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California Highways

Routes 209 through 216

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

209 · 210 · 211 · 212 · 213 · 214 · 215 · 216


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 209



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 209 was defined as "Point Loma to Route 5 in San Diego."

In 2003, Chapter 525 deleted Route 209.

At one time, the segment to Barnett Street was proposed as a freeway.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was originally part of LRN 12, and was signed as part of US 80. It was defined in 1933.

 

Status

The Gate at the Fort Rosecrans Military Reservation is open daily from 8:00am to 5:15pm. As signs get replaced on I-5, references to Route 209 are disappearing; however, Route 209 is still well marked upon Rosecrans.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 


Overall statistics for Route 209:

  • Total Length (1995): 8 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 2,550 to 61,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 8.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 8 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 8 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1939, Chapter 794 added the route “[LRN 3] near Station 398, according to the survey of said [LRN 3], Section B, to Shasta Summit near Summit City”. No route number was assigned. This route was added as an urgency measure, in order to accomodate heavy traffic from US 99 to and from Shasta Dam.

In 1943, Chapter 964 amended the 1939 definition to specify this as LRN 209.

In 1953, Chapter 1836 rewrote the routing: "[LRN 3] near Project City to Shasta Dam"

This is present-day Route 151.


Interstate Shield

Interstate 210



Routing
  1. From Route 5 near Tunnel Station to Route 57 near San Dimas via the vicinity of San Fernando


  2. From Route 57 near San Dimas to Route 10 in Redlands via the vicinity of Highland

Post 1964 Signage History

As defined in 1963, this route ran from "Route 5 near Tunnel Station to Route 10 near the east boundary of Los Angeles County via the vicinity of San Fernando."

The first segment of this route opened in 1955; this is likely the segment that ran from Foothill Blvd. near Gould Ave. east to near the intersection of Montana Ave. and Canada Ave (cosigned with Route 118). When a new alignment over the Arroyo Seco was constructed in 1974, the original alignment was decommissioned and reliquished to the city, still containing one of the grade separations, ramps, mileage signs, and part of the old median. now bypassed portion in Pasadena.

1964 710 RoutingThe first mention of the connection to the Long Beach Freeway was in 1961, when CHPW notes that the extension was defined by SB 480, and Advance Planning was starting to determine potential routes. In 1964, it was reported that planning was underway for the Long Beach Freeway (Route 7, now Route 710) from the Foothill Freeway, Route 134 and Long Beach Freeway Interchange to Norwich Avenue. On June 3-4 1964, a routing was adopted for I-210, Route 134, and Route 710 (then Route 7). This routing extends the Long Beach Freeway four mi N-ly to Route 134, and then extends I-210 N-ly to Sunland. It also extends Route 2 to I-210. Starting at Huntington Drive, the route proceeds N-ly to connect with Route 134/I-210, swings W-ly just S of Devils Gate Dam and proceeding generally S of Foothill Blvd through the Verdugo Mtns and across Big Tujunga Wash to Wheatland Ave. Also noticable on the map is the inclusion of Route 159 (old Figueroa Blvd, and the connection on Linda Vista between Route 134 and I-210), Route 248 (which was the surface street routing of Colorado between Route 134 and I-210 near Monrovia), and Route 212 (which is the old Valley Blvd routing of US 60, former LRN 77). The legislative definitions were later amended to note that Route 159 and Route 248 ceased to be state highways after I-210 was completed. Note how this also still shows Route 118 in the area; that was later renumbered to Route 210.

In 1968, the first official few miles of Route 210 opened for business between Arcadia and Duarte. Work on the freeway west beyond Pasadena to I-5 Freeway and east into the Inland Valley moved steadily. In 1971, the route was completed to Foothill Boulevard in La Verne, where it dumped into the western stub of Route 30, its eastward movement (and years of late-afternoon traffic) ground to a dead stop, 28 miles short of San Bernardino. Route 210, at the present day Route 57 junction, continued continued south to I-10 near Pomona.

In 1989, San Bernardino County approved Measure I, adding ½¢ to the sales tax for highway projects. Shortly after, Los Angeles County followed suit, providing funds for the work in La Verne and Claremont. At this point, Route 30 (now Route 210) continued construction EB.

Turning now to the Route 30 portion in San Bernadino (more information under Route 30): Plans for this route began as early as 1957, but it was the mid-1970s when it got built as far east as Highland and Route 330 (which was originally part of Route 30). We then had the period of freeway doldrums that Route 210 faced. In 1990 that the work began between Highland and I-10 in Redlands. About $79 million later, that segment opened for traffic on July 1, 1993.

In 1998, AB 2388, Chapter 221 split the route into two segments: "(a) Route 5 near Tunnel Station to Route 57 near San Dimas via the vicinity of San Fernando. (b) Route 57 near San Dimas to Route 10 in Redlands via the vicinity of Highland." It also renumbered the I-10 (near Pomona) to I-210 (near San Dimas) portion as Route 57, and renumbered Route 30 as Route 210. The western portion of Route 30 remained signed as Route 30 until November 2002, when is was resigned as Route 210 (state shield) (the eastern portion of "Route 30" remained as Route 30) The portion of (state) Route 210 between Route 57 and Sierra opened on November 24, 2002.

Construction of the I-15/Route 30 210 interchange began in early/mid 1998, with the Route 210 freeway extending west to Haven Avenue in Rancho Cucamonga, and east to Etiwanda Avenue in Fontana. When this segment of freeway opened, it was accessible from Day Creek Blvd east to Sierra Avenue in Fontana. Later, the segment from Route 66 to Day Creek opened.. In late 1998, other San Bernardino County sections started construction, to tie in with the neighboring Los Angeles County section of Route 210 from Foothill Blvd (Route 66) to the county line through La Verne and Claremont. Construction of the Los Angeles county section started in 1997.

In November 2000, the California Transportation Commission had two Route 30 projects on its agenda (yes, as Route 30, not Route 210!). One was a $17.5 million request from SANBAG (San Bernardino Associated Governments) for Route 30 from Cucamonga Canyon Wash to Hermosa Avenue for a 6-lane freeway and two HOV lanes (with $7.44 million to be requested later, and $21.007 million from other sources. The $17.5 million is $2.008M state, $15.492M Federal). The second proejct was segment 4 from Hermosa Ave to Milliken Avenue. This is also 6-lanes plus 2 HOV. The cost for this is $10.166M ($1.167M state, $8.999M Federal), with $10.7M from other sources.

Construction of the remaining segment, between Sierra and the present Route 30 (from I-10 into San Bernardino), began in 2002 and was completed in 2007. Costs for the last section through Rialto and San Bernardino total approximately $233 million. The freeway includes three travel lanes and a carpool lane in each direction and features on-ramps and off-ramps at Alder Avenue, Ayala Drive and Riverside Avenue in Rialto, as well as State Street in San Bernardino. It was also designed to expand. There is a wide enough median so Caltrans could add another lane on either side at any point, up to five lanes on either side. Additionally, the freeway was built with "long life" pavement that can last up to 40 years. Once the City of Rialto extends Pepper Avenue north to the freeway, on-ramps and off-ramps will be built at Pepper (interchange planning for Pepper began in 2014). That segment is signed as (state) Route 210, although at times it was signed as "Temporary Route 30". It opened to the public on July 24, 2007.

As of December 2008, field reports confirmed that Route 30 is now completely resigned as Route 210 on all overhead signs and trailblazers, as well as on approaching routes. In some cases, a Route 210 shield was pasted over an Route 30 shield on the overhead signs, but in many cases, an entirely new sign panel was put up. About half of the postmila bridge ID signs at the overcrossings and undercrossings have been changed from SBD-30 to SBD-210. The postmile markers that showed the route as Route 30. There appears to be one exception, on the short Route 259 connector that links NB I-215 with eastbound Route 210. There is one interchange on that route at Highland Avenue. The shield on the freeway entrance sign at Highland for NB Route 259 (which defaults into EB Route 210) is still a Route 30 shield, rather than Route 210, and the sign designating it as the business route for Route 18 and Route 30 is still there approaching the Highland offramp. Additionally, there are Route 30 shields posted in Claremont and Upland along Baseline Ave and on 19th Street in Rancho Cucamonga as of December 2009.

In May 2014, it was reported that plans were announced for a new interchange on I-210 at Pepper Avenue. Construction of the ‘diamond style’ interchange will start the middle of 2015 with completion in 2016. The project is estimated to cost $19 million.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was approximately LRN 157 (defined in 1933) between US 99 (present-day I-5) and Route 118. Before the freeway, this ran along Brand Blvd and Foothill Blvd. The route was LRN 9, defined in 1909, between Route 118 and the vicinity of La Verne, using a freeway routing. This was also part of LRN 240 between Pasadena and San Dimas, and was defined in 1957. Before the signage as I-210, this route included segments of Route 118 and US 66.

 

Status

In late 2007, the final $233-million, 8-mile extension between the "Route 30" portion of Route 210 in San Bernardino and the Route 210 portion that continues West was completed. However, the I-210/Route 215 interchange will not be complete for a few more years. Construction was originally scheduled begin on the interchange in mid-to-late 2008, with completion around 2011/2012. However, in October 2008, SANBAG increased the delay by turning the project over to Caltrans, moving the date past 2013. A combination of factors, including seismic and structural concerns, are causing the delay of the interchanges that will include elevated "flyover" connectors, similar to those used at the I-215/Route 91 interchange. SANBAG officials made the connectors a separate project because of design changes to deal with seismic and liquefaction concerns at the site. The transition to Caltrans was felt to be beneficial because it would expedite permits and reviews, which had to go through Caltrans anyway. Another advantage to having Caltrans manage construction is that it has access to the State Transportation Improvement Program construction contingency funds that otherwise wouldn't be available to SANBAG. A potential $7.2 million could be made available.

Until the connectors are constructed, it will not be possible to go directly from the EB Route 210 to SB I-215, nor will it be possible to go from NB I-215 to WB Route 210. Other transitions that connect Route 210 to I-215 already exist. The transition from SB I-215 to EB Route 30 (Route 210) is already open. The connector road that will bridge SB I-215 to the WB Route 210 will be operational once Route 210 opens. However, those connectors are not designed to handle the heavy traffic loads (2,500 cars/hour) the final connectors can; the current connectors can only carry 1,500 cars/hour. The delays are primarily seismic: in late 1999 and early 2000, a geologist conducting work in the area identified tell-tale signs of the potential for a seismic phenomenon known as fault rupture. Fault-rupture damage can differ greatly from other seismic activity so special planning is needed.
(Information obtained from San Gabriel Daily Bulletin, 5/29/2007)

In February 2010, the CTC approved an adjustment to the allocation amount for the Route 210/I-215 Connectors project (PPNO 0194Q) in San Bernardino County, from $45,634,000 to $18,672,000, in accordance with Assembly Bill 608. Specifically, on April 16, 2009, the Commission approved Resolutions CMIA-A-0809-012 and STIP1B-A-0809- 015 allocating $29,000,000 Corridor Management Improvement Account (CMIA) and $45,634,000 Regional Improvement Program (RIP) funds to the Route 210/I-215 Connectors project programmed in the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). Both RIP and CMIA allocations were made possible by SANBAG's purchasing of a Private Placement bond from the State Treasurer's Office. The project was awarded on October 25, 2009, for $47,672,000 ($29,000,000 CMIA and $18,672,000 RIP), including supplemental work, state furnished materials, and contingencies. Section 188.8 of the Streets and Highways Code allows the Commission to adjust an allocation amount for a capital outlay project in the STIP if the construction contract award amount for the project is less than 80% of the engineer’s final estimate. As a result, Caltrans requested a downward adjustment of $26,962,000 to San Bernardino County’s regional share balance.

A side effect of the extension of Route 210 has been an increase in traffic. In 2001, the average daily traffic in both directions on Route 210 at San Dimas Avenue was 67,000 vehicles. That number jumped to 177,000 in 2007, with Caltrans expecting it to rise further when the final leg opens. Route 210 is now among the Southland's busiest freeways. Officials in some San Gabriel Valley communities have complained about spillover traffic on surface streets. San Marino officials said traffic on Huntington Drive jumped 20% after the last section of Route 210 opened in 2002. After Route 210 was extended 20 miles east to Fontana in 2002, Fontana noticed an increase not just in freeway traffic but surface street congestion as folks exited the freeway to avoid its congestion.

It is believed that in September 2007 the entire route will be resubmitted to AASHTO to be redesignated as I-210.

Arcadia Basketwork BridgeIn 2009, plans were revealed for a replacement of the railroad bridge in Arcadia. The Gold Line Foothill Extension Authority unveiled a San Gabriel Valley-themed design for a rail bridge honoring local wildlife and native cultures. The 739-foot bridge will stretch diagonally across I-210 to Santa Anita Avenue in Arcadia. It will be adorned by four basket-shaped columns that pay tribute to the basket-weaving of local indigenous peoples, specifically the Chumash who lived along the coast. The columns will contain bright lights to illuminate the dark area under the bridge. The bridge itself will have individual grooves, like the scales of a snake, to honor local wildlife, said artist and designer Andrew Leicester. The design was one of many Leicester had conceptualized, but its selection received approval from both the Foothill Extension board and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). Officials estimate the bridge will cost $20 million to $25 million. Officials hope to get construction going in June 2010, with an eye on completion by 2013. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which oversees funding for the project, lists the project's completion date as 2017. A picture of the basket is available here. Following the August 2010 release of the Phase 2A (Pasadena to Azusa) Request for Proposals for Design-Build-Finance services (to construction the track, stations, a 25-acre Maintenance and Operations Facility, crossings, bridges, utilities and more), the three short listed teams are preparing proposals. Proposals for the $450+ million project are due in late January 2011, and an award is anticipated for April 2011. This schedule keeps us on track for a late 2014 project completion. IFS design-build team Skanska USA/AECOM is Fall and Winter 2010 finalizing designs for the 584-foot bridge over the eastbound lanes of the I-210 freeway. They are currently working with the California Department of Transportation (CALTRANS) to get the necessary permits to conduct some additional geologic testing at the IFS site location, which will help finalize the design (testing will take place in October 2010). Installation begin in mid-2011.

In September 2011, it was reported that foundation work for the Arcadia Bridge had begun. The entire bridge work is expected to be completed in the summer of 2012, while the whole 11.5 mile extension of the Metro Gold Line is due to be finished in 2015. The extension will continue the Gold Line east into Arcadia, Monrovia, Duarte, Irwindale and Azusa. Skanska, the contractor, began serious work on the $18.6-million bridge in early summer 2011, and is scheduled to be complete in July 2012. The steel frame for two of the three bridge columns (and their associated deep foundations) are in the ground and the third was installed in October 2011. The two deep completed foundations are 110-feet-deep and 11-feet in diameter — motorists on the 210 can only see the 16 feet steel skeletons that are above ground. The three deep foundations have nearly 11 miles of rebar, as well as more than 1,300 cubic yards of concrete from Irwindale. They also have a relatively new technology — never used before by Metro — that that in the future will allow Metro to check the structural integrity of the concrete after earthquakes by measuring electrical pulses traveling along wires inside each abutment. In December 2011, work crews will begin installing the falsework allowing them to build the bridge itself. The temporary support for the bridge must span the width of the freeway for the entire stretch across the freeway, which will create a tunnel of sorts for the eastbound 210 while work is being done.

In March 2012, it was reported that construction of the falsework for the bridge was completed. The 584-foot-long falsework consists of nearly 50 beams that are 90 to 100 feet long and hundreds of smaller beams. It will help support over 5,000 tons of concrete that will form part of the bridge's superstructure during an 18-hour period in May.

In October 2012, additional information was provided on the baskets themselves. The two massive decorative baskets, which are each made of 60 different cast segments that weigh 800 pounds each. The concrete segments will form nine rings around the baskets, ultimately stacked and locked together to create the towering forms of woven baskets.First, a pattern for the curvy segment is made, then a mold is taken and the concrete is cast into the mold. The baskets are being made of cement that includes several kinds of glass, stone and sand from the Vulcan Rock Quarry in Azusa to give it a flashier look. About 15 tall concrete reeds will protrude out of each of the baskets as if they were unfinished. The baskets themselves will be installed before the bridge's 12/15/12 dedication. The fabrication and installation cost of the bridge baskets is about $500,000.

In December 2012, it was reported that the bridge was completed on time and on budget.

In June 2010, it was reported that a road was finally constructed under an I-210 overpass. When I-210 was built, a tunnel was left where the freeway passed over East Pasadena, even though there wasn't a road. City engineers at the time didn't have the funds to build a road, but a bridge was built. $9M was spent by the City of Pasadena to permit City engineers to extend Walnut Street and Kinneloa Avenue so that they intersect and so that Kinneloa continues under the freeway. Both roads used to stop short, which cut off traffic. Now drivers and walkers can cross over - residents north of the freeway can easily cross over to the businesses on the southern side of the freeway. Once the project got the green light, the water main and electrical cables had to be upgraded. Construction crews had to build a bridge over the flood channel that cuts over Walnut Avenue. The street grade had to be leveled where there was a hump in the road. However, a report from a reader of this site clarified the situation: When I-210 was built, the Santa Fe mainline was rerouted to the center divider between just west of Lake Avenue to Arcadia, where a bridge crossed the eastbound lanes and the tracks went back onto their original alignment. However, part of the original Santa Fe mainline was far enough south of the freeway to remain. This mainline became a spur that continued to serve businesses along the tracks, ending just west of Allen Avenue at a lumber yard. The spur rejoined the new mainline by passing under the eastbound lanes of I-210 near where Walnut and Kinneloa met, then moving up a tunnel to join the new mainline at Chapman siding, near where the current Sierra Madre Villa Gold Line station is currently located--the tunnel, in fact, is now an access road for MTA. Originally, a set of tracks continued under the westbound lanes to the north side of the freeway to what had been a naval installation of some sort, which is now a self-storage establishment; however, after construction, but before it opened in the late 1970s, the installation closed and those tracks were removed. On the westbound lanes of I-210, you can still see the crossing marked as Navy Spur. The old mainline was finally abandoned in the 1980's and some of the local businesses used the westbound overpass for equipment storage. Looking at old topographic maps of the area, one can see the tracks and the bridges in question--at the time of construction (mid-1970s), the city of Pasadena had no plans to build a road under the freeway at that point as there was an active railroad operating at that time. The overpasses were not built for some unfunded future project--in fact, if you look at the actual alignment of the streets and the freeway bridge before the new project, it is clear that Kinneloa Avenue was not intended to continue northward (it did, in fact, go all the way north to Foothill Blvd before the freeway was built.) The street north of the freeway was named Titley Avenue, reflecting the lack of plans for a Kinneloa extension at that time. The westward extension of Walnut Street from Kinneloa was along the abandoned Santa Fe right-of way.
[Source: Pasadena Star News, 5/28/10]

In December 2002, the CTC considered relinquishment of the former surface routing in Rancho Cucamonga (PM SBD 9.4/9.9).

In April 2003, the CTC considered relinquishment of quite a few segments of what was presumably the old routing: 08-SBd-15, 30-PM 9.2/9.4 Routes 15, 30 in the City of Rancho Cucamonga; 08-SBd-30-PM 9.4/9.6 Route 30 in the City of Rancho Cucamonga; 08-SBd-30-PM 12.7/15.0 Route 30 in the City of Fontana; 08-SBd-30, 210-PM 4.0/9.4 Routes 30, 210 in the City of Rancho Cucamonga; and 08-SBd-30, 210-PM 9.2/12.6 Routes 30, 210 in the City of Fontana.

In October 2004, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the City of Fontana, from Knox Avenue to Sierra Avenue, consisting of superseded highway right of way, reconstructed and relocated city streets and cul-de-sacs. The City, by freeway agreement dated November 14, 1996, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expired September 15, 2004, without exception.

In July 2007, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Claremont, between Williams Avenue and the Los Angeles/San Bernardino County line, consisting of superseded highway right of way, reconstructed and relocated city streets, frontage roads and cul-de-sacs.

In June 2008. the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Rialto, on West Easton Street, between the west city limit line and North Ayala Drive, consisting of relocated and reconstructed city streets and frontage roads.

In January 2011, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Rialto along Route 210 between Mango Avenue and Lilac Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities.

In June 2011, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Rialto along Route 210 on Highland Avenue and between Lilac Avenue and the east city limits, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

As of 2008, the eastern terminus of Route 210 at Route 10 is no longer signed as Route 30/Route 330, Highland/Running Springs. It's now signed as Route 210/Route 330, Pasadena/Running Springs. Also, at the junction of Route 210 and Route 18, freeway entrance shields/overheads have been replaced with Route 210 shields. Other junctions (like Highland Ave/Fwy 210) still have Route 30 freeway entrance shields. The entire former Route 30 Fwy has Route 210 reassurance shields, but certain overheads still contain Route 30 signs (notably with the junction of Route 330), but they may be updated in early 2008.

In March 2008, Caltrans activated four freeway-to-freeway ramp meters: from both the northbound Orange Freeway (Route 57) and the northbound San Gabriel River Freeway (I-605) to the eastbound and westbound Foothill Freeway (I-210) interchanges within the cities of San Dimas to Irwindale in the San Gabriel Valley. On March 10, the meters to the westbound I-210 were activated for the morning commute and the eastbound meters were turned on for the afternoon commute on March 24. The project, just one part of congestion relief on this 50-mile I-210 corridor, will by fall 2008, meter all on-ramps and connectors in both directions from the San Bernardino County line to the Golden State Freeway (I-5). Four freeway-to-freeway connector meters onto eastbound and westbound I-210 will be activated at northbound Glendale Freeway (Route 2) and eastbound Ronald Reagan Freeway (Route 118). Another meter will be activated at eastbound Ventura Freeway (Route 134) to westbound I-210. Construction for the metering project was more than halfway complete by April 2008 and operational.

In April 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of La Verne along Route 210U and 210 from Foothill Boulevard to the Claremont city limits, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

In March 2013, the CTC approved $577,000 to widen ramps on northbound Route 210 and widen Greenspot Road from 4 lanes to 6 lanes in Highland, on Route 210 at Greenspot Road, and on Greenspot Road from Route 210 to Boulder Avenue.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #219: Soundwall construction on the I-210 freeway in Pasadena. $1,440,000.

  • High Priority Project #2051: Improve interstates and roads part of the Inland Empire Goods Movement Gateway project in and around the former Norton Air Force Base. $20,000,000.

 In June 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will improve a section of Greenspot Road between Route 210 and Boulder Avenue, including Route 210 northbound termini ramps and the Boulder Avenue intersection in San Bernardino County. This is the interchange just to the E of the former Norton AFB (San Bernardino International Airport), where 5th Avenue turns into Greenspot Road.

 

Naming

The portion of this freeway from Route 5 to Route 10 is named the "Foothill Freeway". It was officially named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 29, Chapter 128, in 1991 (although the name had been in use long before then). The first segment opened in 1955; the last segment in 1999.

The interchange with Route 57 (i.e., the former Route 30/Route 210 interchange) is named the "Police Officer Louie Pompei Memorial Interchange". Louis ("Louie") A. Pompei was born August 4, 1964, in Shenandoah, Pennsylvania. He was a physical fitness buff, and body builder, who earned a silver medal in the bodybuilding competition of the 1994 California Police Olympics, and who was a runner on the Glendora-Monrovia-Arcadia Police relay team, which annually competes in the Baker to Vegas 120-mile Challenge Cup relay race. He graduated from Mansfield University, Pennsylvania, in 1986 with a BA degree in Criminal Justice Administration; and was hired as a Police Officer trainee by the Glendora Police Department on October 12, 1987. He graduated from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Academy on March 4, 1988, and worked in the Patrol Division of the Glendora Police Department from 1988 to 1992 where he developed an enthusiasm for working narcotics cases, working as a narcotics investigator in the Detective Division of the Glendora Police Department from 1992 to 1995. During this time, he was assigned to a position with L.A. IMPACT, a major crimes multijurisdictional task force, composed of officers from agencies throughout the county, primarily dedicated to investigating major drug suppliers through southern California. On June 9, 2002, while off duty in a Vons Market in Via Verde, Officer Pompei attempted to stop an armed robbery takeover in which a box boy was being pistol whipped, and was killed in a fire fight. His colleagues remember him for his love of life, contagious enthusiasm, positive and outgoing attitude, and generous, helpful, and dependable personality. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 64, Chapter 105, on August 8, 2002. Surprisingly, the resolution refers to the Route 30/Route 210 interchange, even thought at the time of passage, Route 30 no longer existed. I guess the legislative analyst missed finding that error.

The interchange of I-605 and I-210 is named the Los Angeles County Deputy Sheriff David W. March Memorial Interchange. It was named in memory of Deputy David W. March of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, who was killed in the line of duty at the age of 33 on April 29, 2002, in Irwindale while conducting a "routine" traffic stop. He was a longtime resident of Santa Clarita Valley and a 1988 graduate of Canyon High School where he played football and baseball. He served seven years as a law enforcement officer. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 142, July 16, 2004. Chapter 122.

The I-15/Route 210 interchange is named the "William Leonard" interchange. William E. Leonard served as Chairman for both the California Highway Commission and the California Transportation Commission (1973-1974).

The portion of this route that approximates the path of old US 66, as well as the parallel original surface routings, are part of "Historic Highway Route 66", designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 6, Chapter 52, in 1991.

The portion of the route from the City of Duarte to I-15 is named the William H. Lancaster Memorial Highway. William H. ("Bill") Lancaster was born in Bakersfield. He was elected to the Duarte City Council in 1958 and reelected in 1962, and served three terms as the city's mayor. He was elected to the California Assembly in 1972 where he served on the Assembly Committee on Rules, the Assembly Committee on Transportation, and the Assembly Committee on Local Government. He was honored as Legislator of the Year by the League of California Cities in 1991 for his efforts to protect city finances. During his tenure on the Assembly Committee on Transportation, Bill Lancaster fought for the extension of Route 210. He retired from the Assembly in 1992. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 2, Chapter 76, 6/27/2003.

The portion of this route from the existing interchange of Route 210 30 and Route 215, in the City of San Bernardino at post-mile 21.84, to the existing interchange of Route 210 30 and Route 10, in the City of Redlands at postmile 33, is officially named the "Martin A. Matich Highway". This segment was named in honor of Martin A. Matich. Matich served as a Colton City Council member from 1956 to 1958, and served as the mayor of the City of Colton from 1958 to 1960. He also served since 1950 as the president and then the chairman of Matich Corporation, which has been a California company since 1918 and which was founded by his father, John Matich; the company is a leader in providing the highways, airports, and public works projects. He also served his community and state as a member of the Loma Linda University Medical Center, the Loma Linda University Children's Hospital, and the St. Bernardine's Medical Center; as a member of the board of the National Orange Show Foundation; as a member of the board of the Boy Scouts of America-Inland Empire Council; as a member of the board of the Girl Scouts of America-San Gorgonio Council; and as a member and past director of the San Bernardino Chamber of Commerce. He has provided endowed scholarships to the University of Notre Dame under the names of the John Matich Undergraduate Scholarship and the Joyce Athletic Scholarship, and has provided a scholarship to the University of Redlands in the name of Williamina Matich. He also had a constant record of leadership on state transportation issues and, in particular, long-term support for the construction of the Foothill Freeway. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 156, Resolution Chapter 144, on 9/12/2006.

 

Named Structures

The Route 210/I-215 interchange is named the "Gary Moon Memorial Interchange". This interchange was named in memory of Gary Moon, whoserved with utmost distinction as the Director of Freeway Construction for San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG) between October 1990 and March 2003. Mr. Moon earned the respect of the public, elected officials and colleagues for his problem solving abilities, willingness to listen and to take action, sensible and creative approaches to design and construction challenges, fair and kind treatment of staff and coworkers, quick wit and dry sense of humor. During his tenure with the transportation planning agency, Mr. Moon was responsible for the construction of Route 210 in Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, and Fontana, as well as improvements to I-10, Route 60 and Route 71. During his tenure, he was also instrumental in leading project development for the widening of I-215, improvements to congested freeway interchanges, the widening and extension of major streets and the separation of rail crossings from surface streets throughout the San Bernardino Valley. Mr. Moon held a bachelor's degree from Claremont Men's College and both master's and doctorate degrees from Claremont Graduate School, was a former Navy Lieutenant, was a political science instructor at California State University, San Bernardino, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and worked as a principal planner for the Southern California Association of Governments. Too soon after his retirement in March 2003, Mr. Moon was diagnosed with cancer and died after a short battle with the disease at the age of 59 in October 2005. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 16, Resolution Chapter 86, on 7/10/2007.

Bridge 54-0592 on I-10, the I-10/Route 210 (former Route 30) interchange in San Bernardino county, is designated the "Chresten Knudsen Interchange". It was built in 1962, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 21, Chapter 47, in 1991. Chresten Knudsen served as a member of the Redlands City Council and in the 1960's was appointed by Governor Ronald Reagan to the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board.

 

Commuter Lanes

Commuter lanes exist on this route between Route 134 and Sunflower Avenue. These were opened in December 1993, require two or more occupants, and are always in operation.

As of late 2007, there were some proposals to convert some future lanes E of I-605 into High-Occupancy Toll (HOT) lanes, as well as the lanes between Route 134 and I-605. In April 2008, the federal government offered Los Angeles County $213 million to convert these lanes to special, congestion-pricing toll lanes. In the proposed deal, the federal money would go toward the purchase of about 60 high-volume buses that would use the new toll lanes. That would free up MTA funds for creating the toll lanes. CTC approval would be required.

In the former Route 30 portion, HOV lanes are under construction or planned as follows:

  • From Route 57 to Foothill Blvd. These are scheduled to open in February 1998.
  • From Foothill Blvd to the San Bernardino County line. Construction starts January 1998.
  • From the San Bernardino County line to Mountain Avenue. Construction starts in February 2000.
  • From Mountain Avenue to W of Cucamonga Canyon Wash. Construction starts December 1999.
  • From W of Cucamonga Canyon Wash to Hermosa Avenue. Construction starts in October 1999.
  • From Hermosa Avenue to 0.4 mi W of East Avenue. Construction starts in November 1998.
  • From E of Hemlock Avenue to 02 mi E of Sierra Avenue. Construction starts in December 1999.
  • From 0.2 mi S of Pipeline Avenue to 0.9 mi S of Central Avenue. Construction starts in December 2000.
  • From Linden Avenue to Riverside Avenue. Planning stages.
  • From Riverside Avenue to State Street. Construction starts in 2000.
  • From State Street to 0.4 mi E of I-215. Construction starts in 2000.

 

National Trails

Arrowhead Trail Sign This portion of this route from Route 66 to Route 110 was part of the "Arrowhead Trail (Ocean to Ocean Trail)". It was named by Resolution Chapter 369 in 1925.

National Old Trails Road Sign This route replaced a surface routing (i.e., old US 66) that was part of the "National Old Trails Road".

New Santa Fe Trail Sign This route replaced a surface routing (i.e., old US 66) that was part of the "New Santa Fe Trail".

National Park to Park Highway Sign Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway Sign This route replaced a surface routing (i.e., old US 66) that appears to have been part of the "National Park to Park Highway", and the "Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway".

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Los Angeles 210 R0.50 R5.15
Los Angeles 210 R10.86 R11.52
Los Angeles 210 R15.37 R19.49
Los Angeles 210 R19.61 R22.16
Los Angeles 210 R22.22 R36.51
Los Angeles 210 R38.58 R42.18
Los Angeles 210 R42.27 R42.53
Los Angeles 210 R42.94 R52.11
San Bernardino 210 0.00 R8.31
San Bernardino 210 R8.31 R15.02
San Bernardino 210 R15.02 R16.33
San Bernardino 210 R16.33 R18.32

 

Interstate Submissions

Approved as chargeable Interstate on 9/15/1955. Removing interstate status from the former routing between (former) Route 30 and Route 10 (current Route 57), and transferring it to routing from Route 57 to Route 10 in Redlands was submitted to AASHTO in 1998, deferred, resubmitted in 1999, and then withdrawn. Other designations proposed for this route were I-12 (November 1957), I-14 (December 1957), and I-102 (April 1958).

 

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Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.8] From Route 5 near Tunnel Station to Route 134, and from Route 330 near Highland to Route 10 near Redlands.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 210 (before the addition of former Route 30 and the transfer to Route 57):

  • Total Length (1995): 49 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 14,500 to 256,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 49.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAI: 49 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 49 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles, San Bernardino.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1939, Chapter 338 added the route “[LRN 28] near Canby to the Oregon State Line near Merrill” to the state highway system, provided that the United States Government, through its agencies the Bureau of Public Roads and Forest Service construct or reconstruct [the highway] with highway funds or any other funds made available by congress for highway purposes within the state of California. No number was assigned.

In 1943, Chapter 964 repealed the 1939 definition and added the route, with the same routing, as LRN 210.

In 1959, Chapter 1062 reworded the route and added a second segment:

  1. [LRN 28] near Canby to the Oregon line near Hatfield.
  2. From a point on the highway in segment (1) near Hatfield to [LRN 72] near Dorris.

This was numbered as follows:

  1. From LRN 28 (Route 139; present-day Route 139/Route 299 junction) near Canby to the Oregon line near Hatfield.

    This was present-day Route 139.

  2. From a point on the highway in segment (1) near Hatfield to LRN 72 (US 97) near Dorris.

    This is present-day Route 161.


State Shield

State Route 211



Routing

From Route 1 near Rockport to Route 101 near Fernbridge.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 211 was defined as "Route 99 near Delano to Route 65." In 1965. Chapter 1372 deleted that definition of Route 211 and added the route to Route 155.

Unconstructed In 1984, Chapter 409 redefined the route as "Route 1 near Rockport to Route 101 near Fernbridge". This was the result of a diversion of Route 1 was diverted to terminate at US 101; this was an unconstructed segment of Route 1 (SB 2471, Chapter 409). It is unconstructed from Route 1 to Ferndale. Traversable local roads between the US 101 and the Mendocino County Line include Chemise Mountain Road, Kings Peak Road, Wilder Ridge Road, and Mattole Road. These roads are not constructed to state highway standards and are unacceptable candidate highways for the state highway system. Between the Mendocino County Line and Route 1, the existing road is primative and unsuitable for use as a state highway.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1963-1965 definition of Route 211 was part of LRN 136, defined in 1933. A portion of this routing is now Route 155.

The post-1984 routing was originally part of LRN 56, and was to have been signed as part of Route 1.

 

Naming

Route 1 and Route 211 from Mill Valley (Marin County) to Ferndale (Humboldt County) are named the "Shoreline Highway. The portion of the route between Rockport and Ferndale (Route 211) is not constructed. The road runs along the Pacific Shore. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 91, Chapter 239 in 1957.

This portion of coastline is sometimes referred to as "The Lost Coast"

 

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Status

The current routing is unconstructed from Route 1 to Ferndale and is not signed. The portion of the route between the Ferndale city limits and US 101 is signed. The traversable route in Mendocino County is Chemise Mountain Road, Wilder Ridge Road, and Mattole Road.

 


Overall statistics for Route 211:

  • Total Length (1995): 5 miles traversable; 103 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 3,450 to 5,800
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 108; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAS: 5 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Collector: 5 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Mendocino, Humboldt.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

This route number appears not to have been assigned by the California Legislature before the 1963 renumbering.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 212



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 212 was defined to run from the east city limits of Los Angeles to Route 10 near El Monte. This routing was deleted in 1965 by Chapter 1372.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1965 routing of Route 212 was segment (1) of LRN 77, defined in 1933. This corresponded to the pre-freeway surface street routing of US 60/US 70 along Valley Blvd.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1947 (1st Ex Session), Chapter 13 defined LRN 212 as “the Nevada-California State Line in the southern portion of Pahrump Valley to [LRN 23] near Freeman”

In 1955, Chapter 76 reiterated the definition and indicated that Section 600 was applicable to the route. Later that year, Chapter 1488 removed the language relating to Section 600.

This route is present-day Route 178.


State Shield

State Route 213



Routing

From 25th Street in San Pedro to Route 405 via Western Avenue.

The commission may allocate from the State Highway Fund the necessary funds for the construction of all or any portion of said route when the County of Los Angeles and the Cities of Los Angeles and Torrance have entered into a co-operative agreement with the department wherein the said cities and county shall furnish to the state of California without charge all right-of-way necessary and agree to pay one-half the cost of plans and construction.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as "25th Street in San Pedro to Route 405 via Western Avenue." Later that year, Chapter 1729 added the condition: “The commission may allocate from the State Highway Fund the necessary funds for the construction of all or any portion of said route when the County of Los Angeles and the Cities of Los Angeles and Torrance have entered into a co-operative agreement with the department wherein the said cities and county shall furnish to the state of California without charge all right-of-way necessary and agree to pay one-half the cost of plans and construction.”

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 291, defined in 1961.

 

Status

The traversable route from Carson St to I-405 is Western Avenue. There is a parallel unconstructed routing.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 213:

  • Total Length (1995): 8 miles constructed; 2 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 26,000 to 36,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 10.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 7 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 8 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1947, Chapter 1370 added the route “to parallel approximately but not coincide with [LRN 4] near the northerly city limits of San Fernando to a point on said route near the southerly limits thereof”. The route was added with no number.

In 1949, Chapters 909 and 1467 deleted the 1947 definition of the route, and added the route to the highway code as LRN 213 as “from a point on [LRN 4] near the northerly limits of San Fernando to a point on [LRN 4] near the southerly limits of San Fernando, approximately paralleling but not coinciding with [LRN 4]”

In 1961, Chapter 1146 added the condition that LRN 213 would “cease to be a state highway when the commission relinquishes that portion of the present [LRN 4] in the City of San Fernando upon the relocation of [LRN 4] outside of the City of San Fernando”.

This route is no longer a state highway. It was Truman Street and San Fernando Road through the city of San Fernando, and corresponds to a one-way routing parallel to the LRN 4 routing on San Fernando Blvd (US 99). It is not presently in the state highway system. It was constructed in 1950.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 214



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 214 was defined as the route from "Route 19 near Lakewood to Route 5 near Anaheim." This routing likely ran along Carson and Lincoln Blvds.

In 1965, Chapter 1372 added the condition that “this route shall cease to be a state highway when Route 91 freeway is completed from Route 19 to Route 5 and the commission relinquishes that portion of present Route 91 from Route 19 to Route 5.”

In 1981, Chapter 292 deleted the routing.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1981 routing was the old surface street routing of US 91 (pre-1963 Route 15) along Lincoln Avenue between US 101 (present-day I-5) and Route 19. This is LRN 178.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1949, Chapter 1467 added LRN 214 as "[LRN 68] near Ralston Ave to [LRN 55]" This was roughly Ralston Ave in Belmont between US 101 and Route 35/I-280.

In 1953, Chapter 1485 deleted that definition, operative January 1, 1955

084-114In 1959, Chapter 1062 added a new definition of LRN 214, as the route from LRN 239 (future I-280) near Woodside to LRN 68 (Bypass US 101; present-day freeway US 101) at the Harbor Boulevard Interchange in Redwood City. This appears to have been the designation for surface LRN 107 created in advance of the freeway routing for LRN 107 (although until the freeway was constructed, both were technically LRN 107). The route was Route 84 along Woodside Road.


Interstate Shield

Interstate 215



Routing

From Route 15 near Temecula to Route 15 near Devore via Riverside and passing near San Bernardino.

 

Suffixed Routings

This route was once signed as I-15E.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 215 was defined as "Route 60 at Pomona to Route 66 west of Claremont." The route ran along Garey Avenue between US 60 and US 66.

In 1965, Chapter 1372 deleted this routing.

Interstate Shield In 1982, Chapter 681 redefined Route 215 as the future interstate routing: “Route 15 near Temecula to Route 15 near Devore via San Bernardino and passing near Riverside.” This was a renumbering of Route 194.

In 1994, Chapter 1220 clarified the definition: “Route 15 near Temecula to Route 15 near Devore via Riverside and San Bernardino and passing near Riverside.”

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

State Shield The 1964-1965 routing of Route 215 was LRN 19, and was the pre-1964 Route 71. It was defined in 1931.

US Highway Shield Interstate Shield The post-1982 routing had the following signage history:

  1. Between 2 mi N of Temecula and Riverside: The route was signed as US 395, and was LRN 78 (defined in 1931). This was I-15 between 1964 and 1969. For a time it was signed as I-15E. The routing from Perris to Riverside was originally signed as part of Route 740.

  2. Between jct US 60/US 91 (present-day Route 60/Route 91/Route 215 junction) and jct US 60/US 395 (present-day Route 60/I-215 junction): The route was cosigned as US 60/US 395, and was LRN 19, defined in 1909. It was I-15 between 1964 and 1996. For a time it was signed as I-15E.

  3. Between Riverside and San Bernardino: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 395, and was LRN 43, defined in 1931. This was I-15 between 1964 and 1969. For a time it was signed as I-15E.

  4. Between San Bernardino and Devore: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 66/US 395, and was LRN 31, defined in 1915. This was signed as I-15 between 1964 and 1969; for a time it was signed as I-15E.

 

Status

There are a number of projects in the works for the I-215 corridor between Murrieta and Moreno Valley. Construction isn't expected to begin until 2010 at the earliest. The first phase would add lanes in the median and the remaining phase, not expected until 2015, would widen the freeway to its ultimate width, which is yet to be decided. According to the LA Times Bottleneck blog in September 2007, the CTC approved $13 million to widen I-215 from the I-15/I-215 interchange north to Nuevo Road in Perris. The allocation was part of a larger $674 million funding announcement for 35 transportation-related projects statewide. Funding sources include $225 million from Proposition 1B, $60 million from Proposition 42 and $389 million from the Public Transportation Account. (CNS). As of December 2007, there were community public meetings in Perris on this widening. It was noted that Caltrans has started the preliminary engineering and environmental planning process, and that the entire $417M, three-part project would widen about 29.25 miles on I-215 between I-15 and Route 60. The central portion of the project is expected to save about 4,600 hours of vehicle delays and 2,000 gallons of gasoline per day, according to Caltrans and the RCTC. Construction for this portion is expected to begin in 2012.

In December 2008, the CTC approved funding to construct a third mixed flow lane in each direction and widen Route 215 to a minimum of three lanes in each direction near the city of Murrieta. The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account Program and Regional Improvement Program. The estimated cost of the project is $62,321,000 and is estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement. The project runs from Murrieta Hot Springs Road to Scott Road.

In April 2009, it was noted that widening the Clinton Keith Road bridge at I-215 in Murrieta will be done with 2009 Federal Stimulus funding. The project calls for the widening of the two-lane bridge to six lanes. It will take 18 months to complete. Murrieta has pursued the project to relieve traffic at the crossing caused mainly by vehicles from a nearby high school and shopping center. Originally, the city was relying on Measure A funds for the final $10 million for the project. Shortly after Obama proposed the stimulus, however, Riverside County listed the project as a top stimulus priority because of its regional importance and its "shovel ready" status.

In 2007, the CTC recommended that the Corridor Improvement Mobility Account fund widening from I-15 to Scott Road ($38,579K recommended out of a request of $62.231K). It did not recommend funding for a mixed flow lane between Scott Rd. and Nuevo Rd ($172,730K) or HOV lanes between Nuevo Rd. and Box Springs Rd. ($181,700K).

In March 2013, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen the Newport Road overcrossing and reconstruct the I-215/Newport Road interchange ramps in the city of Menifee. The project is fully funded with local dollars. The total estimated cost is $47,700,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14.

215 Widening MapIn August 2009, it was reported that the Riverside County Transportation Commission is working on plans for how to widen I-215 from Perris almost to Murrieta. They have engaged engineering firm URS to finalize engineering and design of the project, from Scott Road north of Murrieta to Nuevo Road, north of Perris. The 13-mile stretch is the middle of three adjacent projects along I-215 to widen the freeway from I-15 in Temecula to Route 60 near Moreno Valley. If approved by RCTC, URS will be paid up to $14.5 million for the design and engineering work. URS did similar design work on the southern segment of the I-215 widening project. The middle phase of widening I-215 to three lanes and adding a carpool lane from Nuevo Road north to Route 60 is the most complex of the three when it comes to design. Bridges at D Street and Perris Boulevard in Perris must be lengthened to accommodate the larger freeway. The entire widening project is expected to cost $417 million, including $38.6 million for the southern segment from California's Prop. 1B transportation bond voters approved in 2006. Work on the southern section of the widening is set to start in 2011, followed a year later by the central section. Construction north of Perris to Riverside is not anticipated until 2012, with all phases finished by 2015.
[Based on an article in the Riverside Press Enterprise, "Widening of 13-mile stretch of I-215 gets OK for final design, engineering", 2009-08-24]

In January 2012, it was reported that the widening project on the six-mile stretch between Murrieta Hot Springs and Scott roads (the "South Project") should be completed in August 2012. Ground-breaking was in February 2011. The project will add a lane in each direction between the two exits. The $33-million project—also known as the I-215 South Project—has created about 594 jobs.

In October 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project ("I-215 Central Project") that will construct one mixed flow lane in each direction from Scott Road to the Nuevo Road interchange, and reconstruct auxiliary lanes between the D Street interchange and the Nuevo Road interchange. The project is fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes local funds. The total estimated cost is $190,947,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to wetlands in the project area will be mitigated by purchasing mitigation bank credits and participation in an In Lieu Fee program. As a result, an MND was completed for this project.

Design work is expected to wrap up on the I-215 Central Project in late 2012, according to RCTC. The estimated project cost is $143 million and is forecast to provide 2,160 jobs. Contingent on funding, construction on the Central Project may start in late 2012 and is estimated to take about three years.

In May 2012, the CTC approved $113.4 to million fund most of the $120 million effort to widen I-215 to three lanes in each direction between Scott Road and Nuevo Road. Work on the 12.5-mile stretch will start in late 2012, after the "South Project" is finished.

In September 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of Riverside, on the west side of Route 215, between Nuevo Road and Oleander Avenue. (8-Riv-215-PM 27.9/32.4)

In January 2012, it was reported that construction should be completed on the new 4th Street/Redlands Ave. bridge in Perris by February 2012. The $30 million project replaces the old two-lane bridge that connected 4th Street/Route 74 to the west and Redlands Avenue to the east of the freeway. Work began on the bridge and expanded entrance and exit ramps in July 2010, and two lanes of the new bridge opened in October when crews demolished the outdated overpass.

Mid County Parkway Project: Riverside County has a project in the words to construct a 16 mile west-east transportation corridor between I-215 and Route 79 connecting the Cities of San Jacinto and Perris. The project will consist of a divided highway including three lanes in each direction with on and off ramps as well as freeway-freeway type interchanges at I-215 and Route 79. This project is currently at the EIR stage.

In May 2012, the CTC authorized SHOPP funding on I-215, in Riverside County, 08-Riv-215 43.9/45.3 In and near the city of Riverside, from Columbia Avenue to the San Bernardino County line; also in Colton and Grand Terrace from the county line to south of the Route 10 interchange . $12,258,000 to rehabilitate 32.7 roadway lane miles to extend pavement service life and improve ride quality. Project ill grind pavement and overlay with rubberized asphalt.

In May 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will reconstruct the I-215/Barton Road Interchange in the cities of Grand Terrace and Colton. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $77,337,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17.

In December 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will reconstruct improvements at the I-215/Van Buren Boulevard Interchange. The proposed improvements include widening of the Van Buren Boulevard Bridge, addition of an eastbound to northbound entrance ramp, reconfiguration and widening of the existing entrance and exit ramps, and construction of auxiliary lanes from Van Buren Boulevard to Cactus Avenue. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (TCIF) and includes local funds. Total estimated cost is $97,550,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement.

In October 2011, it was reported that, due to the favorable sale of bonds, state funding was available for the Van Buren bridge as well as a bridge over Iowa Avenue in Riverside. Both projects have long been identified as critical road improvements that will create construction jobs and help move freight through the Inland area. The planned, $52 million Van Buren overpass will widen the bridge so trucks serving warehouses near the freeway will have better access. Iowa Avenue is one of a dozen railroad grade separations in the county designed to eliminate long waits by cars and trucks as freight trains move through the region.

CTC is in the process of considering construction of two HOV or two mixed-flow lanes between University Avenue and Day Street in Riverside County; and, in the same area, construciton of a truck-bypass connector, bicycle lanes, auxiliary lanes, two direct connectors, and several interchanges; removal of ramps and interchanges; and structure widening, overcrossing reconstruction, connectors realignment, and ramp meter installation. [Negative EIR, May 2002, 2.2c.(2)]

There was a significant multiyear project to reconstruct the Route 91/I-215/Route 60 interchange completed in late 2008. Details may be found here. The project included rebuilding the Spruce Street bridge; relocating the existing eastbound on-ramp to Route 60 from Orange Street to Main Street; and widening the existing highway undercrossing bridges at University Avenue, Mission Inn Avenue and Third Street. The existing southbound (to I-215) loop ramp was replaced with a direct freeway-to-freeway connector, and the the northbound to westbound (to Route 91) loop ramp was replaced with a direct freeway-to-freeway connector. There the existing I-215 southbound off-ramp and northbound on-ramp at Spruce Street were removed and relocated to Route 91 as an eastbound off-ramp and a westbound on-ramp at the new Spruce Street overcrossing bridge. The project realigned East La Cadena Drive between 1st and Spruce Street, and provided a grade separation at the railroad crossing, as well as realigning West La Cadena Drive to accommodate the new interchange connectors. The Route 91 main line was widened, and auxiliary lanes added between University and the 60/91/215 interchange. Additionally, I-215 (Route 60) was widened from the 60/91/215 interchange to the 60/215 junction, including extending the existing carpool lanes from University Avenue to the 60/215 junction, and providing auxiliary lanes leading to and departing from the new freeway connectors. The existing I-215 (Route 60) Blaine Street, Iowa Avenue and Linden Street overcrossing bridges were reconstructed to span the new freeway widening, and the existing I-215 (Route 60) Blaine Street, University Avenue and Central Avenue/Watkins Drive interchanges were improved, including ramp widening. Sycamore Canyon Boulevard was realigned at Central Avenue. The project constructed a new interchange at Martin Luther King Boulevard, and removed the existing El Cerrito Drive interchange. The existing railroad overhead bridges at Down Street and Chicago Avenue were widened. At the 60/215 junction, a truck by-pass connector was constructed from southbound I-215 to eastbound Route 60 and southbound I-215. On Route 60, the existing Day Street interchange was modified. On I-215, the Box Springs Road interchange was rebuilt with an overcrossing bridge. Lastly, a concrete barrier was added on northbound I-215 at the junction to westbound Route 60. This project took over three years, cost over $317-million, and concluded in mid-2008. Caltrans officials planned to open two new connector ramps by the end of 2007, including one that soars 72 feet high and measures just over a mile long.

One of the side-effects of this project was a bottleneck where the freeway narrows from three lanes to one in Moreno Valley. Caltrans created the bottleneck in 2006 to protect workers widening the Box Springs Road bridge over a railroad as part of the Route 60/Route 91/I-215 interchange project. But when the Caltrans deleted the bridgework from the project in 2007 to save time and money, Caltrans did nothing to ease the traffic headache. The narrowing occurs where westbound Route 60 funnels into one lane at the merger with northbound I-215. As of April 2008, Caltrans had planned to make this two lanes again, but only temporarily. The merger will be narrowed again in late 2009 or early 2010, this time for workers to finish the same freeway bridge, now part of a different project managed by the RCTC. The bridge has had numerous construction problems. In February 2007, workers found that the reinforcing steel, or rebar, they had installed for one of the bridge's supports did not leave enough space for the planned insertion of high-tensile steel to strengthen the bridge. Caltrans admitted they had made a design error and instructed the contractor Washington-Obayashi to torch-cut and remove the conflicting rebar. Caltrans paid about $56,000 to correct the error. A few months later, Caltrans instructed workers to even out the bumpy concrete deck of the bridge by grinding it down. But then Caltrans and the contractor determined that doing so would thin out the rebar in some places and damage the bridge. Caltrans and the contractor agreed to solve the problem by paving over the deck with a special concrete and making other repairs. Late submissions to the railroad company and delayed change orders for the bridge would delay the project even more. By the end of May, Caltrans announced it planned to delete the remaining work on the bridge. The decision, made final in October, cut almost $800,000 from the contract, and allowed construction to proceed on other parts of the project. In order to drop the bridgework, Caltrans estimated it will have to spend $100,000 to shore up and retrofit the partially built bridge. Additionally, during construction, Caltrans found that its plans for the bridge were not compatible with an upcoming Riverside County Transportation Commission project to improve the East Junction. In October 2007, the Riverside County Transportation Commission added the deleted bridge widening along with other East Junction work to an upcoming project in a vote that increased that project's budget from $35.4 million to $55.7 million. The commission cobbled together funding for the increase from federal, state and local sources.
[Source: Riverside PE, March 22, 2008]

In April 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Riverside County that would construct two HOV lanes and roadway improvements to connect the existing HOV lanes on Route 60 and Route 215 near the city of Moreno Valley. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes federal and local funds. Total estimated project cost is $55,742,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. Construction activities will remove approximately two acres of willow riparian woodland. In addition, the project will require the acquisition of new right-of-way and result in several commercial displacements.

In June 2012, the CTC amended the CMIA baseline agreement for the I-215 Bi-County HOV Gap Closure project (PPNO 0041G) to update the project funding plan and the delivery schedule. The project, located across the county line between San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, will construct approximately 7.5 miles of high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes in each direction of the I-215. The project limits are from the Route 91/Route 60/I-215 Interchange in Riverside County to the West Orange Show Road/South Auto Drive in San Bernardino County. The project scope also includes the replacement of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Overhead structure and the bridge widening over the Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) lines. Once constructed, this project will complete approximately 70 miles of the HOV lane system on I-215 and Route 91, from the city of San Bernardino to Artesia in Los Angeles County. The preliminary design for the BNSF Overhead structure had assumed a single steel girder to replace the existing structure. Because of a large skew angle and a longer span length, the type of structure was changed to a steel truss. In addition, due to the limited available space in the freeway median, it was determined that three single track bridges will be required instead of a single structure that would have accommodated all three tracks. These changes have resulted in an increase in construction capital from $134,850,000 to $139,063,000; an increase of $4,213,000, and construction support from $13,484,000 to $16,270,000; an increase of $2,786,000.

In January 2014, it was reported that the project between I-210 and Orange Show Road was complete. The overhaul included 15 new bridges, four new lanes, two flyovers and the reconstruction of 34 ramps.

In January 2007, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the City of Riverside, consisting of 5 segments (a mix of Route 91 and I-215) along La Cadena Drive from Malta Place to Spruce Street and from Strong Street to Spring Garden Street, and a portion of Kansas Avenue between Roberta Street and Spruce Street, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets, frontage roads and cul-de-sacs.

In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed widening this route from the east junction with Route 60 south to I-15.

In June 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct one high-occupancy vehicle lane in each direction from the Route 91/Route 60/I-215 Interchange to south of the I-215/Orange Show Road Interchange. The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes federal and local funds. Total estimated cost $177,695,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the proposed project baseline agreement.

In May 2012, the CTC approved amending the funding baseline for a project, located across the county line between San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, that will construct approximately 7.5 miles of high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes in each direction of the I-215. The project limits are from the Route 91/Route 60/I-215 Interchange in Riverside County to the West Orange Show Road/South Auto Drive in San Bernardino County. The project scope also includes the replacement of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Overhead structure and the bridge widening over the Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) lines. Once constructed, this project will complete approximately 70 miles of the HOV lane system on I-215 and Route 91, from San Bernardino to Artesia in Los Angeles County. The funding baseline was amended because the preliminary design for the BNSF Overhead structure had assumed a single steel girder to replace the existing structure. Because of a large skew angle and a longer span length, the type of structure was changed to a steel truss. In addition, due to the limited available space in the freeway median, it was determined that three single track bridges will be required instead of a single structure that would have accommodated all three tracks. These changes have resulted in an increase in construction capital from $134,850,000 to $139,063,000; an increase of $4,213,000, and construction support from $13,484,000 to $16,270,000; an increase of $2,786,000. Estimated project completion is now March 2018.

[TCRP 57]There are plans to add HOV lanes through downtown San Bernardino, from Route 10 to Route 210. This is TCRP Project #57. This project will add two HOV lanes and two mixed flow lanes, including operational improvements and interchange modifications, through San Bernardino. The project is to be delivered in segments. In June 2006, the CTC designated San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG) as the Implementing Agency, and updated the schedule due to the delay in obtaining FHWA approval of the environmental re-evaluation for the corridor, during which only limited right-of-way acquisition was allowed by FHWA. The project is now scheduled to complete in FY 2012.

In August 2011, the CTC amended Resolution CMIA-A-0809-012 to de-allocate $15,460,000 in Proposition 1B Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) funds from the I-215 North Segment 5 – HOV and Mixed-flow Lane Addition project (PPNO 0247N) in San Bernardino County, thereby reducing the original CMIA capital allocation of $44,667,000 to $29,207,000, to reflect contract award savings.

In late 2007, the final $233-million, 8-mile extension between the "Route 30" portion of Route 210 in San Bernardino and the Route 210 portion that continues West was completed. However, the I-210/Route 215 interchange will not be complete for a few more years. Construction was originally scheduled begin on the interchange in mid-to-late 2008, with completion around 2011/2012. However, in October 2008, SANBAG increased the delay by turning the project over to Caltrans, moving the date past 2013. A combination of factors, including seismic and structural concerns, are causing the delay of the interchanges that will include elevated "flyover" connectors, similar to those used at the I-215/Route 91 interchange. SANBAG officials made the connectors a separate project because of design changes to deal with seismic and liquefaction concerns at the site. The transition to Caltrans was felt to be beneficial because it would expedite permits and reviews, which had to go through Caltrans anyway. Another advantage to having Caltrans manage construction is that it has access to the State Transportation Improvement Program construction contingency funds that otherwise wouldn't be available to SANBAG. A potential $7.2 million could be made available.

Until the connectors are constructed, it will not be possible to go directly from the EB Route 210 to SB I-215, nor will it be possible to go from NB I-215 to WB Route 210. Other transitions that connect Route 210 to I-215 already exist. The transition from SB I-215 to EB Route 30 (Route 210) is already open. The connector road that will bridge SB I-215 to the WB Route 210 will be operational once Route 210 opens. However, those connectors are not designed to handle the heavy traffic loads (2,500 cars/hour) the final connectors can; the current connectors can only carry 1,500 cars/hour. The delays are primarily seismic: in late 1999 and early 2000, a geologist conducting work in the area identified tell-tale signs of the potential for a seismic phenomenon known as fault rupture. Fault-rupture damage can differ greatly from other seismic activity so special planning is needed.
(Information obtained from San Gabriel Daily Bulletin, 5/29/2007)

In February 2009, the CTC considered (it was approved in April 2009) a Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) baseline amendment. This amended the CMIA baseline agreements for the Route 210/I-215 Connectors project (PPNO 0194Q) and the I-215 North Segment 5 – HOV and Mixed Flow Lane Addition project (PPNO 0247N) to change the implementing agency for both projects from SANBAG to Caltrans; increase design (PS&E) from $4,000,000 to $4,866,000 for the Route 210/I-215 Connectors project and from $4,541,000 to $5,065,000 for the I-215 North Segment 5 project; increase construction (capital and support) from $79,967,000 to $90,517,000 for the Route 210/I-215 Connectors project and decrease construction from $59,000,000 to $49,000,000 for construction and construction support for the I-215 North Segment 5 project; reprogram $12,733,000 San Bernardino Regional Improvement Program (RIP) from construction capital to construction support for the Route 210/I-215 Connectors project and $6,933,000 CMIA from construction capital to construction support for the I-215 North Segment 5 project; and combine both projects into a single construction contract. The Route 210/I-215 Connectors project is located in San Bernardino County, and will:

  • Construct direct connectors from northbound (NB) Route 215 to westbound Route 210 and from eastbound Route 210 to southbound (SB) Route 215.
  • Construct a replacement bridge for the 27th Street Overcrossing.
  • Construct a mixed flow lane on NB Route 215 from the Route 210/I-215 Interchange to University Parkway.
  • Construct an auxiliary lane on SB Route 215 from University Parkway to the Route 210/I-215 Interchange.
  • Construct a collector-distributor road along NB Route 215 from Highland Avenue 27th Street.
  • Replace loop off-ramp from NB Route 215 to Highland Avenue.
  • Reconfigure local streets east of Route 215 off of 27th Street and other miscellaneous associated improvements

In December 2011, Caltrans opened the connector ramp between northbound I-215 and westbound Route 210, 15 months ahead of projections.

The I-215 North Segment 5 project will construct HOV lanes, construct mixed-flow lanes, and construct auxiliary lanes from south of Massachusetts Avenue to Route 210 in San Bernardino County.

[San Bernardino]The I-215 Segments 1 and 2 project, which is part of the overall I-215 North Corridor project, extends from south of Rialto Avenue to south of Massachusetts Avenue. The project will construct a combination of high occupancy vehicle, mixed-flow and auxiliary lanes. The total cost for this project is approximately $424 million. SANBAG and the Department have been working collaboratively on the I-215 Segments 1 and 2 project, as well as the entire corridor. The Department is performing all the right of way work, including acquisition and utility relocation, while SANBAG is the lead on the remaining design and construction phases. In 2007, the CTC authorized using the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) to fund segments 1 and 2 ($49,120K, total cost $430,341K) and segment 5 ($59,000K, total construction costs $64,875K) of construction of HOV and mixed lanes between I-10 and I-210. They also approved $22 million to fund the I-210/I-215 connectors. This was also on the January 2007 CTC agenda. In June 2008, the CTC approved amending the project plan to implement a corrective action plan to fully fund the right of way (R/W) components of the project.

In April 2009, the CTC approved funding this project (as a loan against future bonds) from 2009 Stimulus funds.

In January 2013, it was reported that some phases of this project were nearly complete. On 1/10/2013, northbound traffic was diverted from the older, center lanes to the newly constructed outside lanes between 2nd and 5th streets. The shift permitted construction crews to complete the reconstruction of the 2nd and 3rd street overpasses. Three lanes of traffic will be available to motorists although the final project will include four general use lanes plus a car pool lane. By March 2013, the agency also plans to open the 5th Street off ramps, providing another route to access downtown San Bernardino. As of 2013, the project is 85 percent complete. Barring any weather or construction delays, SANBAG expects to have it fully open by this fall 2013. The completed project adds a general use lane and carpool lane in each direction on a 7.5 mile stretch of the freeway from Orange Show Road to University Parkway near Cal State San Bernardino. As of January 2013, workers still needed to finish the section between 2nd and 5th streets, ramp construction at 3rd, 5th and Baseline Streets, reconstructing the 16th Street bridge and finishing the connectors to Route 259.
(Source: Press-Enterprise, 1/4/13)

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #2051: Improve interstates and roads part of the Inland Empire Goods Movement Gateway project in and around the former Norton Air Force Base. $20,000,000.

  • High Priority Project #3140: I-215/Los Alamos Road Interchange Project. $1,600,000.

  • High Priority Project #3209: Route 74/I-215 Interchange Project. $800,000.

The San Bernardino Association of Governments is working to widen I-215 in California between DeVore and Interstate 10. A $360 million design-build project that will widen the highway, add interchanges and high-occupancy-vehicle traffic lanes is expected to begin in July 2011, he said.

In June 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will reconstruct the I-15/I-215 Interchange adjacent to the unincorporated Community of Devore in southwestern San Bernardino County. The project will include the widening of I-15, constructing truck bypass lanes through the I-15/I-215 Interchange, reconstructing adjacent local interchanges, and reconnecting Cajon Boulevard between Devore Road and Kenwood Avenue. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). Total estimated project cost is $324,163,000 for capital and support. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed in the 2012 STIP and 2010 SHOPP. The project has been approved by the Commission to be included in the Design Build Demonstration Program. The project will receive an allocation in Fiscal Year 12-13, and will utilize the designbuild method of procurement consistent with the applicable provisions under Public Contract Code, Section 6800.

In December 2012, it was reported that the CTC allocated $53.7 million for the Devore interchange and I-15 Freeway widening project. The project will reconfigure the area where I-15 and I-215 split, add north and southbound lanes and truck bypass lanes.

In August 2012, the CTC approved $137,608,000 in SHOPP funding for projects on I-15 and I-215, near Devore Heights, on Route 15 from south of Glen Helen Parkway to north of Kenwood Avenue and on Route 215 from 1.8 mi south of Route 15 to Route 15. Outcome/Output: Reconfigure connectors from Route 15 to Route 215 to reduce traffic weave movements and improve the operational performance for the interchange.

 

Naming

The portion of this route from Route 60 to the southerly 215/15 junction is named the "Escondido" Freeway.

The portion of Route 215 between the Ramona Expressway Exit, at postmile 31.08, and its junction with State Route 74, at postmile 26.31 is named the "CDF Firefighter John D. Guthrie Memorial Highway." Named in honor of CDF Firefighter John D. Guthrie, as representative for those who died in the Decker Canyon Fire in 1959. As a young man growing up in Perris, California, John Guthrie often volunteered to help the older men fight fires in the rural community and always wanted to be a firefighter. After a two years of service in the Navy, Guthrie returned home and signed on with the United States Forest Service as a firefighter, and, in 1954, was stationed at the El Cariso fire station. In 1955, Guthrie was hired by the California Division of Forestry and began working at the Lake Elsinore Station. On July 8, 1959, two teenagers driving down the curvy highway toward Lake Elsinore lost control of their truck and it flew off of the roadway and down a 200-foot embankment, sparking an inferno that became known as the Decker Canyon Fire. More than 500 California Division of Forestry and United States Forest Service, local, and volunteer firefighters were called to fight the Decker Canyon Fire, which swept out of the hills and forced the evacuation of Lakeland Village. Guthrie was a firetruck driver working at the fire station on Old Town Temecula, and when the call went out Guthrie and his crew headed north toward the billowing smoke. Guthrie and his crew were sent off of the main road about a mile east of El Cariso Village into a canyon to start setting backfires and the shifting winds soon pushed a wall of flame back up the canyon and toward their truck. With the flames advancing on them, Guthrie ordered the other firefighters back to the truck for protection, despite the fact that there was not room in the truck for him. Guthrie attempted to use a firehose to wet himself down for protection, but the firehose was burned beyond use. The flames rushed over the firetruck, charring it and those inside and outside of it almost beyond recognition and the six-man crew perished, some at the scene and others at hospitals in the days and weeks that followed. Twenty-seven other firefighters were injured fighting the 1,700-acre blaze, some losing ears, fingers, and noses. Guthrie, with over 85 percent of his body burned, began walking out of the canyon before others came to his aid and an ambulance arrived to take him to the closest hospital, which was located in Hemet. Guthrie was the last firefighter to die as a result of the blaze, finally succumbing to his injuries at Redland's hospital on September 14, 1959. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 107, Resolution Chapter 80, on 7/8/2008.

The portion of this route between the intersection of Route 60 and the Ramona Expressway in Riverside County is named the "Armed Forces Freeway". This segment was named to commemorate the extensive military history of Riverside County, from 1774 when Lieutenant Colonel Juan Bautista de Anza marched through the area now occupied by March Air Reserve Base, to the formation of Riverside's own World War I volunteer regiment (the Rainbow Rifles), to the establishment of Alessandro Field in February 1918, to the numerous military facilities established throughout the county that contributed to the Nation's war effort during World War II, to today's strategically located and thriving March Air Reserve Base. Riverside County has been home to many important military facilities, including Camp Rancho del Jurupa (1862, Army), Camp Rubidoux (World War II, California State Guard), Camp Ono (World War II, Army), Camp Haan (World War II, Army), Camp Anza (World War II, Army), March Air Force Base and March Air Reserve Base (World War I and continuing, Army Air Corps and Air Force), with additional subsidiary and medical facilities located in Norco, Thermal, Desert Center, Blythe, Banning, Beaumont, Cherry Valley, Hemet, and Palm Springs. The designated portion of Route 215 runs between present day March Air Reserve Base and the Riverside National Cemetery, home of the Medal of Honor Memorial, the Prisoner of War/Missing in Action National Memorial, and the Fallen Soldier/Veterans' Memorial, and thus is a fitting tribute to honor the many men and women of our Armed Forces who have at one time or another called this area home. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 22, Resolution Chapter 106, on 7/25/2007.

The portion of this route from Murrieta Hot Springs Road and McCall Boulevard in the County of Riverside is officially named the "Riverside County Deputy Sheriff Eric Andrew Thach Memorial Freeway". Riverside County Deputy Sheriff Eric Andrew Thach died in the line of duty on October 8, 1999 while responding to a reported "open door" call at a residence in the Pedley area of Riverside County. This turned out to be a home invasion robbery involving a kidnaping. Sherrif Thach was ambushed and shot in the back as he approached the residence. Fellow deputies immediately came to Deputy Thach's aide, and he was transported by ambulance to the hospital where he died. Deputy Thach's killer fled the location on foot and was later shot during a confrontation with members of the Riverside County Sheriff's Emergency Services Team a few miles from the location. Deputy Thach was awarded the Riverside County Sheriff's Department Medal of Honor for his sacrifice and devotion to duty, exemplified by his conduct and actions on October 8, 1999. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 92, Chapter 134, September 12, 2000.

The portion of this route from the Route 60/Route 91/Route 215 junction to Route 10 is named the "Riverside Freeway". It was named by the State Highway Commission (date unknown).

The portion of this route from Highland Avenue in San Bernardino to the northerly 215/15 junction is officially named the "Barstow" Freeway. It was named by the State Highway Commission in 1958. Barstow refers to the city of Barstow, which was named in 1886 by the Santa Fe Railroad for its president, William Barstow Strong.

This portion of this route that was part of US 395 is part of "Historic US Highway 395", designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 98, Chapter 79, 7/8/2008.

This portion of this route from the northern I-15/I-215 junction to the Route 66 junction is part of "Historic Highway Route 66", designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 6, Chapter 52, in 1991.

 

Named Structures

Bridge 53-1367, the I-10/I-215 separation in Los Angeles county, is named the "James A. Guthrie Memorial Interchange". It was built in 1960, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 57, Chapter 193, in 1970. James A. Guthrie was a presidential elector from California in 1956. He served from 1943 to 1967 as a member of the California Highway Commission.

The Route 210/I-215 interchange is named the "Gary Moon Memorial Interchange". This interchange was named in memory of Gary Moon, whoserved with utmost distinction as the Director of Freeway Construction for San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG) between October 1990 and March 2003. Mr. Moon earned the respect of the public, elected officials and colleagues for his problem solving abilities, willingness to listen and to take action, sensible and creative approaches to design and construction challenges, fair and kind treatment of staff and coworkers, quick wit and dry sense of humor. During his tenure with the transportation planning agency, Mr. Moon was responsible for the construction of Route 210 in Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, and Fontana, as well as improvements to I-10, Route 60 and Route 71. During his tenure, he was also instrumental in leading project development for the widening of I-215, improvements to congested freeway interchanges, the widening and extension of major streets and the separation of rail crossings from surface streets throughout the San Bernardino Valley. Mr. Moon held a bachelor's degree from Claremont Men's College and both master's and doctorate degrees from Claremont Graduate School, was a former Navy Lieutenant, was a political science instructor at California State University, San Bernardino, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and worked as a principal planner for the Southern California Association of Governments. Too soon after his retirement in March 2003, Mr. Moon was diagnosed with cancer and died after a short battle with the disease at the age of 59 in October 2005. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 16, Resolution Chapter 86, on 7/10/2007.

The Fifth Street Bridge that crosses I-215 in San Bernardino is named the "John Knabenbauer Fifth Street Bridge". It was named in memory of John Knabenbauer, a dedicated Caltrans maintenance employee, who succumbed to injuries he suffered on November 28, 2007, when he was struck by a passing vehicle while working on I-215, near the Fifth Street off-ramp, in San Bernardino. John was born on October 19, 1965, grew up in the foothills of San Bernardino, and graduated from Cajon High School. A 17-year veteran of Caltrans, John embarked upon his state service career in May 1990 in the Landscape Division of Caltrans District 7 (Los Angeles) as a maintenance worker, and he transitioned to Highway Maintenance in July 1992, where he remained until September 1995, when he transferred to District 8 (San Bernardino/Riverside) in Riverside. John was promoted to Caltrans Equipment Operator II in Riverside on November 1, 2000, and transferred to the Fontana Maintenance Yard on July 16, 2005. Throughout his state service career, John was genuinely respected, admired, and appreciated by all who had the opportunity to know and work with him and to reap the benefits of his exceptional spirit. John received a commendation from President George W. Bush for his work in 2003 during the "Old Fire" in San Bernardino, where he helped maintain traffic control at the bottom of the hill and used a plow truck to maintain an evacuation route. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 24, Resolution Chapter 66, on 7/16/2009.

 

National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

Arrowhead Trail Sign The portion of this route from the northern I-15/I-215 junction to Route 66 (former US 91/US 66) is part of the "Arrowhead Trail (Ocean to Ocean Trail)". It was named by Resolution Chapter 369 in 1925.

National Old Trails Road Sign The original surface routing replaced by I-215 (i.e., old US 66) was part of the "National Old Trails Road".

The original surface routing replaced by I-215 (i.e., old US 66) was part of the "Santa Fe Trail".

National Park to Park Highway Sign Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway Sign The original surface routing replaced by I-215 (i.e., old US 66) appears to have been part of the "National Park to Park Highway", and the "Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway".

All of original US 395 (which includes all of I-215) was part of the "Three Flags Highway".

 

Interstate Submissions

The portion from Devore to I-10 was accepted as 139(b) non-chargeable milage in 1972 as I-215, changed to I-15E in 1973, changed back to I-215 in 1982. In 1996, it was constructed to 139(a) standards. The portion between Route 10 and Route 60 was accepted as 139(a) milage in 1973. The portion between Route 60 and Route 15 was accepted as 139(a) milage in 1972.

 

Historical Route

As of March 2008, the California Transportation Committee unanimously approved the designation of former US 395 as a historic route from San Diego to the Oregon border. It is still pending approval by the legislature and the governor. However, anticipating approval, San Diego County Supervisor Bill Horn approved $4,000 for the 31 signs that now mark old 395 in his district -- from Vista to the Bonsall Bridge, through downtown Fallbrook, to Rainbow.

On July 8, 2008, Resolution Chapter 79 officially designated specified sections of former US Highway Route 395 as Historic US Highway 395. The resolution noted that former US 395 was a scenic stretch of highway that ran through historic areas of the County of Riverside and provided the only direct route from San Diego to the Lake Tahoe region and northern Nevada, before heading back into California on its way north to Oregon and all the way into Canada. While former US 395 remains largely intact through the Counties of Inyo, Mono, Sierra, Lassen, and Modoc, only sections of former US 395 still exist in portions of the County of San Diego and the high desert area of the County of San Bernardino; most of the former highway route has been replaced by I-15 and I-215 in the Counties of San Diego, Riverside, and San Bernardino. US 395, which remains as I-15 and I-215, was the major and most significant connection between San Diego, the Inland Empire, and the eastern Sierra Nevada region. US 395 was known as the Cabrillo Parkway (and later the Cabrillo Freeway) in San Diego, now Route 163, it was the first freeway to be constructed in San Diego and opened to traffic in 1948. Part of the original routing of former US 395 in northern San Diego County includes the old Bonsall Bridge, one of the earliest automotive crossings over the San Luis Rey River, later becoming part of Route 76. The portion of former US 395 between Temecula and Lake Elsinore was part of the Butterfield Overland Mail route, the first major overland delivery service to southern California, established September 16, 1858. After its realignment eastward, former US 395 became the first major expressway and freeway system in the southern portion of the County of Riverside in the early 1950s, servicing the Cities of Temecula, Murrieta, Menifee, Sun City, and Perris. Today this is I-215. The portion of former US 395 between the Cities of San Bernardino and Hesperia, near modern US 395, traverses the Cajon Pass with old US 66 and old US 91, most famously used by the Mormons in 1851 in their crossing into the valley where they subsequently founded the modern Cities of San Bernardino and Riverside. The heritage in the regions through which former US 395 passed was greatly diminished when the former highway was replaced by suburban streets and I-15 and I-215.The Legislature hereby recognizes the remaining segments of US 395 for their historical significance and importance in the development of California, and designates those segments as Historic State Highway Route 395. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 98, Resolution Chapter 79, on 7/3/2008.

 

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Commuter Lanes

HOV lanes are planned as follows:

  • From I-10 to Route 30. This is TCRP Project #57.
  • From the Riverside County line to Orange Show Road. Construction starts in July 1998.
  • From Route 60/Route 91 to University Avenue in Riverside. Construction starts in September 1997.
  • From University Avenue to the E Route 60/Route 215 junction. Construction starts in July 1999.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.8] From Route 74 near Romoland to Route 74 near Perris.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Riverside 215 23.50 23.86
Riverside 215 26.15 26.46
Riverside 215 26.72 28.05
Riverside 215 30.81 31.31
Riverside 215 32.23 32.61
Riverside 215 36.24 36.92
Riverside 215 37.33 37.65
Riverside 215 40.19 40.46
Riverside 215 40.46 43.41
Riverside 215 43.41 43.81
Riverside 215 43.81 45.27
San Bernardino 215 1.11 1.78
San Bernardino 215 2.14 3.71
San Bernardino 215 3.85 4.22
San Bernardino 215 4.33 11.26

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.19] Entire route.

 


Overall statistics for Route 215:

  • Total Length (1995): 54 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 32,500 to 172,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 5; Sm. Urban: 19; Urbanized: 30.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 54 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 54 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Riverside, San Bernardino.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

This route number appears not to have been assigned by the California Legislature before the 1963 renumbering.


State Shield

State Route 216



Routing

From Visalia to Route 198 near Lemon Cove via Woodlake.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This routing is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 133 between Visalia and Woodlake. It was LRN 131 between Woodlake and Lemon Cove. Both routes were defined in 1933. It was not signed before 1963.

 

Status

A routing along Lovers Lane between Houston Road and Route 198 in Visalia was adopted on July 9, 1993.

In September 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Tulare County that will widen Route 216 (Houston Ave) to four lanes from Lovers Lane to McAullif Street in the city of Visalia. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. Total estimated project cost is $11,200,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. The project will require both commercial and residential relocations. In addition the project would remove on-street parking spaces used for businesses in the area.

In October 2012, the CTC approved $4,820,000 in funding for the Route 216 Widening in Visalia, from Lovers Lane to east of McAullif Street. Widen to four lanes.

Caltrans is exploring creating a roundabout on this route at the intersection of Route 216/Route 245 in Woodlake. Other potential/planned roundabout locations in the San Joaquin Valley include Route 145/Jensen near Kerman, Route 168/Auberry Road in Prather, Route 43/Route 137 in Corcoran, Route 190/Road 152 east of Tipton, Route 190/Road 284 east of Porterville, and Route 155/Browning Road in Delano. A 2007 study of 55 roundabouts in the U.S. found a 35% reduction in accidents and a 90% reduction in fatal accidents when intersections with stop signs or signals were converted to roundabouts. It costs about the same to build a roundabout as to put up traffic signals, and they need significantly less maintenance than traffic signal intersections -- about 60% to 90% less, depending on how much landscaping work is required.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 216:

  • Total Length (1995): 19 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,850 to 8,900
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 14; Sm. Urban: 2; Urbanized: 3.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 19 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 3 mi; Minor Arterial: 16 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Tulare.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1853 added LRN 216 as the route “[LRN 20] north of Susanville to [LRN 28] near Adin”.

This route runs from the junction of Route 139 and Horse Lake Road to Route 299 near Adin. This is Route 139.



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