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California Highways

Routes 225 through 232

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

225 · 226 · 227 · 228 · 229 · 230 · 231 · 232


State Shield

State Route 225



Routing

From Route 101 near Santa Barbara to near the Santa Barbara Central Business District.

Note: The CTC is permitted to relinquish the entirety of this route within the jurisdiction of the city of Santa Barbara, between the Route 101/Route 225 separation at Las Positas Road and the Castillo Street interchange with Route 101, on terms and conditions that the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state. This segment was relinquished in December 2013.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as “Route 101 near Santa Barbara to Route 101 near Montecito via the coast.”

In 1998, AB 2132, Chapter 877, signed September 26, 1998 truncated the route to be "Route 101 near Santa Barbara to Route 101 near the Santa Barbara Central Business District Montecito via the coast". Now, rather than following Cabrillo Boulevard along the beach area, the route turns left at Castillo Street and ends at Castillo and US 101.

In 2011, AB 957 (Chapter 536, 10/7/2011) permitted the CTC to "relinquish to the City of Santa Barbara the entire Route 225 within the jurisdiction of the city, between the Route 101/Route 225 separation at Las Positas Road and the Castillo Street interchange with Route 101, on terms and conditions that the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment: (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, Route 225 shall cease to be a state highway and shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

In December 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Santa Barbara on Route 225 between the Route 101/Route 225 separation at Las Positas Road and the Castillo Street interchange with Route 101, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated May 21, 2013, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 536, Statutes of 2011, which amended Section 525 of the Streets and Highways Code.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was LRN 150, defined in 1933.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 225:

  • Total Length (1995): 7 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 11,100 to 21,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 7.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 7 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 7 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Barbara.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1947 (1st Ex Sess), Chapter 11 defined LRN 225 as the route “a connection between [LRN 56] and [LRN 2] near the south boundary of the City and County of San Francisco”.

This route ran from Route 1 to US 101 near the S boundary of San Francisco. This was once proposed as part of I-280.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 226



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 226 was defined as the route "Route 63 near Orosi to Orange Cove."

In 1965, Chapter 1372 deleted this route and transferred the routing to Route 63.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 132, defined in 1933.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1947 (1st Ex Sess), Chapter 11 defined LRN 226 as the route “a point in the vicinity of the intersection of Webster Street and Santa Clara Avenue in Alameda to a point on [LRN 5] in Oakland”

In 1947, Chapter 1449 extended the definition of the route to include “the highway from San Leandro to Oakland via Alameda and the Posey Tube”. However this extension “is part of [LRN 252]”

In 1949, Chapter 1422 repealed the 1947 Chapter 1449 definition, and redefined Route 226 instead:

  1. A point in the vicinity of the intersection of Davis Street and East Fourteenth Street in San Leandro, thence via Davis Street through the City of San Leandro and through the City of Oakland via Bayshore Boulevard and Doolittle Drive, thence through the City of Alameda via Webster Street and Posey Tube and any other tube or crossing to be used in conjunction with Posey Tube, to [LRN 69] in Oakland near Seventh and Harrison Streets.
  2. [LRN 69] near Seventh and Harrison Streets in Oakland to [LRN 5]

In 1955, Chapter 97 added "526.1 Upon the completion of the additional subterranean tube between the Cities of Oakland and Alameda, in the vicinity of Webster Street, to be used in connection with the Posey Tube, both of which tubes are included in the description of [LRN 226], the department may by executive order, rule, or regulation, designate both of said tubes, and the approaches leading to or from the nearest state highway or city street, as one-way highways, and thereafter restrict said tubes and approaches to one-way traffic, proceeding in opposite directions as to each other. Upon the placing of signs notifying the public of such restrictions, any person who wilfully fails to observe such sign is guilty of a misdemeanor."

In 1959, Chapter 1841 clarified the definition:

  1. A point in the vicinity of the intersection of Davis Street and East Fourteenth 14th Street in San Leandro, thence via Davis Street through the City of San Leandro and through the City of Oakland via Bayshore Boulevard and Doolittle Drive, thence through the City of Alameda via Webster Street and Posey Tube and any other tube or crossing to be used in conjunction with Posey Tube, to [LRN 69] in Oakland near Seventh and Harrison Streets.
  2. [LRN 69] near Castro Street Seventh and Harrison Streets in Oakland to [LRN 5]

In 1961, Chapter 1146 relaxed the definition of (a): “[LRN 105] in San Leandro to [LRN 69] in Oakland near Seventh and Harrison Streets via Alameda and the vicinity of Oakland International AirportA point in the vicinity of the intersection of Davis Street and East 14th Street in San Leandro, thence via Davis Street through the City of San Leandro and through the City of Oakland via Bayshore Boulevard and Doolittle Drive, thence through the City of Alameda via Webster Street and Posey Tube and any other tube or crossing to be used in conjunction with Posey Tube,

Also in 1961, Chapter 2196 added “526.2 Because of the statewide interest in navigation, the state will hold and save the United States of America free and harmless from liability for damages to the parallel tubes between the Cities of Oakland and Alameda included in the description of [LRN 226] due to the initial dredging work and subsequent maintenance dredging in an area within 50 feet of said tubes in connection with the deepening of the Oakland Estuary by the Corps of Engineerings of the United States Army and the Director of Finance shall execute an agreement so to do with the proper representatives of the United States of America.”

This route was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 105 (unsigned Route 13) in San Leandro to LRN 69 (Route 17; present-day I-880) in Oakland near Seventh and Harrison Streets via Alameda and the vicinity of the Oakland International Airport.

    This is present-day Route 112 between Route 13 and Route 61; it is present-day Route 61 to unsigned Route 260 near Alameda, and unsigned Route 260 (signed as Route 61) to I-880 (through the Posey Tunnel).

  2. From LRN 69 (Route 17; present-day I-880) near Castro Street in Oakland to LRN 5 (US 50; present-day I-580).

    This is approximately present-day I-980; it was originally part of the 1964-1984 routing of Route 24.


State Shield

State Route 227



Routing

(a) Route 227 is from Route 1 south of Oceano to Route 101 in San Luis Obispo.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 227 was defined as “Route 101 near Arroyo Grande to Route 101 near San Luis Obispo.”

In 1967, Chapter 1584 added the portion from Route 1 to Route 101 was added, making the definition: “Route 1 south of Oceano Route 101 near Arroyo Grande to Route 101 near San Luis Obispo.”

In 1992, Chapter 1243 clarified the routing: “Route 1 south of Oceano to Route 101 in near San Luis Obispo.”

In 2004, AB 3047, Chapter 650 (9/21/2004) permited the California Transportation Commission to relinquish to the City of Arroyo Grande the portion of Route 227 that is located within the Arroyo Grande city limits upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, including, but not limited to, a condition that the City of Arroyo Grande maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 227. Further, the commission may relinquish to the City of San Luis Obispo the portion of Route 227 that is located within San Luis Obispo city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, including, but not limited to, a condition that the City of San Luis Obispo maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 227. In both cases, such relinquishments become effective immediately following the recording by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment, and after they are effective, the relinquished portions cease to be state highways and may not be considered for readoption.

In October 2008, right of way in the city of Arroyo Grande on Route 227 from Route 101 to 250 feet north of Huasna Road was relinquished, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement, dated October 15, 2008, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 787, Statutes of 2000, which amended Section 527 of the Streets and Highways Code.

In November 2010, right of way in the city of San Luis Obispo on Route 227 (Broad Street, South Street, Higuera Street, and Madonna Road) was relinquished, from the southerly city limits to Route 101. The City, by resolution dated August 17, 2010, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. Authorized by Chapter 650, Statutes of 2004, which amended Section 527 of the Streets and Highways Code.

In September 2012, AB 2679 (Chapter 769, 9/29/12) updated the language to reflect the relinquishment in Arroyo Grande and San Luis Obsipo:

(b) (1) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), the commission may relinquish to the City of Arroyo Grande the portion of Route 227 that is located within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, including, but not limited to, a condition that the City of Arroyo Grande maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 227.

(2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately following the recording by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur:

(A) The portion of Route 227 relinquished under this subdivision shall cease to be a state highway.

(B) The portion of Route 227 relinquished under this subdivision may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81.

(c) (b) (1) The Notwithstanding subdivision (a), the commission may relinquish to the City of relinquished former portions of Route 227 within the Cities of Arroyo Grande and San Luis Obispo the are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 227 that is located within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, including, but not limited to, a condition that the City of San Luis Obispo maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 227. 227, the Cities of San Luis Obispo and Arroyo Grande shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 227 and shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 227, including any traffic signal progression.

(2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately following the recording by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur:

(A) The portion of Route 227 relinquished under this subdivision shall cease to be a state highway.

(B) The portion of Route 227 relinquished under this subdivision may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81.

(4) For the portions of Route 227 that are relinquished, the City of San Luis Obispo shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 227.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The original portion of this route was LRN 147, defined in 1933. The 1967 addition was a new routing.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.8] From Route 1 south of Oceano to Route 101 near Arroyo Grande. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Status

Unconstructed from Route 1 in Oceano to Route 101 in Arroyo Grande; however, there is now a proposed routing. No local roads adequately fit the definition of a traversable highway. Caltrans told the city of Arroyo Grande in 9/1982 that there were no plans to construct this segment.

 

National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 227:

  • Total Length (1995): 14 miles traversable; 2 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 2,000 to 29,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 9; Sm. Urban: 3; Urbanized: 4.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 4 mi; FAS: 10 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 4 mi; Minor Arterial: 10 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Luis Obispo.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1947 (1st Ex Sess), Chapter 11 defined LRN 227 as “a connection between [LRN 75] near Lake Temescal in Oakland and [LRN 5] near San Leandro”

In 1957, Chapter 1911 relaxed the definition to “a connection between [LRN 75] near Lake Temescal in Oakland and [LRN 5] near San Leandro”.

This route ran from Route 24 near Lake Temescal in Oakland to US 50. This is part of present-day Route 13.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 228



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 228 was defined as the route "Route 86 approximately two and one-half miles southwest of Brawley to Route 86 approximately two miles west of Brawley." The routing would roughly have been a continuation of Imperial Avenue NB to near Kalin Ave, bypassing downtown Brawley. The routing was never constructed or signed. There is no connection between this routing and the new bypass proposed for Route 78/Route 111 in downtown Brawley.

In 1998, AB 2132, Chapter 877, (September 26, 1998) deleted the routing.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 26. It may have been a bypass of US 99.

 


Overall statistics for former Route 228:

  • Total Length (1995): 2 miles unconstructed
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 2; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Counties Traversed: Imperial.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1947 (1st Ex Sess), Chapter 11 defined LRN 228 as “a connection between [LRN 5] and [LRN 69] near San Lorenzo”.

In 1959, Chapter 1062 swapped the endpoints and extended the routing to [LRN 258]: “[LRN 69] [LRN 258] near San Lorenzo to [LRN 5] near Hayward

This is an unsigned portion of Route 238 between I-580 and unconstructed Route 61.


State Shield

State Route 229



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 229 was defined as the route “Route 58 near Santa Margarita to Route 41 near Creston”

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was LRN 137, defined in 1933. It was unsigned before 1964.

 

Status

This route had been signed between Route 58 and Route 41. It is supposedly still signed (as of 2004) at the junction with Route 58. The road itself (Webster Rd) is only one lane wide from Route 58 north to a mile southwest of Rocky Creek Road, at which point it becomes a two-lane route all the way through Creston and to its terminus at Route 41. (On Route 41, there are signs pointing to Route 229 at that junction as well). The route itself doesn't seem to have any trailblazers but does have mileposts (a similar situation to Route 221 in Napa, which is signed at the junctions but not on the route itself).

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for former Route 229:

  • Total Length (1995): 9 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 100 to 500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 9; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAS: 9 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Collector: 9 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Luis Obispo.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1947 (1st Ex Sess), Chapter 11 defined LRN 229 as “a connection between [LRN 68] and [LRN 2] near San Bruno”.

In 1959, Chapter 1062 swapped the ends and extended the route to [LRN 56]: “[LRN 56] near Pacifica to [LRN 68] near San Bruno”

This is present-day I-380.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 230



Routing

From Route 101 near the south city limits of San Francisco to Route 280 in San Francisco.

Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 89 of Chapter 1062 of the Statutes of 1959, construction of all or any portion of Route 230 may be commenced at any time, if the City and County of San Francisco has conveyed or does convey to the State of California, without charge, all real property presently acquired by it for the construction of such route or portion thereof.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as “Route 101 near the south city limits of San Francisco to Route 87 in San Francisco. Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 89 of Chapter 1062 of the Statutes of 1959, construction of all or any portion of Route 230 may be commenced at any time, if the City and County of San Francisco has conveyed or does convey to the State of California, without charge, all real property presently acquired by it for the construction of such route or portion thereof.”

In 1970, Chapter 1473 extended the routing “…to Route 280 in San Francisco.” This was done by transfer from Route 87, when the portion of former Route 87 from Route 230 to Route 280 was transferred to Route 230 (this might have been the Southern Crossing approach). This was a proposed route and a route was adopted, but the adoption was rescinded in October 1976 . It was supposed to run from Route 101 south of Candlestick Park, over the SF Bay, north past the east side of Candlestick, and ending at the Hunter's Point district of San Francisco. This was supposed be the link for the proposed Southern Crossing bridge over the SF Bay. The current routing is undetermined. It might have run along the Hunter's Point expressway. More information on the Southern Crossing may be found in the entry for I-380.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was part of proposed LRN 289, defined in 1959. Portions were part of LRN 253.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. The freeway route adoption was rescinded effective 10/21/1976.

 

Status

This routing is unconstructed. There is no traversable local road equivalent.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 230:

  • Total Length (1995): 4 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 4.
  • Counties Traversed: San Mateo, San Francisco.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1947 (1st Ex Session), Chapter 13 defined LRN 230 as “[LRN 172] to [LRN 173] via Indiana Street in Los Angeles County”.

This ran from LRN 172 (3rd St/US 60) to LRN 173 (Olympic, later Route 26, later I-10) via Indiana Street in Los Angeles County. It ran from 3rd St along Indiana to Olympic, and then along Olympic W to Soto St. The portion along Indiana was Route 165 between 1964 and 1965.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 231



Routing

No Current Routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 231 was defined as “Route 86 to Route 195 near Mecca via Avenue 66.”

In 1972, Chapter 1216 deleted that routing.

State Shield Toll Road Transportation Corridor In 1988, Chapter 1364 defined a new routing: “Route 5 near the border of the Cities of Tustin and Irvine to Route 91.”

In 1991, Chapter 775 was extended by transfer from Route 241 (Route 261 to Route 241): “Route 5 near the border of the Cities of Tustin and Irvine at Route 133 to …”. At the same time, the portion from Route 5 near Tustin and Irvine to Route 241 was transferred to Route 261.

In 1996, Chapter 1154 deleted the routing. The portion of the route from Route 133 to Route 241 was transferred to Route 133. The portion from Route 241 to Route 91 was transferred to Route 241, making Route 241 run from Route 133 to Route 91. This route was to have been one of the toll roads that form the Orange County Transportation Corridors.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1972 routing for Route 231 was part of LRN 204, defined in 1935.

The 1988-1996 routing of Route 231 was not part of the state highway system in 1963.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Naming

This was to have been the "Eastern Transportation Corridor".

 

Status

Overall statistics for former Route 231:

  • Total Length (1995): 16 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 16.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 16 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Orange.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1949, Chapter 1261 defined LRN 231 as

“[LRN 165] in San Pedro to [LRN 167] in Long Beach, via the mainland portion of Long Beach Outer Harbor and Terminal Island, subject to the following conditions:

1. Except as provided in paragraph number 2, no expenditure shall be made from state highway funds for the acquisition of rights of way for or construction, improvement, or maintenance of said highway until the following conditions have been met:

(a) The Federal Government shall have made available all funds necessary for the construction of said route, other than funds provided under paragraph 2.

(b) The Federal Government and the Cities of Los Angeles and Long Beach shall have granted a sufficient and adequate right of way without cost to the State of California for that portion of said route traversing lands owned or controlled by each of them.

(c) The authorized representatives of the Cities of Los Angeles and Long Beach and the appropriate agency of the Federal Government shall have approved the proposed alignment and the proposed location of all major structures on the route submitted by the State Department of Public Works.

2. Any city or county may contribute to, and the California Highway Commission may allocate monies from the State Highway Fund for the improvement of portions of [LRN 231] on the mainland when such improvement is found necessary to complete and integrated system of freeways between San Pedro, Long Beach, and the Civic Center in the City of Los Angeles.

3. If funds from sources other than state highway funds have not been made available for the construction on all portions of said [LRN 231] that are not on the mainland prior to January 15, 1953, said [LRN 231] shall on that date cease to be a state highway and this section shall have no further force or effect. ”

The route was not listed on the 1963 highway map, so presumably the section ceased to be a state highway in 1953 due to lack of funding.


State Shield

State Route 232



Routing

(a) From Route 1 near El Rio to Route 118 near Saticoy.

(b) The commission may relinquish to the City of Oxnard the portion of Route 232 that is located within the city limits of that city and is between Oxnard Boulevard and Route 101, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the commission and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. (1) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder records the relinquishment resolution that contains the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, that portion of Route 232 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway and may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81. (3) For portions of Route 232 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Oxnard shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 232.

Note: In March 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Oxnard on Route 232 from Oxnard Boulevard (Route 1) to Route 101, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 717, Statutes of 2008, which amended Section 532 of the Streets and Highways Code.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route was defined in 1963 as running "From Route 1 near El Rio to Route 118 near Saticoy." Planned as freeway in 1965; never upgraded.

In 2008, SB 1366 (Chapter 717, 9/30/2008) authorized relinquishment of the portion of the route within the city of Oxnard.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 154, defined in 1933.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1965.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 232:

  • Total Length (1995): 4 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 13,100 to 41,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 4.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 4 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 4 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Ventura.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1949, Chapter 1467 added the route that would become LRN 232 as LRN 207: “[LRN 207] is from Sacramento to Marysville; provided, however, that Section 600 of the Streets and Highways Code shall be applicable to the route added to the State Highway System by this section the same as if said route had been added by the Collier-Burns Highway Act of 1947, and the Department of Public Works shall not be required to maintain any portion of said route until the same has been laid out and constructed as a state highway” In 1951, Chapter 1562 renumbered this duplicate [LRN 207] as [LRN 232].

In 1955, Chapter 1488 removed the Section 600 language.

This route ran from Sacramento to Marysville along El Centro Road. This was part of Route 24 until 1964 and is now county-maintained from West Natomas north to Elkhorn (near I-5), Route 99 from I-5 north to Catlett and Route 70 to Olivehurst. (Some of El Centro Road/Avenue/Boulevard has been bypassed by the freeway routings of Route 70 and Route 99 between Elkhorn and Olivehurst).



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