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California Highways

Routes 233 through 240

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

233 · 234 · 235 · 236 · 237 · 238 · 239 · 240


State Shield

State Route 233



Routing

From Route 152 to Route 99 at Chowchilla via Roberson Boulevard.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This routing remains as defined in 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 124, defined in 1933.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 233:

  • Total Length (1995): 4 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 3,700 to 15,900
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 1; Sm. Urban: 3; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 2 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 3 mi; Minor Arterial: 1 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Madera.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1953, Chapter 1787 defined LRN 233 as: “(a) High Street, Oakland, between [LRN 69] and [LRN 5]; (b) [LRN 227] near the intersection of Park Boulevard, Oakland to [LRN 75] near Lafayette”. Preliminary studies were completed in 1956 covering the location for this future freeway. On December 19, 1956, after various public meetings and a hearing before the Highway Commission, the last gap in the route was adopted and declared a freeway. This future facility will consist of initially four lanes, future six lanes, and starting at the Mountain Boulevard Freeway in Oakland, will traverse Shepherd Canyon and tunnel some 1,400 feet through the Oakland hills. It will span the Redwood Canyon in Contra Costa County and traverse the range of hills easterly thereof entering and crossing the Moraga Valley just north of the present town site. It traverses close to St. Mary's College and terminates at a junction with Route 24 at Pleasant Hill Road. In 1957, Chapter 52 renumbered this definition as LRN 235. It does not appear to have ever been constructed, but corresponds to an unconstructed portion of Route 77.

However, Chapter 1791 also defined LRN 233 as “[LRN 83] near Sierraville to [LRN 21] near Vinto, via Loyalton. Provided, however, that Section 600 of the Streets and Highways Code shall be applicable to the route added to the State Highway System by this section the same as if said route had been added by the Collier-Burns Highway Act of 1947, and the Department of Public Works shall not be required to maintain any portion of said route until the same has been laid out and constructed as a state highway”

In 1955, Chapter 1488 removed the language relating to Section 600.

This was part of Route 49.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 234



Routing

From Route 5 near French Camp to Route 99.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route remains as defined in 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 261, defined in 1959.

 

Status

This routing is unconstructed. According to one Caltrans document, the traversable route is French Camp Road (San Joaquin County Route J9). However, one Caltrans map makes the route appear to be Arch-Airport Rd. In 1983, San Joaquin County passed resolution R-83-1461 for procedures to be followed to include French Camp Road in the state highway system as Route 234 and Eight-Mile Road as Route 235. On November 29, 1993, San Joaquin County adopted Eight-Mile Road as an arterial highway and dropped interest in it as a state highway. They have not shown an opinion on French Camp Road. Caltrans has no plans to assume maintenance of the traversable route.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 234:

  • Total Length (1995): 3 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 3.
  • Counties Traversed: San Joaquin.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1953, Chapter 1700 defined LRN 234 as:

“…the Nevada State Line across the Sierra Nevada Mountains into the San Francisco Bay area on a route to be selected by the California Highway Commission, which route may include all or portions of any existing state highway route or routes. The commission, in determining said route, shall consider military necessities and recommendations appropriate federal authorities.

The commission shall allocate from time to time as federal funds, other than regular federal aid apportionments, are made available as required in this section from the State Highway Fund the sum of twenty million dollars ($20,000,000), for the construction of said route. Such money shall be made available in equal parts in the five fiscal years next succeeding the effective date of this section to the extent that such federal funds are available for matching purposes in each of such years. The allocation of money provided for in this section shall be made out of moneys contained in the State Highway Fund available for construction of state highways in County Group No. 1, but which is not subject to Section 188.4 of this code; and expenditures from such allocation shall be credited against the expenditure required to be made pursuant to Section 188.4 in the counties in which the route provided for in this section lies until June 30, 1962.

No money shall be expended from the allocation make by this section unless and until moneys equal to or in excess of the amount expendable each year from this allocation shall be made available by the Federal Government, in addition to the regular federal aid allocations, for expenditure by the department for the construction of the route provided for in this section, to the end that any sums expended from this allocation shall be matched by like or greater amounts from the Federal Government”

In 1957, Chapter 1911 deleted this LRN. It appears to never have been constructed, nor a sign route number assigned.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 235



Routing

From Route 5 to Route 99 north of the Calaveras River in Stockton.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as “Route 5 to Route 99 north of the Calaveras River.”

In 1990, Chapter 1187 clarified the terminus: “…to Route 99 north of the Calaveras River in Stockton.”

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was proposed LRN 260, defined in 1959.

 

Status

This routing is unconstructed. The traversable route is Eight Mile Road according to one Caltrans document, but according to a Caltrans map, it may be Hammer lane J-8. The county is placing the road into a state of good repair. In 1983, San Joaquin County passed resolution R-83-1461 for procedures to be followed to include French Camp Road in the state highway system as Route 234 and Eight-Mile Road as Route 235. On November 29, 1993, San Joaquin County adopted Eight-Mile Road as an arterial highway and dropped interest in it as a state highway. Caltrans has no plans to assume maintenance of the traversable route. There is no schedule for Caltrans to assume maintenance.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 235:

  • Total Length (1995): 5 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 5.
  • Counties Traversed: San Joaquin.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1953, Chapter 1787 defined LRN 233 as:

  1. High Street, Oakland, between [LRN 69] and [LRN 5]
  2. [LRN 227] near the intersection of Park Boulevard, Oakland to [LRN 75] near Lafayette

In 1957, Chapter 52 renumbered this definition as LRN 235.

In 1957, Chapter 1911 rewrote the definition of (a): "(a) A connection with [LRN 69] near 42d Avenue to a connection with [LRN 5] near High Street in Oakland"

In 1959, Chapter 1062 extended the route again by adding (c): “[LRN 75] near Lafayette to [LRN 75], described in Section 375(a), near Concord”

This route was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 69 (Route 17; present-day I-880) near 42nd Avenue to LRN 5 (US 50; present-day I-580) near High Street in Oakland.

    This is part of Route 77.

  2. From LRN 5 (US 50; present-day I-580) in Oakland to LRN 75 (Route 24) near Lafayette.

    This appears to correspond to a proposed route for Route 77 between I-580 and Route 4. It appears to have run along 13th Avenue and Park Blvd, along Skyline Road, and Morago Road into Lafayette.

  3. From LRN 75 (Route 24) near Lafayette to LRN 75 (Route 21; present-day I-680) near Concord.

    This also appears to be no longer part of the state highway system; it appears to have run along Pleasant Hill Road and Taylor Blvd.


State Shield

State Route 236



Routing

From Route 9 near Boulder Creek to Route 9 near Waterman Gap via Governor's Camp in Big Basin Redwoods State Park.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as “Route 9 near Boulder Creek to Route 9 near Waterman Gap via Governor's Camp in Big Basin Redwood State Park.”

In 1990, Chapter 1187 clarified the origin: “Route 9 near in Boulder Creek to …”

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 44 (defined in 1917) between Route 9 near Boulder Creek and Big Basin, and LRN 42 (defined in 1913) between Big Basin and Route 9 near Waterman Gap. Before 1964, this was signed as part of Route 9 (one of the original 1934 signed routes).

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 236:

  • Total Length (1995): 18 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 170 to 7,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 15; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 3.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 3 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Collector: 3 mi; Rural Minor Collector/Local Road: 15 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Cruz.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1955, Chapter 1789 defined LRN 236 as “…a point northwest of the City of Santa Barbara on [LRN 2] to the campus of the University of California at Santa Barbara, Goleta Campus. The commission shall allocate from the State Highway Fund the necessary funds for the construction of said route. The allocation of money provided for in this section shall be made out of moneys contained in the State Highway Fund available for construction of state highways in County Group No. 2, but which is not subject to Section 188.4; and expenditures from such allocation shall be credited against the expenditures required to be made pursuant to Section 188.4 in Santa Barbara County until June 30, 1963. This route shall be a memorial to the late Senator Clarence C. Ward of Santa Barbara County and shall hereafter be known as Clarence Ward Memorial Boulevard.”

This is present-day Route 217.


State Shield

State Route 237



Routing

From Route 82 near Mountain View to Route 680 in Milpitas.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as “Route 82 near Mountain View to Route 17 near Milpitas.”

In 1965, Chapter 1371 extended the route from I-880 to I-680 by changing "Route 17" to "Route 680". This was done because there were once plans to build a Route 237 freeway angling northeast from about Zanker Rd, crossing I-880 near Dixon Landing Rd, and intersecting I-680 at Scott Creek Rd. There's a bridge at the latter interchange over "nothing", and with sharp eyes you can spot the "future rt. 237" marking on I-680 NB.

In 1988, Chapter 106 clarified the routing to be “Route 82 near in Mountain View to Route 680 near in Milpitas.”

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was originally part of Route 9. It was LRN 113, defined in 1933. Before the current bridge over the Guadalupe River was constructed, it took a route into Alviso via Gold Street north and 1st Street southwest back to current Route 237.

 

Status

This is completely constructed to freeway standards from 1/2 mile from Route 82 to I-880; the last segment (from Middlefield Road to Maude Avenue) opened in 1997. There is currently construction work ongoing at the intersection with I-880.

At one time, there were plans to build this a freeway from I-680 to I-880. However, this now seems unlikely, and a study is being conducted in 2002 to explore upgrading Route 262 instead. According to a posting by Joe Rouse on m.t.r, the planned freeway alignment tied in with the existing alignment west of I-880, crossing I-880 at Dixon Landing Road, and ending at I-680 just south of Scott Creek Road. There are two bridges on I-680 just south of Scott Creek where the ramps would have passed underneath that might have been part of the plan. The problem with this hypothetical routing (it is unclear if it ever went beyond the "on paper" level) was that it would go through a big chunk of the South Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Daniel T. reported on m.t.r that the 1967 and 1969 Gousha maps of San Jose both show the proposed routing, and this routing matches the 1967 Regal Map of San Jose, which actually shows interchange designs. According to the map routings, the I-680 to I-880 connector left the current Route 237 alignment just east of Lafayette Street. It then went NE to Zanker Road, with a standard diamond interchange. It then turned NNE, having a modified cloverleaf interchange with the Nimitz Freeway (EB 237/NB Nimitz and WB 237/SB Nimitz were to be flyovers). Dixon Landing would have been rerouted to loop around the southern end of this interchange. Route 237 would then cross the Alameda/Santa Clara County line, have a half interchange at Oakland Road (straight ramps for EB 237/SB Oakland, loop ramps for NB Oakland/WB 237). The last interchange, 237/680, would be a trumpet, with EB 237/NB 680 flying over and NB 680/WB 237 flying under (at Scott Creek Road, hence the Caltrans Bridge Log entry).

[CTC February 2002 Agenda Item 2.3c]. The following segments of the original routing may have been relinquished: PM R5.6 to PM R5.8 in the City of San Jose.

In November 2006 and February 2008, the CTC considered relinquishment of segments in San Jose, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets. The February 2008 relinquishement was near Zanker Road.

In January 2012, it was reported there are plans to convert the HOV lanes on Route 237 to HOT (Toll) Lanes. This change means the lanes will have fixed entry and exit points. They will remain free to carpoolers, those on motorcycles, and those with exemption stickers; other drivers can use Fasttrak transponders. The conversion will take place on 2/27/2012, and costs $11.8 million. The toll is anticipated to range between 30 and $3.00. These lanes opened at the end of March 2012.

 

Naming

The portion of this route constructed to freeway standards is named the "Southbay" Freeway.

 

Named Structures

Bridge 37-470, the South Alviso Overhead bridge in the City of San Jose, is officially designated the "Warren West Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1993, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 59, Chapter 105, in the same year. Warren West was driving piles to support the South Alviso Overhead when he suffered a fatal heart attack on January 22, 1993.

 

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National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Commuter Lanes

In Santa Clara County, there is a westbound HOV lane from the I-880/Route 237 junction to E of Mathilda Avenue, for a length of 6 mi. Eastbound, there is a HOV lane from Mathilda Avenue to 1.1 mi W of I-880, for a length of 5.7 mi. The westbound lane was opened in 1984, extended in 1991, and relocated in 1995. The eastbound lane was opened in 1984, extended in 1991, relocated in 1995, and shortened in 1996. These require two or more occupants, and are in operation weekdays during the following hours: 5:00-9:00pm and 3:00-7:00pm.

There are plans to connect direct HOV connectors between Route 237 and Tasman Drive. July 2002 CTC Agenda.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Santa Clara 237 R0.38 R1.01
Santa Clara 237 1.05 2.05
Santa Clara 237 3.22 R3.75
Santa Clara 237 R3.98 R4.55
Santa Clara 237 5.40 6.05
Santa Clara 237 6.46 7.12
Santa Clara 237 7.81 8.17

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 237:

  • Total Length (1995): 11 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 29,000 to 88,000.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 11.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 11 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 11 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Clara.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1956 (ex. sess.), Chapter 63 defined LRN 237 as “Junipero Serra Boulevard as it exists and as it was constructed by Joint Highway District No. 10 from its junction with [LRN 56] in Daly City to the present terminus of said highway in the City of San Bruno. Upon the effective date of this section, the Joint Highway District No. 10 shall be dissolved in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 20 of Part 1 of Division 16 of the Streets and Highway Code and all property, assets, and liabilities of said district shall become the property of the State.”

This is a close approximation of the current route of I-280, but was really the original 1964 routing of Route 117. The Route 117 designation may be predated the I-280 designation.


Interstate Shield

Interstate 238



Routing

From Route 680 in Fremont to Route 61 near San Lorenzo via Hayward.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 238 was defined as “Route 680 near Warm Springs to Route 61 near San Lorenzo via Hayward.”

In 1965, Chapter 1371 changed the origin to “Route 680 near Warm Springs in Fremont to …”

In 2009, AB 1386 (Chapter 291, 10/11/2009) authorized relinquishment of the portion of the route in the City of Hayward by adding:

(b) (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Hayward the portion of Route 238 located within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

(2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur: (A) The portion of Route 238 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway. (B) The portion of Route 238 relinquished shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

(4) For relinquished portions of Route 238, the City of Hayward shall maintain signs within its jurisdiction directing motorists to the continuation of Route 238 or to the state highway system, as applicable.

In July 2010, the CTC approved relinquishing right of way in the city of Hayward on Route 238 (Mission Boulevard/Foothill Boulevard) from Industrial Parkway to Apple Avenue, under terms and conditions stated in the letter dated June 1, 2010, determined to be in the best interests of the State. Authorized by Chapter 291, Statutes of 2009, which amended Section 538 of the Streets and Highways Code.

In 2012, AB 2679 (Chapter 769, 9/29/2012) updated the language to reflect the relinquishment in Hayward:

(b) (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Hayward the portion of Route 238 located within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

(2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur:

(A) The portion of Route 238 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway.

(B) The portion of Route 238 relinquished shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

(4) (b) For relinquished portions The relinquished former portion of Route 238 within the City of Hayward is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 238, the City of Hayward shall maintain signs within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 238 or to the state highway system, as applicable.applicable, and shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 238, including any traffic signal progression.

Note that for a long time, the routings of present-day Route 238 and Route 9 were duplicated. After Route 680 was built between the two Mission Blvds, Mission lost the designation as Route 238, until reaching the northernmost interchange. Also, at one time there was talk of having Route 238 use the routing of Warm Springs Blvd and Old Oakland Hwy. A couple of maps showed the signage as such, and this is confirmed in a 1966 CHPW.

Unconstructed The portion between Route 880 and unconstructed Route 61is unconstructed. The traversable local routing is along Lewelling Boulevard. A freeway route has not been adopted.

Mission/Foothill Freeway/Hayward Bypass

Where Route 238 veers off of I-680, between the Durham and Washington exits, where I-680 makes a turn, there is an overpass over the southbound lanes and some pavement suggesting that there might have been an exit from the leftmost northbound lane and an "entrance" to the leftmost southbound lane. This is the beginning of a proposed "Mission" Freeway (upgrade of Route 238) that was never built.

Hayward Bypass CorridorThe proposed Foothill Freeway, also known as the Hayward Bypass, was born on June 21, 1961, when the California Highway Commission (CHC) adopted a location for Route 238 as a Freeway in Alameda County between I-680 and I-580 through the cities of Fremont and Hayward. The CHC also adopted as a freeway other segments of Route 238 through Alameda County on June 21, 1961, December 15, 1965, and July 20, 1967. Following those actions by the CHC, the Department executed freeway agreements with the City of Fremont on December 21, 1966 and April 24, 1967; the City of Hayward on October 5, 1965 and March 13, 1984; and the County of Alameda on October 9, 1964, January 14, 1967, and March 13, 1984. The Department acquired much of the right of way for construction of the adopted Route 238 in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. Caltrans agents, using the threat of eminent domain, bought up 620 parcels -- some with homes or business -- in and around Hayward. This freeway would have traversed the Hayward foothills from Route 580 in Castro Valley to Route 680 in Mission San Jose, while providing regional congestion relief with Central Alameda County.

Opposition to the Route 238 Hayward Bypass happened almost from the date of adoption. A class action lawsuit was filed in June 1971 seeking to halt land acquisition, relocation activities and other preparations for the project. In November of 1971, a preliminary court injunction to halt the project was issued by the United States District Court for Northern California and reaffirmed on appeal in November 1973. On April 25, 1980, the CHC rescinded that portion of the adopted Route 238 freeway location from I-680 to Industrial Parkway in the city of Hayward. In addition, the Commission’s rescission resolution obligated the portion of Route 238 from Industrial Parkway to I-580 to have a funding plan in place within two years (e.g., by 1982). If a financial plan was not forthcoming by 1982, the remainder of Route 238 would be rescinded. Subsequently, in 1982, legislation (AB 3179, Holmdahl) created a process to allow local public agencies to develop an alternative transportation project or projects (LATIP) to address congestion on existing Route 238 and to provide flexibility to local decision makers by ensuring that the investment of funds on the adopted freeway alignment would not preclude consideration of other options. Subsequent to this resolution, legislation was passed to allow additional time to develop a funding plan for the remaining Route 238 location. Current Government Code Section 14528.5 requires that a funding plan be approved before July 1, 2010.

238 routingIn the 1984 State Transportation Improvement Plan, the CHC approved the adopted Route 238 project (Hayward Bypass) for inclusion in the Special Studies category to initiate the environmental studies. In 1986, after years of inaction, Alameda County voters passed a transportation sales tax measure that called for constructing a Hayward freeway. The measure earmarked money from a one-half cent sales tax increase to "...a six-lane freeway/expressway along Foothill Boulevard and Mission Boulevard to Industrial Parkway," the ballot read. But Caltrans' proposed $244 million freeway ended up aligned a half mile east of those roadways in the hills. Opponents sued, arguing the project described on the ballot was not the freeway envisioned in 1961.

In January 1990, the United States District Court approved a Consent Decree that established the procedures for removal of the court injunction of 1971. The Consent Decree, which is still in effect, included commitments from the Department and the City of Hayward for providing relocation benefits to the residents of the adopted Route 238 corridor, replenishment housing, and replacement parks along with other corridor enhancements.

However, in 1997, another lawsuit was filed against the project. This suit disallowed the use of Measure B funds. This suit, along with the subsequent appeals, made construction of the adopted Route 238 (Hayward Bypass) infeasible. A judge ruled in 2002 that the hillside freeway being designed by ACTA and the California Department of Transportation was different from what voters approved in 1986, thereby disqualifying the project from Measure B funds.

In November 2002, Measure U was passed by the City of Hayward supporting improvements along the traversable Route 238 (Mission Boulevard) in lieu of a bypass along the adopted Route 238 corridor. The Hayward Bypass will not be constructed as a State freeway within the foreseeable future as it is not acceptable to local stakeholders, does not conform with most recent local and regional plans, and local funding of the project through Measure B has been withdrawn.

The final chapter was written in April 2004, when Caltrans appeal of a trial court decision blocking the long-debated transportation project was rejected. The First District Court of Appeals in San Francisco reaffirmed the ruling Alameda County Judge Gordon Baranco made in January 2002 that Caltrans' proposed route for the freeway through the hills was not the one voters approved with a ballot measure funding the project. According to the Tri-Valley Herald, under a variety of different names and versions, the freeway—a north-south link between Interstate 580 in Castro Valley and Fremont has been one of the most contentious, enduring and litigious civic debates in Hayward's history. During all this time, Caltrans has rented nearly 400 houses, apartments and townhouses in Hayward and Castro Valley. Other properties have been boarded up or torn down. Some Caltrans-owned vacant land sat encircled by chain-link fences and posted with signs: "State property, no trespassing." Also in 2004, the Legislature passed SB 509 (Government Code section 14528.5) to extend the provisions of the LATIP process to July 2010. The Alameda County Congestion Management Agency, working with the City of Hayward, Alameda County, the City of San Leandro, the Alameda County Transportation Authority and Caltrans is charged with the responsibility of developing the LATIP.

The city has moved on with an alternative plan for relieving traffic in the corridor. A working group of community members has used $1.5 million of the $111 million raised for the freeway by Measure B, to study a road-widening and improvement project along Foothill and Mission boulevards. This alternative includes a grade separation at the Five Flags intersection where Foothill and Mission intersect with Jackson and E streets. In 2005, the Alameda County Transportation Authority began work to divert the controversial project's money into a compromise plan that would, instead of creating a new freeway east of Mission and Foothill boulevards, simply improve existing roads. ACTA would use $15 million in Measure B funds to fix the I-580 interchange at Redwood Road in Castro Valley, $5 million to study the traffic problems in the central county area and another $5 million to improve circulation in the congested Bayview Avenue area of Castro Valley. The Hayward traffic improvement projects would include a major grade separation at the Five Corners intersection of Mission and Foothill boulevards and Jackson Street and a downtown traffic loop that would convert some Hayward streets into one-way routes. This was on the May 2005 CTC Agenda, whch would move funds to fix I-580.

In October 2005, the Governor signed AB 1462 which changes the existing law that authorized a city or county in which a planned transportation facility was to be located on Route 238 in Alameda County to develop and file with the California Transportation Commission a local alternative transportation program that addresses transportation problems and opportunities, and provides for the use of revenues from the sales of excess properties acquired for the planned state facility in order to fund the local alternative program, but limits the use of revenues from excess property sales to highway purposes. It also extends the applicability of the provision that the commission may not approve a local alternative program under these provisions after July 1, 2010 to a Route 84 between existing Route 238 and I-880 in Alameda County. (Chapter 619, October 6, 2005)

In late November 2006, Caltrans announced that over the next two years it will sell off 1,100 to 1,200 parcels of surplus real estate, including the properties in and around Hayward. Caltrans has given Hayward $250,000 to plan how best to use the 300 acres of land. And Caltrans will cooperate with the city as the agency sells off the land. But before Caltrans can start selling the land, the California Transportation Commission has to release it for sale. Sunne Wright McPeak, state Secretary of Business, Transportation and Housing, said the sale fits with Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's mandate to sell surplus state assets. The goal of Caltrans is to sell 640 parcels next year and another 500 in 2008. For the Alameda County Transportation Authority, the land sale is a boon, as the authority will get the proceeds of the land sales -- an amount as much as $200 million -- that can be used to pay for highway -- but not transit -- improvements in central Alameda County. They're likely to include expansions of Foothill and Mission boulevards, a new Redwood Road interchange at I-580 and congestion relief projects on Interstates 238, 580 and 880. To get the money, the authority needs to submit a spending plan to the state Transportation Commission -- probably in 2008 or 2009 -- and have it accepted. On September 28, 2009, relative to the housing element resolution following provisions of the 1990 Consent Decree, Caltrans, the City of Hayward and the Public Interest Law Project, held a meeting with Caltrans' residential tenants residing in the adopted Route 238 Corridor. Provisions from the Draft Settlement Agreement were presented to the tenants. The agreement includes programs to provide: (1) monetary and other assistance to all eligible corridor tenants, (2) 237 new, low-income housing units, and (3) a home purchase program for eligible corridor tenants, currently renting eligible detached single family residences. On October 6, 2009, following the tenant meeting, the City of Hayward approved the Settlement Agreement. The Final Settlement Agreement is expected to be signed by the end of December 2009 by the two remaining parties--Caltrans and the Public Interest Law Project. Superior Court Approval of the final Settlement Agreement is anticipated thereafter.

AB 1386 Chapter 291, 10/11/2009) enacted provisions relating to the disposition of excess properties acquired for the Route 238 Hayward Bypass project. This law will become operative on the date on which the Superior Court issues the final approval order for the Settlement Agreement signed by Caltrans, the City of Hayward, and the Public Interest Law Project, or on January 1, 2010, whichever occurs later. AB 1386 also includes provisions for the relinquishment of traversable Route 238, the programming of LATIP projects, and use of proceeds from the sale of excess lands. In December 2009, the CTC began the processing of rescinding the freeway adoption for the western portion of the Hayward Bypass route (I-580 to Industrial Blvd.). Once this route rescission is approved and litigation matters are settled, the County of Alameda will be able to proceed with planned enhancements to relieve congestion in central Alameda County. These enhancements will include improvements along the traversable Route 238, also known as Mission Boulevard, through the city of Hayward. Litigation matters are expected to be resolved by the end of December 2009. In the adopted Route 238 corridor, there are 464 parcels estimated to be worth between $90 million and $125 million, based on 2009 market value and best use assumptions.

In November 2010, the CTC formally rescinded of the freeway adoption. The rationale was as follows: The route segment is not needed for system continuity. The need for a freeway corridor parallel to I-880 to handle interregional traffic can be served by improving the adjacent facilities including the traversable Route 238. The traversable highway traffic is local versus interregional, and improvements can be made to the traversable Route 238 to accommodate future traffic demand. On June 30, 2010, the Commission approved the relinquishment of the traversable Route 238, Mission and Foothill Boulevards, from Industrial Parkway to 0.3 mile south of I-580 to the City of Hayward.

[238 Hayward Loop]In August 2012, updates were provided on the Route 238 corridor project in Hayward. The goal of the project is construction of a "loop" to speed traffic through downtown Hayward to link I-580 and Route 238. As of August 2012, the project ws roughly two-thirds complete. LED streetlights have been installed for almost the full length of Foothill Boulevard from I-580 to Mission Boulevard. Video-monitored traffic signals have been activated at several intersections. The northern portion of the Foothill corridor is paved, with new sidewalks and a median. Near the southern end of the project, a section of Mission is nearly finished, with a repaved road and new sidewalks, lights and median. The project has encountered delays due to unexpected problems -- among them a Mission Boulevard sidewalk that was really a basement roof, the discovery of abandoned wells and underground gas storage tanks. In addition, rain delays during the wet winter of 2010 also pushed the project back. The heart of the project is a "loop" of one-way streets through downtown. This has involved torn-up sidewalks and intersections, but completion is in sight. Several intersections along Foothill in the loop are still torn up, awaiting the arrival of huge custom-made traffic signal bridges that will span the boulevard. After they are installed, the one-way loop will be go into effect. Old signals will be removed, and roads in the downtown will be ground down and leveled out. Paving downtown streets, one of the final steps, probably won't happen until May 2013.
(Oakland Tribune, 8/1/2012)

Unconstructed The segment between I-880 and Route 61 is unconstructed; the traversable route is Lewelling Blvd. There are not plans to adopt a route in this area.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Before the 1964 signed/legislative route alignment, this route was signed as Alternate US 101. It was LRN 5, defined in 1909, between I-680 in Fremont and I-580 near Hayward; it was signed as Route 9 before 1964. The route was LRN 228, defined in 1947, between I-580 and Route 61. This is signed as I-238 between I-580 and I-880, and unsigned for the remainder of the route.

Portions of Route 238 were originally called the "Llewelling Blvd" Freeway. The original plans were to extend this westward to the Route 61 freeway. Later plans were to have extended this across the bay to meet US 101 at the I-380 interchange north of the airport. [Thanks to Scott "Kurumi" Oglesby for much of this information]

 

Status

Route 238 was widened from four to six lanes from north of Niles Canyon Road to south of Mowry Avenue in Fremont. Construction began in 2002 and is completed in summer 2005. The project includes the widening the Alameda Creek Bridge and replacing two railroad bridges. This project follows other recent Route 238 widening projects—between Decoto Road and Whipple Road in Union City (from four to six lanes)—and in the vicinity of Industrial Blvd in Hayward. Mitigation planting was approved in July 2010.

After the new I-680 alignment was finalized, Oakland Road and Main Street were signed as Route 238, since that portion of Mission Blvd south of the present terminus of Route 238 was signed as Route 238 to Warm Springs. Today's I-880 freeway was signed as Route 17 and Temporary I-680 north of US 101 to the junction of Route 262 and Route 17 and Temporary I-280 south of US 101 to the junction of US 280. Note that Mission Blvd crosses I-680 twice. At the first (northern) crossing it is signed as Route 238 and this is the present terminus of Route 238. At the second (southern) crossing it is signed as a connection to I-880; this is the eastern terminus of (unsigned) Route 262. Also, the city of Milpitas built a new alignment for Main Street, so present-day maps do not show how Oakland Road connected with Mission Blvd in Warm Springs via Main Street.

When I-680 was built in the hills through Fremont's east side in the 1963-1964, an overpass and roadway was also constructed heading northwest where I-680 now turns east up through Mission Pass, between the Washington Boulevard and Auto Mall Parkway exits. That section, about 1,000 feet long, was the start of the aborted Mission Freeway that was to have run northwest under Lake Elizabeth through the middle of Fremont and Union City to connect with I-580 in Hayward. These plans were scuttled in the 1970s. This "bridge to nowhere" was demolished in 2002 to accomodate widening of I-680. However, the Caltrans Bridge Log dates the bridge as 1971, and refers to it as "FUTURE 238/680".

In May 2010, the CTC accepted for future consideration of funding the FEIR for a project to covert downtown Hayward into a loop of one-way streets. This project will add peak hour travel lanes, improvements at major intersections along the route, pedestrian and bicycle improvements, and landscaping.

In January 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Alameda along Route 238, on Westerman Court, Morrill Street, and Langton Way, consisting of collateral facilities.

In March 2014, the CTC authorized vacation of right of way in the county of Alameda along Route 238 at Westerman Court, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes. The County, having no desire to retain interests in the area, and to clarify title, quitclaimed all rights, title and interests to the State.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #2448: Widen I-238 between I-580 & I-880 in Alameda County. $800,000.

In November 2006, Caltrans began a project to widen I-238 between I-880 and I-580 to three lanes in each direction. The project is planned to take about four years and be complete in 2010. Information on the project can be found at http://www.dot.ca.gov/dist4/i238_880.

 

 

Naming

Historically, this route is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). A portion of this route has officially been designated as part of "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1707, Chapter 739, on October 11, 2001.

Some refer to this route as the Foothill Freeway.

 

Interstate Submissions

State Shield Interstate Shield The portion from Fremont to Hayward was submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1968; not accepted. A portion of this route is designed as I-238 for continuity of numbering; it is non-chargable interstate with the I- designation approved by AASHTO.

 

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Other WWW Links

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Alameda 238 14.54 16.70

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Status

There is supposedly at least one study attempting to connect this to the "Southern Crossing".

 

National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

 


Overall statistics for Route 238:

  • Total Length (1995): 16 miles traversable; 2 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 26,000 to 105,000.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 18.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 2 mi; FAU: 14 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 16 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Alameda.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1957, Chapter 26 defined LRN 238 “to extend from a point on [LRN 4] south of Bakersfield to a point on [LRN 7] near Woodland, on a route along the westerly side of the San Joaquin Valley to be selected by the California Highway Commission, which route may include all or portions of any existing state highway route or routes”.

This route runs from LRN 4 (US 99; the present-day I-5/Route 99 junction) S of Bakersfield to LRN 7 (US 40; present-day I-80) near Woodland. This is the "Western Alignment", and is present-day I-5.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 239



Routing

From Route 580 west of Tracy to Route 4 near Brentwood.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route remains as defined in 1963. The traversable route is Mountain House Road and Byron Highway. Caltrans has no plans to adopt this route.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was part of proposed LRN 110, defined in 1959. It was unsigned and unconstructed, although it appears to follow the route of Contra Costa/Alameda/San Joaquin County Route J4.

 

Status

This routing is unconstructed. The traversable local routing is along Mountain House Road, and Byron Highway, as well as Vasco Road and Walnut Blvd. These existing roads are substandard for incorporation into the state system.

This route was originally planned to be a portion of the Mid-State Tollway between Sunol and Vacaville. The tollway was a proposal that would start off of I-680 near Sunol, cross I-580 west of Livermore (roughly along the alignment of the Livermore Bypass), and then will extend north to Route 4 near Antioch. A spur will come off the tollway near Brentwood and run SE to the junction of I-580 and I-205. The tollway could be designated Route 84, since it roughly follows the built and unbuilt portions of the route and the spur could be designated Route 239, since it follows the general routing for that unbuilt highway. The tollway was originally supposed to extend to I-80 between Vacaville and Dixon with a spur connecting with I-505 at the 80/505 junction, but that portion was killed due to the need for high-level crossings (150') of the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers plus environmental issues.

There is also an effort by Rep. Pombo to build a freeway along the Route 239 corridor. This freeway would would run along the path of the two-lane Byron Highway from the western end of Tracy northwest to Brentwood. There, it would connect with the Route 4 bypass currently scheduled for construction. Brentwood political leaders have been pushing for the new freeway to provide the city with a thruway to I-5, I-580, and I-205. The plan is to attract white-collar and industrial businesses and transform the city from a bedroom community to a job center. The new freeway proposal also will give Tracy commuters a connection to the north, and an alternative commute route to the East Bay. An article in the East Bay Express notes that the arrival of the federal funds for the Route 239 project also happens to coincide with a multimillion-dollar land deal currently underway with members of Pombo's family.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #1930: Conduct study and construct Route 239 from Route 4 in Brentwood area to I-205 in Tracy area. $4,000,000.

 

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.19] Entire route. It is believed this designation will provide increased funding. Designated by SB 802, Chapter 598, 9/2003.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 239:

  • Total Length (1995): 17 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 17; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Counties Traversed: Alameda, Contra Costa.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1957, Chapter 23 defined LRN 239 as “a point on [LRN 56] near Daly City to a point on [LRN 2] near San Jose on a route to be selected by the California Highway Commission, which route may include all or portions of any existing state highway route or routes”. The urgency clause noted this was related to a circumferential freeway around San Francisco Bay.

In 1961, Chapter 1146 rewrote the routing as “the junction of [LRN 68] and [LRN 69] in San Jose to [LRN 56] near Daly City”.

This route is part of I-880 between the US 101/I-880 junction to the I-880/I-280 junction, and is I-280 between from I-880/I-280 N to LRN 56 (Route 1) near Daly City. Between San Bruno and Daly City, the route appears to duplicate LRN 237 (which may be the old surface street routing). Note that the I-280 route includes a portion of LRN 2 between old surface US 101 in Daly City and freeway US 101.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 240



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 240 was defined as “Route 1 near Seal Beach to Route 405.”

In 1968, Chapter 282 repealed the definition of Route 240, transferring the routing to Route 605.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1968 routing was part of LRN 170, defined in 1933.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1957, Chapter 24 defined LRN 240 to be “[LRN 4] near Glendale to [LRN 26] near the east boundary of Los Angeles County on a route to be selected by the California Highway Commission, which route may include all or portions of any existing state highway route or routes”. The urgency clause noted this was related to a circumferential freeway around Los Angeles.

This route runs from I-5 near Glendale to I-10 near the east boundary of Los Angeles County. This LRN was used for the future freeway routings of Route 134 between present-day I-5 and I-210, and I-210 between Route 134 and Route 57, and Route 57 between I-210 and I-10. It duplicated the paths of LRN 161 and LRN 9. The portion between the post-1998 Route 210/Route 57 junction and I-10 was originally also I-210.

Between San Dimas and US 60/US 70/US 99, LRN 240 was to have been designated Route 71 (the signed Route 71 at this time ran to the east along LRN 19).



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