California Highways
www.cahighways.org

California Highways

Routes 185 through 192

 
powered by FreeFind

California Highways Home Page
State Highway Routes
Numbered County Highways
State Highway Types
Interstate Types and History
Highway Numbering Conventions
State Highway Renumberings
State Highway Chronology
Maps Trails and Roads Related WWW Links Site Change Log Sources and Credits

Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

185 · 186 · 187 · 188 · 189 · 190 · 191 · 192


State Shield

State Route 185



Routing

From Route 92 in Hayward to Route 77 in Oakland.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as "Hayward to High Street in Oakland."

In 1984, Chapter 409 clarified the routing: "Route 92 in Hayward to High Street Route 77 in Oakland."

In 2009, AB 1386 (Chapter 291, 10/11/2009) authorized the relinquishment of the portion within the city of Hayward by adding the following:

(b) (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Hayward the portion of Route 185 located within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

(2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur: (A) The portion of Route 185 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway. (B) The portion of Route 185 relinquished shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

(4) For relinquished portions of Route 185, the City of Hayward shall maintain signs within its jurisdiction directing motorists to the continuation of Route 185 or to the state highway system, as applicable.

In July 2010, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Hayward on Route 185 (Mission Boulevard) from Foothill Boulevard to A Street, under terms and conditions stated in the letter dated June 1, 2010, determined to be in the best interests of the State. Authorized by Chapter 291, Statutes of 2009, which amended Section 485 of the Streets and Highways Code.

In 2012, AB 2679 (Chapter 769, 9/29/12) updated the language to reflect the relinquishment in Hayward:

(b) (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Hayward the portion of Route 185 located within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

(2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur:

(A) The portion of Route 185 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway.

(B) The portion of Route 185 relinquished shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

(4) (b) For relinquished portions The relinquished former portion of Route 185 within the City of Hayward is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 185, the City of Hayward shall maintain signs within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 185 or to the state highway system, as applicable. applicable, and shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 185, including any traffic signal progression.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 105, defined in 1933.

Route 185 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 185 between 1934 and 1964. It appears that portions of Route 185 are the older surface street routing for Route 17 (now I-880), combined with an older unsigned routing. The portion N of the junction with Route 61 in San Leandro (i.e., N of Estudillo) is former Route 17.

 

Status

Prior to 2008, Route 77 from the official terminus of Route 185 in Oakland and I-880 was signed as Route 185, making it appear that Route 185 continues to I-880. This was corrected by 2008.

 

Naming

E 14th Street and Mission Blvd.

Historically, this route is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). A portion of this route has officially been designated as part of "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1707, Chapter 739, on October 11, 2001.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 185:

  • Total Length (1995): 10 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 16,600 to 25,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 10.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 10 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 10 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Alameda.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 60] near Laguna Beach to [LRN 2] near Irvine" to the highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 185 with that definition. The definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering.

This route ran from Route 1 near Laguna Beach to US 101 near Irvine. This is Route 133 as defined in 1963 (i.e., present-day non-toll portions).


State Shield

State Route 186



Routing

From the international boundary near Algodones to Route 8.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

186 and 117Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 186 was defined as "Route 1 near Pacifica to Route 101 near San Bruno."

In 1965, Chapter 1372 added the portion from Route 101 to Route 87: "Route 1 near Pacifica to Route 87 via the vicinity of Route 101 near San Bruno."

In 1969, Chapter 294 renumbered this route as Route 380.

State Shield In 1972, Chapter 742 redefined the route as "From the international boundary near Algodones to Route 8. " Chapter 1216 in 1962 did the same thing; in 1990, Chapter 216 removed the duplicate definition.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1969 routing of this route was LRN 229, defined in 1947.

The post-1972 routing of Route 186 was not defined in 1963.

Route 186 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 186 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 186:

  • Total Length (1995): 2 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 2000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 2; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 2 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 2 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Imperial.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 23] near Palmdale to Swartout Valley" as a state highway. This was codified in the highway code as LRN 186 with the definition "[LRN 23] near Palmdale to [LRN 61] in Swartout Valley", but the routing was repealed later that year by Chapter 426. This occurred as part of a compromise to create the Arroyo Seco Parkway. The following is a quote from the Historical American Engineering Record on the Arroyo Seco Parkway:

Because gas tax funds were going to be needed to build the road, another formidable political force joined the alternately strident, persuasive, and aggrieved stakeholders: the State Highway Commissioners. Unless the Arroyo Seco Parkway could qualify as a state highway, it would not receive the tax funds that would maintain it. As guardians of the 1 ¼ cent highway gas tax fund doled out to counties and cities, however, the commissioners opposed adding any more mileage to the state highway system.

To solve the problem, Los Angeles County Supervisor Roger Jessup offered a swap: the county would take back ten to fifteen miles of the Pear Blossom Highway, which ran from Palmdale to Cajon Pass at the northeastern edge of Los Angeles County, allowing that mileage to be granted to the Arroyo Seco Parkway. The State Highway Commission balked at this idea, requiring the county to assume control of the entire thirty-four miles of the Pear Blossom Highway. To keep the scheme alive, the county agreed to this.

Miller amended her bill by inserting a provision that effectively removed the Pear Blossom Highway from the state system. The coalition of South Pasadena and Highland Park residents who supported the parks for which they had been assessed, led by Thrasher, sought an amendment to return previously levied park assessment funds in the Arroyo Seco to the cities losing the land to highway right-of-way. This amendment was defeated. Assembly Bill 2345 authorizing the Arroyo Seco Parkway passed the state assembly and senate by a large margin, and Governor Frank Merriam signed it into law on July 13, 1935. The bill did not specify the exact route.

It does not appear that the LRN 186 definition of the Pear Blossom Highway was signed as Route 138.

LRN 186 was redefined in 1959 by Chapter 1062 as the route from LRN 194 (Route 79) to LRN 19 (US 60) near Moreno. This was a transfer from LRN 194. This is the former routing of present-day Route 79 along Gilman Springs Road (the present routing is Lamb Canyon).


State Shield

State Route 187



Routing

From Lincoln Boulevard to Route 10 via Venice Boulevard.

Note that, with respect to this routing, prior to the construction of any portion of this highway, the City of Los Angeles shall furnish to the State of California without charge all right-of-way necessary for that portion and the City of Los Angeles and the County of Los Angeles shall enter into a cooperative agreement with the department wherein the city and the county agree to pay one-half the cost of plans and construction. The title to that portion of the right-of-way acquired by the City of Los Angeles, and furnished to the State of California, for Route 187, but not needed for that route upon its construction, has been to the city.

SB 177, Chapter 106, 1988 contains special legislation to improve the traversable route.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

163 in Santa MonicaIn 1963, Route 187 was defined as the route "Route 1 at a point near Colorado Avenue in Santa Monica to Route 10 via Pacific Avenue and Venice Boulevard; provided that prior to the construction of any portion of this highway the City of Los Angeles shall furnish to the State of California without charge all right-of-way necessary for that portion and the City of Los Angeles and the County of Los Angeles shall enter into a co-operative agreement with the department wherein said city and county agree to pay one-half the cost of plans and construction."

Note that the grade separation here is part of the eastern-most portion of the Santa Monica pier.

In 1988, Chapter 106 deleted the Santa Monica portion of the route, retaining the conditions: "Route 1 at a point near Colorado Avenue in Santa Monica the South city limits of Santa Monica near Dewey Street to Route 10 via Pacific Avenue and Venice Boulevard; providedů"

In 1994, AB 3132, Chapter 1220 deleted the portion from the South city limits of the City of Santa Monica to Lincoln Boulevard, changing the origin to "Lincoln Boulevard". It is unclear why they did not identify Lincoln Boulevard as Route 1.

Note that the bridge log shows a junction with Route 1 at the McClure Tunnel. This dates back to the original 1964 definition of the route, and represents that Santa Monica Pier bridge.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route corresponds to the 1961 definition of LRN 163, defined in 1933. It was not signed until 1988. Route 187 was not included in the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

 

Naming

Maps based on the 1956 freeway plan show this route as the "Venice Freeway". It was named after the community of Venica, CA, founded by Abbot Kinney in 1904 as part of his Ocean Park tract, envisioning it as an imitation of Venice, Italy.

 

Status

Unsigned Not completely signed.

In December 2013, it was reported that the Santa Monica City Council was looking closely at the impact some of the plans to replace the “structurally deficient” concrete bridge, which connects Colorado Avenue to the historic Santa Monica Pier. There was particular concern that the new bridge allow people of all abilities equal access to the Santa Monica Pier. The future of the Pier Bridge, built in 1939 by the California Department of Highways, has been a topic of discussion for nearly 20 years in Santa Monica. Prior to August 2010, the plan was to rehabilitate the bridge; the decision to replace was made in August 2010. In a 2010 survey, the bridge received a 30.6 sufficiency rating on a 100-point scale. Caltrans says it has inadequate seismic strength, crumbling concrete and cracks in the deck. Also, the sidewalks are too narrow and it has steep curbs and substandard lane widths. The replacement project is eligible for nearly 90 percent federal funding. In the next step, City planners will move forward with environmental impact studies required by both State and national law, a process they said can last from 18 to 24 months.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 187:

  • Total Length (1995): 5 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 30,000 to 56,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 5.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 6 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 5 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the following routes to the highway system:

  • [LRN 27] near Holtville to Calexico-Midway Wells Road near Bonds Corner
  • [LRN 26] near Brawley to [LRN 27] near Holtville
  • [LRN 26] near Indio via Mecca to [LRN 26] near Brawley via the N shore of the Salton Sea
  • [LRN 26] near Whitewater to Perris-Indio Road near Indian Wells
  • [LRN 26] near Whitewater to Morongo Valley

In 1935, these routes were added to the highway code with the following routing:

  1. [LRN 26] near Whitewater to Morongo Valley
  2. [LRN 26] near Whitewater to [LRN 64] near Indian Wells
  3. [LRN 26] near Indio via Mecca and the north shore of the Salton Sea to [LRN 26] near Brawley
  4. [LRN 26] near Brawley to [LRN 27] near Holtville
  5. [LRN 27] near Holtville to [LRN 202] near Bonds Corner

In 1959, Chapter 1062 extended segment a to "[LRN 43] near Lucern Valley via Monongo Valley", and corrected the spelling of White Water.

Signage on this route was as follows:

  1. LRN 26 (US 60/US 70/US 99; present-day I-10) near White Water to LRN 43 (Route 18) near Lucerne Valley via Morongo Valley.

    This is present-day Route 62 to Yucca Valley, and Route 247 to Lucerne Valley.

  2. LRN 26 (US 60/US 70/US 99; present-day I-10) near White Water to LRN 64 (US 60/US 70; present-day I-10) near Palm Desert.

    This is Route 111.

  3. LRN 26 (US 60/US 70/US 99; present-day I-10) near Brawley to LRN 27 (US 80; present-day I-8) near Holtville.

    This is Route 111 to Brawley, and Route 115 to Holtville.

  4. LRN 27 (US 80; present-day I-8) near Holtville to LRN 202 near Bonds Corners.

    This was Route 115 until 1973.


State Shield

State Route 188



Routing

From the international boundary near Tecate to Route 94.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 188 was defined as "the south end of Fallen Leaf Lake to Route 89 near Camp Richardson." This was Fallen Leaf Road near Lake Tahoe. Few realized it was even in the state highway system. In 1965, Chapter 1372 deleted this routing.

State Shield In 1972, Chapter 1216 defined the current routing.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1965 routing for this route was LRN 94, defined in 1933.

The 1972 routing for Route 188 was not defined in 1963.

Route 188 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 188 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

Truck ScalesThere are plans to build truck scales near Tecate. This project is fully funded in the 2006 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The project includes Corridor Border Infrastructure (CBI) funds and Federal Motorcarrier funds. The total estimated project cost is $23,870,000. The project is programmed in the 2006 SHOPP for state-only matching funds for $8,927,000.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 188:

  • Total Length (1995): 2 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 2,750 to 4,150
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 2; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 2 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 2 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 43] near Mr. Anderson to the Cajon Pass-Lake Arrowhead Road". In 1935, this was added to the highway code with the routing:

"[LRN 43] near Mr. Anderson to [LRN 59]"

This routing remained unchanged until the 1963 great renumbering. It ran from Route 18 near Mt. Anderson to the present-day Route 138/Route 173 junction. This is signed as Route 138.


State Shield

State Route 189



Routing

From Route 18 near Strawberry Peak to Route 173 near Lake Arrowhead via Strawberry Flat.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route is as defined in 1963 (hell, 1933!)

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The current route has the same number as the pre-1963 LRN. LRN 189 was defined in 1933. However, Route 189 was not included in the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 189:

  • Total Length (1995): 6 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 3,200 to 7,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 6; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 6 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 6 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Bernardino.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the route from "[LRN 43] near Strawberry Peak via Strawberry Flat to the Cajon Pass-Lake Arrowhead Road near Lake Arrowhead" was added to the state highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 189 with the routing:

"[LRN 43] near Strawberry Peak via Strawberry Flat to [LRN 59] near Lake Arrowhead"

This definition remained the same until 1963, and modulo route number changes, is still the routing for Route 189.


State Shield

State Route 190



Routing

From Route 99 near Tipton to Route 127 near Death Valley Junction via the vicinity of Porterville, Camp Nelson, Olancha, and Death Valley.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route is as defined in 1963. The last 47 mi of this route, between Quaking Aspen to Haiwee Pass, was adopted in late 1965. This is the segment over the sierras, from Quaking Aspen Campground to near US 395 near Haiwee Cyn Road. It has never been constructed. The remainer of this route (from Route 99 to Quaking Aspen Campground, and from US 395 near Haiwee Cyn Road to Route 127 near Death Valley Junction is conventional highway.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 190 was signed along the route from Jct. US 99 at Tipton to Death Valley Junction via Lone Pine. This route was LRN 127, defined in 1933.

 

Status

Caltrans is exploring creating a roundabout on this route at the intersection of Route 190/Road 152 east of Tipton. Other potential/planned roundabout locations in the San Joaquin Valley include Route 145/Jensen near Kerman, Route 168/Auberry Road in Prather, Route 43/Route 137 in Corcoran, Route 216/Route 245 in Woodlake, Route 190/Road 284 east of Porterville, and Route 155/Browning Road in Delano. A 2007 study of 55 roundabouts in the U.S. found a 35% reduction in accidents and a 90% reduction in fatal accidents when intersections with stop signs or signals were converted to roundabouts. It costs about the same to build a roundabout as to put up traffic signals, and they need significantly less maintenance than traffic signal intersections -- about 60% to 90% less, depending on how much landscaping work is required.

In May 2012, it was reported that Caltrans was holding meetings on the intersection of Route 190 and Road 284. Two build alternatives and a no-build alternative are under consideration. The alternatives include a single-lane rural roundabout or a traffic signal with a protected left turn.

In January 2012, the CTC approved $5.75 million for an asphalt-overlay project on Route 190 in Tulare County near Lake Success. The upgrade from Road 284 to the Tule River Bridge will improve pavement quality and increase service life.

In April 2012, the CTC authorized SHOPP funding on Route 190, in Inyo County, 09-INY-190 R65.9/R66.5 Near Panamint Springs, from 8.0 miles east of Panamint Valley Road to 10 miles west of Wildrose Road. $1,018,000 to realign roadway to allow the construction of a shoulder catchment area for falling rocks and minimize the potential of traffic collisions.

Unconstructed Unconstructed from Quaking Aspen to Route 395 on a route adopted 10/20/1965. Portions of the route were adopted as a conventional highway on 4/15/1964. Rescinding the route was recommended on 6/25/1982, but nothing ever happened. District 9 recommends deletion of the route.

One 1953 map shows the routing between Wonoga Peak and Lone Pine as what is now Horseshoe Meadows Road, Tuttle Creek Road, and Whitney Portal Road. The map implies that the Route 136 routing was used, but doesn't make it explicit. According to the Traversable Highways report, there are no local roads that adequately fit the description of a traversable highway. This is mountainous terrain. There are no plans to construct this.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.7] From Route 65 near Porterville to Route 127 near Death Valley Junction.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.7] From Route 136 near Keeler to Route 127 near Death Valley Junction (never upgraded). Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.18] Between Route 65 and Route 127.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 190:

  • Total Length (1995): 188 miles traversable; 43 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 200 to 14,800.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 227; Sm. Urban: 4; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 164 mi; FAS: 24 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 4 mi; Minor Arterial: 160 mi; Collector: 24 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Townes Pass (4956 ft)

  • Counties Traversed: Tulare, Inyo.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

1944 MapIn 1933, Chapter 767 added the routes from "[LRN 9] near San Dimas to [LRN 26] near Redlands via Highland Avenue" and "[LRN 26] near Redlands to [LRN 43] near Big Bear Lake via Barton Flats" to the highway system. In 1935, these were added to the highway code as LRN 190, with the route:

  1. [LRN 9] near San Dimas to [LRN 26] near Redlands via Highland Avenue
  2. [LRN 26] near Redlands to [LRN 43] near Big Bear Lake via Barton Flats

The map to the right shows LRN 190 (Route 30) to its junction with LRN 207. This is where the route turned into Route 38.

In 1957, Chapter 1911 deleted the specific routing via Highland Avenue from segment (a).

This route was signed as follows:

  1. LRN 9 (US 66; I-210) near San Dimas to LRN 26 (US 70/US 99; present-day I-10) near Redlands.

    This was Route 30 between Route 57 and I-10; it is present day Route 210. It originally ran along Highland Avenue

  2. LRN 26 near Redlands to LRN 43 near Big Bear Lake, via Barton Flats.

    This is present-day Route 38.


State Shield

State Route 191



Routing

From Route 70 near Wicks Corner to Paradise.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This routing is unchanged from 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was LRN 295, defined in 1961. It was unsigned before 1963.

Route 191 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 191 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 191:

  • Total Length (1995): 11 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 4,400 to 8,700
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 9; Sm. Urban: 2; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 11 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 2 mi; Minor Arterial: 9 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Butte.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

1944 mapIn 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 31] near Verdemont to Highland Avenue, San Bernardino, via Little Mountain" as part of the highway system. This route was added to the highway code as LRN 191 with the routing:

"[LRN 31] near Verdemont to [LRN 190] in San Bernardino, via Little Mountain"

This routing remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. This was Route 206.


State Shield

State Route 192



Routing

From Route 154 near Santa Barbara to Route 150 near the Ventura-Santa Barbara county line via Foothill Boulevard.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This routing is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was originally part of Route 150, which was signed in 1934. It was renumbered to Route 192 in 1963. The route was LRN 80, defined in 1931. Route 192 was not defined as part of the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 192:

  • Total Length (1995): 21 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 470 to 12,100
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 3; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 18.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 14 mi; FAS: 7 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 2 mi; Minor Arterial: 14 mi; Collector: 5 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Barbara.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 77] via Euclid Avenue to Highland Avenue in Upland" as part of the highway system. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 192, with the routing:

"[LRN 77] via Euclid Avenue to [LRN 190] in Upland"

In 1959, Chapter 1062 relaxed the routing: "[LRN 77] via Euclid Avenue to [LRN 190] in Upland"

This route ran from Route 71 to Route 30 (I-210) near Upland. This is present-day Route 83.



Back Arrow
Highways 177-184
State Highway Routes
Return to State Highway Routes
Forward Arrow
Highways 193-200
© 1996-2012 Daniel P. Faigin.
Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.