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California Highways

Routes 217 through 224

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

217 · 218 · 219 · 220 · 221 · 222 · 223 · 224


State Shield

State Route 217



Routing
  1. From Route 101 near Ellwood to the campus of the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB).


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was not part of the 1963 definition of Route 217. It was added in 1965 by Chapter 1372 as “(a) Route 101 near Ellwood to the Goleta Campus of the University of California.”

    In 1968, Chapter 282 changed "Goleta Campus of the University of California" to "campus of the University of California at Santa Barbara".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was not defined before 1963. The route was not signed before 1964.

     

    Status

    The route is unconstructed from UCSB campus to Route 101. There are not any local roads that adequately fit the description of a traversable highway. Caltrans recommends unadopting the route, as it traverses a highly sensitive environmental area, an industrial park, and several residential subdivisions. There are no plans to construct this route by the city or the state.


  2. From the campus of the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) to Route 101 northwest of the City of Santa Barbara.

    Note: The state has authorized relinquishment of the portion of Route 217 from the westerly end of both the East Goleta Overhead and the Route 101/Route 217 separation structures to UCSB. Authorized by SB 532, Ch 1007, 10/10/99. This segment has not yet been relinquished, according to the CalTrans Photologs made available in 2001.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was the entire route, and was defined as:

    “the Goleta Campus of the University of California at Santa Barbara to Route 101 northwest of the City of Santa Barbara.

    The commission shall allocate from the State Highway Fund the necessary funds for the construction of said route. The allocation of money provided for in this section shall be made out of moneys contained in the State Highway Fund available for construction of state highways in County Group No. 2, but which is not subject to Section 188.4; and expenditures from such allocation shall be credited against the expenditures required to be made pursuant to Section 188.4 in Santa Barbara County until June 30, 1963. This route shall be a memorial to the late Senator Clarence C. Ward of Santa Barbara County and shall hereafter be known as Clarence Ward Memorial Boulevard.”

    In 1965, Chapter 1371 deleted the text on funding, but the text was restored by Chapter 1372 that same year, which changed the funding text to refer to "Section (b) of this route" and added section (a).

    In 1968, Chapter 282 changed "Goleta Campus of the University of California" to "campus of the University of California at Santa Barbara"... and removed the funding text again.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 236, defined in 1955. The route was not signed before 1964.

     

    Status

    In February 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will extend Fowler Road from South Street to Fairview Avenue; extend Ekwill Street from Kellogg Avenue to Fairview Avenue; and add roundabouts at the Fowler Road/Fairview Avenue intersection, at the Ekwill Street/Pine Avenue intersection, and at the Route 217 northbound and southbound on- and off-ramps. This project will also add a right turn lane and modify parking on Kellogg Avenue near Hollister Avenue. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The total estimated project cost is $17,955,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 STIP. A copy of the FEIR has been provided to Commission staff. Resources that may be impacted by the project include; noise, biological resources including wetlands and Waters of the U.S. Potential impacts associated with the project can all be mitigated to below significance through proposed mitigation measures.

     

    Naming

    This section named the "Clarence Ward Memorial Boulevard". It was named by Assembly Bill 2718, Chapter 1953, in 1955. California State Senator Clarence C. Ward served the people of Santa Barbara County from 1941 to 1955.

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Santa Barbara 217 1.05 2.87

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 

Status

Unconstructed Part (1) unconstructed. Part (2) is constructed to freeway standards from Goleta to Route 101.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1965.

 


Overall statistics for Route 217:

  • Total Length (1995): 2 miles traversable; 4 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 17,500 to 26,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 6.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 2 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 2 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Barbara.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

This route number appears not to have been assigned by the California Legislature before the 1963 renumbering.


State Shield

State Route 218



Routing

From Route 1 to Route 68 via Canyon del Rey.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as “Route 1 near Del Rey Oaks to Route 68 via Canyon del Rey.”

In 1968, Chapter 282 relaxed the definition: “Route 1 near Del Rey Oaks to Route 68 via Canyon del Rey.”

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 169, defined in 1959. It was not signed before 1964.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 218:

  • Total Length (1995): 3 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 7,300 to 18,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 3.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 3 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 3 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Monterey.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1961, Chapter 1768 defined LRN 218 as “LRN 187 near Yucca Valley to Utah Trail Road in the town of Twentynine Palms.”

This route ran from the Route 62/Route 247 junction near Yucca Valley to Utah Trail Road in the town of Twentynine Palms. This is part of present-day Route 62.


State Shield

State Route 219



Routing

From Route 99 at Salida easterly to Route 108.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This routing in unchanged from its 1963 definition.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was LRN 13, defined in 1909. It may have originally been signed as Route 108.

 

Status

PPN 9940There are currently plans to widen this route in Stanislaus county. [May 2002 CTC Agenda, item 2.1b.(2); July 2002 CTC Agenda item 2.2c.(8)] According to the July and September 2006 agendas, the project, as currently scoped, will widen Route 219 to four lanes from Post Miles (PM) 0.1 to 4.9. In March 2005, an updated cost estimate placed R/W capital at $42 million and Construction capital at $33 million. The increase in R/W was due to the rise in property values, including the right of way needed to accommodate estimated traffic capacity based on an updated traffic analysis. Due to funding constraints, and the result of a Value Analysis Study, the Department of Transportation, StanCOG, and local officials reduced the scope of the project by splitting it into two phases. Phase 1 will extend from PM 0.1 to 2.9 and be fully programmed through construction. The scope of the work for Phase 1 includes acquiring right of way for an ultimate six- lane facility, widening the highway from two to four- lanes, and upgrading intersections with local roads. As part of the intersection improvements, an additional receiving lane and a right-turn lane will be added at the intersection of Route 219 and Sisk Road. Phase 1 will be ready for construction during the Summer of 2007. Phase 2 will extend through the remainder of the original scope, from PM 2.9 to 4.9, and be funded at a later date. In 2007, the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) was recommended to fund $14,760K to widen this route to 4-lanes from Route 99 to Marrow Rd, and $18,813K to widen the route to four lanes from Marrow Rd to Route 108. In June 2008, the CTC approved reducing Regional Improvement Program (RIP) Right of Way Capital funds from $17,000,000 to $14,760,000 ($2,240,000 decrease) and increasing federal Demonstration (Demo) Right of Way Capital funds from $0 to $2,240,000 ($2,240,000 increase). The RIP funds would be programmed and allocated to the Route 219 Expressway, Phase 1A project so that the construction phase can commence. Federal Demo funds, which are programmed for construction of the Route 219 Expressway Phase 1A project but are temporarily unavailable, will be reprogrammed to the Route 219 Expressway Phase 2 project so that it remains fully funded.

In December 2011, the CTC updated the project schedule, as the End Right of Way milestone was delayed by nine months in order to provide additional time for two property owners to relocate. Although Orders for Possession were secured several months ago, the right of way demolition and clearing process stalled because two property owners were building new houses behind their existing homes, which extended the relocation process. The Begin Construction milestone is being delayed by 18 months, nine months of which is a direct result of the right of way delay described above. The other nine months of delay is due to a mistake in the original schedule, which proposed starting construction two months before the End Right of Way milestone. It is more realistic for construction to begin seven months after the End Right of Way milestone. The End Construction milestone is being delayed by 30 months, 18 months of which is a direct result of the begin construction delay described above. The other 12 months of delay is from a thorough analysis of the construction working days. A construction duration of 12 months was unrealistic. A construction duration of 24 months is more realistic based on the final plans and stage construction requirements. The Begin Closeout milestone is being delayed by 30 months because it is directly related to the End Construction milestone, which is being delayed by 30 months as described above. The End Closeout milestone is being delayed by 41 months, 30 months of which is a direct result of the Begin Closeout delay described above. The other 11 months of delay is caused by a mistake in the original schedule, which showed a duration of one month for Closeout. Closeout requires a duration of 12 months. The net result is that the proposed end of construction is 5/31/2014, with project closeout proposed for 7/31/2015.

In December 2011, the CTC authorized $23.76 million for phase 2 of the Route 219 Widening near Salida, from Morrow Road to Route 108. Widen to 4 lanes.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #1230: Improve Route 219 to four-lanes in Modesto, Riverbank and Oakdale. $1,600,000.

  • High Priority Project #3801: Improve Route 219 to four-lanes in Modesto, Riverbank and Oakdale. This seems to be supplemental funding for HPP #1230. $4,000,000.

In December 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Stanislaus along Route 219 from Kiernan Court to Dale Road, consisting of collateral facilities.

 

Naming

The portion of Route 219 between Route 99 and Route 108 in Stanislaus County is officially designated the "CHP Officer Earl Scott Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officer Earl Scott. who was tragically shot and killed while making a traffic stop on Route 99 in Stanislaus County on February 17, 2006. Officer Scott was 36 years old and had served with the California Highway Patrol (CHP) for five years. Officer Scott came from a long line of family members who devoted themselves to public service under the auspices of the CHP, including his father and two uncles who retired from the CHP as sergeants, and a cousin who currently serves as a sergeant with the CHP. Officer Scott is remembered as being the first to volunteer for such causes as shaving his head for "Shave the Brave," a fundraiser for cancer victims. Officer Scott also frequently took youth Law Enforcement Explorers on ride-alongs. Officer Scott touched many lives and leaves behind many fellow officers whose friendship with Officer Scott was more akin to being a family. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 31, Resolution Chapter 47, on July 11, 2011.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 219:

  • Total Length (1995): 5 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 12,200 to 14,300
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 5.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAS: 5 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 5 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Stanislaus.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

This route number appears not to have been assigned by the California Legislature before the 1963 renumbering.


State Shield

State Route 220



Routing

From Route 84 on Ryer Island to Route 160.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This routing is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 100, defined in 1933.

 

Status

There is confirmation of signs at the junction with Route 160, both on Route 220 itself and on Route 160. The route includes the J-Mack Ferry at Steamboat Slough (which is unsigned, unlike the Route 84 Ferry). The J-Mack is a cable ferry; i.e. it runs along a cable just under the water's surface.

In February 2009, the J-Mack was taken out of service briefly for repair and reconstruction. The J-Mack, built in 1969, runs on an inch-thick steel cable draped through Steamboat Slough between Ryer Island in Solano County and Grand Island in Sacramento County. Powered by two diesel engines, the ferry uses a mechanical system that grabs the cable and pulls the ferry back and forth. The J-Mack doesn't need replacing, but it needs some mechanical work and is in desperate need of a new paint job. Normally the ferries run round the clock, stopping only for twice-daily 20-minute lunch breaks, when river conditions make it unsafe to operate, or when something breaks down and needs fixing, which has been happening often. It appears that it was taken out of service again in in late January 2010.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 220:

  • Total Length (1995): 6 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 300 to 830
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 6; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAS: 6 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Collector: 6 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Sacramento, Solano.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

This route number appears not to have been assigned by the California Legislature before the 1963 renumbering.


State Shield

State Route 221



Routing

From Route 29 near Soscol Road to Route 121 at Imola Avenue in Napa.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 221 was defined as "Route 29 to Route 121 near Napa." Based on what is shown as a proposed routing on the 1963 state highway map, this was likely a planned freeway bypass N of Napa along either Trancas St or Lincoln Av. This may have been a routing for LRN 6.

In 1984, Chapter 409 completely rerouted Route 221, redefining it as "Route 29 near Suscol Road to Route 121 at Imola Avenue in Napa." This change deleted the portion between the original two termini (indicating abandonment of the proposed routing), and the portion from Route 29 near Soscol Road to Route 121 at Imola Avenue was transferred from Route 29. This is a former segment of Route 29 that was bypassed by the Napa River Bridge and the new freeway in the early 1980s. The state wanted to relinquish it; but local authorities didn't want it and it remained in the State Highway System but was renumbered Route 221.

In 1990, Chapter 1187 changed ""Suscol" to "Soscol"

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was part of LRN 8, defined in 1909. It was originally signed as part of Route 29. The segment was previously cosigned as Route 12/Route 29.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 221:

  • Total Length (1995): 3 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 21,200 to 32,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 3.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 3 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 3 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Napa.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1947 (1st Ex Sess), Chapter 11 defined this route as “A point on [LRN 60] near Los Angeles Airport to a point on [LRN 165] between Santa Barbara and Slauson Avenues”

In 1953, Chapter 1836 relaxed the description and extended the route: “A point on [LRN 60] near The Los Angeles International Airport to a point on [LRN 165], the Harbor Freeway, between Santa Barbara Avenue and Florence Slauson Avenues

In 1959, Chapter 1062 truncated the route back to [LRN 60] (Route 1), and extended the terminus to [LRN 170] (I-605): “[LRN 60] northwest of the Los Angeles International Airport to [LRN 170] a point on [LRN 165], the Harbor Freeway, between Santa Barbara Avenue and Florence Avenue

This route runs from Route 1 to Route 605, and is most of the proposed/partially constructed Route 90 freeway. A submission of proposed freeways listed LRN 221 as running from the Ocean Freeway (LRN 60) to the San Diego Freeway, and being the Manhattan Freeway, but that doesn't correspond to the 1947 or 1959 routings.


Unsigned

Unsigned State Route 222



Routing

From Route 101 near Ukiah easterly to East Side Road in Talmage.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this was defined as "Route 101 near Ukiah to the west line of the grounds of the Mendocino State Hospital."

In 1981, Chapter 292 changed the definition to "Route 101 near Ukiah easterly to East Side Road in Talmadge the west line of the grounds of the Mendocino State Hospital".

In 1990, Chapter 1187 changed "Talmadge" to "Talmage"

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was part of LRN 70, defined in 1925. It was unsigned.

 

Status

There are no state signs, but the route does have postmiles. The primary justification for this route being in the system was the State Hospital, which is now a Buddhist Temple.

[222 Russian River Bridge]In March 2009, the CTC approved a project to replace the existing Russian River Bridge and construct roadway improvements. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated project cost is $16,500,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10.

In May 2011, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Ukiah on Route 222 (Talmage Road), consisting of superseded highway right of way.

 

Naming

The Talmage Bridge that crosses over Route 222 in the County of Mendocino is named the "Ronald Ledford Memorial Bridge". It was named in memory of Ronald Ledford, who was born in Ukiah, California, on May 7, 1944, to Ray and Tillie Ledford. Mr. Ledford attended grammar school locally, and graduated from Ukiah High School in 1962. Mr. Ledford followed his family’s historical agricultural roots, spanning more than a century in the Talmage area as a farmer and expanded his business interests by investing in rental properties throughout the Ukiah Valley. Mr. Ledford made significant contributions to the community throughout his lifetime by serving on boards and commissions and in civic organizations, personally supporting many charitable causes as a quiet financial benefactor and an outgoing motivator, and planning many fundraisers, especially causes supporting children and individuals with special needs. Mr. Ledford passed away suddenly on April 26, 2010. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 222:

  • Total Length (1995): 2 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 4,350 to 8,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 2; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 2 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 2 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Mendocino.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

[LRN 222]In 1947 (1st Ex Sess), Chapter 11 defined LRN 222 as “[LRN 165] near Adams Street to [LRN 205] near Elysian Park in Los Angeles”. This routing remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. The route ran from US 6 (later I-110) near Adams Street to US 66 near Elysian Park in Los Angeles. This was part of the proposed "East Bypass" routing along a route slightly E of Main Street. It was part of the 1964-1965 incarnation of Route 241. It was never constructed, and is not currently part of the state highway system.


State Shield

State Route 223



Routing
  1. From Route 5 to Route 99 south of Greenfield.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 264, defined in 1959.

     

    Naming

    "Bear Mountain" Boulevard


  2. From Route 99 south of Greenfield to Route 58.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield This was part of LRN 140, defined in 1933. Before 1963, it was signed as part of US 399.

     

    Naming

    The portion of Route 223 from Route 99 to Route 58, in the County of Kern is included in the National Purple Heart Trail. The National Purple Heart Trail was established in 1992 for the purpose of commemorating and honoring men and women who have been wounded or killed in combat while serving in the United States Armed Forces. The National Purple Heart Trail courses its way across the vast majority of the United States. In 2001, pursuant to Senate Concurrent Resolution 14, the Legislature designated portions of I-5 and I-80 as California's selections for inclusion in the National Purple Heart Trail. In 2009, pursuant to Assembly Concurrent Resolution 12, the Legislature designated a portion of US 101 for inclusion in the National Purple Heart Trail. Thie resolution designates an additional portion of the state highway system for inclusion in the National Purple Heart Trail in order to honor the men and women who have been wounded or killed in combat while serving in the United States Armed Forces. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 105, Resolution Chapter 95, on 8/20/2010.

     

    Other WWW Links

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 223:

  • Total Length (1995): 30 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 660 to 8,700
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 28; Sm. Urban: 2; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 21 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 2 mi; Minor Arterial: 19 mi; Collector: 9 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Kern.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1947 (1st Ex Sess), Chapter 11 defined LRN 223 as “a point on [LRN 2] near Division Street to [LRN 56]”.

This was the routing from US 101 near Division Street to Route 1 in San Francisco. It appears to have been a routing along Oak and Fell Streets in San Francisco, and then through the Golden Gate Park to Route 1. This was the "Western Freeway" I-80 routing. In the 1955 trafficways plan, it was shown as "Deleted, pending further study".

Between 1968 and 1972, this route was Route 241 (note that LRN 222 was the 1964-1965 Route 241).


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 224



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, this route was defined as “Route 101 near Carpinteria to the Carpinteria Beach State Park.”

In 1992, Chapter 1243 clarified the definition: “Route 101 near in Carpinteria to Carpinteria State Beach Park”.

In 1996, Chapter 1154 deleted the route. According to the CalTrans photolog, this routing had not been relinquished as of 2001.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1996 incarnation of this route was LRN 152, defined in 1933.

 


Overall statistics for former Route 224:

  • Total Length (1995): 1 mile
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,100 to 22,800
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 1.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 1 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 1 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Barbara.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1947 (1st Ex Sess), Chapter 11 was defined as “a point on [LRN 2] near the intersection of Lombard Street and Van Ness Avenue to the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge approach in San Francisco”.

This was what was Route 480 between 1964 and 1968. Portions of this were constructed to freeway standards, but were destroyed by the 1989 Loma Priata Earthquake.



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