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California Highways

Routes 177 through 184

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

177 · 178 · 179 · 180 · 181 · 182 · 183 · 184


State Shield

State Route 177



Routing

From Route 10 near Desert Center to Route 62 near Granite Pass.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 177 was defined as “Route 79 near San Jacinto to Route 60 near Moreno.” The routing was approximately along Gilman Springs Road.

In 1965, Chapter 1372 deleted this route.

State Shield In 1972, Chapter 1216 defined a new routing: “Route 10 near Desert Center to Route 62 near Granite Pass.”

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1965 routing was part of Route 79, and was originally part of LRN 194. In 1959, the legislative route number was changed to LRN 186. It was signed by 1963, but was not part of the 1934 definition of Route 79.

The post-1972 routing was not defined in 1963.

There was no signed Route 177 as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 177 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 177:

  • Total Length (1995): 27 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,050 to 4,100
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 27; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 27 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 27 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Riverside.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from “Brea to [LRN 77] near Chino” to the highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code with the routing:

“[LRN 176] near Brea to [LRN 77] near Chino”

This routing remained unchanged until the 1963 "great renumbering. This route ran from Route 90 (nee Route 42) near Brea to Route 71 near Chino. It is part of present-day Route 142.


State Shield

State Route 178



Routing
  1. From Bakersfield to Route 14 near Freeman via Walker Pass.

    In 2006, AB 1858 (Chapter 315, September 18, 2006) authorized relinquishment in Bakersfield:

    Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Bakersfield the portion of Route 178 that is located within the city limits of that city if the city agrees to accept it. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment: (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 178 shall cease to be a state highway. (3) The portion of Route 178 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81. (4) For the portion of Route 178 that is relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Bakersfield shall install and maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 178.

    The portion in Bakersfield was relinquished in June 2011.

    In 2012, AB 2679 (Chapter 769, 9/29/2012) updated the language to reflect the relinquishment:

    (b) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Bakersfield the portion of Route 178 that is located within the city limits of that city if the city agrees to accept it. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment:

    (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 178 shall cease to be a state highway.

    (3) The portion of Route 178 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (4) (b) For the The relinquished former portion of Route 178 that is relinquished under this subdivision, within the City of Bakersfield is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 178, the City of Bakersfield shall install and maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 178. 178 and shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 178, including any traffic signal progression.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment had the route: “(a) Route 99 in Bakersfield to Route 14 near Freeman via Walker Pass.” Later that year, Chapter 1698 relaxed the definition to be “(a) Bakersfield to Route 14 near Freeman via Walker Pass.”

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 178 was signed along the route from Jct. US 101 at Santa Margarita to Jct. Route 7 (US 395) at Freeman Junction via Bakersfield. The route originally began at US 101 near Santa Margarita, and continued through Pozo, La Panza and McKittrick. It then ran through Buttonwillow, and Rosedale to Bakersfield. This was LRN 58, defined in 1919, and is present-day Route 58.

    The route then ran along the current routing through Bodfish, Weldon, the Sequoia Forest, and Freeman. The routing ended at Route 7 (now Route 14/US 395). This was LRN 57, defined in 1919.

     

    Status

    In June 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Bakersfield on Route 178 from Route 99 to M Street, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated May 2, 2011, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 315, Statutes of 2006, which amended Section 478 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    Freeway from Downtown Bakersfield to approximately 4 miles out of town. Freeway ends for 1 mile, and then begins again (signed as freeway as a 2 lane road section for 2.2 miles). Also begins again near the town of Lake Isabella. Originally in Bakersfield, Route 178 followed 24th Street, had a short multiplex with southbound US 99/eastbound US 466 on Golden Stave Avenue (present day Route 204/Business Route 99), and a short multiplex with US 466 (Sumner Street) to Baker Street. It then continued north on Baker Street and then east on Niles Street. The traffic circle underneath the current Route 204/Business Route 99 freeway at Chester Avenue was in existance even in 1942, when Route 204/Business Route 99 was US 99/US 466.

    [178 Fairfax I/C]Caltrans has plans to construct an interchange at Route 178 and Fairfax Road. The construction will include soundwalls and the widening of Route 178 from a two-lane expressway to a four- lane freeway, east of Oswell Street overcrossing to west of Morning Drive. Construction should start in September 2007, and be completed by September 2009.

    A project to widen the route to 4 lanes from Route 184 to Miramonte Drive was submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding ($8,166K requested), but was not recommended for funding.

    The history of the freeway section of Route 178 is quite interesting. The complete freeway version of the route did not get built because the funding was cut off in 1974 when Governor Jerry Brown ended the freeway building binge. Proposed Freeway 178 is part of the both the County and the City of Bakersfield's 2010 General Plan. The route adoption was made April 27, 1960 by the California Highway Commission. The proposed freeway would follow existing alignment as a far Mesa Marin Raceway. The state already owns this piece, it pretty clearly marked by a fence line on either side of Route 178. Then Freeway 178 breaks north and crosses the Kern River east of the county golf course. It would then follow Rancheria Rd more or less for about 10 miles until it drops south through a tunnel into the existing freeway segment at the top of the canyon.

    The canyon segment of Route 178 scores a unheard of 257 on the state's safety index; this means that the canyon portion of Route 178 gets 257% more accidents then would be expected on a mythical state highway with similar average daily traffic. Current thought is that having the highway in the canyon next to the Kern River (a) poses a significant threat to the riparian ecosystem in the Kern Canyon, (b) a risk to the water quality of ground the water recharge supply in the southern San Joaquin valley, (c) a risk to the drinking water supply of metropolitan Bakersfield, and (d) a risk to the irrigation water supply to the farms in the southern San Joaquin Valley. [Information on the history of Route 178 comes from a post by Karl Davisson]

    The risk of the canyon section of Route 178 was highlighted again in 2013. In 2012, CHP said it handled 48 accidents in the canyon. As of April 2013, there have been 18 accidents in the area. According to officials these accidents are not only costing lives, but also taxpayer money. A recent rescue on the route cost at least $34,000. Currently there are guardrails installed sporadically along Route 178 in the canyon. When Caltrans was asked whether additional guardrails could be installed, the response was that many locations in the canyon only have one or two feet of shoulder, and Caltrans needs more than that to properly and safely install guardrailing. The posts supporting the rails need to have sufficient rigidity and integrity to withstand an out of control vehicle. Concrete walls in steep canyon areas are not feasible, but due to cost and environmental impacts.
    (Source: ABC23, 4/23/13)

    According to Caltrans, there is an unconstructed adopted route from W of Route 184 to W of Miracle Hot Springs that is parallel to the existing route.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • National Corridor Infrastructure Improvement Program #6: Design, planning, and construction of Route 178 in Bakersfield. $100,000,000.

    • National Corridor Infrastructure Improvement Program #7: Widening of Rosedale Highway between Route 43 and Route 99 in Bakersfield, and widening of Route 178 between Route 99 and D Street in Bakersfield. $60,000,000.

    Bakersfield Crosstown Freeway

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • Projects of National and Regional Significance #1: Bakersfield Beltway System, $140,000,000.

    • National Corridor Infrastructure Improvement Program #4: Centennial Corridor Loop in Bakersfield, $330,000,000.

    This route is not yet formally in the state highway system. The proposed freeway is supposed to start about ¾ mile from where Route 178 comes to an end in Downtown Bakersfield. From there, it will curve south, then west to run along the railroad tracks south of the existing Route 178. The freeway would then begin to curve slightly north, then west as it crosses over Route 99. Then it will run about 5 miles west where it will join up with the future Westside Beltway.

    The Centennial Corridor is an 8 lane freeway that will connect the Westside Parkway west of Route 99 to State Route 178 in the northeast part of Bakersfield. The project study report (PSR), a preliminary planning document, is currently underway for this project. The environmental document and initial engineering/alignment studies for the Centennial Corridor are planned to begin the Summer of 2003 and will take several years to complete. Currently, the initial phase of construction for the Centennial Corridor is planned for 2008 or 2009. The Centennial Corridor will connect to the Westside Parkway and is currently planned to continue east under Route 99 and under Oak Street north of the BN&SF railroad tracks. There is proposed to be a SPUI interchange at Oak Street. In the downtown area, the Centennial Corridor is proposed to go over and have a partial interchange with F Street. Continuing east after F Street, the Centennial Corridor is then planned to swing south over the BN&SF railroad tracks. There would be an off ramp to 14th Street which would allow access to areas north and south of the Centennial Corridor at Chester Avenue, L Street, N Street, and Q Street. At Q Street, there is proposed to be an on ramp for eastbound traffic and an off ramp for westbound traffic.

     

     

    Naming

    Kern Canyon Road to Route 155; Walker Pass Road to Route 14. Kern River was named by Frémont in 1845, for his topographer and artist, Edward M. Kern of Philadelphia. The county was named in 1866.

    The portion of Route 178 between M Street and Fairfax Road in the City of Bakersfield in Kern County is named the "CHP Officer David W. Manning Memorial Freeway." It was named in honor of California Highway Patrol Officer David W. Manning, who passed away on February 15, 1996, from injuries he received on January 26, 1996 as a result of a traffic accident. Officer Manning had been one of the first officers assigned to the new Bakersfield area motor squad when it was reactivated after a 25-year absence. He liked to carry candy canes with him while on duty to hand out to children he encountered. At the scene of his fatal collision, Officer Manning's motorcycle was on its side surrounded by candy canes. He was a member of the California Highway Patrol for eight years and served in East Los Angeles and Bakersfield. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 50, July 16, 2004, Chapter 117.

    The portion of Route 178 from post mile 13.7 at the mouth of Kern Canyon eastbound to its intersection with Kernville Road (Route 155) in Kern County is named the “Kern County Deputy Sheriff William "Joe" Hudnall, Jr., Memorial Highway”. This segment was named in memory of Deputy Sheriff William "Joe" Hudnall Jr., who was hired by the Kern County Sheriff's Department on September 27, 1997, after putting himself through the P.O.S.T. Academy at his own expense. Deputy Sheriff Hudnall was killed in the line of duty on November 14, 2006, while transporting a prisoner from his duty assignment in Kernville, California, to Bakersfield, California. His patrol unit was struck head-on, on Route 178 in Kern Canyon, by a vehicle operated by a person who was under the influence of a controlled substance. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 90, Resolution Chapter 71, on 7/3/2008.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  2. From Route 14 near Freeman to Route 127.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963: “(b) Route 14 near Freeman to Route 127.”

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was not part of the original 1934 signage of Route 178. This was LRN 212, defined in 1947. It was not signed until after 1964.

     

    Status

    Unconstructed This segment is unconstructed from 15 miles east of Ridgecrest to 15 miles west of Route 127 (10 miles from the eastern boundary of the Death Valley National Monument). The "traversable" route is a winding dirt road through mountain passes in a desolate area. It passes through the gunnery range of the China Lake Naval Weapons Center and through the Wingate Wash area (a National Park Service designated wilderness area). The area is not suitable for a state highway, and District 9 recommends it be deleted from the state highway system.

     

    Naming

    "Inyokern" Road; "Trona" Road

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] From Route 14 near Freeman to the vicinity of the San Bernardino county line. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.7] From the east boundary of Death Valley National Monument to Route 127 near Shoshone.


  3. From Route 127 to the Nevada state line in Pahrump Valley.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963: “(c) Route 127 to the Nevada state line in Pahrump Valley.”

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was not part of the original 1934 signage of Route 178. This was LRN 212, defined in 1947. It was not signed until after 1964.

     

    Naming

    This segment is named the "Charles Brown Highway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 13, Chapter 244, in 1961. California State Senator Charles Brown served the people of Inyo and Mono Counties from 1939 to 1962.

     

    Interregional Route

    [SHC 164.18] Between Route 168 near Lake Sabrina and Route 395.

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Kern 178 1.68 R6.65

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 178:

  • Total Length (1995): 152 miles traversable; 56 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 180 to 58,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 188; Sm. Urban: 7; Urbanized: 13.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 118 mi; FAU: 4 mi; FAS: 30 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 19 mi; Minor Arterial: 103 mi; Collector: 30 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Walker Pass (5250 ft); Salsberry Pass (3315 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: Kern, San Bernardino, Inyo.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the route from “Cerritos Avenue to [LRN 43] near Olive via Anaheim” was added to the state highway system. This routing is unclear; may have run from near Anaheim and Katella to either Route 91 or Route 55. In 1935, the route was added to the highway code as LRN 178 with that routing.

In 1953, Chapter 1836 rewrote the definition to be "Lakewood Boulevard to Manchester Avenue via Carson-Lincoln". For a route idea of this route, see here.

In 1957, Chapter 36 clarified the definition to be “[LRN 168] near Lakewood Boulevard to [LRN 174] near Anaheim Manchester Avenue via Carson-Lincoln

This is the route from Route 19 near Lakewood to US 101 near Anaheim. This route was US 91, and approximates the routing of pre-1963 Route 18. It was later Route 214, and was deleted in 1981. It is not currently in the state highway system.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 179



Routing

From Route 80 near Vacaville to Route 128 near Berryessa Reservoir.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route is as defined in 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route (proposed with no routing) was LRN 244, defined in 1959. It was unsigned.

Route 179 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 179 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route; unconstructed. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Status

The traversable local route is Cherry Glen Road and Pleasant Valley Road. A specific routing has not been determined. There is no recommendation to adopt these roads into the state system.

 


Overall statistics for Route 179:

  • Total Length (1995): 14 miles
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 14; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Counties Traversed: Solano, Yolo.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

LRN 179 was defined in 1933 as the route from [LRN 60] near Long Beach to Santa Ana. It was codified into the 1935 highway code as:

“from [LRN 60] near Long Beach to Santa Ana”

In 1957, Chapter 36 extended the route to "[LRN 43] near Orange".

This routing (signed as Route 22) ran from LRN 60 (former Route 3; former US 101A; present-day Route 1) near Long Beach to LRN 43 (Route 55) near Orange.


State Shield

State Route 180



Routing
  1. From Route 25 near Paicines to Route 5.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, the first two segments were defined as "(a) Route 101 near Gilroy to Route 156. (b) Route 156 to Route 99 near Fresno passing near Paicines and Mendota."

    In 1965 Chapter 1371 split (b) into two segments: "(b) Route 156 to Route 5 passing near Paicines. (c) Route 5 to Route 99 passing near Mendota."

    In 1984, Chapter 409 deleted (a), truncated (b), and clarified (d): "(b) Route 156 Route 25 near Paicines to Route 5. [...] (d) The General Grant Grove section of Kings Canyon National Park to Kings Canyon River Kings Canyon National Park boundary near Cedar Grove." The former (a) and the segment removed from (b) were transferred to Route 25. This resulted in the current definition of (a)

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 180 was (to be) signed along the route from Jct Route 25 at Pacines to Jct. Route 7 (US 395) at Independence, via Fresno. Oddly, it was part of LRN 263, defined in 1959, and does not appear to have been part of the state highway system between 1933 and 1959. The routing was only "proposed" in 1963, and likely corresponds to a county route. "Tis a puzzlement"

     

    Status

    Unconstructed Unconstructed; the traversable local routing may be signed as County Route J1. The traversable route is Panoche Road and San Benito County Road with no plans for improvement. The 32' San Benito County Road has a structural section consisting of chip seal over Class 4 asphaltic base. No state adoption is requested or recommended. Panoche Road between San Benito County and I-5 is an unimproved dirt road. If a new state highway is constructed in the area, a new alignment is recommended, and it is unlikely any of the existing road would be incorporated. State adoption of Panoche Road was not recommended.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  2. From Route 5 to Route 99 passing near Mendota.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, the second segment of this route was defined as “(b) Route 156 to Route 99 near Fresno passing near Paicines and Mendota.”

    In 1965 Chapter 1371 split (b) into two segments: “(b) Route 156 to Route 5 passing near Paicines. (c) Route 5 to Route 99 passing near Mendota.”

    In 1984, Chapter 409 deleted (a), making this (b)

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 180 was (to be) signed along the route from Jct Route 25 at Pacines to Jct. Route 7 (US 395) at Independence, via Fresno. Between I-5 and Route 33, it was part of LRN 263, defined in 1959, and does not appear to have been part of the state highway system between 1933 and 1959. The routing was only "proposed" in 1963, and likely corresponds to a county route. "Tis a puzzlement" Between Route 33 and Route 99, this was part of LRN 41, defined in 1919.

     

    Status

    Unconstructed Unconstructed between Route 5 and Route 180 / Route 33. The traversable local route is E on Shields between I-5 and Fairfax, S on Fairfax Ave between Shields and Belmont, and E on Belmont between Fairfax and Route 33 (this is all County Route J1). This route was recommended by a Fresno County report that concluded it was best for regional traffic. Silver Creek, a natural drainage channel intersects Belmont Ave about E mi. W of existing Route 180. This channel has caused extensive flooding on Belmont Ave. Fresno County is prevented from raising the grade of Belmont Avenue by a court order obtained by the surrounding landowners. The district recommended that the state not adopt the road.

    However, in the February 2001 CTC Agenda, there was a funding request to complete the environmental study for this segment. Additionally, there is a Caltrans information sheet stating that Caltrans proposes to conduct a Route Adoption Study on Route 180 for the unadopted segment from Mendota to I-5 (this is TCRP Project #93). The study could begin as soon as funding is available and would take approximately four years to complete, at an estimated cost of $7 million. The project would will add a needed east-west connection to I-5 with a new interchange that would enhance the farm to market shipping opportunities for the region, as well as closing a gap between Route 180, Route 33 and I-5.

    According to the CTC in February 2006, work on Project #93 was initially to be limited to the environmental studies and preliminary engineering required for a Route Adoption Study for a segment of Route 180 between I-5 and Route 33, near Mendota. In February 2003, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) expressed their concern that Route 33 was not a logical terminus point for the project. Based on this concern, the Project Development Team stopped work on the Route Adoption Study and began work on the alternative of a “traversable highway”. However, in January 2004, the Council of Fresno Governments (Fresno COG) formed the Route 180 Steering Committee to consider a regional look at the entire Route 180 corridor and the concept of creating a four-lane expressway between Fresno and Interstate 5. The possibility of this new expressway required various alternatives to again be considered and, in July 2004, the Steering Committee re-initiated the Route Adoption Study extension from I-5 to Brawley Avenue, not to Route 33, as originally recommended by FHWA (which would be a new alignment for Route 180). In February 2006, the CTC reconsidered the allocation.

    [TCRP 93]In April 2006, the CTC had a report on a study to evaluate a range of alternative route alignments for Route 180, between I-5 and the vicinity of Valentine Avenue, west of Route 99 in Fresno County. Upon completion of the Environmental Impact Report (EIR), a route adoption will be requested from the California Transportation Commission. The adopted route will eventually be developed into a transportation facility as demand for improvements become known, and as funding becomes available. The environmental document is anticipated to be completed in Fiscal Year 2007-08. The alternatives being considered are: (•) An existing alignment between Route 33 and the eastern project limit, (•) A new northern alignments between Route 33 and the eastern project limit, (•) Three new alignments between I-5 and Route 33.

    [Map]By March 2007, construction was to begin on Segment 2 of this western extension, which includes construction of 2.5 miles of a six- lane freeway from the Route 99/Route 180 Interchange to Marks Avenue, then a four-lane freeway to Brawley Avenue. There will be a full interchange at Marks Avenue. There will be a signalized intersection at Brawley Avenue and cul-de-sacs at Whitesbridge Road, Valentine and Hughes Avenues. Construction should be completed by late March 2008.

    As of 2004, the Route 180/Route 99 interchange is now complete, although the Route 180 freeway only extends as far west as Hughes Avenue. However, because of this finished constrution, Route 180 no longer follows Route 99 south and Stanislaus Street to reach Whitesbridge Avenue, instead using Hughes Avenue to connect to Whitesbridge Avenue westbound.

    2007 CMIA. Three projects on Route 180 in Fresno County were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding. These projects were braided ramps between Route 41 & Route 168 ($30M requested); construction of an expressway from Academy to Trimmer Springs ($45.2M), and construction of an expressway from Trimmer Springs to Frankwood ($46.5M) . None of these projects were recommended for funding.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #287: Rehabilitation, repair, and/or reconstruction of deficient two-lane roads that connect to I-5, Route 180, Route 41 and Route 99 throughout Fresno County. See also HPP #3798. $2,800,000.

    • High Priority Project #1511: Route 180 Freeway Improvements in Fresno. $7,600,000.

    • High Priority Project #3798: Rehabilitation, repair, and/or reconstruction of deficient two-lane roads that connect to I-5, Route 180, Route 41 and Route 99 throughout Fresno County. This seems to be supplemental funding for HPP #287. $1,500,000.

    SR_180 I_5 to SR_99 In May 2013, the CTC approved funding a study to identify the most appropriate location for a four-lane expressway for Route 180 to connect the cities of Fresno, Kerman, Mendota, and Firebaugh, and the unincorporated community of Rolinda. The project is programmed in the Traffic Congestion Relief Program. The project will need an approval for a route adoption from the Commission. The study requires environmental funding only, and the total estimated cost is $7,000,000. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed in the Traffic Congestion Relief Program. The current traversable route for Route 180 is a two-lane conventional highway which begins at Route 33 in the city of Mendota. It proceeds east along Whitesbridge Avenue through the city of Kerman and the unincorporated community of Rolinda to Brawley Avenue. At Brawley Avenue, Route 180 becomes a four-lane freeway through the city of Fresno. Currently, there is no reliable and continuous regional east-west highway between the city of Fresno and I-5. It is predicted that by year 2030, the section of SR 180 along West Whitesbridge Avenue between the cities of Kerman and Fresno will have inadequate capacity to accommodate local and regional travel demand. The “Route 180 Extension” project from I-5 to Route 33 was considered and recommended for approval on November 30, 1999. Governor Gray Davis included $7 million in Transportation Congestion Relief Program funds for environmental studies to extend Route 180 westward from Mendota to I-5 in Fresno County. Research and development studies began in year 2000 to locate a workable alignment between I-5 and Route 33.

     

    Naming

    The segment from Route 99 to Route 33, and upon completion, from Route 33 to I-5, is officially named the "Deran Koligian Memorial Highway". Deran Koligian, the son of Armenian immigrants, was born in Fresno County and raised on his family farm in the Kearney Park community. He served in the South Pacific in World War II, and after the war, returned home to attend Fresno State College and to manage his family's farm. He began his public service in 1957, spending 24 years on school boards in western Fresno County, including the Madison Elementary School Board and the Central High School Board. He was elected to the Fresno County Board of Supervisors in 1982. Deran Koligian was a strong supporter of agriculture and a protector of agricultural lands from urban encroachment; and also was a vocal supporter of Measure C, which provided local augmentation for the construction and maintenance of state highways and local roads. As a member of the Fresno Transportation Authority, he was instrumental in securing funds for numerous road and highway transportation projects, including the extension and widening of Route 180 in western Fresno County. He was an active member of St. Paul's Armenian Church and was the first Armenian-American to be elected to office in Fresno County. He served with distinction until he death on December 11, 2001. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 94, Chapter 158, September 11, 2002.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  3. From Route 99 near Fresno to the General Grant Grove section of the Kings Canyon National Park.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963. In 1963, the segment from Brawley Avenue (west of Route 99) to 0.1 mile west of Highland Avenue (east of Route 99 and of City of Fresno) was adopted as a freeway and as a part of the California Freeway and Expressway System by the California Highway Commission. In 1995, the Commission adopted 12.3 miles of Route 180 as controlled access highway from 0.1 mile west of Temperance Avenue to Frankwood Avenue in the county of Fresno. A portion of the controlled access highway alignment from 0.1 mile west of Temperance Avenue to 0.1 mile west of Highland Avenue runs parallel to the adopted freeway but did not connect to the freeway alignment on the western end. In 1996, the Commission adopted as a freeway a segment of the 1995 controlled access highway corridor, from N. Fowler Avenue to 0.2 mile west of DeWolf Avenue and rescinded a portion of the 1963 adopted freeway from N. Fowler Avenue to 0.1 mile west of Highland Avenue, thus modifying the controlled access highway corridor to begin at 0.2 miles west of DeWolf Avenue.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 180 was (to be) signed along the route from Jct Route 25 at Pacines to Jct. Route 7 (US 395) at Independence, via Fresno. It was LRN 41, defined in 1919. Before its present routing was established, Route 180 entered Fresno via Whitesbridge and B, then after US 99, it ran continued south on US 99/Broadway to Ventura Street, and then continued east on Ventura. It was formerly a county road.

     

    Status

    Part (3) is constructed to freeway standards from Fresno to Chestnut Avenue, past Route 41. It looks like the planned freeway routing will go east as far Leonard Avenue. This freeway bypasses the original routing along Ventura Avenue (in fact, the signs have been removed from Ventura between Route 99 to Chestnut Avenue. Some of the original routing has been relinquished. For example, the California Transportation Commission, at its June 2000 meeting, discussed relinquishing the old routing of Route 180 from PM 58.0-61.4 in the City of Fresno (Agenda Item 2.3c). Curb ramps had to be constructed before this was done (at at cost of $317K).

    In September 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Fresno along Route 180 from the west city limits, near South Valentine Avenue, to Hughes West Diagonal, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    In August 2012, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Fresno along Route 180 at Locan Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In May 2011, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Fresno along Route 180 between South Clovis Avenue and Temperance Avenue, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities

    In April 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Fresno on Kings Canyon Avenue (Route 180) and along realigned Route 180 between Clovis Avenue and Locan Avenue, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    In October 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Fresno along Route 180 between De Wolf Avenue and Quality Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In May 2001, the CTC considered TCRP Project #91 to build a new expressway E of Clovis, Clovis Avenue to Temperance Avenue in Fresno County. In August 2004, the CTC has a request to amend the proposal to update project schedule and funding plan previously approved.

    According to Joe Rouse, in May 2001:

    It is fully signed as Route 180. On Route 99, the exit to Route 180 used to be signed as "To Route 41 North", but it is now signed as Route 180 East, Kings Canyon. They used greenout on those signs, and the letters on the greenout are not button copy and although it is not reflective greenout, it has the state shield shape found on the new reflective signs. On Route 41, the exit used to be signed as "To Route 99 North", but now it is signed as "Route 180, Kings Canyon, Mendota". These are new button copy sign panels, not greenout. The Route 180 freeway mainline ends at Cedar Ave. You can see where the future mainline lanes will be. Traffic is forced onto ramps that end at Chestnut Ave. and traffic continuing east on Route 180 is directed south onto Chestnut to Kings Canyon Rd. This routing is well signed for both east and westbound traffic. No "TEMPORARY" plates are used over the Route 180 shields on Chestnut.

    There are no Route 180 shields on the Route 99/Route 180 multiplex between the Route 180 freeway and Stanislaus St. The Route 180 shields at the exit to Ventura St. on Route 99 in downtown Fresno have been removed (not greened out). Interestingly, the connector from the new Route 41 to NB Route 99 has a sign for Ventura St. with a large green space on it for a Route 180 shield. However, I didn't see any residue or greenout that indicated that a shield had been on there.

    In June 2012, the Fresno Bee reported on an upcoming project that will improve the merges on Route 180 between Route 41 and Route 168. The goal of the $49 million project is to build "braided" ramps intended to reduce the weaving and ease congestion for drivers. Specifically, a pair of bridges -- one on each side of the freeway -- will eliminate the need for merging drivers to swerve across each other's paths to get where they want to go. The major features of the work are the two bridges. On the north side of the highway, one bridge will carry cars coming from southbound Route 168 onto westbound Route 180 over the motorists that want to get off Route 180 onto Route 41. The other bridge will be for drivers on eastbound Route 180 who want to get onto northbound Route 168. That traffic will be carried over the drivers coming off Route 41 trying to get onto eastbound Route 180. Another feature of the work will include bypass lanes so that drivers going from Route 41 to Route 168, or from Route 168 to Route 41, can do so without merging onto the main lanes of Route 180, further reducing traffic congestion. Metering lights to control the flow of traffic merging onto the freeways are a third part of the plan. The Cedar Avenue on-ramp to westbound Route 180 is being widened to two lanes to allow metering lights, and metering also is planned on the ramp from westbound Route 180 to southbound Route 41.
    (Source: Fresno Bee, 6/19/2012)

    Construction began in Summer 2002 on Route 180 through Southeast Fresno, going as far as Clovis Ave, according to a June 25, 2002 report in the Fresno Bee. This involved four miles of new road, six lanes, and 65 tons of asphalt. According to a map in the article, the segment from Chestnut Ave to Clovis Ave cost $80 million, and construction started in August 2002, with completion expected in 2½ years. The segment from Clovis Ave to Locan Ave cost $48 million, with construction beginning in August 2004. The expressway from Locan Ave to Academy Ave will cost $47 million, and construction begins in 2005. The expressway from Academy Ave to Trimmer Springs Rd in Centerville will cost $29 million, and construction starts in 2006. Lastly, the segment from Trimmer Springs Road to Frankwood Ave will cost $23 milllion, with construction also beginning in 2006. This extension will be called the Sequoia Freeway.

    According to the Fresno Bee, in late September 2005, the Sequoia Freeway from the Route 168 junction east to Clovis Avenue opened. The new road has already set off a frenzy of new home development in southeast Fresno, where about 5,000 houses are under construction, approved or awaiting review east of Clovis Avenue. The project also includes a final pair of ramps connecting Freeway 168 and Freeway 180 at their interchange east of downtown Fresno. Work is scheduled to in 2006 on the $47 million western segment from the Hughes-West Diagonal to Brawley Avenue, where the new freeway will rejoin the existing rural Route 180. The project will include an overpass at Hughes/West and is scheduled to be finished in 2008. The final freeway segment east of the new section, from Clovis Avenue to a junction with the existing highway at Temperance Avenue, is further out, as funding for that segment has been delayed by the state's budget crisis, and work is scheduled to begin in 2008-09.

    In December 2009, the segment between Clovis and Temperance avenues opened. This completion also marked the start of construction for the next project on Route 180: widening it from two to four lanes between Temperance and Academy avenues, a more than six-mile stretch. Federal stimulus funds approved by Congress in February are covering $18.3 million of the $29.6 million construction cost for the Temperance-Academy segment. The rest is mainly from Measure C, Fresno County's half-cent transportation sales tax. The stimulus money allowed Caltrans to move up construction from 2012 to 2009.

    In April 2002, the CTC considered (Agenda Item 2.5b.(1)) STIP Project #4, which would construct new six lane freeway on eight lane freeway alignment from Route 168 to Fowler Avenue.

    In September 2005, the CTC considered relinquishement of former Route 180 right of way in the City of Fresno, at G Street and Divisadero Street, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets.

    In December 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of rights of way (1) in the County of Fresno, from North Winery Avenue to Sunnyside Avenue, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads, frontage roads, and cul-de-sacs, and (2) in the City of Fresno, between Chestnut Avenue and Clovis Avenue, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets, frontage roads, and cul-de-sacs.

    In July 2007, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Fresno, between Chestnut Avenue and Clovis Avenue, consisting of superseded highway right of way, and right of way in the county of Fresno, between Peach Avenue and Clovis Avenue, consisting of superseded highway right of way. In Feburary 2008, there was a similar relinquishment, between Peach Avenue and Minnewawa Avenue, consisting of superseded highway right of way that is appurtenant to a previously relinquished superseded highway and inadvertently omitted from said relinquishment.

    Route 180 at DeWolf AvenueIn October 2008, the CTC considered a route adoption for a future freeway from Temperance to DeWolf Avenue near Fresno. This mitigated negative declaration in Fresno County will update the Department’s freeway agreement and identify an interchange for future construction. This project for the freeway agreement and subsequent route adoption only is fully funded. Funding for the interchange has yet to be identified. A separate project and environmental evaluation will be conducted once a future build project is proposed. Segment 1 of the Kings Canyon Expressway project, in eastern Fresno County, from Locan Avenue to Quality Avenue, is expected to start construction in August 2009. Traffic studies for the Kings Canyon Expressway project projected that the Level of Service (LOS) at DeWolf Avenue intersection will become level F (breakdowns of traffic flow, recurring points of congestion, peak hour flow rates are at highway capacity) in 2019, less than 10 years after completion of the proposed expressway project. The Supplemental Project Report for the expressway project, approved on December 20, 2007, recognized the need for an interchange at DeWolf Avenue. However, due to funding constraints, construction of a new interchange at DeWolf Avenue is not feasible at this time. In the meantime, the Kings Canyon Expressway Project will improve and signalize this intersection and will include two through lanes in each direction on Route 180, right-turn lanes, a westbound left-turn lane and dual eastbound left-turn lanes at DeWolf Avenue. A subsequent project will construct an interchange to provide adequate capacity for a 20-year design period.

    180 - Temperance to CoveIn January 2013, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct a four lane expressway on the existing alignment on Route 180 from Quality Avenue to Smith Avenue. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program for right of way. At the January 2013 CTC meeting, the project will be programmed in the Proposition 1B State and Local Partnership Program. The total estimated cost for capital and support is $23,000,000. Construction is estimated to begin in FY 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program and the State and Local Partnership Program.

    Route 180 Kings Cyn Frontage Road ConnectionIn conjunction with the above project, in January 2013 the CTC authorized of a new public road connection as a temporary connection to Route 180 from Kings Canyon South Frontage Road at Post Mile (PM) 73.8, in the county of Fresno. The proposed temporary new public road connection is necessary to provide access to Route 180 from properties adjoining the Kings Canyon South Frontage Road during the construction of segment 2. The Kings Canyon Expressway project, Segment 2, proposes to improve safety and increase highway capacity by converting Route 180 from a two-lane conventional highway to a four-lane expressway starting at 0.2 mile west of Quality Avenue to just east of Trimmer Springs Road. This segment will connect with the previously constructed Segment 1, west of Quality Avenue. In mid-2012, it was determined that environmental permits necessary for project delivery could not be obtained for the Centerville Kingsburg Canal, also known as Kingsberg Canal, and China Slough locations to meet the accelerated project schedule needed for Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) funding. Therefore, the Segment 2 project scope was revised to meet the CMIA funding deadline. The eastern project limit was moved from east of Trimmer Springs Road to a location west of the Centerville Kingsburg Canal. Unfortunately, the project did not receive the CMIA funding requested but it was decided to move forward with the revised project scope. Local Measure funding and State and Local Partnership Program funding (Proposition 1B) will be used to fully fund this project. Construction of Segment 2 is expected to start August, 2013. Project scope for Segment 3 will be revised to include the area from the revised Segment 2 project limit to the China Slough location east of Trimmer Springs Road. Due to the Segment 2 project limit change, a temporary new public road connection is proposed to Route 180 from Kings Canyon South Frontage Road on the south side of Route 180. The connection is necessary to provide access to properties adjoining the frontage road to Route 180 during the Segment 2 construction period. The temporary connection will be in service starting July 2013 until the transition to Segment 3 is constructed (approximately July 2016). The frontage road associated with the new public connection will be relinquished to Fresno County upon completion of Segment 2.

    In May 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Fresno along Route 180 from South Brawley Avenue to South Marks Avenue, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    In August 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will replace the Kings River Overflow Bridge near the town of Minkler. The project is fully funded in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. Total estimated project cost is $6,403,000 for capital and support.

     

    Naming

    The Route 180 interchange at Fowler Avenue in the City of Fresno is named the “Kimberly Marie Hamilton Memorial Interchange”. It was named in memory of Kimberly Marie Hamilton, born August 14, 1987, in Fresno, California. She attended Clovis East High School in Fresno, California, and was an avid golfer and hockey fan. Kimberly spoke often of becoming a teacher, and was loved and respected by family and friends. On May 7, 2004, Kimberly was the victim of a car accident that occurred on Fowler Avenue near Belmont Avenue in the City of Fresno under tragic circumstances involving a construction vehicle. Her death has affected and touched many people's lives, and has increased the call for better safety practices in and around roadway construction sites. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 139, Resolution Chapter 136, on 9/5/2008.

    The segment of Route 180 from the intersection with Brawley Avenue to the Intersection with Highland Avenue is named the Sequoia-Kings Canyon Freeway. It was named for its terminus in the Sequoia National Park and the Kings Canyon National Park. This park is the home to immense mountains, deep canyons, and huge sequoia trees. Thanks to their huge elevational range, 1,500' to 14,491', these parks protect stunningly diverse habitats. The Generals Highway climbs over 5000 feet from chaparral and oak-studded foothills to the awe-inspiring sequoia groves. From there, trails lead to the high-alpine wilderness which makes up most of these parks. Beneath the surface lie over 200 fascinating caverns. The park was named after the Giant Sequoia tree, the Sequoia gigantia. The name is traced to Indian Chief Sequoya, creator of the Cherokee alphabet, whose name means "opossum." In volume of total wood, the giant sequoia stands alone as the largest living thing on Earth. Its nearly conical trunk, like a club, not a walking stick, shows why. At least one tree species lives longer, one has a greater diameter, three grow tall, but none is larger. In all the world, sequoias grow naturally only on the west slope of the Sierra Nevada, most often between 5,000 and 7,000 feet. There are some 75 groves in all. The General Sherman tree is between 2,300 and 2,700 years old. Its largest branch is almost seven feet in diameter. Each year the General Sherman adds enough wood growth to make a 60-foot-tall tree of usual proportions. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Chapter 85, in 1997.

    The section of Route 180 between Clovis Avenue and General Grant Grove Park, in the County of Fresno, is named the “Senator Chuck Poochigian Highway”. This segment was named in honor of Charles S. "Chuck" Poochigian, a third generation resident of central California who was born and raised on a family farm in the Lone Star area of eastern Fresno County, between Fresno and Sanger, near the Route 180 corridor. Chuck and his wife, Debbie, were married in 1977 and have three grown children, a daughter-in-law, and a grandson. Chuck Poochigian received his bachelors degree in Business Administration from California State University, Fresno, in 1972, and his law degree from the Santa Clara University School of Law in 1975, he served for six years as a member of the California Air National Guard, and he practiced general civil and business law from 1975 until November, 1988. In 1988, Poochigian was chosen by Governor George Deukmejian to serve on his senior staff, and assisted the Governor in the selection of key administration officials and members of over 375 state boards and commissions, as well as certain judicial appointments. In 1991, Governor Pete Wilson named Poochigian as his Appointments Secretary, with the primary focus on assisting the Governor in his selection of judges for California's trial and appellate courts. Poochigian was elected to the California State Assembly in 1994, and to the California State Senate in 1998, and over the course of his legislative career he represented eastern parts of central California from Bakersfield to Lodi. As a legislator, Poochigian focused his energy on major public policy issues while being attentive to the particular needs of his constituents in the rich agricultural region of central California, and held key positions including serving as the Chair of the Appropriations Committee, as the Assistant Republican Leader in the Assembly, as the Republican Caucus Chair and the Assistant Republican Leader in the Senate, and as a legislative appointee to the Little Hoover Commission appointed by both Democratic and Republican leaders. Poochigian received numerous awards and recognition for outstanding public service, including an Outstanding Senator Award, numerous Legislator of the Year Awards, a Technology Leader Award, a Distinguished Legislator Award, a Distinguished Service Award, two President's Recognition Awards, a Distinguished Alumnus Award, and a 2007 Distinguished Service Award with his wife Debbie. Poochigian was a highly respected leader in Sacramento and a staunch advocate for sound fiscal planning, living within our means, and ensuring that the people of central California received a fair share of infrastructure funding, including the distribution of moneys for transportation and school construction. Poochigian authored numerous bills that involved comprehensive reform and required bipartisan consensus, including laws dealing with the expansion of higher education opportunities, special education funding, workers' compensation system reform, and public safety. Poochigian worked tirelessly to support the rights of crime victims and their families, led the fight against identity theft, worked to protect children from dangerous sexual predators, authored bills to incarcerate felons with firearms, and was an advocate for tough penalties for repeat offenders. Poochigian's reputation for strong leadership and hard work was recognized by the California Journal magazine, which ranked him Assembly Republican "Rookie of the Year" for 1996, and he was also ranked among the top five legislators in the 80-member State Assembly in the following separate categories: effectiveness, integrity, intelligence, problem solving, potential, and overall. In ratings released in March of 1998, Poochigian was recognized as one of the top five Assembly Members in the categories of integrity and hard work, in the June 1999 California Journal he was described as "A voice of reason highly respected for his problem-solving skills," and in August of 2004, the California Journal selected him as the Senate recipient of its "Minnie Award" for integrity. As of 2008, Senator Poochigian now practices law with the Fresno-based firm of Dowling, Aaron and Keeler. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 103, Resolution Chapter 87, on 7/10/2008.

    The segment between Route 99 and Chestnut Avenue, as well as any future freeway extension between Chestnut Avenue and Clovis Avenue is named the "Senator Jim Costa Highway". Jim Costa was elected to the California State Assembly in 1978 at the age of 25. He had a background in farming (he grew up in a farming family of Portuguese descent and was raised on his family's farm in western Fresno County), and focused intently on the issues of water, agriculture, transportation, housing, and problems of the San Joaquin Valley. In the Assembly, he served as Chair of the Assembly Water, Parks, and Wildlife Committee and the Subcommittee for the Assembly Ways and Means Committee. In 1994, he was elected to represent the 16th Senatorial District. In the Senate, Senator Costa served on the Agriculture and Water Resources Committee, the Banking, Commerce and International Trade Committee, the Housing and Community Development Committee, and the Transportation Committee. Senator Costa's major accomplishments include obtaining $26M for a UCSF-Fresno Medical Education and Research Center to ease the San Joaquin Valley's shortage of physicians; forging historic agreements that protected the water supply; moving the primary to the first Tuesday in March of even-numbered years; helping child protective services and improving response to abuse complaints; writing agricultural land conservation laws; authoring "Three Strikes, You're Out" standard; authoring reform of the Endangered Species Act; coauthoring legislation that equalized special education funding and support for county offices of education; authoring legislation that requires local agencies to give greater consideration to the availability of water when considering major new development; advocating for reduction of Bay Area smog blowing into the San Joaquin Valley and working to switch San Joaquin Valley truck fleets to cleaner fuels by gaining approval of a first-of-its-kind program to create LNG terminals; creating the San Joaquin River Conservancy to establish a parkway along the San Joaquin River; authoring legislation that encourages investment in construction of affordable housing for low and moderate income families; leading the effort to save and improve Amtrak passenger rail service in California and to create the California High Speed Rail Authority; and bringing to fruition the construction of eight prisons built in local communities that requested them, providing over 10,000 permanent jobs. This resolution was a "Thank You for your Years of Service". Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 102, Chapter 130, on August 23, 2002.

     

    Named Structures

    The Route 41/Route 180 interchange is named the "Rose Ann Vuich" Interchange. Rose Ann Vuich was the state senator that secured the funding for completion of Route 41 and Route 180. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Chapter 85, in 1997.

     

    National Trails

    National Park to Park Highway Sign Portions of this route appear to have been part of the "National Park to Park Highway".

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.7] From Route 65 near Minkler to General Grant Grove section of Kings Canyon National Park.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  4. From the General Grant Grove section of the Kings Canyon National Park to the Kings Canyon National Park boundary near Cedar Grove.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as “(d) The General Grant Grove section of Kings Canyon National Park to Kings River Canyon.”

    In 1984, Chapter 409 clarified this segment to be “(d) The General Grant Grove section of Kings Canyon National Park to Kings Canyon River Kings Canyon National Park boundary near Cedar Grove.”

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 180 was (to be) signed along the route from Jct Route 25 at Pacines to Jct. Route 7 (US 395) at Independence, via Fresno. Oddly, it was part of a 1959 extension of LRN 41, so it is unclear why it was signed in 1934. Additionally, the signed route continued E from the current terminus across the mountain (routing not determined) to Route 7 (US 395) in Independence. That portion of the route doesn't correspond to anything in the state highway system prior to 1934... or even since. Again, "Tis a puzzlement."

     

    Naming

    This segment has historically been called the "Kings River Highway".

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.7] Entire portion.

     

    National Trails

    National Park to Park Highway Sign Portions of this route were part of the National Park to Park Highway.

exitinfo.gif

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Interstate Shield Around 1985, the number I-180 was briefly proposed for the Richmond-San Rafael stretch of what is now I-580 and was formerly part of CA 17.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Fresno 180 R55.84 R56.30
Fresno 180 R56.30 R56.78
Fresno 180 R56.84 R57.47
Fresno 180 R57.60 R60.86
Fresno 180 R60.86 R63.44

 

Interstate Submissions

Around 1985, the number I-180 was briefly proposed for the Richmond-San Rafael stretch of what is now I-580 and was formerly part of Route 17.

In 1958, the California Department of Highways proposed the designation I-180 for what is now I-280.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.18] Between the east urban limits of Fresno and Kings Canyon National Park.

 


Overall statistics for Route 180:

  • Total Length (1995): 112 miles traversable; 68 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 400 to 41,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 167; Sm. Urban: 2; Urbanized: 11.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 112 mi; FAU: 7 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 59 mi; Minor Arterial: 53 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Benito, Fresno, Tulare.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the route from "[LRN 2] near Orange County Hospital northerly to Hermosa Beach-Santa Ana Canyon Road" was defined as part of the state highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 180, with the routing:

"[LRN 2] near Orange County Hospital northerly to [LRN 175]"

This route ran from US 101 near Orange County Hospital (now the Western Medical Center, Anaheim) northerly to US 91. This is close to the present-day routing of Route 57; however, the specific definition for LRN 180 corresponds to 1964-1981 Route 250. It ran along State College Boulevard, and was eliminated as a state highway when Route 57 was completed.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 181



Routing

From Route 116 near Forestville to Route 101.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route remains as defined in 1963.

River Road, as now exists between Fulton (US 101 and Mark West Springs Road) and Gurneville (Route 116) was built on top of an old SP railroad right-of-way by Sonoma County in the late 1950's. This alignment basically bypassed several secondary county roads such as Laughlin Road, Woolsey Road, Trenton Road, and the what was then called "River Road". The segment from US-101 to Mirabel Road was the proposed Route 181. At the time the "new" River Road was constructed, it was proposed that Route 116 be rerouted away from its Pocket Canyon Road alignment between Forestville and Guerneville, and routed down Mirabel Road to River Road, and then West to Guerneville.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was proposed LRN 250, defined in 1959.

Route 181 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 181 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route; unconstructed. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Status

The routing for Route 181 has not been determined; although there is a traversable local route: Mirable Road and River Road, with no plans for improvement to state standards.

 


Overall statistics for Route 181:

  • Total Length (1995): 10 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 10; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Counties Traversed: Sonoma.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the route from "[LRN 43] to La Habra-Santa Ana Canyon Road near Yorba Linda via Grand Avenue and Glassell Avenue" was defined as part of the state highway system. In 1935, it was added to the highway code as LRN 181, with the routing:

"[LRN 43] to [LRN 176] near Yorba Linda via Grand Avenue and Glassell Avenue"

This routing is unclear: It ran somehow from US 91 to Route 90 (nee Route 42), but the routing the specify doesn't work. In 1951, Chapter 1562 deleted the routing.


State Shield

State Route 182



Routing

From Route 395 near Bridgeport to the Nevada state line via Walker River.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route is as defined in 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was LRN 96, defined in 1933. It appears not to have been signed before 1964.

Route 182 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 182 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

In August 2002, the CTC considered a proposal to relinquish the segment from PM 0.8 to PM 1.5.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 182:

  • Total Length (1995): 13 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 450 to 1,300
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 13; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAS: 13 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Collector: 13 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Mono.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

LRN 182 was defined in 1933 (and captured into the highway code in 1935) as:

“from [LRN 2] near Orange to Orange County Park.”

In 1957, Chapter 1911 amended the definition to begin at "[LRN 43] near Orange", and it had this definition until 1963, when it was included as part of Route 22. This segment was deleted from Route 22 in 1965 and is no longer part of the state highway system. It ran along Chapman Avenue. It appears to be present-day Orange County Route S25.


State Shield

State Route 183



Routing

From Route 101 in Salinas to Route 1 near Castroville.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

As defined in 1963, this route was "Route 101 near Salinas to Route 1 near Castroville."

Until the early 1980s, Route 1 entered Castroville from the south via Route 156 eastbound (the current freeway), then exited at the diamond interchange for Merritt Street and continued northwest via Merritt. However, by the mid-1980s, the current Castroville bypass was constructed; as a consequence, the portion of freeway on Route 1 between Merritt Street and the bypass became an extension of Route 156, and Merritt Street became part of Route 183.

In 1992, Chapter 1243 clarified the definition "Route 101 near in Salinas to Route 1 near Castroville."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was LRN 118, defined in 1933. It appears to have been unsigned before 1964. Part of this is Business Route 101.

Route 183 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 183 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. This routing would've begun near the current US 101/Boronda Road interchange and headed north. This routing would have been to the opposite shore of the Salinas River as the current Route 183; it would've split outside of Salinas (unlike the current route, which begins along Business Route 101) and intersected Castroville north of town after crossing the Tembladero Slough, going over the Southern Pacific tracks northwest of Route 156.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 183:

  • Total Length (1995): 10 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 11,200 to 29,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 6; Sm. Urban: 2; Urbanized: 2.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 2 mi; FAS: 8 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 2 mi; Minor Arterial: 8 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Monterey.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 60] near Seal Beach to [LRN 2] near Santa Ana" to the state highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code with that definition. This may have been a routing along Westminster Avenue.

In 1951, Chapter 1562 deleted this route.

In 1961, Chapter 1247 added a new definition of LRN 183: "[LRN 83] near Canyon Dam to [LRN 29] near Westwood"

This route ran from Route 89 near Canyon Dam to Route 36 near Westwood. This is present-day Route 147.


State Shield

State Route 184



Routing

From Route 223 near Weed Patch to Route 178.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route is as defined in 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was LRN 143, defined in 1933. It was not signed before 1964.

Route 184 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 184 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

In September 2011, it was reported that the intersection of Route 184 and Kimber Avenue has been allocated $600,000 for work that will allow safer access, improve traffic flow and eliminate the need for U-turns.

 

Naming

The route was traditionally named "Weedpatch" Highway.

It has also been designated the "Deputy James Throne Memorial Highway" It was named in memory of Deputy James Throne, born on September 6, 1978 in the small central valley town of Shafter. Deputy Throne graduated from Shafter High School where he played football. Following his high school graduation, Deputy Throne worked in the Kern County oilfields. Deputy Throne put himself through the Kern County Sheriff' s Department Academy, graduating in 2002, because he wanted more out of his life. Deputy Throne joined the Kern County Sheriff's Department on February 8, 2002, as an extra help deputy. In August 2003, Deputy Throne joined the Taft Police Department where, within less than one year, he was assigned to CAL-MMET, a multijurisdictional, specialized unit targeted at street-level methamphetamine use and sales. Deputy Throne's desire to excel, innate abilities, and work ethic made him a very successful, trusted, and well-liked member of the team. Deputy Throne rejoined the Kern County Sheriff's Department fulltime on September 10, 2005, where he was initially assigned to the Court Services Division. After completing a field training program on June 24, 2006, he was assigned to a patrol position at the Lamont Substation, where he would spend the rest of his career. Because of Deputy Throne's prior experience, he was able to assist his colleagues with their narcotics investigations. Deputy Throne also served the department through teaching in-service classes and defensive tactics, and as an involved member of the Sheriff's Activity League. He often read to children in afterschool programs and presented classes on drug and gang awareness. In recognition of his law enforcement capabilities and contributions to his colleagues and community, the Bakersfield Optimist Club honored Deputy Throne as the 2007 Officer of the Year. On May 23, 2008, while assisting another deputy in pursuit of a suspect, Deputy Throne's patrol car was struck by another deputy's patrol car, and Deputy Throne died at the accident scene. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 48, Resolution Chapter 80, on 7/17/2009.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 184:

  • Total Length (1995): 14 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 2,650 to 16,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 4; Sm. Urban: 4; Urbanized: 6.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 14 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 10 mi; Minor Arterial: 4 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Kern.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route "[LRN 60] near Corona Del Mar to Santa Ana via Main Street" to the highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 184 with that definition.

In 1961, Chapter 1770 split the routing at [LRN 158]: "(a) [LRN 60] near Corona Del Mar to [LRN 158]; (b) [LRN 158] to Santa Ana via Main Street"

Signage was as follows:

  1. From Route 1 near Corona Del Mar to present-day I-405.

    This segment is the original routing of the Route 73 freeway.

  2. From present-day I-405 to US 101 in Santa Ana via Main Street.

    This was originally part of Route 73, but was deleted in 1965.



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© 1996-2012 Daniel P. Faigin.
Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.