/25/2008]

In June 2008, the CTC approved the selected alternative for the Route 405 construction. The alternative selected was Alternative 2: which widens the facility solely to add a NB HOV lane. This alternative will still take seven Sherman Oaks homes, and portions of about forty, but it will leave the southbound side of I-405 unchanged. The NB roadway will meet current design standards for lane, median, and shoulder widths except at the I-10/I-405 interchange and between Moraga Dr. and Sunset Blvd interchanges. Standard lanes consist of an 11' half median, a 12' HOV lane, a 1' HOV buffer, 5 12' mixed-flow lanes, and a 10' outside shoulder. The selected alternative would also widen the SB I-405 to meet current design standards for lane, median, and shoulder widths at certain sections. SB standardization would be within the following segments: Olympic Blvd and Waterford St, and between Bel Air Crest to the north end of the project. Local interchanges within the project limits would be reconstructed and improved notably at Wilshire Blvd, Sunset Blvd, and Skirball Center Drive. There is the goal that wall designs be compatible with the surrounding community. There are also plans to improve wildlife crossings.

In early 2009, it looked like the project might be out of luck, due to a $730 million shortfall. The project was supposed to begin in mid-May, largely paid for with bond revenue awarded in 2007. However, that money was temporarily rescinded in December 2008 as the Legislature struggled to close a $42 billion deficit. As of April 2009, the freeway project has about $378 million - including the $200 million in stimulus money - enough to continue the project for 15 months. About $13 million in local money and $48 million from a state traffic relief program are secured for the lane. The federal government has kicked in $117 million, separate from the stimulus money, contingent on construction starting in 2009. The LA MTA eventually decided to start the project, hoping that they could come up with the money later. Although the MTA has just a fraction of the project's $1 billion price tag, construction of the 10-mile northbound car-pool lane should begin in summer 2009. The project, approved by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority board, is expected to create some 18,000 construction jobs and be completed in 2013. The MTA still needs to raise $614 million — money originally approved by voters in a bond measure but withheld by the state as it grappled with its massive budget deficit — to complete the project. In case the remaining money never materializes, the Metro board agreed to set aside $30 million to cover the costs of suspending or ending construction contracts. In early May 2009, MTA will award a $712 million construction contract to Kiewit Pacific Co. for the widening project. With $372 million in hand, there is enough money to keep the project going for 15 months. That will pay to relocate water, gas and phone lines and work on some freeway ramp widening.
[Source: LA Daily News, April 2009]

In April 2009, the CTC approved funding this project (as a loan against future bonds) from 2009 Stimulus funds.

Construction on this project started in January 2010. The project includes a 10-mile HOV lane on the northbound I-405 between I-10 and US-101; removal and replacement of the Skirball Center, Sunset Blvd. and Mulholland Dr. bridges; realingment of 27 on and off ramps; widening of 13 existing underpasses and structures; and construction of approximately 18 miles of retaining wall and sound wall. The construction work is quite complicated. Every task - from setting up K-rails and street cones to excavating foothills and readjusting freeway lanes - must be managed between 10p and 6a. Crews must minimize the noise and ensure that their lights don't shine into windows or along wildlife corridors. They must also avoid the inordinate number of oil and gas lines under the route and utility poles alongside the route.

In May 2010, work began on the demolition of the Sunset Blvd bridge. Mostly this has been preparation work: relocation of utilities, restriping of lanes, etc. It was estimated the bridge demolition would begin in mid-May, but as of late June no demolition had started. The plan is to keep the bridge open as it is rebuilt. The southern half of the bridge was completed in July 2010.

I-405 skirball center bridgeIn October 2010, demolition work began on the Skirball Center bridge. Demolition went fast, and was the northern half was completed in October 2010. There are two options being considered regarding the Skirball Center ramps. The first would keep the ramps where they are. The second would relocate the SB ramps south of the current Skirball bridge. The preferred option, based on traffic analysis, is the relocation of the ramps. This has the additional benefits of adding a lane to Skirball Center Drive E of I-405, adding a sidewalk to the W side of Skirball Center Drive from the new Mulholland Bridge to the Skirball bridge, adding a sidewalk to the N side of the bridge, and having more space for bicyclists on the bridge. There will also be new signage directing visitors to the Skirball Cultural Center, a dedicated northbound right-turn lane between new SB ramps and Skirball Bridge, bicycle lanes on Sepulveda Bl between Skirball Bridge and new southbound ramps, and southbound hook ramps that provide greater ramp storage capacity. There will also be a dedicated right-turn lane from northbound Sepulveda Bl onto new southbound I-405 on-ramp, and a dedicated double left-turn lane from southbound Sepulveda Bl onto southbound I-405.

In September 2010, it was reported that Caltrans and Metro have finally decided to alter the way the impressively high, 1959-era Mulholland Drive bridge is replaced during the I-405 widening project: they will build an all-new bridge before they tear down the old bridge. This actually saves $4 million to $10 million over juggling the two projects. Coming from the west, drivers would enter the new bridge in the same place they do now, then angle slightly south across the freeway before ending up on Skirball Center Drive. Only after the new span was completed would the old one come down, thus reducing traffic-related inconvenience during construction. However, those plans were changed in early 2011 back to the original approach due to complaints from those in the area. There was concern from residents and environmentalists about increased traffic congestion and threats to wildlife; there were also demands that the new bridge be designed by a world-class architect (which was the deal-breaker, cost-wise, for Metro).

In October 2010, an article was published that highlights the problems in this construction. Consider utility relocation. Shell, Chevron, Exxon and Mobil each have oil pipelines through the pass. SCS Energy has a natural gas pipeline to UCLA. There are fiber optics lines. Southern California Gas Company and Southern California Edison bring gas and electricity to their customers through the pass. Verizon and ATT connect residences and business via the Sepulveda Pass, and the Metropolitan Water District has a 96-inch-diameter water line under Sepulveda Boulevard. Some of those utilities run along and through the three bridges to be replaced—Sunset, Skirball and Mulholland—complicating their demolition and reconstruction.

I-405 Wilshire RampsIn December 2010, it was reported that the project will involve reconfiguration of the southbound Wilshire Blvd interchange, adding flyover ramps to eliminate the intercrossing of exiting and entering traffic. Currently, vehicles trying to get off the freeway onto Wilshire must jockey with other vehicles entering the freeway. Under the new configuration, the on ramps and off ramps are completely separate.

In May 2012, it was reported that the rampture would begin in June 2012. This is the first 90 day closure of the Wilshire ramps. This closure includes the Westbound Wilshire on-ramp to Northbound I-405, and the Northbound I-405 off-ramp to Westbound Wilshire. The six other Wilshire ramps will be closed consecutively, some two at a time, between 14 and 90 days. The image below provides additional details:
(Source: Metro.Net)

Rampture

In July 2011 (the weekend of July 15-16), "Carmageddon" has been predicted as Caltrans closes the entire I-405 freeway roughly between Sunset Blvd and US 101 in order to demolish half of the Mulholland Bridge. Details here. The following is a description of how the southbound portion of the bridge is being demolished:

The demolition timeline will begin Friday evening, July 15, 2011 when work crews begin closing freeway on- and off-ramps between the I-10 and US 101 as early as 7 p.m. to prevent additional vehicles from entering into the closure area. Crews will then begin closing freeway lanes one by one on both sides of the freeway at 10 p.m. in order to achieve a full freeway closure by midnight. The Mulholland Bridge also will be closed. The area surrounding the Mulholland Bridge will be lit up like the Astrodome utilizing two very large light plants and about 12 regular light plants. Staged in nearby project construction yards and other areas, 15 pieces of heavy construction equipment (with another five on standby) and an army of 100 demolition workers and support staff will be poised to begin their precision operation. Starting at 12 midnight, trucks will begin to haul dirt onto the 405 freeway underneath the Mulholland Bridge to form a cushion four feet high on the freeway roadbed. The dirt will catch falling debris and prevent concrete pieces from damaging the freeway lanes. At approximately 2 a.m. Saturday morning, workers will use a large diamond-bladed saw to cut the bridge top deck and soffit to safely demolish the southern half while keeping the northern half structurally sound. Workers also will cut slots in the southern side of the bridge to quicken the demolition process. During demolition work, workers will perform vibration monitoring and other tests to ensure the structural integrity of the northern side of the bridge is retained at all times. At approximately 5 a.m. Saturday morning, as many as four “hoe rams,” or rolling jack hammers of various sizes will begin to chip away at the south side of the bridge. Approximately 4,000 tons of concrete will be removed in the first phase of demolition work. Two Hoe rams will be stationed on the bridge deck starting in the center working toward each end. Once they have reached the ends of the bridge, two hoe rams will begin to work on the ground also starting in the center and working toward both ends. These giant and powerful demolition machines will deliver between 1,200 and 7,500 foot-pounds of power to break away concrete from the bridge. This compares to 90 foot-pounds delivered by a common hand-held jack hammer. Operators in these machines will be able to deliver between 300 and 600 blows per minute on the concrete decking to break pieces into sizes no bigger than a basketball or microwave oven which can then be easily hauled away from the demolition site. Later, the concrete will be pulverized and recycled. The bridge’s railing will also be taken down by hoe-ram. Front-end loaders will also be used during the demolition to load demolition debris into trucks. While the hoe rams steadily chip away at the concrete, other workers using long-handled oxygen/acetylene torches will cut the steel rebar from the bridge deck amid a crackle of sparks. Workers will be tied to a secure anchor and will be wearing fall protection equipment as they work. Workers will continue to cut the rebar into smaller pieces on the ground so that it can also be recycled. This demolition work is expected to last throughout Sunday, July 17 as crews also demolish the bride’s south columns, leaving the other two columns in-tact to support the north side of the bridge. Once the demolition operation is complete, an army of laborers will thoroughly clean the edge of the bridge to assure that no particles are left to fall on the traffic below. Finally, the remaining portion of the bridge will be inspected by structural engineers from Kiewit and Caltrans. This demo work is expected to last until 2 a.m. Monday morning, July 18, when crews will wrap up demolition and begin their final cleanup to prepare the freeway for reopening by 5 a.m. Between 10 and 20 large trucks and several front end loaders will be used for the cleanup. The freeway surface under the bridge will be cleaned by a parade of street sweepers, inspected, and finally restriped with fresh paint. Ramps and freeway connectors will reopen by 6 a.m.

Debris from the demolished bridges has been used for the construction of the Metro Orange Line in Chatsworth.

The second "carmageddon" occured the weekend of September 29, 2012.

Larry Scholnick provided a good summary of all the work involved in this simple HOV lane addition: The basic goal of the project is to install a northbound HOV (carpool) lane from I-10 (where the NB HOV lane becomes a regular, mixed-flow lane) to US-101 (where the NB HOV lane resumes). No additional regular, mixed-flow lanes will be built; there will continue to be 5/6 NB through lanes (5 South of Skirball Center and 6 North of Skirball Center) and 5/4/5 SB through lanes (5 north of Skirball Center, 4 between Skirball Center and Waterford, and 5 south of Waterford). At first glance it seems like the freeway should only be widened by 12 feet. However, there are currently no center breakdown lanes on either side of the freeway, so this project will add those lanes. At second glance it seems like the freeway will be widened by (12+10+10) 32 feet. However, the existing lanes are about a foot narrower than the current 12-foot standard, so all 10+ existing lanes (5+ NB plus 4+ SB plus one SB-HOV) will we widened by a foot, so the total widening will be over 40 feet. For the section between Olympic and Santa Monica Blvds this is comparatively easy because there is extra right-of-way that was originally intended for the connectors to the (never-built) Beverly Hills (CA-2) Freeway. The interchange with Wilshire Blvd is a full cloverleaf, made up of four onramps and four offramps. Each ramp has a tight turning radius, typical of 1960's construction. In order to eliminate weaving, and to modernize the interchange, all 8 ramps will be torn down and replaced. The ramps will be replaced in pairs; WB-NB & NB-EB will be replaced first. When complete there will be flyover ramps that will eliminate weaving; EB-NB will fly over NB-WB, and SB-EB will fly over WB-SB. The new ramps that include bridges over Sepulveda will leave room for a wider Sepulveda to go under. Every bridge where the freeway crosses OVER a surface street (Exposition, Pico, Olympic, Santa Monica, Ohio, Wilshire, Constitution, Montana, Church, Getty Center, Sepulveda near Getty Center, Bel Air Crest, Sepulveda near Valley Vista and perhaps Ventura) will be widened. All onramps and offramps that are not being replaced will be realigned to the widened freeway. Each bridge where the freeway crosses UNDER a surface street (Sunset, Skirball Center, and Mulholland) will be replaced with a bridge that is wider in both dimensions – room for the wider freeway below and more lanes on the surface street above. In each case the old bridge will be sliced in half (lengthwise), leaving half of the bridge standing while the other half is demolished and replaced. Once the first new half is complete, traffic will be switched to the new half and the other half will be demolished and replaced. The NB Montana offramp will be eliminated, just as its SB counterpart (Waterford) was eliminated several years ago. The convoluted NB ramps at Getty Center will be replaced by regular 'diamond' ramps, similar to the SB ramps at Getty Center. The SB ramps at Skirball Center will be replaced by a new half- interchange along Sepulveda, just north of Mountaingate; the new SB 'Skirball Center' ramps will be about 1/2 mile south of the Skirball Center bridge. In most areas, the centerline of the freeway will not shift significantly; the freeway will be widened by approximately equal amounts on each side; however, since there is no room for widening on the west side of the freeway through the community of Brentwood Glen (where Church Lane, the only north-south road through the area is right next to the west side of the freeway), the entire widening through this area will be on the east side of the freeway. Since Sepulveda is right next to the east side of the freeway, the hillside east of Sepulveda between Montana and Sunset has been torn down; most of the lanes of Sepulveda will be where the hillside was and the freeway widening will cover most of the existing lanes of Sepulveda.

In February 2013, a replacement on-ramp at Skirball Drive to I-405 SB opened. This new ramp is 2,000 feet south of the Skirball Bridge, and is one of the key roadway improvements in this billion dollar freeway widening project. The new ramp provides greater ramp storage capacity for vehicles entering and exiting I-405, as well as providing dedicated turn-lanes on Sepulveda Boulevard for cars entering and exiting the freeway. The construction also provides new bike routes on Sepulveda Boulevard between Skirball Center Drive and the new southbound on- and off-ramps, as well as a simpler design for the Sepulveda Boulevard/Skirball Center Drive intersection, resulting in a safer intersection.

In April 2013, it was reported that the project was behind schedule. Work on the end sections was proceeding according to schedule, and the project team has achieved a substantial amount of work to date, including new Wilshire on and off-ramps, a new and wider Sunset Bridge, I-10 interchange improvements, Sepulveda Boulevard improvements and a new on-ramp at Skirball. By the end of 2013, the project anticipates completing all bridges and utility work will be nearly complete with project ramps, underpasses, soundwalls and retaining walls. However, structural failure of miles of new sound walls that had to be demolished and rebuilt, a legal wrangle over the placement of ramps near the Getty Center and the complex logistics of finding and relocating more than a dozen utility lines under Sepulveda Boulevard have created delays. Tthe project is now slated to take at least a year longer than first anticipated and cost about $100 million more than the originally budgeted $1 billion. Officials now aim to complete the bulk of the project by June 2014, with work on the problematic middle segment between Montana Avenue and Sunset Boulevard lasting perhaps until fall 2014. The delays so frustrated Elon Musk of SpaceX that he donated $50K to an advocacy group (although some reports made it seem as if he donated to speed up construction).
(Source: LA Metro 2/22/13, Los Angeles Times 4/24/13, LA Times 4/25/13)

In June 2013, it was reported that the construction project is reportedly $100 million over budget and to cover the cost overrun the Metro board asked staff to look into implementing a congestion pricing program for the 405 HOV lanes.

In August 2013, it was reported that Metro is seriously exploring the idea of a subway/expressway tunnel(s) under I-405 freeway. Theproject has been fast-tracked; in fact,the transit agency could be looking for funding partners within a year. Work could begin within 2 to 3 years. To build a tunnel or two of them under the freeway it could take 4 to 5 years. The funding would be from a private-public partnership which could involve big international construction and financial companies. Without such a Public Private Partnership (P3) this would have taken 20 to 30 years to pull off. The estimated cost of such a project is in the area of $10 Billion. There is Measure R tax money of one billion that could be used. The other 9 would come from private investors (P3) who would get their money back from expressway tolls if such a roadway is part of the project and/or fees for subway service. The present thinking is a train/expressway system that uses two tunnels or one very large one. The first phase would be through the 10 mile Sepulveda Pass, but it would eventually be expanded from Sylmar, in the San Fernando Valley, all the way through to LAX. That would be a 28 mile system. It could be anywhere from 60 to 90 feet below the surface. Given the steep incline and decline in the pass distances would vary from one part to another since trains need to run on a flat surface. The diameter of a tunnel might be 60 to 70 feet depending on whether there is one or two. Unlike the tunneling done for the Red Line the burrowing equipment is much different and considerably improved than when our first subway was built. Burrowing so far underground would also limit disruption to construction weary residents in the pass. There are no fault lines to present quake problems.
(Source: MyFoxLA, 8/22/13)

In early November 2013, work on the Wilshire ramps was completed and all on- and off-ramps were opened. In late November, the Montana offramp from the NB I-405 was permanently closed (and its removal was started).

In late May 2014, the HOV lanes opened for service, although landscaping, signage, and retaining wall work still remained. Caltrans took the opportunity to provide some statistics on the project. Enough concrete was used on the project to build four Staple Centers, enough dirt was moved to fill 100,000 dump trucks and enough rebar installed to build 15,000 Volkswagen beetles. They also provided the following summary of the improvements:

  • Upon completion of the work, there are now HOV lanes on I-405 for 36 miles in both directions between the Orange County line and the northern San Fernando Valley, where I-405 merges into the Golden State Freeway. Metro is also studying a new express bus that would run between Westwood and the northern San Fernando Valley using the HOV lane on the 405. Measure R also provides $1 billion in seed money for a separate transit project that would span the Sepulveda Pass. Initial studies are underway and among the alternatives being evaluated is a transit tunnel under the pass, perhaps to be accompanied by a tolled tunnel for motor traffic.
  • The on- and off-ramps at Wilshire Boulevard were rebuilt with flyover ramps to eliminate bottlenecks from cars exiting I-405 mixing with cars trying to enter. The ramps were also expanded to hold more vehicles. For example, the ramp from eastbound Wilshire to northbound I-405 is 3,129-feet long — 500 feet longer than the ramp it replaced — and has 280 percent more capacity. The southbound off-ramp from I-405 to eastbound Wilshire now has 134 percent more capacity.
  • The new Sunset Boulevard Bridge is higher, longer and significantly wider at 120 feet — approximately 30 feet wider than before the project. It features two additional traffic lanes and higher capacity on- and off-ramps to improve area traffic flows and reduce congestion on local streets. Motorists will now enjoy dedicated turn lanes to access freeway ramps, and motorists traveling east/west through the bridge will be able to do so more quickly.
  • The new Mulholland Bridge is 10 feet wider than the one it replaced and built to modern seismic standards. A new sidewalk was added on the south side of the bridge.
  • The ramp from westbound I-10 to northbound I-405 was widened and other improvements were made to ramps at the extremely busy I-10/I-405 junction.
  • The I-405 on- and off-ramps that serve Skirball Center Drive were demolished and rebuilt 2,000 feet south of their former location. This should help ease the traffic crunch at the intersection of Skirball Center Drive and Mulholland and make it easier to exit and enter the freeway. The new ramps also hold more than 200 additional vehicles.
  • Among other improvements: new turn lanes for those entering I-405 from Sepulveda Boulevard, new sidewalks, curbs and gutters along Sepulveda Boulevard, new bike lanes for parts of Sepulveda Boulevard, an addition of 1,200 feet to the off-ramp to Cotner, the street that motorists use to access Santa Monica Boulevard (the ramp is now 2,300 feet long).

West Los Angeles

In 2008, a project was completed that widened the freeway and added southbound HOV lanes between Waterford St and 0.5 km S of I-10. This section of the freeway was origianlly constructed on a fill segment between 1958 and 1963. It was an eight-lane facility consisting of four 12 ft lanes, with 8-10 ft shoulders and a 22 ft median. Later restriping reduced this to a non-standard 11 ft lanes, with the median being used to add two mixed flow lanes and a 4 ft non-standard half-median. The project widened the existing freeway to add an 11.8 ft HOV lane, and a 2 ft buffer next to the median. The five existing mixed flow lanes were restriped even narrower as four 10.8 ft lanes and one 11.8 ft lane. A 9.8 ft outside shoulder, and a 3.3 ft half median was also provided. To eliminate weaving conditions, two auxiliary lanes were added. One was added upstream of the SB off-ramp to WB Wilshire Blvd, and included widening of the off-ramp. The second was added between the SB I-405 on-ramp from Santa Monica Blvd and the SB I-405 off-ramp at Olympic Blvd. The current auxiliary lane between Santa Monica Blvd and Wilshire Blvd was maintained. Additionally, the Waterford Street on-ramp SB was closed. The total cost for this project is $74.4 million, with an estimated completion of August 2006 (although this date was not met). This is TCRP Project 52. It was completed around 2008.

In 2008-2009, Caltrans widened I-405 from ten to twelve lanes from Route 90 to I-10. This project added one HOV lane northbound. It resulted in signficant changes in the Culver Blvd offramp. The the previous NB exit that deposited Culver traffic at Braddock and Sawtelle was removed; it was replaced by a direct offramp at Culver. A similar change was made for southbound traffic. The lanes were opened in November 2009. The $167 million widening project took five years to complete, and added carpool lanes and exit lanes on the freeway. The five main traffic lanes in each direction were widened from 10 feet wide to 12 feet, and the often-uneven asphalt surface next to the center divider was replaced with concrete.
(Source: KCBS 11/7/2009)

In 1989, the CTC relinquished roadway that predated Route 405 (i.e., former Route 7): Sepulveda Blvd between I-405 and Slauson.

In December 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Culver City adjacent to Route 405 between Sawtelle Boulevard and Barman Avenue, consisting of a reconstructed city street.

[Arbor-Vitae Map]There are continual discussions about adding an interchange at Arbor-Vitae. Based on an article in the Daily Breeze, the plan is based on a much earlier plan to construct a new interchange along I-405 at Arbor Vitae Street. The project was original initiated by Los Angeles World Airports (Los Angeles Department of Airports at the time) in 1976 to provide an alternate East-West access route between I-405 and the Los Angeles International Airport. This project was part of a larger project proposed in 1980 and scheduled to be constructed in 1984. However, the Arbor Vitae Interchange had been postponed multiple times due to funding considerations. The current version of the project entailing the south half of the interchange and widening of the Arbor Vitae Bridge was going to be constructed in 2002. However, the delivery of this project was postponed for three reasons: First, opposition from local residents, who live adjacent to the proposed project, and the Inglewood Unified School District Board was prevalent during the public comment periods; second, the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) did not support the construction of the full interchange, and led to the current south half version of the interchange. Third, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) would only approve an environmental document that includes the full interchange. It lacks support from local elected officials. At this time, this project is programmed through the Project Approval/Environmental Document [PA/ED] phase (the current phase). There is only partial funding currently programmed for the construction of this proposed project; an additional $37 million is needed to construct this project. If approved, the project will be funded from the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and the Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP). The proposal called for a new south-half interchange, including a southbound on-ramp to I-405 from a widened Arbor Vitae overpass, as well as a northbound off-ramp from the freeway to the street. The project’s purpose is to reduce congestion at the Century Boulevard and Manchester Boulevard interchanges by creating along Arbor Vitae Street, from the I-405, a new direct vehicle access to and from the Hollywood Park Casino, the University of West Los Angeles, the Forum, and Centinela Hospital. The project would result in the agency taking nine homes and two businesses - down from roughly 50 homes under an earlier plan, which also encroached on an Inglewood school site, according to planning documents. A later meeting indicated a fair amount of opposition to the plan. In September 2010, it was reported that Caltrans had cancelled plans for this interchange. Specifically, Caltrans chose the "no-build" alternative - which was based on several factors, including the project's anticipated effects on traffic conditions along local streets, community opposition as well as funding. The agency needed roughly another $30 million to fund the estimated $82 million project. Additionally, a Caltrans letter stated that the Federal Highway Administration failed to grant the exception needed to build the proposed half-interchange.

LAX to Orange County

In October 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Los Angeles County that will improve the Avalon Boulevard/I-405 interchange by constructing a new southbound on-ramp, widening the northbound off-ramp and on-ramp, and widening northbound Avalon Boulevard. The project is fully funded with Local and Federal funds. This project will be requesting a New Public Road Connection from the California Transportation Commission at the October 26-27, 2011 Meeting. The total estimated cost is $19,300,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. A copy of the ND has been provided to Commission staff. Due to potential impacts to visual resources, hydrology and water quality, community impacts, cultural resources, and the local economy, an Initial Study was completed for the project. Based upon environmental studies and proposed environmental commitments, including minimization and avoidance measures, incorporation of BMPs, limited hours of construction, the project will not have a significant effect on the environment. As a result, an ND was completed for this project.

The proposed new route connnection will be at Lenardo Drive. The specific proposal is to modify the Avalon Boulevard/I-405 interchange in the city of Carson to provide access to the approved development of the Carson Marketplace Project in the southwest quadrant of this interchange. The modifications to this interchange include the southerly extension of Lenardo Drive over the Torrance Lateral Channel to connect to Avalon Boulevard and the realignment of the southbound I-405 on and off ramps to begin and end at Lenardo Drive. This break in access control requires the approval of a new connection by the California Transportation Commission. The proposed improvements support the additional access needs of the Carson Marketplace Project and also address growing traffic volumes in the vicinity. The Avalon Boulevard interchange is located in the city of Carson, in Los Angeles County, between the Main Street and the Carson Street interchanges along I-405. I-405 has 12 lanes north of Avalon Boulevard and 10 lanes south of Avalon Boulevard. Traffic in the southbound direction is served by a loop on-ramp and a diagonal off-ramp in the southwest quadrant of the interchange. In the northbound direction the interchange is a half diamond. Avalon Boulevard is a major thoroughfare through the City of Carson with four to six lanes serving primarily residential, commercial, and light industrial traffic demands. The proposed interchange modification would extend the existing Lenardo Drive south from the proposed Carson Marketplace over the Torrance Lateral Channel to Avalon Boulevard. The existing southbound I-405 on- and off-ramps, located between the Torrance Lateral Channel and Avalon Boulevard, will be realigned and widened. A new two-lane southbound on-ramp will be constructed east of Avalon Boulevard and across from Lenardo Drive. The existing northbound off-ramp will be widened from one to three lanes at the terminus to increase storage capacity and to accommodate left turns. The northbound on-ramp will also be widened to increase capacity and accommodate two left-turn lanes from northbound Avalon Boulevard. The existing Avalon Boulevard structure will be widened and repaved.

The LA Times reported in 2009 on a dichotomy between Los Angeles and Orange County regarding I-405 widening. Although Orange County has plans to add up to two lanes on each side of the roughly 14-mile stretch of I-405 between Route 73 and I-605. Bridges would also be rebuilt, some homes would be taken under eminent domain and the carpool buffer would shrink. However, Los Angeles county has no plans for widening. One reason is that the L.A. County side has less space for expansion than Orange County does. Los Angeles county has focused more energy and funds towards rail lines. This may create a problem similar to that seen on I-5 at the county line.
(Source: Los Angeles Times, 11/17/2009)

In July 2013, it was reported that Long Beach has protested the expansion plans in the original study. The revised study presents three alternatives, in addition to the required no build alternative:

  • Adding a single general purpose lane in each direction from Euclid Street to I-605.
  • Add the single lane plus a second lane in each direction from Brookhurst Street to the Seventh Street interchange (northbound) and Seal Beach Boulevard (southbound).
  • Add the general purpose lane plus a tolled express lane in each direction between Route 73 and Route 22 (Seventh Street). The existing carpool lane would become part of a joint tolled facility.

According to the supplemental study, between two to five intersections (not including ramps) in Long Beach would be impacted if one of the improvements is built. That number rises to four to nine intersections by 2040. The intersections immediately impacted by all three alternatives are at Los Coyotes Diagonal and Bellflower Boulevard and Willow Street and Bellflower Boulevard. If one of the larger alternatives is chosen, impacts are expected at Willow Street and Woodruff Avenue and Willow Street and Los Coyotes Diagonal. Percentages of intersection improvement costs paid for by Caltrans and OCTA in the draft report range from 30% to 4.45%, with each intersection costing between $240,000 to $810,000.

In August 2013, the CTC received a draft EIR for comment. The project in Los Angeles and Orange Counties proposes to construct roadway improvements on Interstate 405 (I-405) within the project limits, including 15 local street interchanges and three freeway-to-freeway interchanges (12-Ora-405, PM 9.3/24.2, 07-LA-405, PM 0.0/1.2, 12-Ora-22, PM R0.7/R3.8, 12-Ora-22, PM R0.5/R0.7, 12-Ora-73, PM R27.2/R27.8, 12-Ora-605, PM 3.5/R1.6 07-LA-605, PM R0.0/R1.2). The project is not fully funded. Depending on the alternative selected, the total estimated project cost ranges between $1.3 billion and $1.7 billion. The project will seek funding through the State Transportation Improvement Program, federal and local fund sources, and possibly toll revenue. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2015-16. Alternatives considered for the proposed project include:

  1. No Build Alternative.
  2. Alternative 1 - This alternative would add one general purpose lane in each direction of I-405 from Euclid Street to the I-605 interchange.
  3. Alternative 2 - This alternative would add one general purpose lane in each direction of I-405 from Euclid Street to the I-605 interchange and add a second general purpose lane in the northbound direction from Brookhurst Street to the Route 22/ 7th Street interchange.
  4. Alternative 3 - This alternative would add one general purpose lane in each direction of I-405 from Euclid Street to the I-605 interchange and add a tolled Express Lane in each direction from Route 73 to Route 22 East.

According to the August 2013 revised study, the following measures would be incorporated to minimize impacts of the project:

  1. A payment shall be made by the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) to the City of Long Beach to cover the project’s fair share cost of the improvements at intersections owned by the City of Long Beach.
  2. A payment shall be made by OCTA to the California Department of Transportation based on a Traffic Mitigation Agreement Fair Share Deferment.

Orange County

I-405/Route <a href=22 Interchange" align="right" width="250" height="482" border="0" hspace="10" vspace="5">In December 2005, utilizing Measure M money, the OCTA authorized construction of HOV connector ramps between I-405 and Route 22 and between I-405 and I-605. This project, called the "West County Connector", received additional stimulus funding in 2009. Some state and federal funding for the $400 million West County Connector project had already been secured by early 2009. About $26 million of stimulus funding is recommended to go toward the project. Construction is scheduled to begin in early 2010 and end in 2013, and will create an estimated 12,000 jobs in the region.

At its meeting on July 9, 2009, the CTC approved a CMIA project baseline agreement amendment to split the Route 22/405/605 HOV Connector with ITS Elements project (PPNO 2868C) into two construction projects: (1) Route 22 to I-405 between Seal Beach Boulevard and Valley View Street (PPNO 2868B); (2) I-405 to Route 605 between Katella Avenue and Seal Beach Boulevard (PPNO 2868C). In October 2009, the funding was rearranged to give some priority to the first of these two. In February 2010, the CTC approved amending the CMIA Program project baseline agreement for the Route 22/405/605 HOV Connector project (PPNO 2868C) to transfer $3,360,000 from CMIA reserve to Construction and reduce Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Program (CMAQ) funding by $24,100,000.

In December 2010, it was reported that construction was beginning, and commuters will be hit hard. The $277-million freeway project requires a series of road closures, including one of the main portals to a veterans' hospital and a major state university. The work will be done in two segments, and lane and street closures are to be sequenced to minimize some of the traffic impacts. When completed in 2014, the so-called West County Connector project built by the Orange County Transportation Authority will create a seamless link between carpool lanes and ease rush-hour bottlenecks on the I-405, Route 22 and I-605 freeways. The project calls for an additional carpool lane in each direction of the I-405 between Route 22 and I-605. Large overpasses will be built to connect the carpool lanes on the I-405 to those on the other freeways. Bridges and connectors throughout the project area are to be rebuilt, including those at 7th Street, Valley View Street and Seal Beach Boulevard. Onramps and offramps related to those structures also will be redone. In addition to 7th Street, two other heavily traveled bridges will be affected by the project: Seal Beach Boulevard over the I-405 and Valley View Street over Route 22. The number of traffic lanes will be reduced on the bridges for 11 months and 20 months, respectively.

In September 2012, construction crews will shut down the eastbound Route 22 connector to the northbound I-405 for one year. The transition road, which carries about 3,000 vehicles a day must be rebuilt to make way for the new carpool lane connector between I-405 and I-605. During construction, the eastbound Route 22 transition to the northbound I-605 will remain open. From eastbound Route 22, the Orange County Transportation Authority advises motorists to exit and turn right at Studebaker Road and continue north to access the northbound I-405 on-ramp. All of the construction is part of a project that will connect carpool lanes on I-405, I-605 and Route 22. It's scheduled for completion in 2014.

[Susan St.]In April 2007, the CTC considered approval of a Negative Environmental Impact Statement and approval of a public road connection for the Susan Street Ramp. This project would construct a northbound exit ramp about 0.4 miles beyond the Route 73 merge ramp onto I-405. The proposed exit ramp would connect to the southern extension Susan Street at the IKEA driveway intersection. The exit ramp is estimated to cost $1.5 million and is fully funded from local sources. Construction would begin in FY 2007-08. The proposed improvement will mitigate congestion by providing direct access from the northbound I-405 distributor road and diverting traffic from the existing Harbor Boulevard and Fairview Road interchanges to this proposed improvement at Susan Street. The proposed improvement is to construct a northbound I-405 off-ramp to Susan Street. Susan Street, a north-south arterial, is located north of I-405 midway between Harbor Boulevard and Fairview Road. The Susan Street off-ramp will begin 0.4 miles west of northbound Route 73 to northbound I-405 merge. The off-ramp extends 0.2 miles as a single lane and widens to three lanes at the ramp terminus. The Susan Street off-ramp will be braided below the Fairview Road on-ramp to northbound I-405. The proposed improvements will increase the capacity and improve operations of the existing Harbor Boulevard and Fairview Road interchanges.

In June 2012, there were public hearings on the plans to widen I-405 between I-605 and Route 73. Caltrans and the Orange County Transportation Authority are looking at three alternatives for the San Diego Freeway, between the Corona del Mar (SR-73) and the San Gabriel River (I-605) freeways. The first option is to widen the I-405 by adding a single general-purpose lane in each direction from Euclid Street to I-605. The second option would do the same thing as the first and also add a general-purpose lane in the northbound direction from Brookhurst Street to the Seventh Street exit on Route 22 and a second general-purpose lane southbound from Seal Beach Boulevard to Brookhurst. The third option would add one regular lane in each direction of I-405 from Euclid Street to the I-605 interchange and a tolled express in each direction from Route 73 to I-605. There also is a no-build alternative. The third option has received an icy reception in Costa Mesa and Westminster. Seal Beach doesn't want either the second or third options because both would move a sound wall closer to the College Park East community. And in Fountain Valley, some officials are concerned because of the impact on local businesses. Under the third option, two toll lanes from Route 73 to I-605 would be free to cars with three passengers most of the time, but there would be a charge during peak hours. Cars with just a driver or two people would be charged. A decision is in Summer 2012. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2015 and could last roughly 4½ years. The cost of the project ranges from $1.3 billion to $1.7 billion, depending on which alternative is chosen.
(Source: OC Register, 6/13/12)

As originally constructed, there were problems with the new HOV connector ramps between I-405 and Route 55. It seemed that the bridge had cracks so severe that the bridge might not be able to handle the weight of daily traffic. The estimated repair costs would be 80% of construction costs for this bridge. The bridge was eventually repaired and reopened.

In June 2007, the OCTA outlined a 5-year plan for the use of the 2nd Measure M funds that included adding lanes on Route 91 between I-5 and Route 57 and between Route 55 and the Riverside County border; adding lanes on I-405 between I-605 and Route 55; a new NB lane on Route 57 between Orangewood Avenue and Lambert Road.

In February 2010, the Daily Pilot reported that the Orange County Transportation Authority approved further environmental and engineering study of a proposal to add high-occupancy toll (H.O.T.) lanes to I-405 in Orange County between I-605 and Route 73. Specifically, the proposal proposes to add one general-purpose lane and one H.O.T. lane in each direction on I-405 between Route 73 and I-605 freeways. There is already one high-occupancy vehicle lane in each direction that would be converted into a H.O.T. lane, so it would create a total of two express H.O.T. lanes in each direction. About $600 million in funding for the expansion is available from Measure M2 – a ½¢ county sales tax that pays for transportation improvements – but that is far less than is needed for even the most modest expansion currently being considered. The cheapest option being explored is to add one general-purpose lane in each direction, which would cost $1.7 billion but would generate no revenue. The most expensive is to add two express lanes in each direction and charge tolls, which would cost $2.2 billion but would generate $197 million annually – enough to support the full cost of the project. The freeway expansion is tentatively slated to begin in 2016.
[Source: "OCTA approves study of 405 widening project", Daily Pilot, 2/10/2010]

405 Orange CountyIn August 2012, the CTC reviewed a draft EIR for this project, and indicated that there were no comments to the Draft EIR, that the Findings were accepted and that consideration of funding should be brought forward to the Commission for approval of Design Build funds. The Draft EIR proposed the following alternatives: (0) No Build Alternative; (1) Alternative 1 would add one general purpose lane; (2) Alternative 2 would add two general purpose lanes; and (3) Alternative 3 would add one general purpose lane and one Express Toll Lane. The Toll Express Lane and the existing High Occupancy Vehicle Lane would be managed jointly as a tolled Express Lanes Facility with two lanes in each direction.

In September (and again in October) 2012, the OCTA voted against HOT lanes for I-405 in Orange County. The OCTA did approve a $1.3 billion plan that adds one lane in each direction from Euclid Avenue to I-605. The project will be fully funded by Measure M, a half-cent sales tax voters approved in 2006. The board could not gather the votes in favor of the toll system because too many questions remained regarding how the anticipated toll revenue – about $1.5 billion generated over 20 years – would be used. Under the vetoed toll option, existing carpool lanes would be used to create toll express lanes between Route 73 and I-605. That alternative also included adding one general-purpose lane in each direction. In early 2013, the California Department of Transportation will look at three options. The first adds one general-purpose lane in each direction. Cost: $1.3 billion. The second adds two general-purpose lanes each way. Cost: $1.4 billion. A third option adds one general-purpose lane in each direction and a toll lane to the existing carpool lane that will be managed together. Cost: $1.7 billion. OCTA is working closely with Caltrans and anticipates they will concur with the board's selection of alternative 1.

In January 2013, it was reported that several cities along the I-405 corridor in south Orange County want more widening than the OCTA approved. They favor a proposal that would add two lanes in each direction, not just one, at a cost of around $1.4 billion. Voters in 2006 approved the idea of adding one lane in each direction as part of a package of transportation projects paid for with a half-percent sales tax, known as Measure M2. Planners later raised two other possibilities. The first would add two lanes in each direction. The other would add one normal lane and create two pay-to-ride toll lanes in each direction, in part by using existing carpool lanes. That last option drew immediate fire from cities along I-405. Six of them – Costa Mesa, Huntington Beach, Westminster, Fountain Valley, Seal Beach and Los Alamitos – launched a $25,000 lobbying effort to derail the toll lanes and push for two new lanes in each direction. They're considering whether to pool another $25,000 to keep the fight going. The $1.4 billion cost to add two lanes in each direction may seem like a short jump from the $1.3 billion estimate for single lanes, but that's a difference of $100 million. Those who support the double-lane solution say the money could be found in other projects. The OCTA board, though, voted 12-4 last fall to support the less-expensive single-lane project.
(Source: Orange County Register, 1/25/13)

In December 2013, the OCTA approved adding a new lane in each direction of I-405 between the LA County Line and Costa Mesa. No toll lanes.

In July 2014, it was reported that Caltrans is moving forward with a controversial plan to add toll lanes to I-405 in Orange County despite strong opposition from nearby cities. The Caltrans plan incorporates some of the OCTA proposal, but generated opposition because it adds the toll component and overtakes an existing carpool lane to create the two HOT lanes in each direction. Caltrans is exploring the possibility of allowing vehicles with two or more occupants to ride free in the toll lanes, but a final decision has not been made. Under the plan, Orange County transit officials would continue with their project adding a free lane on each side of the 405. When that work is done, Caltrans plans to build a second new lane on each side. These new lanes, plus two existing carpool lanes, would then be coverted to HOT lanes for use by solo drivings willing to pay as well as carpoolers with multiple passengers.
(Source: Los Angeles Times, 7/25/14)

There are plans to add auxiliary lanes from Sand Canyon Road on-ramp to Jeffrey Road, and from Route 133 to San Canyon Road. July 2005 CTC Agenda.

In May 2013, the CTC received notice that the OCTA would propose delaying the environmental phase of the Route 405 Southbound Auxiliary Lane – University to Sand Canyon project to FY 2014-15 in order to align the project with the schedule of an adjacent Route 405 southbound auxiliary lane project. In June 2013, the CTC approved delaying $224,000 in RIP PA&ED from FY 2013-14 to FY 2014-15 for the Route 405 Southbound Auxiliary Lane – University to Sand Canyon project (PPNO 4956) in Orange County.

In August 2014, the CTC authorized $528K for construction of an auxiliary lane on I-405 from University to Route 133 southbound.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for this route:

  • High Priority Project #28: In Huntington Beach, remove the Beach Blvd. off-ramp. Construct an additional mixed-travel lane on I-405 North at the Beach Blvd. interchange. $400,000.

  • High Priority Project #317. Construct one additional all-purpose lane in each direction on I-405, and provide additional capital improvements from Route 73 through the LA County line. $2,568,000.

  • High Priority Project #1609. Project Study Reports for I-105 and I-405 Interchanges at Los Angeles International Airport. $320,000.

  • High Priority Project #2198. Avalon Boulevard/I-405 Interchange modification project, Carson. $4,800,000.

  • National Corridor Infrastructure Improvement Program #18: I-405 HOV Lane. This refers to the major missing segment of HOV lane, northbound, between I-10 and N of US 101. $100,000,000.

  • Transportation Improvement #20: Widen Northbound I-405 between I-10 and US 101 for HOV lane. $30,000,000.

 

 

Naming

This route is named the "San Diego" Freeway; the first portion opened in 1957; the last in 1969. It was named by the State Highway Commission on November 18, 1954. San Diego refers to the eventual southern terminus of the route (after all merges). The name refers to Saint Didacus of Alcalá, a Franciscan saint of the 15th century. The bay was named by Vizcaíno in 1602, the mission in 1769, the county in 1850 and the new city in 1856. The name was likely given to encourage people to take the I-405 bypass of downtown to go to San Diego (connecting with I-5 to the S).

The portion of I-405 from Atlantic Avenue to Cherry Avenue south, in the County of Los Angeles, is named the "Signal Hill Police Officer Anthony “Tony” Giniewicz Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Anthony “Tony” Giniewicz, who faithfully served the Signal Hill Police Department and the residents of the City of Signal Hill as a police officer assigned to patrol operations. Officer Giniewicz was shot in the line of duty by three gang members while responding to a robbery in progress at a restaurant in the City of Long Beach on February 19, 1985. Officer Giniewicz was paralyzed from the chest down as a result of his wounds and remained in poor health until passing away as a result of complications on December 7, 2011. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 84, Resolution Chapter 89, on July 9, 2014.

The portion of I-405 between Rosecrans Avenue in the City of Manhattan Beach and Hawthorne Boulevard in the City of Lawndale is named the Martin L. Ganz Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of Martin L. Ganz, a police officer with the Manhattan Beach Police Department. Officer Ganz was a well-liked and respected Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) officer who took great care to teach the children of Manhattan Beach to stay away from drugs and alcohol. He was a member of the South Bay Regional Driving Under the Influence Task Force and prided himself on taking drunk drivers off the streets. On December 27, 1993, Officer Ganz was shot and killed in the line of duty while protecting the people and property of the City of Manhattan Beach. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 145, August 19, 2004. Chapter 148

The portion of I-405 between Rosecrans Avenue and El Segundo Boulevard in the County of Los Angeles is named the "Hawthorne Police Officer Andrew Garton Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Hawthorne Police Officer Andrew Garton, a seven-year veteran of the Hawthorne Police Department, who died on May 26, 2011 from injuries sustained in a motorcycle crash during the funeral procession of another fallen officer. Officer Garton, 44, was the first Hawthorne officer to die in the line of duty in the department’s 89-year history. Garton was born on January 23, 1967, in San Fernando, California, and graduated from Antelope Valley High. Prior to becoming a police officer, Andrew was a skilled ceramic tile setter. He met his wife, Tracy, in 1989 while installing tile at the house that would eventually become their home. Andrew and his wife married at SeaCoast Grace Church in April 1993, and continued to reside in Orange County. Inspired by Sgt. Shawn Shimono, a close friend for over 20 years, Andrew entered the police academy, graduating on February 20, 2004, and became a Hawthorne police officer. Andrew served as Vice President of the Hawthorne Police Officer’s Association and as Treasurer of the Hawthorne Police Officer’s Association Political Action Committee. Andrew was a long-time member of the Hawthorne SWAT Team, and an accomplished motor vehicle and traffic investigator. He was also active in both scouting and coaching youth baseball. For those who knew him, he was both a mentor and a friend. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

Before 1954, this route was named the "Sepulveda Freeway". Sepulveda refers to the boulevard that the route parallels, which was named for the Sepulveda family of early Los Angeles.

The portion of Route 405 from Howard Hughes Parkway to Mulholland Drive in the County of Los Angeles is named the "Nathan Shapell Memorial Highway". This segment was named in honor of Nathan Shapell, a builder of lives who was dedicated to helping others less fortunate. A survivor of the Holocaust, he was determined to not only rebuild his own life, but to help others rebuild theirs. For more than five years after World War II, he built a community for thousands of displaced people and survivors of the camps before emigrating to the United States in the early 1950s. Shapell built a highly successful real estate development company that is recognized as an industry leader and highly respected as a role model for corporate philanthropy. He dedicated a major portion of his life to public service. He was a past President and Executive Board Member of the American Academy of Achievement and served as a Member of President Reagan's Private Sector Survey on Cost Control. He founded and cochaired Building a Better Los Angeles, a one-time project that raised over $1 million for the homeless. In 1987, he accepted the position of President of D.A.R.E. America, a renowned drug abuse resistance education program. In 1992, Governor Pete Wilson appointed him to serve as a member of the California Competitiveness Council and develop recommendations to revitalize California's economy. Nathan Shapell's greatest public contributions were made through his 29 years of service on California's "Little Hoover Commission." As chairman for an unprecedented 18 years of this one-of-a-kind commission, he helped save taxpayers billions of dollars and improve the lives of hundreds of thousands of Californians in areas that include nursing home operations, children's services, property management, transportation, the Medi-Cal program, and public education. Nathan Shapell's commitment to service on behalf of the public was recognized in 1986 when Santa Clara University bestowed upon him an honorary Doctorate of Public Service degree. In 1987, Tel Aviv University awarded Mr. Shapell a Doctor Philosophiae Honoris Causa. He chronicled the early years of his life in his book, "Witness to the Truth". Mr. Shapell lived in Beverly Hills until his death on March 11, 2007. (What is interesting, perhaps because it was a rush job, is that the resolution doesn't mention that Mr. Shapell built loads and loads of homes in areas that were developed due to the freeways, such as the S.F. Bay area and Porter Ranch. Some might say that it would have been more appropriate to designate Route 118 between Balboa Blvd and Topanga Canyon Blvd in his honor. However, also not mentioned in Shapell's Jewish philanthrophy, which is perhaps the basis for having the route on the heavily Jewish westside, ending at Mulholland, where the Skirball Center, American Jewish University, and Stephen S. Wise Temple are located) Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 73, Resolution Chapter 148, on 10/2/2007.

The portion of Route 405 from Venice Boulevard to National Boulevard in the City of Los Angeles is officially designated the "CHP Officer Philip Dennis Ortiz Memorial Highway" It was named in memory of CHP Officer Philip Dennis Ortiz. Ortiz was born June 27, 1961, in Santa Monica, California. He graduated from Santa Monica High School in 1979 and attended Santa Monica City College. Prior to joining the California Highway Patrol (CHP), Philip worked for a local supermarket; however, he always had a dream of becoming a CHP Officer. On December 23,1982, CHP Officer Philip Dennis Ortiz, badge number 10428, graduated from the CHP Academy and was assigned to the central Los Angeles area office. After more than seven years of service in the central Los Angeles area, Officer Ortiz was transferred to the west Los Angeles area, where he spent the remainder of his career. Officer Ortiz performed several duties over the course of his career, some of which included a motorcycle officer, a motorcycle officer in charge of training the officers who successfully passed motor school, a weapons/range officer, a physical methods of arrest (PMA) instructor, and protective services detail (PSD). On June 22, 2010, CHP Officer Philip Dennis Ortiz pulled a vehicle over for a high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane violation. While approaching the vehicle, another car was driving along the shoulder and struck Officer Ortiz and his motorcycle. Officer Ortiz was transported to the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center where he remained until his passing almost two weeks later. Officer Ortiz is admired for his professionalism, dedication, honesty, loyalty, respect, courage, and "espirit de corps." He consistently represented the best of the CHP and was an outstanding role model. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 41, Resolution Chapter 52, on July 15, 2011.

 

Named Structures

The I-405/I-10 Interchange is named the "Marilyn Jorgenson Reece Memorial Interchange". It was named in honor of Marilyn Jorgenson Reece, who was born and raised in North Dakota and earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1948. Ms. Reece moved to Los Angeles with her parents shortly after graduation in 1948, and went to work for the State Division of Highways, which later became the Department of Transportation, as a junior civil engineer in Los Angeles. After six years of experience required to sit for the Professional Engineers Exam, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece became the state's first fully licensed female civil engineer in 1954. In 1962, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece received the Governor's Design Excellence Award from Governor Pat Brown for designing the I-10/I-405 interchange. Ms. Reece became the Division of Highway's first woman resident engineer for construction projects shortly after receiving that award. The three-level I-10/I-405 interchange designed by Marilyn Jorgenson Reece opened in 1964 and was the first interchange designed in California by a woman engineer. Urban critic Reyner Banham, author of <I>Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies</I>, admired the wide-swinging curved ramps connecting the two freeways, and wrote that the I-10/I-405 interchange "is a work of art, both as a pattern on the map, as a monument against the sky, and as a kinetic experience as one sweeps through it". During her 35-year career, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece's projects included serving as senior engineer for the completion of Route 210 through Sunland in 1975—at the time, the largest construction project the Department of Transportation had ever awarded—at $40 million. After retiring in 1983, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece taught engineering classes at Cal State Long Beach; and during Women's History Month in 1983, the Los Angeles City Council honored Marilyn Jorgenson Reece for making significant contributions to the city. In 1991, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece received life membership in the American Society of Civil Engineers. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 72, Resolution Chapter 96, on 8/15/2006.

The freeway interchange between Route 105 and Route 405 is officially designated the "Sadao S. Munemori Memorial Freeway Interchange". Sadao S. Munemori, an American of Japanese ancestry, served in the 100th Infantry Battalion of the US Army, a unit composed mainly of Japanese-Americans from Hawaii. This battalion later became part of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the most highly decorated unit of World War II for its size and time in combat. In March 1945, Private Munemori and his company were ordered back to Northern Italy to join forces in the final push against the Gustav Line, a fortified German position that had held up the Allied advance for more than four months. On April 5, 1945, the company came under murderous fire, and its commander, Lt. David Novack, and squad leader, Staff Sgt. Kei Yamaguchi, were severely wounded and Private Munemori took command and single handedly, using grenades, knocked out two enemy machine guns, giving his own life to save two of his comrades when he used his own body to shield them from an exploding enemy grenade. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 41, Chapter 131, in 1994.

The interchange of I-405 and I-110 in the City of Carson in the County of Los Angeles is named the "CHP Officer Merle L. Andrews Memorial Interchange". This interchange was named in memory of CHP Officer Merle L. Andrews, who was killed in the line of duty on December 20, 1967. Officer Andrews was attempting to arrest a man wanted in connection with a stolen vehicle, robbery, and kidnaping when the man opened fire on Officer Andrews, and Officer Andrews succumbed to his injuries as a result of the shooting. Officer Andrews was born on February 4, 1928, in Redondo Beach, California; his family settled in Compton where he graduated from Compton High School and attended Compton Junior College. He enlisted in the United States Navy serving from 1945 through 1949, and also followed in the footsteps of his father and brother by joining the Compton Police Department. He joined the CHP on July 8, 1958. After successfully completing his academy training, he reported to the South Los Angeles area on October 3, 1958. During his CHP career, Merle L. Andrews made significant contributions to traffic safety and assisting the motoring public and was known by his fellow officers for his dedication to the department and to the protection of the citizens of our state. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 20, Resolution Chapter 65, on 07/07/2005.

 

Interstate Submissions

Approved as chargeable Interstate on 9/15/1955; Freeway. Originally, the California Department of Highways proposed this as I-9. In April 1958, they proposed it as I-3. They later suggested I-405, and that suggestion was accepted by AASHTO.

 

Commuter Lanes

Commuter lanes exist or are planned for this route in the following areas.

Northbound:

  1. Orange County, between I-5 and the Los Angeles County line (opened April 1990).
  2. LA County, between the Orange County line and I-710 (opened October 1998).
  3. LA County, between I-710 and I-110 (opened October 1998).
  4. LA County, between I-110 and I-105 (opened October 1993).
  5. LA County, between I-105 and Route 90. This project was on the CTC Agenda in February 2002 (actually, it was a 20 month allocation time extension). The estimated allocation amount is $3,279,000, with right of way costs running $1,912,000. It was completed in May 2007. To make room for the 11-foot-wide high-occupancy vehicle lanes, the shoulders of the freeway were narrowed and the lanes were re-striped.
  6. LA County, between Route 90 and I-10 (under construction).
  7. LA County, between I-10 and US 101 (see STATUS above).
  8. LA County, from US-101 to I-5 (opened October 1996).

Southbound:

  1. I-5 to US-101 (opened October 1996)
  2. US-101 to I-10 (construction completed as of January 2002 to a point between Wilshire and Waterford). See above for more details.
  3. I-10 to Route 90 (under construction)
  4. Route 90 to I-105 (opened in May 2007)
  5. I-105 to I-110 (opened in 1993)
  6. I-110 to I-710 (opened October 1998)
  7. I-710 to Orange County Line (opened October 1993)
  8. Orange County Line to I-5 (opened April 1990).

All lanes require two or more occupants, and are always in operation.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Orange 405 0.00 1.09
Orange 405 3.69 6.19
Orange 405 7.58 7.79
Orange 405 8.40 12.41
Orange 405 12.50 24.18
Los Angeles 405 0.00 1.32
Los Angeles 405 1.50 7.41
Los Angeles 405 7.52 8.76
Los Angeles 405 8.91 9.78
Los Angeles 405 9.87 24.67
Los Angeles 405 24.73 28.60
Los Angeles 405 28.65 34.41
Los Angeles 405 37.01 48.03

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

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Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 405:

  • Total Length (1995): 72 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 94,000 to 325,000; (2001) ...to 331,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 72.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAI: 72 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 72 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Orange, Los Angeles.


X-ed Out Pre-1964 State Shield

Former Pre-1964 Signed State Route 440



Pre 1964 Signage History
This route ran from US 99 in Redding to Lassen National Park via Viola. It was signed as part of the original state signage of routes as Route 440, and was an extension of LRN 20, defined in 1933. In 1935, it was re-signed as Route 44.


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