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California Highways

Routes 89 through 96

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

89 · 90 · 91 · 92 · 93 · 94 · 95 · 96


State Shield

State Route 89



Routing
  1. Route 395 near Coleville to Route 88 via the vicinity of Markleeville.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(a) Route 395 near Coleville to Route 50 near Meyers via the vicinity of Markleeville."

    In 1986, Chapter 928 split (a) into two parts: "(a) Route 395 near Coleville to Route 88 via the vicinity of Markleeville. (b) Route 88 near Picketts Junction to Route 50 near Meyers." The portion between the two segments was transferred to Route 88.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 89 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 7 (US 395) near Coleville to Jct. US 99 (I-5) near Mt. Shasta, via Truckee, Quincy, and Chester. This segment was part of LRN 23. The portion between US 395 and Markleeville was defined in 1909; the remainder was defined in 1911.

     

    Status

    In May 2008, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the county of Shasta, at County Road No. 9S01 (McArthur Road), consisting of a reconstructed and relocated county road.

     

    Naming

    The segment from Route 4 to Route 88 is named the "Alpine State Highway". It was named by Resolution Chapter 468 in 1911. This segment also had the historic name of the "Big Trees Highway".

    The segment from the Alpine/Mono County line to the junction of Route 89 and Route 4 is named the "Robert M. Jackson Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Robert M. Jackson, who was born in Sacramento, California on September 21, 1912. His family moved to Markleeville in Alpine County when he was two weeks old and remained there until 1924 when they moved to Los Angeles County. Robert M. Jackson returned every summer to Alpine county to work at the historic Alpine Hotel. In 1942 Robert M. Jackson enlisted in the United States Army Air Corps. He was stationed in Texas, Brazil, and finally in the Ascension Islands. After being discharged in 1945, he returned to Markleeville where he built the home he lived in for the rest of his life. In October 1946, Robert M. Jackson began work with the Alpine County Public Works Department, where he spent more than 30 years surveying, engineering, constructing, and realigning many of the county and state highway routes of today. Robert M. Jackson's most significant accomplishment was the completion of Route 89 over Monitor Pass in the early 1950's. This 18-mile span traverses both Alpine and Mono counties, and is a mountainous road reaching elevations in excess of 8500 feet. The original road grade was crooked and steep, as much as 17% in some places. The majority of the survey work done by Robert M. Jackson was on horseback. Alpine County and the Department of Transportation cooperated for 7 years to complete the project, which was dedicated on September 12, 1954. Robert M. Jackson retired from Alpine County in 1973, after 27 years of service. He remained in Alpine County until his death on May 12, 2004. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 57, Resolution Chapter 27, on 4/21/2006.


  2. Route 88 near Picketts Junction to Route 50 near Meyers.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, the first segment of Route 89 was defined as "(a) Route 395 near Coleville to Route 50 near Meyers via the vicinity of Markleeville."

    In 1986, Chapter 928 split (a) into two parts: "(a) Route 395 near Coleville to Route 88 via the vicinity of Markleeville. (b) Route 88 near Picketts Junction to Route 50 near Meyers." The portion between the two segments was transferred to Route 88.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 89 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 7 (US 395) near Coleville to Jct. US 99 (I-5) near Mt. Shasta, via Truckee, Quincy, and Chester. This segment was part of LRN 23, and was defined in 1911.


  3. Route 50 near May's Junction to Route 80 via Tallac, Emerald Bay, McKinney's, Tahoe City, and the Truckee River.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is the original (b) from 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 89 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 7 (US 395) near Coleville to Jct. US 99 (I-5) near Mt. Shasta, via Truckee, Quincy, and Chester. This segment was part of LRN 38, defined in 1911. Originally, Route 80 (I-80) was US 40.

     

    Status

    El Dorado ImprovementsThere are plans to construct roadway improvements between the El Dorado County Line to Route 28. This project is fully funded in the 2006 SHOPP. The total estimated project cost is $85,300,000. Construction is estimated to begin in FY 2007-08. The project will involve the removal of mature vegetation and the disturbance of existing wetlands. In addition, changes in the visual character of the area in the form of new lighting resulted in a Mitigated Negative Declaration being completed for this project.

    In September 2011, it was reported that a portion of Route 89 connecting Tahoe City to Truckee will be repaved, shoulder to shoulder. The project will begin in Spring 2012, taking one construction season to complete. Funds from the California State Highway Operation Protection Program will be used. Repaving will start 0.2 miles south of the Squaw Valley USA exit and end at the Nevada County state line near Truckee.

    In October 2012, it was reported that the shoulder to shoulder repaving project on Route 89 between Squaw Valley Road to West River Street was completed. The $7.2 million project between Truckee and Olympic Valley improved the surface for bikes and motor vehicles, and included water quality protection from stormwater drainage while extending the pavement life an additional 10 years.

    It was also reported in September 2011 about plans to reconstruct the Fanny Bridge. The bridge was constructed in 1920 and spans the Truckee River, Lake Tahoe's sole outlet, near the at-times very congested pedestrian intersection at the Wye intersection in Tahoe City. The project would rehabilitate Fanny Bridge, while simultaneously addressing traffic congestion. Preliminary plans feature four alternatives. Initially, the preferred option calls for construction of a four-lane bridge to span the Truckee River farther west from the current Fanny Bridge location. The bridge would be part of a new road that would serve as the main ingress/egress route connecting Route 89 and Route 28. Roundabouts also would be installed at each intersection. Meanwhile, Fanny Bridge's structural deficiencies will be addressed, and the remaining stretch of Route 89 from the Wye to the intersection of the newly built road will be transformed into a local neighborhood street, with a variety of traffic calming features designed to dissuade motorists from using the path as a primary means of travel. The other three alternatives include changing the existing Route 89 just south of Fanny Bridge into a pedestrian/bike trail; installing a cul-de-sac at the end of that street; or conducting the project without roundabouts, respectively. Planning level cost estimates call for a $13-18 million investment. The project is slated to continue to solicit community input and feedback throughout 2011 and develop a final design by 2012. Construction is tentatively scheduled to commence in 2014.

    In October 2011, the CTC approved $40,413,000 for a project in Tahoe City from 0.2 mile south of the El Dorado/Placer County Line to the Truckee River Bridge. The project will construct water quality collection and treatment facilities to meet the requirements of California Regional Water Quality Control Board. (Construction will take more than 3 years due to permit restriction on grading and soil disturbances between May1 to October 15 each year. Also, traffic restrictions are reduced between June 15th and Labor Day during the peak tourist season. Construction is estimated to begin Summer of 2012 and be completed by December 2015. As a result, the California Department of Transportation is also requesting 39 months to complete construction.)

    In January 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in El Dorado County will implement water quality improvement measures on Route 89 from US 50 to Cascade Road in and near South Lake Tahoe. These improvements will comply with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit requirements and implement elements of the Lake Tahoe Environmental Improvement Program. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $30,023,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 SHOPP.

     

    Naming

    The portion of the route between Truckee and Tahoe City is named the "10th Mountain Division Memorial Highway". The 10th Mountain Division of the United States Army, consisting of 15,000 soldiers, served gallantly in the Italian campaign during World War II. It had many members from Sierra County. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 43, Chapter 106, in 1997.

     

    Named Structures

    Near Alpine Meadows Road is the "Allexey Waldemar Von Schmidt Historical Plaque". It was designated by Senate Concurrent Resolution 75, Chapter 105, in 1992. Allexy Waldemar Von Schmidt was a 19th century Russian immigrant and civil engineer whose survey helped establish the border between California and Nevada.


  4. Route 80 near Truckee to Route 70 near Blairsden.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is the original (c) from 1963.

    The route between Satley and Sierraville is signed as Route 49, although it is legislatively Route 89. This results in signs for 49 North and 89 South ... and the reverse of this going the other way.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 89 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 7 (US 395) near Coleville to Jct. US 99 (I-5) near Mt. Shasta, via Truckee, Quincy, and Chester. This segment was part of LRN 83, defined in 1933. Originally, Route 70 was Alternate US 40.

     

    Status

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $6,000,000 in SHOPP funding, programmed in Fiscal Years 2012-13 and 2013-14, for repairs near Truckee, from the Nevada/Sierra County Line to Junction Route 49 north of Sierraville that will rehabilitate 30.2 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the traveling surface, minimize costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

    In March 2012, the CTC approved SHOPP funding for work near Truckee, from 0.2 mile south of Squaw Valley Road to Nevada County line. $8,360,000 to rehabilitate 16 lane miles of pavement to improve ride quality and extend the pavement service life.

    A bypass for Route 267 around the Route 89/Route 267 interchange in Truckee was completed in 2004 to get all the Tahoe-bound traffic out of central Truckee. The Route 89 portion of the alignment is short; most of the bypass is for Route 267. The bypass includes a long viaduct across the Truckee River, which is visible as you come off the hill near the Central Truckee exit. This bypass is 2 lane expressway with sufficient right of way to expand it to 4 lanes when needed. From the old interchange, the east and west bound on ramp will remain to provide the town with direct highway access.

    In July 2002, the CTC considered for future funding a project to realign Route 89 near Clio in Plumas County. [2.2c.(5)]

    In December 2008, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Plumas along Route 89 near Whitehawk, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #234: Widen Route 89 at the existing “mousehole” two lane RR underpass in Truckee. This has been a crusade of Rep. John Doolittle, according to the Sierra Sun. The narrow tunnel is heavily used by pedestrians headed to the Crossroads shopping center and bicyclists heading up and down Route 89. The Town of Truckee has taken the lead on the complicated project that involves Caltrans, Union Pacific Railroad, Nevada County and to some extent Placer County. Widening the existing passage, or building a second undercrossing, is saddled with the extra challenge of completing the work while railroad traffic continues on the tracks above.$2,827,744

     


  5. Route 70 near Indian Falls to Route 36 near Deer Creek Pass.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is the original (d) from 1963.

    The route between Blairsden and Indian Falls is cosigned as Route 70/Route 89, although it is legislatively Route 70.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 89 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 7 (US 395) near Coleville to Jct. US 99 (I-5) near Mt. Shasta, via Truckee, Quincy, and Chester. This segment was part of LRN 83, defined in 1933. Originally, Route 70 was Alternate US 40.

     

    Status

    In October 2009, the CTC approved vacation of right of way in the county of Siskiyou along Route 89 between 0.1 mile west and 0.1 mile east of Dead Horse Canyon Road, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In Janury 2013, the CTC approved amending the 2012 STIP to program $30,000 of Regional Improvement Program (RIP) Transportation Enhancement (TE) funds programmed by Modoc County (PPNO 2437) to Right of Way Support for the Greenville Route 89 Rehabilitation project (PPNO 3355) in Plumas County. The funds are needed to complete Right of Way (R/W) activities. This project is in Greenville, on Route 89 between Hideaway Road and Mill Street. It will upgrade sidewalks and curb ramps to meet ADA requirements.

     

    National Trails

    [Volcanic Byways]This route is part of the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway All American Road, between Route 147 and Route 36, and between Route 44 and I-5.


  6. Route 36 near Morgan Summit to Lassen Volcanic National Park.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(e) Route 36 near Morgan to Lassen Volcanic National Park." In 1984, Chapter 409 changed "Morgan" to "Morgan Summit".

    The route between Route 36 near Deer Creek Pass and Route 36 near Morgan Summit is cosigned as Route 36/Route 89, although it is legislatively Route 36.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 89 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 7 (US 395) near Coleville to Jct. US 99 (I-5) near Mt. Shasta, via Truckee, Quincy, and Chester. This segment was part of LRN 83.

     

    Status

    The continuation of this route through Lassen Volcanic National Park is occasionally closed in winter; a park fee is charged when it is open.


  7. Route 44 to Route 5 near Mt. Shasta.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is the original (f) from 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 89 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 7 (US 395) near Coleville to Jct. US 99 (I-5) near Mt. Shasta, via Truckee, Quincy, and Chester. This segment was part of LRN 83, defined in 1933.

     

    Status

    In May 2008, the CTC considered approval for future consideration of funding a bridge replacement (Lake Britton Bridge) near McCloud for which a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed. The project will involve construction activities in an area that is habitat to three federally listed special-status species and one state species of special concern. These species include the Bald Eagle, Northern Spotted Owl, Rough Sculpin, and the Osprey.

     

    Named Structures

    On the northbound and southbound portions of Route 89, in the vicinity of mile post markers 89SHA36.00 and 89SHA41.00, in the unincorporated area of Shasta County, there are memorials in memory of "California Highway Patrol Officer Arthur E. Dunn". On July 9, 1977, while transporting a prisoner to jail on Route 89 in Shasta County, Officer Dunn was shot and killed by a prisoner. He had joined the California Highway Patrol in March 1963, graduated from the patrol academy and was assigned to the West Los Angeles area on July 5, 1963. He transferred to the Sacramento area on December 3, 1965, the Redding area on October 11, 1967, and was assigned to the Burney Resident Post in July 1968. The memorial was established in memory of Officer Dunn as a result of his steadfast dedication to the citizens of the State of California, and his commitment and contributions to the safety of the motoring public. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 85, Chapter 125, on August 21, 2002

Pre 1964 Signage History

This is all the original routing of Route 89, and dates back to the original signage of the route in 1934. The portion between US 395 and Route 4 was in the planning stages in 1935. The portion between Boca and Route 49 was under construction.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

This route was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 111, Ch. 96 in 1986.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.14] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 1:

  • Total Length (1995): 243 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 400 to 17,800
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 242; Sm. Urban 1; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 243 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 108 mi; Minor Arterial: 135 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Monitor Pass (8314 ft); Luther Pass (7740 ft).

  • Counties Traversed: Mono, Alpine, El Dorado, Placer, Nevada, Sierra, Plumas, Tehama, Shasta, Siskiyou.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, a segment from "[LRN 49] near Middletown to [LRN 15] near Upper Lake via Lakeport" was added to the highway system. In 1935, this was defined to be LRN 89, with that same definition. This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. This was originally (circa 1934) signed as part of Route 29; it is present-day Route 175 between Middletown and 4 mi SE of Kelseyville; cosigned Route 175/Route 29 (legislative Route 29) to 6 mi NW of Kelseyville, and Route 29 the remainder of the way to Route 20.


State Shield

State Route 90



Routing

From Route 1 northwest of the Los Angeles International Airport to Route 91 in Santa Ana Canyon passing near La Habra, except for the portion within the city limits of Yorba Linda.

The relinquished former portion of Route 90 within the City of Yorba Linda is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption [as a state highway]. The City of Yorba Linda shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished former portion of Route 90, including any traffic signal progression, as well as maintaining signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 90.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as "Route 1 northwest of the Los Angeles International Airport to Route 605."

In 1965, Chapter 1330 transferred the portion from Route 605 to the junction of Routes 39 and the then Route 42 near La Habra were transferred from Route 42 (and thus, Route 90 gained the Yorba Linda freeway). This made the definition: "Route 90 is from Route 1 northwest of the Los Angeles International Airport to the junction of Routes 39 and 42 near La Habra." Chapter 1372 also amended the route that year, but appeared to make no other changes.

Construction on the route begin in 1966 between Centinela Ave and I-405. The remainder of the route to the W, between Centinela and Route 1 was pending completion of the Pacific Coast Freeway. Eventually, that freeway was abandoned and the western segment was constructed as a limited-access expressway. The eastern portion (Slauson Freeway) still had no route determination, and has not been constructed to date.

In 1968, Chapter 282 transferred more from Route 42 ("Route 39/Route 42 to Route 91"), making the definition "Route 1 northwest of the Los Angeles International Airport to Route 91 in Santa Ana Canyon passing near La Habra." As a personal footnote here: I remember distinctly driving with my brother on Route 90, right after it opened, sometime in 1968 or 1969.

In April 2002, AB 885 (Chapter 27, 4/23/2002) permitted the relinquishment of that portion of Route 90 in the city of Yorba Linda. Upon relinquishment, the relinquished portion (a) ceases to be a state highway; and (b) may not be considered for future adoption as a state highway. The City of Yorba Linda is required to ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 90 (including any traffic signal progressions), and must maintain signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 90. This reliniquishment was done to permit the City of Yorba Linda to quickly assume and complete various construction and maintenance projects on the applicable portion of Route 90 that were underway in 2002 or in the planning and development stages.

In 2003, AB 1717 (Chapter 525, 9/25/2003) changed the legislative definition to reflect the relinquishment.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was unsigned in 1963. It did, however, have a legislative definition:

  1. LRN 221, proposed, with no routing determined, between Lincoln Blvd and LRN 170 (future I-605). This corresponds to the remainder of the original Route 90 definition, and the unconstructed portion. The portion between Route 1 and I-110 was defined in 1947; the remainder in 1959.

  2. LRN 176, which runs from the Route 42/LRN 170 (I-605) junction to Yorba Linda. This corresponds to the subsequently added portion of the route that used to be part of Route 42. It also helps to explain why the route was shown as it was on some maps. The portion between Route 39 and Route 91 was defined in 1933; the remainder in 1959.

X-ed Out Pre-1964 State Shield Route 90 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 90 between 1934 and 1964.

In 1960, it was reported in CHPW that a section 3.9 miles long in the Culver City-West Los Angeles area was adopted on December 16, 1959 as a freeway by the California Highway Commission. The estimate of cost for ultimate development to eight lanes is $30,800,000 for right-of-way acquisition and construction. The Marina Freeway will provide traffic service for the motorists using recreational facilities in the Santa Monica Bay area, and it could eventually serve as a part of the East-West Slauson Freeway which was included in Senate Bill 480.

In 1963, it was noted that the easterly continuation of the Marina Freeway was under study, and would be called the Slauson Freeway.

 

Status

Unsigned The portion from Inglewood to where Route 90 meets Route 39 is unsigned; small sections are freeway; orginally planned as freeway from Route 1 to Route 605 as the Marina-Slauson Freeway, with the remainder of the route (along Route 42) to have been the Yorba Linda Freeway. The traversable local routing is Slauson Avenue, which does not have adequate construction. The route concept report recommends deletion of Route 90 from the state highway system from unconstructed Route 258 to the Orange County line.

There is a plan, on the western end, to extend the Marina Freeway west to Mindanao by building a full interchange and grade-separation at Culver.

According to the Daily Breeze in March 2006, Los Angeles County Public Works (see http://www.sr90admiraltyway.org/) has a plan to relieve clogged intersections in and around Marina del Rey by extending the Marina (Route 90) Freeway past Lincoln Boulevard, allowing motorists to bypass the busy thoroughfare on their way to the water (not all of this would be Caltrans, unless the legislative definition is changed). Note that portions of this would not be state highway; specifically, the portion W of Lincoln Blvd. This connector would provide a direct link to Admiralty Way, a four-lane road lined with boat storage, retailers and park space that circles the marina. An alternative being considered would widen Admiralty Way to handle heavier volumes of traffic from new and future residential developments. These projects are being planned at the county level, and would result in the addition of an exit at Lincoln Blvd. A draft environmental impact report is not expected to be finished until 2007, and construction isn't anticipated until at least 2011. The department is studying three options for a freeway connector, all of which would require the freeway to be realigned between Mindanao Way and Lincoln Boulevard:

  • • The "Northern Alternative" would send a road through the Beverly Hills Rent-A-Car site on the west side of Lincoln Boulevard and a portion of Admiralty Park.

  • The "Basin F Alternative" would send the connector road through part of a Toyota dealership site on the east side of Lincoln.

  • The "Bali Way Alternative" would tie into the existing intersection of Lincoln and Bali Way. It would require the complete takeover of the Toyota dealership and could eliminate one parking spot from the Marina campus of the Centinela Freeman Healthsystem.

On the eastern end, there is currently a plan to extend the freeway portion of this route over Orangethorpe Avenue/Esperanza Road and the subsequent rail grade, due to increasing rail traffic. Also in the works are plans to expand this road using the old Pacific Electric right of way through Yorba Linda (construction has started in Yorba Linda). Brea also has expansion plans, and Placentia needs only to restripe the road (all .3 miles of it) when the expansion on either side is finished. Eventually, Imperial Highway will be 3 lanes between Route 39 and Santa Ana Canyon Road. However, as of 2004, it appears that funding problems have waylayed the Imperial Highway bridge over the BNSF grade that it crosses near Anaheim and unincorporated Yorba Linda.

As of August 2002, construction in Yorba Linda is complete. Dennis Carr reports that they even moved the remaining rail car down near Polly's Pies, at the crossing of Imperial Hwy and Lemon St, which as he understands it was the location of the old PE rail station in Yorba Linda. In June 2002, the CTC had on its agenda the relinquishment of 12-Ora-90-KP 12.87/16.25 and KP 16.25/18.91 in the City of Yorba Linda. This is likely the original highway bypassed by the new construction.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #1915: Construct and improve medians and drainage on Imperial Highway from west border to east border of city in La Mirada. $1,360,000.

 

 

Naming

The segment of this freeway from Route 1 to Route 91 (although it is not all constructed to freeway standards) is named the "Marina Freeway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 56, Chapter 25 in 1976. The Marina Freeway opened in 1968.

Between 1971 and 1976, the entire route (adopted and unadopted portions) was named the "Richard M Nixon" Freeway. Richard Nixon was the 37th President of the United States. Born in California in 1913, Nixon had a brilliant record at Whittier College and Duke University Law School before beginning the practice of law. He served as both a congressman and a senator from California, and was Vice President under President Eisenhower. He was elected president in 1968, and served until he resigned in 1974. For more details, consult his official biography or visit the Richard M Nixon Library. A snippit from the Los Angeles times shows the resolution was past in the August-September 1971 timeframe, and was authored by Assemblyman John Briggs (R-Fullerton). Briggs sought the naming because the potential freeway would run through Whitter (where Nixon grew up) and end in Yorba Linda (where he was born).

This was originally to have been named the Marina-Slauson Freeway, and would have run to I-605.

The portion of this route constructed to freeway standards in Orange County is named the "Yorba Linda" Freeway, and opened in 1970. It was named by location.

The portion of the former freeway in Yorba Linda has been renamed the Richard Nixon Parkway by the Yorba Linda City Council. They recently finished an upgrade project, funded by the City of Yorba Linda, which turned the Super 2 into a Super 4 (except for a 4/10 of a mile stretch still controlled by the state). The city council, having been given control of that portion of SR-90, decided that they no longer wanted it to be called a freeway, so they've renamed it and have removed all references to the term "freeway" from local signs, including removing the "Freeway Entrance" signs from its one controlled access intersection, Kellogg Dr.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Los Angeles 90 1.11 2.76

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 90:

  • Total Length (1995): 16 miles traversable; 25 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 24,000 to 77,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban 0; Urbanized: 41.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 2 mi; FAU: 14 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 16 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles, Orange.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the segment from "[LRN 7] near Vacaville to [LRN 7] near Dunnigan" was added to the highway system. In 1935, this definition was codified as LRN 90 in the highway system. This route ran from US 40 near Vacaville to US 99W near Dunnigan. It appears to have been unsigned in 1963; it is present-day I-505.


State Shield

State Route 91



Routing

From Vermont Avenue at the eastern city limits of Gardena to Route 215 in Riverside via Santa Ana Canyon.

The relinquished former portions of Route 91 in the Cities of Gardena, Torrance, Lawndale, Redondo Beach, Manhattan Beach, and Hermosa Beach are not a state highway and are not eligible for adoption [as a state highway].

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as "Route 1 near Hermosa Beach to Route 395 via Santa Ana Canyon."

In 1969, Chapter 294 changed "Route 395" to "Route 15" (present-day I-215).

In 1977, Chapter 919 changed "Route 15" to "Route 194".

In 1982, Chapter 681 changed "Route 194" to "Route 215".

In 1994, Chapter 1220 clarified the terminus as "Route 215 in Riverside via Santa Ana Canyon."

In 1997, Assembly Bill 1561, Chapter 945 introduced a discontinuity when a portion of the route was turned over to the city of Gardena. Additionally, a provision has been added to the law to allow a portion of Route 91 to be relinquished to the city of Torrance. This made the definition:

  • From Route 1 near Hermosa Beach to Western Avenue in the City of Gardena.

  • From Vermont Avenue in the City of Gardena to Route 215 in Riverside via Santa Ana Canyon.

In 1999, the state was permitted to relinquish the portion of Route 91 between Route 107 and Route 1 to the Cities of Hermosa Beach, Lawndale, Manhattan Beach, and Redondo Beach if the cities agree to accept it and the California Highway Commission approves (AB 1650, Ch 724, 10/10/99). This relinquishment was started in 1999:

  • The portion in Redondo Beach (from Harper to Hawthorne) was relinqushed in 2001.

  • The portion in Lawndale from PM 2.0 to PM 2.4 was on the CTC agenda for relinquishment in January 2002.

In 2003, the legislative definition was changed once again to make the route continuous from the eastern limits of Gardena. (Assembly Bill 1717, Chapter 525, 9/25/2003).

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

US Highway Shield Route 91 was originally US 91. As this 1926 map shows, it looks like US 91 was originally planned to follow what is now US 95 into Las Vegas. The 1928 definition of the signed route ran from the Nevada-California state line S of Jean NV via Baker to Daggett. This routing followed the current I-15 alignment south from the Nevada state line, diverging from the current I-15 alignment at the Ghost Town Road exit, headed south to Daggett via Yermo-Daggett Road (and ending at US 66 there). In 1938, US 91 was rerouted away from Daggett to follow Yermo Road and the I-15 alignment, then along old US 466 (now Old Highway 58) west to First Avenue south into Barstow (to end at US 66/Main Street). In 1947, US 91 was extended south to Long Beach via US 66/US 395 and Route 18.

US 91 rarely ran as just US 91:

  1. US 91 originally started in Long Beach at the corner of Pacific Coast Highway and Atlantic Blvd (this was the terminus of US 6, and the junction of US 6, Route 15, and US 91). When the Long Beach Freeway was constructed the terminus was move W two blocks to the freeway junction.

  2. US 91 then ran E along Pacific Coast Highway (US 101A) to Lakewood Blvd (Route 19). This was part of LRN 60, defined in 1919.

  3. US 91 then ran N along Lakewood Blvd (cosigned with Route 19) to Carson St, which turned into Lincoln Avenue. This segment was part of LRN 168, defined in 1933.

  4. US 91 then ran E along Lincoln Avenue, cosigned with the 1934-defined Route 18. US 91 would run cosigned with Route 18 into San Bernardino; although by 1963, Route 18 had been trucated to start in San Bernardino). Originally, this segment continued E along Lincoln, Center Ave, and Anaheim-Olive Blvd to the junction with Route 55 near Santa Ana Canyon. This was LRN 178, defined in 1933.

    After construction of the US 101 freeway, LRN 178 was truncated on its eastern end to terminate at US 101. When this occurred, US 91 then ran N from Lincoln Ave (Route 18) to Orangethorpe along US 101. This segment was part of LRN 174, defined in 1933.

    From the US 101/Orangethorpe Junction, the route ran E along Orangethorpe to Santa Ana Canyon, along Route 14 (present-day Route 91). This was part of LRN 175, defined in 1933. Present-day Route 91 follows pre-1964 Route 14 W from the junction with US 101 (now I-5).

    From Santa Ana Canyon, the route ran NE cosigned with Route 18 to Riverside. In the early 1960s, it was signed as just US 91. This was part of LRN 43, defined in 1931. Riverside is the present-day eastern terminus of Route 91.

  5. From Riverside to San Bernardino, the route ran cosigned with US 395 (and Route 18). This was also part of LRN 43, defined in 1917. The US 395 signage appears to have started around 1935. The start of the US 91 co-signage is undetermined.

  6. From San Bernardino, the route continue N to the vicinity of Hesperia cosigned with US 66 and US 395. This was part of LRN 31, defined in 1915.

  7. From the vicinity of Hesperia to Barstow, the route was cosigned with US 66. This was also part of LRN 31, defined in 1915.

  8. From Barstow to the Nevada state line, the route was cosigned with US 466. This was the remainder of LRN 31, defined in 1925.

However, the current definition of Route 91 consisted of only two of these LRNs: LRN 175 between Hermosa Beach and Santa Ana Canyon, and LRN 43 from Santa Ana Canyon to Riverside.

 

Status

Note that Route 91 has its own twitter account. The updates come directly from Fernando Chavarria, OCTA’s community relations officer, who provides the public with firsthand knowledge and up-to-the-minute construction updates

Los Angeles County

In August 2011, the CTC approved $1,800,000 in SHOPP funding, programmed in Fiscal Years 2012-13 and 2013-14, for repairs in the city of Los Angeles, at the Route 110 connector Bridge #53-2549H and in Long Beach at Route 710 Bridges service life of the structures.

Orange County

In August 2011, the CTC approved $21,457,000 in SHOPP funding in the cities of La Palma, Buena Park, Anaheim and Fullerton, from the Los Angeles County Line to Lakeview Avenue, that will resurface mainline and ramps on 128 lane miles of pavement to improve safety and ride quality. Project will replace damaged slabs, grind pavement, overlay existing asphalt pavement and ramps, and install concrete termini at ramps.

In September 2012, the CTC approved $34,950,000 in SHOPP funding on Route 91 for the Route 91 Auxiliary Lane Connection. In Fullerton and Anaheim, westbound from Route 57 to I-5. Construct a lane on existing auxiliary lanes through interchanges to form a continuous fourth lane. (TCIF Project 34) (Future Consideration of Funding – Resolution E-10-75, August 2010.) (Contributions from other sources: $13,050,000.) Outcome/Output: Construct 4.6 miles of new lanes. Hours of congestion are decreased approximately 10 percent on the freeway.

In November 2010, the CTC approved amending the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) Program and the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for the Route 91 Widening — Route 55 connector to Weir Canyon project (PPNO 4598A) in Orange County to advance the construction schedule from Fiscal Year (FY) 2011-12 to FY 2010-11 and to split out $2,498,000 of STIP Regional Improvement Program (RIP) to later landscaping work required for the project.

In July 2011, it was reported that groundbreaking was scheduled for the $84 million project that will add one general-purpose lane for six miles in each direction between Route 55 and the Route 241. Crews will widen the bridge for Imperial Highway and the Weir Canyon Road undercrossing in both directions. Traffic estimates for 2011 are that this section of Route 91 carries an average of up to 174,000 vehicles in the eastbound direction with about 160,000 vehicles that travel the westbound portion of that freeway. By 2014, officials expect that traffic volumes will grow to an average of 158,000 to 190,000 daily. Funds for the widening project come from the State Transportation Improvement Program and Proposition 1B — a bond approved by voters in November 2006. About $400,000 in funds are also provided by the renewed version of Measure M that voters approved in 2006.
(Source: OC Register)

Route 91/Route <a href=55" align="right" width="350" height="259" border="0" hspace="10" vspace="10">In August 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to extend a westbound lane from the northbound Route 55/westbound Route 91 connector through the Tustin Avenue interchange and reconstruct the westbound auxilliary lane from east of the northbound Route 55/westbound Route 91 connector to the Tustin Avenue off-ramp. Construction is expected to begin in FY 2014-2015.

In February 2012, the CTC updated the project. The intent of the project is to connect existing auxiliary lanes through interchange from Route 57 to I-5 project will create a fourth mixed-use lane on westbound Route 91 by connecting existing auxiliary lanes through interchanges. The project is currently programmed with $34,950,000 in TCIF funds and $35,750,000 in local measure funds. The project is scheduled for construction in December 2012. The amendment moved the replacement planting scope to a separate project funded with $2,455,000 in local measure funds. It also updated the funding plan for support and capital components funded with local measure funds. Construction is currently scheduled to end in October 2016.

Toll Road Has parallel (toll) express lanes from Route 55 to the junction with Route 241 in Orange County, opened in 1996. These toll roads are the subject of contention due to a non-compete agreement, which prevents the public transportation agencies from upgrading their highway or adding lanes without compensating the company. This resulted in a payment of $4M in public funds for the rights to ease a bottleneck along a 1,000 yard stretch of freeway just each of Coal Canyon Road. In order to speed improvements on this congested stretch of highway, the OCTA agreed on 4/19/2002 to purchase the 10 miles of toll lanes for $207.5M. Under the agreement, the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) will assume the toll road's $135M debt, and make a one-time payment of $72.5M (which includes the $4M Coal Canyon Road improvement payment). Although touch and go in the state assembly, a bill authorizing this purchase was approved on 9/18/2002. (Assembly Bill 1010, Chapter 688, 9/18/2002). Note that the tolls on these lanes are adjusted quarterly as part of the Orange County Transportation Authority's congestion management pricing policy. It calls for dropping and raising tolls based on traffic demand. Traffic volumes are monitored daily and adjusted quarterly. An example of this adjustment was in January 2010, when the toll for those traveling in the eastbound direction on Wednesdays from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. saw the toll drop from $5.45 to $4.95, and those travelling on Fridays from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. saw the toll drop from $4.10 to $3.60.

In December 2011, the results of a survey regarding use of the toll lanes was released. Typical users of the toll lanes are fully employed, relatively well-off men who pay the fees to avoid long traffic delays when they drive to visit friends and relatives or for recreational outings. Those least likely to pay are students, the unemployed and those earning less than $25,000 a year. Commuters heading to and from work constitute less than half of those who use the toll lanes. Overall, 90 percent of those who use the toll lanes said they "were generally satisfied with their experiences," and they estimated they shave about half an hour from their travel times by paying the tolls. The average monthly toll bill for those surveyed was $57.55. More details can be found in the Voice of OC article.

In December 2005, the OCTA and the RCTC approved the addition of an extra eastbound lane, from the Foothill-Eastern tollway (Route 241) in Anaheim to the Corona Expressway (Route 71). Plans call for completion of that lane in two to three years. They also approved the planning phases of a widening project for one or two lanes in both directions between I-15 in Riverside County and Route 55 in Orange County. Board members also asked for more analysis on the possibility of adding four to six lanes elevated over the median or alongside Route 91 from I-15 to the Route 261. The agency eliminated from consideration plans to widen Route 55, into which Route 91 feeds, and to widen Ortega Highway (Route 74) in South County. Some of these items were submitted for funding from the 2007 Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) allocations. The projects approved for funding on this route were the EB auxiliary lane, Route 241 to Route 71 ($71.4 million funded out of $73.8 million requested) and the addition of lanes from Route 55 to Gypsum Canyon ($22 million funded out of $48 milllion requested). However, there were two requests that were not recommended for funding: a WB auxiliary lane from Route 55 to Tustin ($47.5 million), and converting the WB auxiliary lanes to through lanes from Route 57 to I-5 ($36 million).

In June 2012, information was provides on the estimated pricing for the Corona HOT lanes. The peak rush-hour toll for the eastbound Corona stretch would be $5.45; through the Santa Ana Canyon in Orange County, the highest price now is $9.75. The full, 18-mile stretch could top $15 for a one-way trip on a Friday afternoon. Work on the lanes is scheduled to begin in 2013. A firm will be chosen in early 2013 to finalize designs and build the new lanes and other improvements. Once the lanes are complete, transitioning between the toll lanes in Riverside County and Orange County will appear seamless for drivers. The same in-car transponders will track the tolls, and all the charges will be on the same monthly bill. Drivers will be able to choose whether to take the toll lanes in each county. For example, a driver could use them to bypass slow traffic in Riverside County but hop into the general-use lanes in Orange County. Similar to the Orange County setup, electronic message signs will advertise the current price at toll-lane entry points. Unlike Orange County, which raises prices only when traffic flow reaches a threshold of 3,128 cars per hour, Riverside County officials approved a tiered approach that could result in more fluctuations in the hourly price, depending on how busy the freeway is at those times.
(Source: Press-Enterprise, 6/11/12)

In January 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding roadway improvements including widening of existing lanes and constructing an additional lane on Route 91 between Route 241 near Yorba Linda and Route 71 near Corona. Specifically, the project will construct roadway improvements to a 6.9 mile long section of Route 91 in Riverside and Orange Counties. The improvements will include widening of existing lanes and shoulders and the construction of an additional lane in both directions between Route 241 and Route 71. The project is programmed with corridor mobility improvement account funds, traffic congestion relief funds, local funds, federal demonstration funds, and Regional Measure 2 funds. The total estimated project cost is $81,400,000. The construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement. The rough routing is as follows:

[241-71]

In June 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding this project, which will add one general purpose lane on eastbound Route 91 between the Route 91/55 connector and east of Weir Canyon Road interchange, and on westbound Route 91 east of Weir Canyon Road interchange and Imperial Highway interchange. This project will also modify the westbound on-ramps at Lakeview Avenue interchange. The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program. The estimated project cost is $96 million, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement.

At its meeting on June 11, 2009, the CTC approved the request from the OCTA to delete the Route 91 Eastbound Lane — Route 241 to Route 71 Interchange project (PPNO 4678) in Orange County from the CMIA program. OCTA replaced $71,440,000 of CMIA funds with regional funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act).

In November 2009, construction began on the $59.5-million project. The roughly 6-mile-long project will run from Route 241 to Route 71, and will add one lane to the four existing eastbound lanes, excluding two express lanes. In January 2010, the CTC adjusted funding so that demonstration construction could start sooner using design-build. The lane was opened to traffic in December 2010.

In March 2013, the CTC approved $39,173,000 in funding for construct of one mixed flow lane in each direction from Route 241 to Pierce Street, collector distributor system from Lincoln Avenue to I-15, one new HOT lane/convert existing HOV lane from County Line (Design-Build Project).

In June 2007, the OCTA outlined a 5-year plan for the use of the 2nd Measure M funds that included adding lanes on Route 91 between I-5 and Route 57 and between Route 55 and the Riverside County border; adding lanes on I-405 between I-605 and Route 55; a new NB lane on Route 57 between Orangewood Avenue and Lambert Road.

In October 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to construct a direct flyover connector from eastbound Route 91 to northbound Route 71 and reconfigure the eastbound Route 91 ramp between Green River Road and the Route 91/Route 71 interchange. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $113,000,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated tobegin in Fiscal Year 2015-16. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. Due to potential impacts to hazardous waste, visual resources, hydrology and water quality, noise, biological resources, and traffic, an Initial Study was completed for the project. Based upon environmental studies and proposed environmental commitments, including minimization and avoidance measures, restoration activities, and incorporation of BMPs, the project will not have a significant effect on the environment. As a result, an MND was completed for this project.

In August 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct an additional westbound lane from Route 57 to Route 5 in the cities of Anaheim and Fullerton. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund and includes local funds. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. Total estimated project cost is $73,400,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the proposed project baseline agreement.

The agency also agreed to continue studying controversial proposals for elevated lanes down the median of the existing highway, or alongside it, and a tunnel between Orange and Riverside counties through the Santa Ana Mountains (see Orange-Riverside County Connector below for more details).

There have also been mumblings regarding a direct connector between the Route 91 Express Lanes and Route 241. According to this page, they are currently conducting a feasability study.

In May 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Orange, to the Orange County Flood Control District, a political entity governed by the Orange County Board of Supervisors, along Route 91 between Weir Canyon Road and Coal Canyon Road, consisting of collateral facilities.

In January 2014, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Orange, to the Orange County Flood Control District, a political entity governed by the Orange County Board of Supervisors, along Route 91 between the boundary common to Orange and Riverside Counties, and 0.7 miles westerly thereof, consisting of collateral facilities. The Orange County Flood Control District, by resolution dated February 9, 2010, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

Riverside County

In October 2010, AB 2098 was signed, which allows the Riverside County Transportation Commission to utilize the “design-build” process for the 91 Corridor Improvement Project. Design-build permits the lead agency on a publicly funded project to keep procurement and contractor hiring under one roof, in contrast to “design-bid-build,” which requires dividing up the design and construction phases of a project between different entities. Design-build can shave three to five years off the time it takes to complete a project. It was estimated that 18,000 jobs would be created by the $1.3 billion project, which is slated to get under way in early 2012 and reach completion by late 2015. The project calls for an eight-mile extension of the two eastbound toll lanes that currently stop at the Riverside-Orange County line. Improvements will also be made to the I-15/Route 91 interchange in Corona and various roads that parallel Route 91.

The RCTC is preparing to launch construction of the makeover of Route 91 by late 2013 or early 2014. That massive undertaking, besides constructing toll lanes, entails adding two general-purpose lanes, replacing overpasses and building a sweeping connecting ramp that will drop northbound I-15 commuters into the new Route 91 express lanes. There are also plans for HOT lanes on I-15 once the Route 91 construction is complete.

In December 2013, Riverside County broke ground on a long-anticipated widening project meant to smooth away a bottleneck that snags traffic at its border with Orange County. The project will widen each side of the freeway from four regular lanes to five and replace the single carpool lanes with dual pay-to-ride express lanes. Construction is scheduled to get underway in earnest by January and last until 2017.

In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed constructing freeway and operational improvements.

The 2009 Economic Simulus funds were expected to speed up the construction of Route 91 between Route 241 and Route 71. OCTA staff members recommended that about $71 million of the expected stimulus money go toward Route 91 freeway project. An additional $4 million will come from toll revenue and state funding, and $5 million will come from the Riverside County Transportation Commission. Nearly 2,000 jobs would be created by Route 91 widening project. Construction is scheduled to begin in July 2009.

In 2007, Rep. Gary Miller, R-Diamond Bar, introduced a $390,000,000 bill in Congress to widen Route 91 and take other measures to try to decongest the heavily clogged route. The bill would allocate $221.3 million for an extra lane in both directions, from Route 55 to the Riverside County border; $65 million for a special interchange in San Diego County making it easier for northbound truckers on I-5 to go east on Route 56 (thus diverting those who head north, take Route 55 and then going east on Route 91); $56 million to construct an interchange connecting the Route 91 Express Lanes and the Route 241 Toll Road; $40.7 million for an eastbound lane from Route 241 to Route 71; and $7.1 million for added lanes for truck weigh stations. The earliest any of the bill's projects could be completed is by 2011. By 2030, daily usage is projected by transportation officials to swell to 450,000.

[Toll Chart]In December 2007, it was announce that in January 2008, the toll on Fridays on the eastbound 91 Express Lanes will rise to $10; this rise comes nine months after the boost to $9.25. It will be in effect from 3 to 4 p.m. This is an example of congestion pricing — additionally, the eastbound toll during the same 3 to 4 p.m. hour will increase from $4.95 to $5.95 on Wednesdays and from $4.95 to $5.70 on Thursdays. As of 2007, Route 91 was one of the most congested highways in Southern California. More than 320,000 vehicles use the freeway each day to commute between Orange and Riverside counties.

According to the Orange County Register, there are also plans to extend the Route 91 Express Lanes in a 12-mile stretch of Route 91 between Route 241 and Pierce Street in the city of Riverside. The preferred plan calls for the extension of Route 91 toll lanes, creating four toll lanes — two eastbound and two westbound — between the Riverside County line and Pierce, which is about three miles east of I-15. It also would add a general-purpose lane on each side of Route 91 and would create entries to Route 91 toll lanes from I-15 at Hidden Valley Parkway to the north and Cajalco Road to the south. The 12-mile stretch of Route 91 is traveled by an estimated 280,000 to 300,000 motorists each day. By 2030, that number is expected to skyrocket to some 425,000 motorists. Extending the toll lanes along the full 12-mile stretch and adding connectors from I-15 is estimated to cost $1.3 billion. About $300 million would come from Riverside County's Measure A, a half-cent sales tax for transportation projects in that county. The bulk of the remaining cost — some $1 billion — would come from the sale of private bonds, to be repaid by funds collected from motorists using the new toll lanes. Transportation officials hope to follow a design-build model — similar to the concept that allowed for the quicker expansion of Route 22; this would permit much of the improvements to be finished by the end of 2015.

In July 2011, it was reported that the $1.3 billion project to widen Route 91 through Corona and add two toll lanes in each direction must wait to receive a federal grant that transportation officials say is necessary to start the work. Specifically, the project could not proceed without the $446 million federal loan, and said loan was not in the Summer 2011 route of federal loan commitments for road and transit projects. If officials must wait to reapply for the $446 million loan until 2012, it would potentially delay the start of construction of the lanes until 2013, thereby moving the opening from 2017 to 2018.

Route 91 Toll Lanes CoronaIn May 2013, it was reported that the Riverside County Transportation Commission on Tuesday, May 8, 2013, approved a $632.6 million contract to widen Route 91, including the toll lanes, through Corona. The contract is a major element of the $1.3 billion Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project. The $1.3 billion figure includes the new contract and other money spent acquiring land, designing the project and doing an environmental study. Construction is scheduled to begin in early 2014. Preliminary work could start this year and the lanes are expected to open by 2017. The project will replace carpool lanes with two toll lanes in each direction that will connect to toll lanes already in Orange County. Also, a fifth convention lane will be added in each direction. Without the toll lanes, 22 regular lanes would be needed to manage rush-hour congestion. Besides adding lanes, the project will rebuild seven interchanges and provide a connector from northbound I-15 to the Route 91 toll lanes. Street improvements in Corona and additional express bus service also are part of the project.
(Source: Press Enterprise, 5/8/13)

In July 2013, it was reported that the Riverside County Transportation Commission has announced the sale of bonds to pay for the construction, operation, and maintenance of the project. The funding ensures that work on the highway widening and new toll lanes in Corona will begin by the end of the year, even as land acquisition along the highway continues. Completion is set for 2017. The project will add at least two lanes of capacity to Route 91 at its most congested points through Corona. Toll lanes will be connected in a way that will take commuters traveling north on I-15 directly to the toll lanes. In addition, funding will rebuild seven interchanges and improve access from local streets to on- and offramps.

In December 2011, the US Department of Transportation approved $20 million in TIGER funding for the Route 91 corridor. This payment will support a TIFIA loan that will finance up to one-third of the costs of the $1.3 billion, 8-mile extension of the Route 91 Express Lanes. The project will extend the Route 91 Express Lanes from the current eastern terminus at the border of Orange and Riverside Counties eastward to I-15. Additionally, one general-purpose lane will be added to the facility in each direction along the project route.

In December 2009, the CTC received information on a proposal to amend the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) to reprogram $2,000,000 Regional Improvement Program (RIP) funds from the Route 91/Route 71 Interchange and Connectors project (PPNO 0077G) to a new Route 91 Corridor Improvement project (PPNO 0077J) in Riverside County. The Corridor Improvement project will reduce congestion and improve mobility within the corridor limits by constructing: one mixed-flow lane, in each direction, from Route 241 to Pierce Street, a collector/distributor system from Lincoln Avenue to I-15, a high occupancy toll (HOT) lane and/or conversion of one existing high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane, in each direction, from the County Line to I-15, and a HOT median direct connector at the Route 91/I-15 interchange.

In October 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen the Route 91 Corridor, including constructing one mixed-flow lane in each direction, one auxiliary lane in each direction, highoccupancy or tolled express lanes, and direct high-occupancy or tolled express lane connections between Route 91 and I-15. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. This project is included in the Design-Build pilot program. The total estimated cost for capital and support is $1,300,517,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program.

[TCRP 64]There are currently plans (TCRP #64) to improve the Green River Interchange to NB Route 71, including adding an auxiliary lane and connector ramp. (June 2002 CTC Agenda Item 2.1c.(1)). In August 2007, the CTC approved two actions regarding this project, specifically with Project #64.1 and #64.2. TCRP #64.1 would improve the Green River Interchange and add an auxiliary lane and connector ramp east of the Green River Interchange to northbound Route 71 in Riverside County. Project #64.2 would improve the Green River Interchange and add an auxiliary lane and connector ramp east of the Green River Interchange to northbound Route 71 in Riverside County. The actions that were approved were to transfer $590,000 in TCRP funding from TCRP #64.1 to TCRP #64.2 for Plans, Specifications, and Engineering (PS&E), to program $4,410,000 in new TCRP funds for PS&E on congestion and improve local traffic circulation on Route 91 in the area of Green River Road and Route 71. TCRP Project #64.1 relieves congestion on Route 91 in the area of Green River Road and Route 71 and improves local traffic circulation on Green River Road in the vicinity of Route 91 by replacing the current 3-lane Green River Road overcrossing with a 6-lane overcrossing, modification of ramps, and local street improvements at the interchange. Project 64.1 was completed in 2007 with funds remaining in the account due to various transfers. TCRP Project #64.2 relieves congestion on Route 91 in the eastbound direction by adding a lane in the vicinity of the Green River Interchange on eastbound Route 91 between Route 241 and Route 71, near the Riverside/Orange County line, extending to the Route 71/Route 91 interchange near the city of Corona in Riverside County. This project should complete in FY11/12.

In March 2013, it was reported that the Budget and Implementation Committee for the RCTC approved a multi-million-dollar financing plan that calls for the issuance and sale of up to $475 million in Riverside County Transportation Commission sales tax revenue bonds (limited tax bonds), and up to $275 million in county transportation commission toll revenue bonds. The plan also includes a $435 million Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) loan from the U.S. Department of Transportation. These funds will be used to make improvements along Route 91 from the Orange County line to about Pierce Street in Riverside, including upgrading the interchange with I-15. The work would complement ongoing I-215 construction that includes widening as well as improvements to the Route 60/I-215 interchange

In May 2009, the CTC approved a project to widen the existing Van Buren Boulevard interchange from four to six lanes, and construct ramp and roadway improvements in the city of Riverside. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes local and federal funds. Total estimated project cost is $44,882,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2008-09. The project was later rejiggered to use $16M in ARRA funds, but that fell through in August 2009 when officials realized the project was not "shovel-ready" enough to qualify for the federal help. Officials said they will look to state and local coffers to cover the needed reconstruction at Van Buren and Route 91. Upgrades to Van Buren and Route 91 -- an approximately $34 million endeavor -- include rebuilding ramps and widening the freeway overpass from four to six lanes. Timing proved to be critical when it came to the federal stimulus money. To comply with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act's schedule, a highway project had to be ready to start construction by March 2010, said Shirley Medina, the transportation commission's programming and planning manager. A project also had to have regional impact and create jobs. The plans and right-of-way land acquisitions were not ready for the Van Buren upgrades, but they were for a project at Route 74 and I-215 project. Medina and John Standiford, the transportation commission's deputy director, expressed confidence that the $16 million needed to complete the Van Buren project will come from state coffers, most likely Caltrans. About $14 million would come from Measure A funds, $2.3 million from the transportation commission's regional coffers and $1.5 million from the city of Riverside.

In mid-January 2010, the Riverside City Council voted on whether to give a $15.5 million contract to Skanska USA to widen the bridge where Van Buren crosses the freeway, widen westbound freeway ramps, and add an eastbound ramp on Indiana Avenue. Construction of the $34.5 million project is expected to begin in February 2010 and should last 15 months.

There is a significant project to reconstruct the Route 91/I-215/Route 60 interchange. Details may be found here. The project includes rebuilding the Spruce Street bridge; relocating the existing eastbound on-ramp to Route 60 from Orange Street to Main Street; and widening the existing highway undercrossing bridges at University Avenue, Mission Inn Avenue and Third Street. There are also plans to replace the existing southbound (to I-215) loop ramp with a direct freeway-to-freeway connector, as well as replacing the northbound to westbound (to Route 91) loop ramp with a direct freeway-to-freeway connector. There are also plans to remove the existing I-215 southbound off-ramp and northbound on-ramp at Spruce Street. These ramps will be relocated to Route 91 as an eastbound off-ramp and a westbound on-ramp at the new Spruce Street overcrossing bridge. The project will also realign East La Cadena Drive between 1st and Spruce Street, and provide a grade separation at the railroad crossing, as well as realigning West La Cadena Drive to accommodate the new interchange connectors. The Route 91 main line will be widened, and auxiliary lanes added between University and the 60/91/215 interchange. Additionally, I-215 (Route 60) will be widened from the 60/91/215 interchange to the 60/215 junction, including extending the existing carpool lanes from University Avenue to the 60/215 junction, and providing auxiliary lanes leading to and departing from the new freeway connectors. The existing I-215 (Route 60) Blaine Street, Iowa Avenue and Linden Street overcrossing bridges will be reconstructed to span the new freeway widening, and the existing I-215 (Route 60) Blaine Street, University Avenue and Central Avenue/Watkins Drive interchanges will be improved, including ramp widening. Sycamore Canyon Boulevard will be realigned at Central Avenue. The project will construct a new interchange at Martin Luther King Boulevard, and remove the existing El Cerrito Drive interchange. The existing railroad overhead bridges at Down Street and Chicago Avenue will be widened. At the 60/215 junction, a truck by-pass connector will be constructed from southbound I-215 to eastbound Route 60 and southbound I-215. On Route 60, the existing Day Street interchange will be modified. On I-215, the Box Springs Road interchange will be rebuilt with an overcrossing bridge. Lastly, there will be a a concrete barrier on northbound I-215 at the junction to westbound Route 60. This project has taken three years, cost over $317-million, and should conclude in Spring 2008. Caltrans officials plan to open two new connector ramps by the end of 2007, including one that soars 72 feet high and measures just over a mile long.

In January 2007, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the City of Riverside, consisting of 5 segments (a mix of Route 91 and I-215) along La Cadena Drive from Malta Place to Spruce Street and from Strong Street to Spring Garden Street, and a portion of Kansas Avenue between Roberta Street and Spruce Street, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets, frontage roads and culde- sacs.

Route 91 Project in RiversideThere is also a TCRP project that is adding HOV lanes between Adams Street and the Route 91/I-215/Route 60 junction. In January 2007, the CTC processed a request to reallocate some funds on this project and to update the completion schedule. The overall project consists of adding one HOV lane in each direction on Route 91 from Adams Street to the Route 60/91/215 Junction in Riverside County. The project also includes modifying the interchange, constructing retaining walls and soundwalls, and widening and reconstructing the existing roadway and bridges. Stage 1 of the project (Project #62.1) consists of widening Route 91 to provide one HOV lane in each direction from University Avenue to the 60/91/215 Junction. This project was selected in May 2001 as one of the pilot projects using Design Sequencing. The project was awarded in February 2004. The transfer of $16,300,000 from Project #62 to Project #62.1 is necessary to cover cost increases due to bid item quantity adjustments, unforeseen utility relocations, and adjustments to environmental and right of way mitigation for related changes. In order to fully fund Project Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) funding. The final phase is now scheduled to finish in FY 2011/2012. In July 2010, the project was amended to increase the costs: specifically, the following changes were made: increase Environmental (PA&ED) from $2,681,000 to $3,193,000; increase Plans, Specifications, and Estimate (PS&E) from $13,070,000 to $20,262,000; increase Right of Way (R/W) from $31,682,000 to $62,157,000; increase Construction Support from $14,598,000 to $20,598,000; and decrease Construction Capital from $177,146,000 to $171,146,000.

In 2007, the CTC recommended that the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) fund construction of HOV lanes between Adams St and the Route 60/Route 91/I-215 interchange ($157,198K). They did not recommend funding the Route 71/Route 91 interchange and connectors ($99,014K).

By December 2007, a mitigated Negative EIR had been received on this project, as the project will involve construction activities in an area that is habitat to the Stephen’s kangaroo rat, a federally listed threatened species. The project will also result in the disturbance of riparian habitat. The total estimated project cost, support and capital, is now $232,777,000, provided by $24,263,000 in Regional Improvement Program funds, $3,700,000 in Traffic Congestion Relief Program funds, $47,616,000 in Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality funds, and $157,198,000 in Corridor Mobility Improvement Account funds. It is now estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2010-11.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $157.2 million in funding from the state's Prop. 1B bond program, which voters approved in 2006, to add a car pool lane to Route 91 from Adams Street to the Route 60/Route 91/I-215 interchange.

In January 2012, it was reported that the project to widen Route 91 in Riverside will cost between $17 million and $21 million more than initially estimated because the job’s low bidder has been disqualified. Officials opened bids on 12/8/2011 for the project to add car pool lanes along six miles of east- and westbound Route 91 from Adams Street to the Route 60/Route 91/I-215 interchange. Since then, contractors and Caltrans officials have traded letters and worked to resolve a host of issues ranging from estimates of how long the job would take to not including enough minority contractors in the process. A Southern California Congresswoman also has weighed in on behalf of companies in her district, according to letters associated with the project. Atkinson Construction was the apparent low bidder, estimating that it could build the lanes for $108.2 million, nearly $18 million lower than any of the competitors for the job. Less than two weeks later, the company was deemed “noncompliant” because it failed to submit certifications for painting standards and because Atkinson used a different way of calculating how many days the job would take, compared to other companies. SEMA Construction, which had the second-lowest bid at $125.9 million, called Atkinson’s claim they could build the project in 212 days “irresponsible” and “unrealistic” in a letter protesting the Atkinson bid to Caltrans officials six days after the bids were opened. Caltrans officials disqualified Atkinson on Dec. 20, and said SEMA was the lowest responsive bidder. Soon after, a fencing subcontractor for Atkinson protested SEMA’s bid, saying the company failed to meet a 7 percent goal of hiring minority contractors. The same complaint to SEMA’s bid was raised by Rep. Judy Chu, D-Monterey Park, and Flatiron Construction, who submitted the third-lowest bid on the car pool lane project. SEMA is moving forward with the bid, saying they acted in good faith to try to partner with minority businesses but fell short of the 7% goal. Caltrans can award a contract to a company that doesn’t meet the minority hiring standard if the company can demonstrate it did enough to solicit job estimates from minority-owned subcontractors.
(Source: Press-Enterprise, 1/25/2012)

In March 2012, ground was broken for the Route 91 widening. This will complete the HOV lane from Los Angeles County to the junction with Route 60. Construction of the $232 million project is being overseen by Caltrans. SEMA Construction is the general contractor. About 1,500 jobs will be created by the project, according to estimates. Completion is scheduled for late 2015. According to SEMA’s bid, it has 570 working days — about 2˝ years — to finish the job. That doesn’t count utility relocations and land clearing that has already happened. For example, since early 2011, crews have been working relocating water, electrical and gas lines beneath, atop and along the freeway. For example, crews installed new electrical lines and power poles around the Arlington Avenue exit ramp from westbound Route 91, to allow for the ramp’s redesign. The construction will affect downtown Riverside. 14th Street, one of the city’s busiest ingress and egress points to downtown offices, will be cut in half. The entire bridge will be replaced with a new overpass, one portion at a time. Entrance and exit ramps to the new 14th Street bridge also will get a serious update. The new ramps will be braided, like those along I-215 in San Bernardino near Inland Center Drive, so that traffic getting on the freeway and exiting drivers do not conflict. 14th Street will never close entirely for an extended period, but Ivy Street and Cridge Street will close so crews can demolish the bridges and replace them. The railroad bridge between Cridge and Ivy is also coming down and being replaced so that it can span the widened freeway.
(Source: Press-Enterprise, 4/3/2012)

General

Freeway from Route 110 to Route 215; planned as freeway, never upgraded, between Route 405 and Route 110. The first segment (as freeway) opened in 1968; the last segment opened in 1975.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #1176: Study and construct highway alternatives between Orange and Riverside Counties, directed by RCTC, working with local transp. authorities, and guided by the current MIS. This is more funding for the study of a Orange-Riverside County Connector (see below).$3,200,000.

  • High Priority Project #1655: Landscape the south side of Route 91 at Bellflower Blvd in Bellflower.$200,000.

  • High Priority Project #3175: Route 91/I-605 Needs Assesment Study, Whittier, CA.$12,800.

  • High Priority Project #3339: Study and construct highway alternatives between Orange and Riverside Counties, directed by RCTC, working with local transp. authorities, and guided by the current MIS. This is more funding for the study of a Orange-Riverside County Connector (see below).$12,600,000.

 

Orange-Riverside County Connector

The Irvine Company has proposed stacking a freeway on top of railroad tracks through Santa Ana Canyon to relieve traffic on the Riverside Freeway. The 10-mile freeway would be built above a heavily traveled rail line from Interstate 15 in Riverside County to the Foothill tollway in northeast Orange County, running parallel to the Riverside Freeway. The result would be side-by-side freeways passing through the canyon that links Orange and Riverside counties. In 2005, the estimate for construction of a double-deck, elevated road would be $50 million to $80 million per mile. The cost to build a 10-mile, six-lane freeway could be anywhere from $360 million to $4.8 billion.

There have also been proposals to ease traffic by drilling a tunnel or carving a highway through the Cleveland National Forest. The tunnel proposal involves an 11-mile tunnel that would run from Route 133 in Irvine to Cajalco Road at I-15. A different tunnel proposed by the Riverside County Building Industry Assn. would cut through the mountains from Interstate 15 and loop back to the Riverside Freeway, where it would connect to the Foothill tollway along four miles of double-decked lanes. Again, this tunnel would connect to Cajalco Road, which turns into the Ramona Expressway and runs past the former March Air Reserve Base, one of the region's newest cargo airports. According to a 2005 report, two route options (for new relivier routes) currently under study call for building one or more tunnels from the I-15 Freeway through the Cleveland National Forest to Orange County. One starts at Cajalco Road in Corona and the other at Lake Street or Nichols Road in Lake Elsinore. Both tie in near the Route 133/Route 241 interchange in Irvine. Either route could have one continuous tunnel at least 10 miles long or multiple shorter tunnels.

In 2002, motorists made about 250,000 trips a day on the Riverside Freeway. In 2005, Route 91 — which now includes four toll lanes — carries 264,000 cars a day. In 2020, there could be as many as 452,000. As the population grows, the traffic slows — down to 5 mph now during rush hour. The state has even gotten into the act; ACR 81, passed in 2002, calls for a study for such a Riverside to Orange County Transportation Corridor. The North County Times had an article on a commuter meeting on this route that explored five corridors: existing Route 91; the parallel railroad corridor to the north; Lake Street/Nichols Road and I-15 in Lake Elsinore to Route 133 and Route 241 in Orange County; Cajalco Road and I-15 in south Corona to Route 133 and Route 241; and the Ortega Highway (Route 74). Within each corridor, there are multiple options. Freeways, railroad tracks and exclusive bus lanes all are on the table. All told, there are a dozen potential fixes under study, all entailing a different mix of potential improvements. One final preferred fix is expected to be named in December 2005, when a $3.3 million study is completed.

According to the Orange County Register, a November 2005 study suggested that lanes should be added to Route 91 to ease congestion, and commuters should be encouraged to use the Route 241 toll road instead of Route 55. The report also recommended that an elevated roadway parallel to the 91 should be further explored and a detailed geotechnical study should be conducted on the proposed tunnel beneath the Cleveland National Forest to learn if the water table makes such a concept too expensive - and a reason to drop the idea. Specifically, the study suggested adding lanes to Route 91 in segments, up to three lanes in one stretch. Building them and other freeway improvements would cost $670 million. It is also suggested to reduce the tolls on Route 241 to encourage traffic to take that route. In compensation, the Orange and Riverside transportation agencies would build additional lanes for the toll road web. If enough added cars and trucks jump onto Route 241 and related toll roads, enough tolls would be collected to cover the reduced price of the toll. Widening the lanes and other changes could cost $470 million. There is also the possibility of creating a roadway just north of Route 91 for a four-lane, mostly elevated highway that could go over wildlife corridors; this would cost an estimated $2.7 billion. The tunnel approach, as well as widening Route 74, are currently cost prohibitive, and potentially geologically prohibitive.

As more details emerged, the plan proposed a freeway through the forest and a double-decking Route 91. Specifically, the regional transportation panel decided to recommend building those new roads, and add a few lanes to the 91, to accommodate the roughly 450,000 cars forecast to travel daily between the counties by 2030. The panel didn't specify whether the forest freeway, extending from I-15 and Cajalco Road to Irvine, would go either in a long, continuous tunnel under the Santa Ana Mountains or a series of short tunnels interspersed with overland highway sections. It would not be built entirely above ground through the Cleveland National Forest, however. If transportation officials wanted to put all traffic on Route 91, they would need to widen it to 22 lanes. The $10 billion preferred plan does call for some widening on Route 91 in Riverside County, to match the number in Orange County, Rahimian said. With those improvements in place, officials could accommodate the forecast growth either by constructing a six-lane elevated highway over the 91, or punching a six-lane freeway through the forest. Cost projections include $6 billion for the forest-tunnel highway. The Corona elevated highway's price tag is pegged at $2.7 billion. [The] second deck would partially cover Route 91 and would run between I-15 and Route 241 toll road in Orange County. It would empty directly onto Route 241.

[Linkj to Press Enterprise Image]In February 2010, it was reported that an 11.5-mile tunnel between Corona and Irvine through the Santa Ana Mountains is technically feasible and deserves more study, although it is well out of the price range of public agencies. Based on the tests by Irvine-based engineering firm Kleinfelder, there are no "fatal flaws" in building a 52-foot-wide tunnel to carry traffic and another smaller tunnel for passenger rail service and a water line. But obstacles remain, much as they did in 2007 when the feasibility study was started. Engineers have said since 2008 that the tunneling would require larger boring machines than have ever been built, and designers will have to find an answer for how to ventilate the tunnel that isn't damaging to the forest above. The estimated cost to build one of the two 53-foot tunnels and the 27-foot hole for rail and water company use would be nearly $8.6 billion. The route would be roughly from the Route 133/Route 241 junction to Caljaco Road and I-15. Currently, the counties are investigating if they could borrow for construction based on anticipated tolls. The price of a one-way trip through the tunnel is estimated to vary between $4 and $20, depending on the time of day, according to a report presented to the bi-county authority. The tunnel would be used in one direction in the morning, then reverse course in the evening to handle rush-hour traffic. Construction would not start until 2019 and take a decade, according to the current schedule.
[Source: "OC-RivCo tunnel feasible, but pricey", Dug Begley, Riverside Press Enterprise, 2/3/2010]

In July 2010, it was reported that although the tunnel was technically feasible, it was economically infeasible. At a cost of $8.6 billion, it's simply too expensive, especially since officials can't start collecting tolls until after they spend 10 years building it. The proposed 11.2-mile tunnel also faces technical and environmental issues that could slow or stop construction. The notion right now is to make the project low priority until something changes -- technology improves so much that construction costs drastically drop, they receive a large bundle of money, etc. Backers are hopefull that groundwater monitoring at least will continue. To meet rules regarding construction in national forests, 10 years of groundwater monitoring must be compiled. If officials suspend the $30,000-a-month monitoring, they would have to start all over again if the project were revived. The image to the right shows some of the issues (click for detail)


 

Naming

The segment of Route 91 from the western city limits of Gardena to Route 710 is offically named the "Gardena Freeway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 16, Chapter 35, in 1991. Gardena refers to the city of Gardena, which was derived from "garden" and was applied to the subdivision in the 1880s.

Before 1991, the 4.7mi segment W of Route 710 had been named the "Redondo Beach Freeway" (named by the State Highway Commission). It was named because it traverses the City of Redondo Beach, CA, which was founded in 1881 and apparently named after the adjoining Ranch Sausal Redondo (round willow grove).

Additionally, the portion of Route 91 in the City of Compton from Alameda Road to Central Avenue is named the "Willard H. Murray" Freeway. Willard H. Murray was a member of the state assembly, an engineer at TRW, a congressional aide to Mervyn Dymally, and a past chair of the Legislative Black Caucus. He established the first institute of the preservation of jazz as an art form at Cal State Long Beach. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 78, Chapter 135, in 1997.

The westbound portion of Route 91 between Central Avenue and Figueroa Street, in the City of Carson is officially named the "Rudolph B. Davila Memorial Freeway" This segment was named in memory of Rudolph B. Davila, who was born in El Paso, Texas, and was raised in Watts, California. As a young man during the Depression, he worked in vineyards and helped restore the California missions as part of the Civilian Conservation Corps. During World War II, Rudolph B. Davila helped take out several machine gun nests and prevented a 130-man American rifle company from being slaughtered in a German ambush in Italy. According to his Medal of Honor citation, Davila’s machine gunners were caught on an exposed hillside by heavy grazing fire from a well-entrenched Germany force and were reluctant to risk putting their guns into action. Davila crawled 50 yards to the nearest machine gun, set it up alone and opened fire on the enemy. In order to observe the effect of his fire, Davila fired from the kneeling position, ignoring the enemy fire that struck the tripod and passed between his legs. Ordering a gunner to take over, Davila crawled forward to a vantage point and directed the firefight with hand and arm signals until both hostile machine guns were silenced. Bringing his three remaining machine guns into action, Davila drove the enemy to a reserve position 200 yards to the rear. When Davila received a painful wound in a leg, he dashed to a burned tank and despite the crash of bullets on the hull, engaged a second enemy force from the tank’s turret. Dismounting, he advanced 130 yards in short rushes, crawled 20 yards and charged into an enemy-held house to eliminate the defending force of five with a hand grenade and rifle fire. Climbing to the attic, he straddled a large shell hole in the wall and opened fire on the enemy. Although the walls of the house were crumbling, he continued to fire until he had destroyed two more machine guns. Davila’s “intrepid actions brought desperately needed heavy weapons support to a hard-pressed rifle company and silenced four machine gunners, which forced the enemy to abandon their prepared positions,” the citation read. Davila received a battlefield commission to second lieutenant and was initially awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, the Army’s second-highest honor. His wife, Harriet, lobbied Army officials for years to award her husband the Medal of Honor. A captain in the rifle company had said he would recommend Davila for the Medal of Honor. On June 21, 2000, 56 years later, Rudolph B. Davila, who was of Filipino and Spanish descent, along with 20 other Asian American World War II veterans, received a Medal of Honor from President Bill Clinton at a White House ceremony after an army panel reviewed their wartime actions and deemed them worthy of the nation's highest commendation for battlefield bravery. Rudolph B. Davila earned the medal for his extraordinary heroism during the offensive that broke through the German mountain strongholds surrounding the Anzio beachhead in May 1944. When asked what made him rise to his knees with a machine gun while his fellow soldiers hugged the ground, Rudolph B. Davila said, "I knew what I was fighting for, and most of the kids didn't," he said, ascribing his self-assuredness to accounts he had read of Hitler. "I had this fervour about the defense of freedom, even though I couldn't define freedom. I just knew we were going to be enslaved to Hitler if we didn't defeat him." The war ended for Rudolph B. Davila in late 1944 when a tank round exploded in a tree and shrapnel ripped into his right shoulder. Over the next six years, he underwent 13 operations on his arm and met his wife, Harriet, at a military hospital in San Francisco, California. After the war, Rudolph B. Davila earned bachelor's and master's degrees in sociology from the University of Southern California, and spent 30 years as a teacher and counselor in the Los Angeles City School District. Rudolph B. Davila was an excellent cook and gardener. He terraced his hillside yard and built retaining walls. He also built the family's house in Harbor City, California, and his retirement home in Vista, California. Rudolph B. Davila died January 26, 2002, in Vista, California, after a long illness and is survived by his children. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 107, Resolution Chapter 125, on 9/7/2010.

The segment of Route 91 between I-605 and Pioneer Boulevard, in Los Angeles County, is named the "Los Angeles County Deputy Sheriff David Powell Memorial Highway" It was named in memory of Deputy David Powell of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department who was killed in the line of duty on November 30, 2002, in the City of Artesia while conducting an investigation. Deputy Powell was a resident of Torrance and a graduate of Loyola Marymount University. Deputy Powell stated the reason he became a law enforcement officer was to make a positive difference in other people' s lives, and as a deputy sheriff, he was praised by his peers, supervisors, and members of the community for his tireless efforts to guide young people away from drugs and gangs. Deputy Powell was awarded the Medal of Valor by the City of Lakewood for saving the life of an individual attempting suicide in the year 2000, and several months prior to his death, Deputy Powell tried desperately to remove critically injured passengers from a burning vehicle and was again honored for his heroic actions with a second Medal of Valor. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 30, Resolution Chapter 47, on 6/9/2009.

The segment of Route 91 from Route 5 in Fullerton to Route 710 is named the "Artesia Freeway". Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution, Chapter 148 in 1970.

Bridge 53-958 on I-110, the I-110/Route 91 interchange, is named the "Edmond J. Russ Interchange". It was built in 1985, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 135, Chapter 162. [Note: According to the CalTrans logs, this bridge is actually on Route 110; thus the named interchange is at the Route 110/Route 91 junction.] Ed Russ is a former mayor of Gardena; during his term (which ended in 1982) he was able to push for the extension of the then Redondo Beach Freeway to the Route 110. This extension relieved the traffic that plagued Atresia Blvd from the end of the freeway at Broadway to Route 110. When the extension was completed in 1985, it was given the legislative name in his honor, but it was up to the private sector to produce the funds to make and install the signs for the interchange. It wasn't until 1998-99 that a group of Gardena businesspeole and citizens, led by the Gardena Valley News, began a campaign to raise the money needed. The signs were installed in the latter half of 1999.

The Route 91/Route 55 interchange is named the "Mark Denis Melbourne Memorial Interchange". Mark Denis Melbourne was a fixture on southern California radio, giving traffic reports for four decades. He was regarded as one of the most respected broadcasters in southern California and was used as the "image voice" for KFI 640 AM. He was also a part-time communications instructor at the University of Southern California, and was regarded as having loved to share his knowledge of broadcasting with others. He advocated reporting traffic without panic and with caring, and was willing to help frustrated drivers avoid bottlenecks. He was also the unidentified voice on the monorail that ferries visitors around Disneyland. He died of a fatal illness in the year 2000 in his home in Anaheim Hills at the early age of 59. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 50, Chapter 104, on August 8, 2002.

The interchange at I-15 and Route 91 within the City of Corona in the County of Riverside is named the Officer Shannon Distel Memorial Interchange. It was named in memory of CHP Officer Shannon Distel of the California Highway Patrol, who was killed in the line of duty on August 27, 2003. Officer Distel was patrolling on surface streets at 4:15 pm on August 27, 2003, when his motorcycle collided with a pickup truck pulling a trailer. This naming is in recognition of the hazardous work, serious responsibilities, and strong commitment that Officer Distel willingly accepted during his six years as a law enforcement officer. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 163, August 19, 2004, Chapter 151.

The segment of Route 91 from Route 5 to the Route 60/Route 215/Route 91 interchange is named the "Riverside Freeway". It was named by the State Highway Commission (date unknown). The first segment opened in 1958. It was named because it traverses the City of Riverside CA, which was named in 1871 because of its location on the banks of a channel of the Santa Ana River. The county was named after the city in 1893.

The 4.7 mile portion of Route 91 between La Sierra Avenue and Madison Street in the County of Riverside is named the "Officer Michael Crain Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Riverside Police Officer Michael (Mike) Crain, born in 1978 in Anaheim, California. Mike was raised in the Riverside, California, area and graduated from Redlands High School in 1996, after which he attended Crafton Hills College in Yucaipa, California, for a year prior to enlisting in the United States Marine Corps. During his military service, Mike served two deployment tours in Kuwait as a rifleman in the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Division, serving as a squad leader and being promoted to the rank of Sergeant, and was stationed at Camp Pendleton in Oceanside, California, where he taught Military Operations in Urban Terrain. Sergeant Crain was awarded the Good Conduct Medal, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon with one star, a Certificate of Commendation, and the Rifle Marksmanship Badge. After being honorably discharged from the Marine Corps, Mike graduated from the Riverside Sheriff’s Academy, Class #152, and was sworn in as a Riverside Police Officer on August 24, 2001. Following his graduation from the Field Training Program, Officer Crain was assigned to Field Operations as a Patrol Officer. During his 11-year tenure with the Riverside Police Department, he served as a Patrol Officer and was assigned to the Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) Team. Officer Crain also served as a Helicopter Observer, a Field Training Officer, a Firearms Instructor, and was assigned to the University Neighborhood Enhancement Team (UNET). During the early morning of February 7, 2013, Officer Crain was gunned down in an apparent ambush while he was on patrol and parked at a stoplight with a trainee officer. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 134, July 7, 2014, Chapter 84

Additionally, the segment of Route 91 from Route 71 to Route 15 is officially named the "Corona Freeway". It was named by the State Highway Commission in 1958, and follows former LRN 77. It was named because the route traverses the community of Corona (Latin: Circle), which was named in 1896 because of the circular drive around the city; this was the scene of spectacular auto races 1913-1916.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Los Angeles 91 R6.34 R6.71
Los Angeles 91 R7.86 R8.13
Los Angeles 91 R10.70 R11.43
Los Angeles 91 R11.50 R11.87
Los Angeles 91 R11.99 R20.74
Orange 91 R1.69 R4.06≡0.41
Orange 91 0.41 5.53
Orange 91 5.91 7.50
Orange 91 8.11 8.55
Orange 91 8.85 11.71
Orange 91 8.94 13.05
Riverside 91 R0.60 R1.19
Riverside 91 5.20 6.82
Riverside 91 7.03 7.57
Riverside 91 10.30 10.55
Riverside 91 11.45 11.95
Riverside 91 12.40 21.70

 

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Business Routes
  • Riverside: Magnolia Avenue. It appears for the signage for this business route was gone as of 2007.

 

Commuter Lanes

Commuter lanes exist for all of Route 91 in Los Angeles County. The eastbound lanes between Central Avenue and I-605 were opened in 1985; westbound between I-110 and I-605 in 1993, and between I-605 and the Los Angeles county line in 1994.

In Orange County, HOV lanes exist between 0.2 mi E of the Route 57 interchange and the Riverdale Avenue overcrossing. HOVs also may use the Route 91 toll road for free between the Los Angeles/Orange County line and the Orange/Riverside County line. All these lanes opened in December 1995, and are always in operation. Lanes also exists from the Los Angeles County line to 0.3 mi E of Stanton Avenue; and from 0.2 mi E of Gilbert to 0.3 mi W of La Palma. Construction started on these lanes in January 1997.

In Riverside County, HOV lanes exist between the Orange County line and Mary Street. The portion between the Orange County line and Magnolia Avenue opened in September 1992; the remainder (between Magnolia Avenue and Mary Street) opened in July 1995. In May 2001, the CTC considered an Agenda Item (TCR Project #62) to construct HOV lanes from Mary Street to the Route 60/Route 215 junction. In December 2004 and January 2005, a request was made to extend the project limits for the Route 91 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lanes project (PPNO 0092A) in Riverside County to close the gap of the HOV lane in the eastbound direction, between Adams Street and Mary Street. In September 2005, the extension of the HOV lanes from Mary Street to the Route 60/Route 215 interchange was delayed. The original construction contract was awarded in February 2004 after nearly a year of delay caused by the previous suspension of allocating new TCRP funds. The need to reconcile differences between the bid package and the completed design has resulted in additional schedule delays and additional costs. The project is now scheduled to complete in June 2007.

All HOV lanes require two or more occupants, and operate 24 hours all days.

In November 2012, it was reported that the HOV lanes in Orange County had been restriped to allow entry and exit at any time ("continuous access"), as opposed to only at specific ingress and egress points.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.5] From Route 55 near Santa Ana Canyon to I-15 near Corona.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.5] From I-405 to I-215 near Riverside. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 91:

  • Total Length (1995): 65 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 27,000 to 271,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban 0; Urbanized: 65.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 59 mi; FAU: 6 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 65 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the segment from "[LRN 3] near Lincoln to [LRN 17] near Newcastle" was added to the state highway system. This was codified as LRN 91 in 1935, and the definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. This ran from US 99E near Lincoln to US 40 (present-day I-80) near Newcastle. This was unsigned in 1963; it is present-day Route 193 between Route 65 and I-80.


State Shield

State Route 92



Routing
  1. From Route 1 near Half Moon Bay to Route 280.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route runs along Half Moon Bay Road and San Mateo Road. It was unsigned before 1964, and was LRN 105 (defined in 1933). Portions may have been 3rd Avenue.

     

    Naming

    Route 92 from Route 1 to Route 280 is named the "J. Arthur Younger" Freeway. Jesse Arthur Younger, born 11 April 1893, Albany, Oregon, graduated from the University of Washington at Seattle, 1915, and served in World War I. He was the representative from the 9th California Congressional District to the United States House of Representatives, 1953-1967. He died 20 June 1967. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 78, Chapter 188 in 1967.
    [Biographical Information from the Online Archives of California]

    Portions of this route were named "Skyline Blvd" by Resolution Chapter 46 in 1919.

    Historically, this route is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). A portion of this route has officially been designated as part of "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1707, Chapter 739, on October 11, 2001.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.5] Entire portion.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.5] Entire portion.


  2. From Route 280 to Route 580 near Castro Valley and Hayward.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains unchanged from its 1963 definition.

    In 2009, AB 1386 (Chapter 291, 10/11/2009) authorized the relinquishment of the portion of the route in the city of Hayward by adding the following:

    (b) (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Hayward the portion of Route 92 located within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

    (2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur: (A) The portion of Route 92 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway. (B) The portion of Route 92 relinquished shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (4) For relinquished portions of Route 92, the City of Hayward shall maintain signs within its jurisdiction directing motorists to the continuation of Route 92 or to the state highway system, as applicable.

    In July 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Hayward on Route 92 (Jackson Street) from Mission Boulevard to just south of Atherton Street, under terms and conditions stated in the letter dated June 1, 2010, determined to be in the best interests of the State. Authorized by Chapter 291, Statutes of 2009, which amended Section 392 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    In 2012, AB 2679 (Chapter 769, 9/29/2012) updated the language to reflect the relinquishment within the City of Hayward:

    (b) The relinquished former portion of Route 92 within the City of Hayward is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 92, the City of Hayward shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 92 or to the state highway system, as applicable, and shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 92, including any traffic signal progression.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route runs across the San Mateo Toll Bridge. This was originally a private bridge that was purchased by the state in the summer of 1951 for $6 million. It was unsigned before 1964. It is LRN 105 (defined in 1933) to Route 238 (former LRN 5), and LRN 259 (defined in 1959) between Route 238 and I-580 (former US 50). When it was unsigned (i.e., LRN 105), it appears to have run along Crystal Springs Avenue and 3rd Avenue in San Mateo.

    In March 1957, the routing was adopted for this freeway (at the time, called the 19th Avenue Freeway). This adoption extended the route from Skyline Blvd (present-day Route 35) to the Alameda County line. The segment from the Alameda County Line to the Eastshore Freeway (then Route 17, now I-880) was adopted in August 1952.

    On the EB Route 92 to SB US 101 ramp, the ramp momentarily widens to the point where it could accommodate 3 lanes (but is only marked for 1 lane). Then suddenly, on the left side of this ramp, the pavement simply ends. From this point and beyond, the ramp is only wide enough for 1 lane (and 1 shoulder lane). From a different angle, it almost looks like the pavement was supposed to continue and convert into a seperate flyover ramp, connecting eastbound 92 with northbound 101 (there's a cloverleaf ramp connecting these 2 freeways as of today). This is a remnant of a planned continuation of Route 92 (from US 101 to Ralston) that would have been farther south than the route that actually got built. Before it was finished, the interchange had a unique, goofy appearance: several ramps, including part of that one, were concrete supported by wooden truss structures. Route 92 from US 101 to the San Mateo Bridge used to have a totally different routing. The very elaborate bridge that now supports "Fashion Island Blvd." used to be part of Route 92. Traveling WB on Route 92 past the US-101 interchange, notice the guide-sign on the opposite roadway, telling you about the upcoming exits. That sign is a little farther away from its readers than is Caltrans' usual practice.. because the roadways used to be much closer together; further, at that point, you were driving uphill [from surface level up to the viaduct level] so that sign was way above you as you approached it. [Based on MTR postings by John David Galt and "Blue Plate"]

    Mr. Roadshow of the Mercury News investigated the "kink" in the San Mateo Bridge. This kink is the transition from the low-rise trestle section to the high-rise section and it's due to how the trestle section was widened. When the trestle section had only four lanes (two in each direction), the median barrier in the center of the bridge for both the trestle and high-rise sections made a relatively straight line. However, when the trestle section was widened to six lanes, all of the widening was done along the north side. The three westbound lanes are on the widened structure; the three eastbound lanes are (mostly) on the old trestle section. This meant that the six lanes on the trestle section are laterally offset in relation to the six lanes on the high-rise section. As for why the bridge was widened in two sections, Mr. Roadshow explained it as follows. In those days, the old Division of Bay Toll Crossings was responsible for the toll bridges in the region. Planners did not have the funding to widen the entire span to six lanes, but they were looking ahead to when six lanes might be needed and took the opportunity to build the wider bridge. After that, economic conditions and overall funding priorities kept the project low on the list of highway improvements until voters approved a regionwide tax to make the bridge six lanes each way.
    (San Jose Mercury News, 2/8/2013)

     

    Status

    Unconstructed Freeway has been completed from Route 280, through San Mateo, over the San Mateo Bridge, to .5 miles east of the Route 880 junction, which is unconstructed at this point.

    Unconstructed The portion of (2) From Route 238 to Route 580 is unconstructed, but roughly parallels Grove Way and A Street. The routing is along Jackson Street, and it dumps into Route 238 at Mission Blvd. The Route 238 - I-580 segment was planned as freeway, but deleted from the Freeway and Expressway system in 1975. The route was rescinded effective 1/22/1976. There are no plans to complete this segment.

    In June 2010, it was reported that studies are beginning to improve the El Camino Real/Route 92 interchange. Officials from three local transit agencies are splitting a $450,000 study that by the end of Summer 2011 should map out why cars move so slowly through the area, and what can be done about it. The purpose of the study is to figure out if there are any quick and easy fixes for operational problems in the interchange. C/CAG, MTC and the county Transportation Authority will each pay $150,000 to fund the study.
    [Source: Oakland Tribune, 6/9/10]

    In January 2011, results from the study were disclosed. Five options are being considered. The favored option includes converting the existing cloverleaf configuration to a “partial cloverleaf” configuration. This would require the elimination of two loop ramps and the construction of diagonal off-ramps. Cost for the work is expected to be up to $15 million and San Mateo is currently sitting on a $2.8 million grant from the federal government for the design and construction of the project. The city is also seeking about $5 million for the project from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. The focused study also favored an option that calls for constructing partial cloverleafs at the interchange with the widening of Route 92 by one lane in each direction. The other three options include:

    • Conversion of the northern half of the interchange to a diamond configuration. The two existing loop ramps would be eliminated. The existing westbound-to-northbound diagonal ramp would be widened. A left-turn lane would be added to northbound El Camino Real. The existing southbound-to-westbound diagonal ramp would be relocated to fit the new intersection which would be controlled by a traffic signal.
    • Conversion of the northeast quadrant of the cloverleaf to a diamond configuration. The northbound-to-westbound loop would be eliminated, with a northbound left-turn lane on El Camino Real provided. The westbound-to-northbound ramp would be widened for additional lanes and signalized at El Camino.
    • Conversion of the existing full cloverleaf configuration to a diamond configuration with modifications to the Route 92/Delaware Street interchange. The westbound on-ramp from Delaware would be connected to the westbound off-ramp to El Camino Real. The off-ramp from eastbound Route 92 to Delaware would be eliminated. Traffic wishing to reach Delaware Street would exit at El Camino Real, proceed through the intersection of the off-ramp and onto the eastbound on-ramp.

    In February 2014, it was reported that the draft EIR for reconstruction of the El Camino Real/Route 92 interchanage was released for public comment. The current El Camino Real-Route 92 interchange is laid out in a full cloverleaf configuration, with four circular ramps guiding cars on and off the highway. The merging lanes are short and tricky to negotiate. Traffic on Route 92 often backs up as motorists slow down to exit or accommodate cars shifting from the onramp to the highway. Caltrans proposes dismantling two of the cloverleafs. The planned configuration would funnel vehicles leaving the highway to new three-way intersections with stoplights at El Camino Real. If the plan is approved in its current form, Caltrans expects to begin construction in 2017.

    Caltrans recently rebuilt the Route 92/I-880 interchange. The original interchange was a conventional cloverleaf interchange, with collector/distributor roads on I-880. The new $245 million interchange has 3 levels: I-880 at the bottom; Route 92 West next, with a left-hand ramp to I-880 South; Route 92 East at the top, soaring over both I-880 and the Route 92 West/I-880 South transition ramp. The project will take out business and/or homes west of I-880 south of Route 92, and either east or west of I-880 north of Route 92, depending on which alignment Caltrans picks. In 2010, it was reported that the estimated completion for this project is in late 2012. It was actually reopened in October 2011. About 235,000 vehicles pass through the interchange daily as of 2011. The project, constructed by Flatiron Construction and Granite Construction, was completed on schedule and about $1 million under budget.

    The San Francisco Bay Crossings Study, dated June 2002, had improvements to the San Mateo Bridge corridor as Alternative 3. This would be the addition of a second bridge to add additional lanes. Note that the current bridge is the 10th largest bridge structure in the world. Costs for the improvements and widening of the bridge run from $2.052 to $2.356 billion dollars. Contrast these with the costs for Alternative 4, described under I-380.

    According to the San Jose Mercury News, there are plans in early 2009 to raise tolls on the San Mateo Bridge, likely $1, and likely to be applied to carpoolers as well. They may also add congestion pricing. This is being done to help support the cost of retrofitting the Dumbarton and Antioch spans for earthquake improvements. In February 2010, the toll increased to $5 at all times on the Dumbarton, San Mateo, Richmond-San Rafael, Carquinez, Benicia-Martinez and Antioch bridges. In July 2010, the toll will be extended to carpoolers, who will pay $2.50.

    In July 2011, it was reported that Caltrans plans to shut down the San Mateo Bridge in both directions for two full weekends for a $10 million repair job in 2012. The bridge underwent a partial retrofit that included adding a 30-foot-long, wishbone-shaped steel beam just east of the incline section in 1999. In October 2010, however, inspectors discovered a 10-inch crack in the beam - apparently caused by the movement of a steel plate that wobbles every time a heavy truck rolls over it. The closure is to install a permanent solution.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #2484: Reconstruct I-880/Route 92 interchange in Hayward. $1,400,000.

     

     

    Commuter Lanes

    This route has HOV lanes on the westbound approach to the San Mateo Bridge, from Hesperian Blvd to west of the toll plaza, for a total length of 2.0 mi. They opened in October 1989 and were extended in 1992, with the EB end relocated from the Clawiter Road on-ramp to Hesperian Blvd as part of the San Mateo Bridge Widening project completed in January 2003. They require two or more occupants, and are in operation on weekdays between 5:00 AM and 10:00 AM and between 3:00 PM and 6:00 PM.

     

    Naming

    Route 92 from Route 280 to the San Mateo/Hayward Bridge is named the "J. Arthur Younger" Freeway. J. Arthur Younger was a U.S. Congressman. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 78, Chapter 188 in 1967.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 35-252 on US 101, the Route 92/Route 101 Interchange in San Mateo, is named the "Harold "Bizz" Johnson" Interchange. Congressman Harold T. "Bizz" Johnson, state Senator from 1949 to 1958, who served in the House of Representatives from 1958-1980, was instrumental in helping establish the Rails-to-Trails program. He also promoted water development projects and sided with consumer-owned electric utilities against the economic and political clout of big investor-owned systems like Pacific Gas and Electric Co. He also successfully broadened language in the Surface Transportation Assistance Act to allow bridges over highways, railroads and other physical features to qualify for funding under the Act's bridge replacement provisions. It was built in 1971, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 42, Chapt. 155 in 1985.

    Bridge 35-232 is also named the "Leslie Charlene Curtis Memorial Bridge". This name was assigned by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 84, Chapter 129, in 1985. Leslie Curtis was killed in an auto accident at this location.

    Bridge 35-054, over San Francisco Bay, is named the "San Mateo-Hayward Bridge". It as built in 1967. It replaced an earlier bridge at this location.

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 92 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 92 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Mateo 92 R8.83 R9.54
San Mateo 92 R10.01 R11.77
San Mateo 92 R12.00 R12.28
San Mateo 92 R12.60 R13.84
San Mateo 92 R13.95 R14.32
Alameda 92 2.41 2.85
Alameda 92 4.27 6.23

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.5] From Route 280 to Route 238. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 92:

  • Total Length (1995): 28 miles traversable; 2 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 17,700 to 107,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 7; Sm. Urban 0; Urbanized: 23.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 26 mi; FAU: 2 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 21 mi; Minor Arterial: 7 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Mateo, Alameda.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the segment from "[LRN 65] near Coloma to Marshall's Monument" was added to the highway system. In 1935, that routing was defined as LRN 92, and remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It ran from Route 49 near Columa to Marshall's Monument. This is present-day unsigned Route 153.


State Shield

State Route 93



Routing
  1. Unconstructed Route 77 near Moraga to Route 24 near Orinda.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, the first two segments of this route were defined as "(a) Route 680 near Alamo to Route 77 near Burton. (b) Route 77 to Route 24 near Orinda."

    In 1973, Chapter 602 deleted the first segment, leaving only "(a) Route 77 near Burton to Route 24 near Orinda." This segment appears to have been LRN 255. This portion would have followed the east side of the Robert Sibley Volcano Regional Preserve, then paralelled Pinehurst Road to Route 77 near the Upper San Leandro Reservoir. Route 93 would have multiplexed with Route 77 between there and Moraga (where the LRN 255 portion would split off).

    In 1988, Chapter 106 clarified the definition: "(a) Route 77 near Burton Moraga to Route 24 near Orinda."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This routing was proposed, with no routing determined, in 1963. It was LRN 254, defined in 1959.

     

    Status

    The traversable local routing is along Moraga Way. There are no plans to improve this to state standards.


  2. Unconstructed Route 24 near Orinda to Route 80 in Richmond and Pinole.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(c) Route 24 near Orinda to Route 17 in Richmond via San Pablo." It was renumbered as (b) in 1973.

    In 1988, Chapter 106 clarified the definition of (a) and split (b): "(a) Route 77 near Burton Moraga to Route 24 near Orinda. (b) Route 24 near Orinda to Route 17 Route 80 in Richmond and Pinole. (c) Route 80 to Route 580 in Richmond via San Pablo and north Richmond." This also reflected the renumbering of Route 17 as I-580.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This routing was proposed, with no routing determined, in 1963. It was LRN 254, defined in 1959. It runs roughly along San Pablo Dam Road.

     

    Status

    The traversable local routing is along Camino Pablo, and San Pablo Dam Road. There are no plans to improve this to state standards.


  3. Route 80 to Route 580 in Richmond via San Pablo and north Richmond.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was created from a split of the original 1963 (c) [Route 24 near Orinda to Route 17 in Richmond via San Pablo] in 1988.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This routing was proposed, with no routing determined, in 1963. It was LRN 254, defined in 1959. It runs roughly along San Pablo Dam Road.

     

    Status

    This is constructed to expressway standards. Note that Richmond Parkway (constructed by the City of Richmond), although it has callboxes signed "CC-93", is not part of the state highway at the present time. Those callboxes were placed by the County, not the state, and the highway is not up to state expressway standards. The city wants to eventually have the route incorporated into the state system; hence the numbering. According to Sean Tongson, a Contra Costa County transportation improvement plan booklet indicates that some of the planned improvements include raising $17 million dollars to improve the Richmond Parkway; the reasoning for this besides improving traffic safety and maintenance include prepping for 'the transfer of ownership to the California Department of Transportation'. The state will not accept the route until it meets state expressway standards.

     

    Other WWW Links

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 93 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 93 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route, all of which are unconstructed. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 93:

  • Total Length (1995): 19 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 5; Sm. Urban 0; Urbanized: 14.
  • Counties Traversed: Contra Costa.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the segment from "[LRN 65] near Cool via Georgetown to [LRN 65] near Placerville". In 1935, this routing was codified as LRN 93 in the highway code, and the definition remained unchanged until 1963. It ran from Route 49 near Cool via Georgetown to Route 49 near Placerville. This was unsigned before 1964, and is present-day Route 193.


State Shield

State Route 94



Routing

From Route 5 near San Diego to Route 8 west of Jacumba via Campo.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

The definition of this route is unchanged from 1963.

According to Andy Field, the western end of this route was originally to connect to Route 163. It is unclear if this would have been an all Route 94 loop in downtown San Diego, or part Route 163 and part Route 94.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 94 was signed along the route from San Diego to Jct. US 80 (I-8) at White Star, via Jamul and Campo. This originally ran along Campo Road, Federal Blvd, and Market Street (although it may have also run along Broadway) to Pacific Highway. It was LRN 200, defined in 1933.

 

Status

IntersectionIn September 2000, the California Transportation Commission considered a $1.7 million phase 1 proposal (TCRP Project #87) for two new freeway connector ramps at the Route 94/Route 125 interchange. Total estimated cost is $90 million. This funding was extended in September 2005 as the project is ready to proceed. In April 2007, the CTC amended project 87.2 to orogram an additional $3,610,000 in TCRP funds for Project Approval & Environmental Document (PA&ED). This project will construct the ultimate two-lane freeway-to-freeway connectors from westbound Route 94 to northbound Route 125 and from southbound Route 125 to eastbound Route 94. The project will also widen Route 125 providing additional lanes from Spring Street to Lemon Avenue, and provide auxiliary lanes from the connectors to the next interchange at Lemon Avenue. The additional $3,610,000 for PA&ED was needed to study impacts to the large number of residential, commercial, and resource rich areas that will be impacted by this project. It is estimated that four years will be required to complete the needed environmental studies, complete the draft environmental document, circulate it for public comment, and gain final approval. The project is now scheduled for construction between FY 2012 and FY 2017.

TCRP Project #77 regarded an environmental study to add capacity to the Route 94 corridor between downtown San Diego to the Route 125 junction in Spring Valley. Currently, only the Alternative Analysis has been approved. The Alternative Analysis is to provide a thorough study of several alternative approaches to providing capacity enhancements. Study alternatives include, but are not limited to, reversible lanes, additional travel lanes (HOV and mixed flow), auxiliary lanes, and access improvement modifications. The environmental report/study will further evaluate the design alternatives from the Alternative Analysis. In 2002, San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) began development of an additional tax ordinance for transportation in the region, Transnet II. At the same time, SANDAG took the opportunity to study in greater detail both HOV lane needs and the development of Bus Rapid Transit routes throughout the region. As SANDAG’s studies impacted the Route 94 alternative study, the decision was made to postpone further work on the Alternative Analysis until final decisions were made by SANDAG. In November 2005, the San Diego voters passed Transnet II. With the Transnet II funds now available, interest in the Alternative Analysis has resumed in 2006 with SANDAG identifying several projects along the Route 94 corridor. The Department, working in conjunction with SANDAG, is now able to resume the Alternative Analysis study with greater knowledge of future improvements needed in the region and can proceed towards starting the environmental process.

[Map]In September 2007, the CTC approved a resolution to revise the project scope and update the schedule and funding plan for TCRP Project #77 – Route 94; complete environmental studies and construct HOV lanes from downtown San Diego (Route 5) to Route 805 in San Diego County. In 2002, San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) developed an additional tax ordinance for transportation in the region, TransNet II. At the same time, SANDAG took the opportunity to study in detail both HOV lane needs and the development of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) routes throughout the region. As the studies impacted the Route 94 alternative study, the decision was made to postpone further work on this project until final decisions were made by SANDAG. In November 2005, San Diego voters passed TransNet II. With the TransNet II funds now available, SANDAG, in conjunction with the Department, resumed the alternative study identifying several projects along the Route 94 corridor. As part of recent Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) updates, SANDAG has completed its HOV and BRT studies. These studies show a high priority need for critical HOV and BRT efforts on Route 94 between Route 5 and Route 805, while the Route 94 segment between Route 805 and Route 125 (the portion of original TCRP #77 limits) was shown as a lower priority need for HOV and BRT. To address the high priority need, Caltrans requested to reduce the limits of the project to the area between Route 5 and Route 805 only. The scope of the work would expand to include construction of HOV lanes and the implementation of BRT service from Route 15 to Route 805. It is anticipated that funding for the construction of the HOV lanes will come from a combination of local, State and federal sources. The schedule and funding for the segment between Route 805 and Route 125 will be addressed in the future under a completely separate project. It is anticipated that construction will be complete in FY2015/2016.

[Improvements]In November 2007, the CTC received notice of preparation of an EIR regarding construction of roadway improvements including adding passing lanes and upgrading existing lanes and shoulders to current standards on Route 94 near Dulzura in San Diego County between PM 20.7 and PM 38.9. The project is fully funded in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program, Congestion Mitigation Air Quality Program and San Diego’s Association of Governments Transnet Program. The total estimated project cost is $56 million. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010-11.

In December 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of La Mesa along Routes 94 and 125 between Grove Street and Spring Street, consisting of relocated and reconstructed county roads and frontage roads. The County of San Diego, by freeway agreement dated September 30, 1968, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State to roads which on that date were within an unincorporated area of the county and have since been annexed by the City.

In March 2012, the CTC authorized SHOPP funding on Route 94, in San Diego County, 11-SD-94 13.8/14.4 Near Lemon Grove, from Via Mercado Road to 0.1 mile east of Jamacha Boulevard. $1,600,000 to construct median barrier to improve safety by reducing cross centerline collisions.

In October 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of San Diego along Route 94 at Steel Canyon Road, consisting of collateral facilities.

In March 2013, the CTC authorized $13,008,000 to rehabilitate 30 lane miles of pavement to extend service life and improve ride quality for the segment near Jamul, from Route 54 to 0.2 miles east of Marron Valley Road.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #1639: Resurface and construct truck lane at Route 94 and I-8 interchange. $2,400,000.

 

 

Naming

The portion of this route between Route 5 and Route 125 is named the "Martin Luther King Jr. Freeway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 67, Chapter 129, in 1989. Martin Luther King, Jr., (January 15,1929-April 4, 1968) was a seminal figure in the battle for civil rights in the United States. Martin Luther attended segregated public schools in Georgia, graduating from high school at the age of fifteen; he received the B. A. degree in 1948 from Morehouse College, a distinguished Negro institution of Atlanta from which both his father and grandfather had been graduated. After three years of theological study at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania where he was elected president of a predominantly white senior class, he was awarded the B.D. in 1951. With a fellowship won at Crozer, he enrolled in graduate studies at Boston University, completing his residence for the doctorate in 1953 and receiving the degree in 1955. In 1954, Martin Luther King accepted the pastorale of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In December, 1955, he led the first great Negro nonviolent demonstration of contemporary times in the United States, the bus boycott in Atlanta. In 1957 he was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. In the eleven-year period between 1957 and 1968, King traveled over six million miles and spoke over twenty-five hundred times, appearing wherever there was injustice, protest, and action; and meanwhile he wrote five books as well as numerous articles. He was named Man of the Year by Time magazine in 1963; and became not only the symbolic leader of American blacks but also a world figure. At the age of thirty-five, Martin Luther King, Jr., became the youngest man to have received the Nobel Peace Prize. When notified of his selection, he announced that he would turn over the prize money of $54,123 to the furtherance of the civil rights movement. On the evening of April 4, 1968, while standing on the balcony of his motel room in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was to lead a protest march in sympathy with striking garbage workers of that city, he was assassinated.
[Biography excerpted from the information on the Nobel Prize site; more information is also available at The King Center]

Until 1989, it was named the "Helix" Freeway. This is named after nearby Mt. Helix, which itself was named after the local Helix species of snail. This probably has something to do with its spiraling base. The mountain's peak is 1,370'. Mt. Helix appears on the La Mesa city seal, and the name is applied to various landmarks and roads

The portion of this route E of Route 125 is informally named the "Campo" Freeway.

The portion of this route between Bancroft Drive and Avocado Boulevard in the County of San Diego is offically named the "James Craig Schmidt Memorial Highway." It was named in memory of James Craig Schmidt, who was born in 1927, in Peoria, Illinois. After graduating from high school, Schmidt enlisted in the United States Navy, and later attended Illinois Wesleyan University, the University of Illinois, and De Paul University Law School, becoming a member of the Illinois State Bar and later the California State Bar. In 1958, Mr. Schmidt moved to San Diego, married, and began his career in the savings and loan industry, becoming legal counsel and senior vice president with Home Federal Savings and Loan before later joining San Diego Federal Savings and Loan as executive vice president-managing officer. In 1967, Mr. Schmidt was appointed as Assistant Secretary for Business and Transportation under Governor Reagan, and was later appointed to the California Toll Bridge Authority and the State Transportation Board. Mr. Schmidt was involved in local transportation issues for many years in the County of San Diego, was instrumental in the removal of tolls from the San Diego-Coronado Bridge, and was a long-time board member of the San Diego Highway Development Association and the first recipient of its lifetime achievement award in 2011. Mr. Schmidt had a distinguished record of community service, as a member of many organizations and the recipient of numerous awards, including the designation by the City of San Diego of a James C. Schmidt Day in 2000 for his service and dedication to the city. As an avid sports fan, Mr. Schmidt attended every game of the San Diego Chargers from the date of their first game in San Diego in 1961, and helped launch the first Holiday Bowl in San Diego in 1978 and served as President of the 1986 Holiday Bowl and Chairman of the 1987 Holiday Bowl. Further, as a guest commentator for the Daily Transcript, Mr. Schmidt wrote regular articles on a wide variety of topics, including sports, transportation, housing, real estate, desalinization, and grand jury reports, helping to educate readers and document local history. James Craig Schmidt died of cancer in January 2013. Named on 9/27/13 by ACR 57, Res. Chapter 136, Statutes of 2013.

The portion of this route between Old Campo Road and Melody Road in the County of San Diego is officially named the Stephen Palmer, Sr. Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of Caltrans Imperial Landscape Crew member Stephen Palmer, Sr., was born in 1946, in Lima, Peru. Palmer served in the United States Navy from July 21, 1964, to November 22, 1967. Stephen Palmer, Sr., began working for the Department of Transportation (Caltrans) in 2007, where he quickly worked his way into playing an integral role and became a proud member of Caltrans District 11’s Imperial Landscape Crew. Palmer died from injuries sustained after being struck by a trolley car in the National City area of San Diego while on the job on May 4, 2011. Working for Caltrans runs in the family; Palmer's son, Stephen Palmer, Jr., also works for Caltrans District 11 Maintenance. It was named by SCR 83, chaptered 2/3/2014, Resolution Chapter 3.

 

Historical Route

Route 94 from the junction of Jamacha Road in Rancho San Diego to the eastern terminus at the junction with Historic Highway Route 80 in Boulevard has been designated as “Historic Highway Route 94” This naming recognizes the history of Route 94. Route 94 was previously known as Campo Road or Old Route 200, which began as foot trails, and with great labor was improved to accommodate wagons and stagecoaches and, until 1918, was the main artery road from San Diego, California to Yuma, Arizona. In 1829, the trails provided access to the Jamul Rancho owned by Governor Don Pio Pico. In the 1880s, Campo Road provided necessary and difficult access for the backcountry pioneers to San Diego to sell their products and secure needed supplies. The first telegraph line from San Diego to Arizona followed the general route of Campo Road in 1874. The first horseless carriage trip on Campo Road from San Diego to Campo and back was made in 1904 by John Gay of Lakeside The early Campo Road was used by the United States Military during the Mexican Revolution in 1911, during World War I, and extensively during World War II for support of Camp Lockett located in Campo. Camp Lockett was the last home of the famous Buffalo Soldiers of the 10th Cavalry of the United States Army. On August 21, 1933, the title to Old Route&nbsp;200 was transferred to the State of California and renamed Route 94. The beginning of Highway Route 94 at the time of transfer was in Lemon Grove at North Avenue and Imperial Avenue (now Lemon Grove Avenue), continuing through Spring Valley, Jamul, Dulzura, Cottonwood Grade, Potrero Grade, to Campo, then easterly along CampCreek and terminating at the junction of Route 12 at White Star, a total distance of about 66 miles. The San Diego and Arizona Railway, the last transcontinental rail link built in the United States, which was completed in 1919, crosses Route 94 in five locations, two at grade and three by bridge, and generally follows Route 94 all the way to Yuma. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 131, 6/2/2010, Resolution Chapter 33.

 

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Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.5] From Route 125 near Spring Valley to Route 8 west of Jacumba.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Diego 94 1.41 5.99
San Diego 94 6.15 8.77
San Diego 94 9.23 10.50
San Diego 94 R10.99 R11.40

 

Commuter Lanes

HOV lanes are planeed for this route between I-5 and I-15.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.5] From Route 5 near San Diego to 0.3 miles east of Sweetwater Bridge. Constructed to freeway standards from Route 5 to 2 mi W of Route 54. The portion from Route 5 to Route 54 near Jamacha Road was added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. A revised designation (Route 5 to 0.3 miles east of the Sweetwater Bridge) was defined in 1992.

 

National Trails

US Highway Shield Old Spanish Trail Sign This route was part of the "Old Spanish Trail". You can see it on an early 1923 map at the OST100 web site. Campo on the map is now on Route 94. The 1924 and 1925 maps no longer show Campo, and by 1926 when the federal highways came into existence, Campo is replaced by Alpine (the US80 alignment).

 


Overall statistics for Route 94:

  • Total Length (1995): 63 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 800 to 172,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 49; Sm. Urban 0; Urbanized: 14.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 55 mi; FAU: 8 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 37 mi; Minor Arterial: 26 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the route from "[LRN 38] near Camp Richardson to S end Fallen Leaf Lake" was defined to be a state highway. In 1935, that route was codified as LRN 94, and retained that definition until 1963. It ran from Route 89 near Camp Richardson to the south end of Fallen Leaf Lake, and was signed as Route 188 between 1964 and 1965. This was defined in 1933.


US Highway Shield

US Highway 95



Routing
  1. From Route 10 near Blythe to Route 40 near Needles.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was originally signed as Route 195, and renumbered as US 95 upon the definition of US 95 in the late 1930s (at which point the original 1934 Route 95 (see below) was renumbered as US 395). This segment was LRN 146, defined in 1933.

     

    Status

    In June 2012, the CTC approved $272,000 to install median rumble strip to improve safety by reducing crosscenterline collisions on Route 95 from 12 miles south of Havasu Lake Road to 9 miles south of Route 40.

    In March 2013, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will realign the vertical profile of US 95, construct two 12-foot lanes with 8-foot shoulders, and restripe the centerline for a no passing zone. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $5,735,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.5] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  2. From Route 40 west of Needles northerly to the Nevada state line.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was originally signed as Route 195, and renumbered as US 95 upon the definition of US 95 in the late 1930s (at which point the original 1934 Route 95 (see below) was renumbered as US 395). This segment was LRN 146, defined in 1933.

     

    Status

    Note that there is a parallel AZ 95 on the Arizona side; directional signs near Blythe are provided by Arizona. AZ 95 runs from Needles North. Specifically, the road leading from Topock AZ thru Golden Shores AZ to Courtwright Jct (where it rejoins AZ 95 coming from the Needles bridge) was posted as AZ 95 until the early 90s, ADOT having taken over the road from the county. When ADOT found out that there was not clear title to the right of way (and that the Native landowners wanted some hefty compensation), the road was relinquished back to the county and AZ 95 was rerouted, with ADOT-furnished trailblazing in California from I-40 to the Needles bridge (specifically, all the signs for AZ 95 in Needles were furnished by ADOT; the I-40 signs were installed by Caltrans; and the street signs in Needles were placed by ADOT under permit). However, Caltrans does not permit trailblazing of AZ 95 along I-40 in California, because there is too much potential for confusion with US 95. Caltrans also doesn't officially recognize AZ 95's "hitchhiking" along I-40, but agrees that it's a better route than old AZ 95.

Pre 1964 Signage History

State Shield US Highway Shield The current route of US 95 was originally signed as Route 195 in the original state signage of routes in 1934. In that definition, Route 195 ran from Palo Verde to Blythe (present-day Route 78), and from Blythe to the Nevada state line (present-day US 95). This was all LRN 146.

AZ 95 actually predates US 95 in this region. US 95 reached Blythe in 1940, but didn't enter Arizona until 1960, when it took over AZ 95 down to San Luis. AZ 95 was established from San Luis to Yuma in 1936, and extended to Bouse in 1938. In 1954 it was put on a more direct route to Parker, and took over a bit of AZ 72 in the process. It was extended north starting in 1962. It was also constructed south from I-40 in the late 60s, and finally finished between the two by 1970.

Pre-1964 State Shield In the original state signage of routes in 1934, Route 95 was signed along the route from US 66 near Cajon to Route 7 (US 395) near Little Lake. This was later resigned as US 395, and was LRN 145, defined in 1933.

 

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Interregional Route

[SHC 164.15] Between Route 10 and the Nevada state line.

 


Overall statistics for Route 95:

  • Total Length (1995): 117 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,500 to 5,400
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 110; Sm. Urban 7; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 117 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 25 mi; Minor Arterial: 92 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Riverside, San Bernardino.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the route from "[LRN 23] near Coleville to the California-Nevada state line" was defined as a state highway. This route was codified in 1935 as LRN 95, and retained that routing until the 1963 renumbering. LRN 95 ran from Route 89 near Coleville to the Nevada state line, an was signed as US 395.


State Shield

State Route 96



Routing

From Route 299 near Willow Creek via the vicinity of Weitchpec to Route 5 near the confluence of the Shasta and Klamath Rivers.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this routing was defined as "Route 299 near Willow Creek to Route 5 near Klamath River Bridge via the vicinity of Weitchpec."

In 1965, Chapter 1401 changed the terminus to "Route 5 near the north city limit of Yreka via the vicinity of Weitchpec."

In 1968, Chapter 282 changed the terminus again, this time to "Route 5 via the vicinity of Weitchpec near the confluence of the Shasta and Klamath Rivers."

In 1984, Chapter 409 corrected the wording to "Route 299 near Willow Creek via the vicinity of Weitchpec to Route 5 near the confluence of the Shasta and Klamath Rivers."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 96 was signed along the route from Jct. US 101 at Klamath to Jct. US 99 near Yreka, via Klamath River. Its original routing ran from US 101 at Klamath to Weitchpec along present-day Route 169, and then along the present-day Route 96 routing to US 99 (I-5) 9 mi N of Yreka. This was all LRN 46, defined in 1919. The routing was later changed (after 1934, but before 1963) to start at Route 299 near Willow Creek. The portion from Willow Creek to Weitchpec was LRN 84, defined in 1933. The 1968 change added a small portion of LRN 3 (1910) to the route as a result of a transfer from Route 263.

 

Status

In August 2011, the CTC approved $4,725,000 in SHOPP funding for maintenance along Route 96 near Orleans, from Salmon River Bridge to Klamath River Bridge at various locations. This work would rehabilitate six bridges by performing preventive maintenance to provide smoother ride and extend the life of the structures. They also approved $2,160,000 in SHOPP funding to rehabilitate the existing drainage system at 82 locations near Somebar, from Humboldt County line to 1.2 miles east of Scott River Bridge to upgrade drainage system components that have reached the end of their useful lives to reduce maintenance costs and maintenance exposure to traffic.

 

Scenic Highway

According to Dan Kilmer, "Route 96 is very well maintained between I-5 and Happy Camp, CA. (a distance of approximately 63 miles) and is becoming more and more popular with motorcyclists due to the beautiful scenery and very comfortable riding conditions (due to smooth road surfaces). In fact, Happy Camp last year hosted a second annual motorcycle ralley that is fast becoming popular. There is also a not so well maintained road over the Siskiyou Mountains from Happy Camp north to O'Brien or Cave Junction, Oregon and Route 199 that is also very scenic, although it is slow due to lots of tight turns and, in some areas, poor road surfaces."

 

Naming

Between Yreka California, and O'Brien Oregon, Route 96, together with US Forest Route 48, is designated as "State of Jefferson National Scenic Byway". This is in recognition of the once proposed State of Jefferson. Jefferson was proposed to be located in the mountain border region of what is more commonly known as Northern California and Southern Oregon. The State of Jefferson secession movement of 1941 was begun primarily to draw attention to the need of good roads into the back country to access vital mineral and timber resources for defense related purposes before the United States was drawn into WWII. For information on the State of Jefferson, see http://www.jeffersonstate.com/, http://www.stateofjefferson.com/, and http://eserver.org/bs/48/shaw.html. This appears to have been named at the national level.

 

Named Structures

Bridge 04-402, at Pearch Creek in Humboldt county, is named the "Henry Edgar Beck Jr. Memorial Bridge". Henry Edgar Beck, Jr. worked as a highway maintenance equipment operator and acting foreman for the State Division of Highways from 1926 to his retirement in 1965. It was built in 1974, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 71 in 1977.

Bridge 02-156, at the Klamath River in Siskiyou county, is named the "Lyle H. Davis Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1970, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 127 in 1974. Lyle Davis died March 13, 1974, operating heavy equipment while pioneering a new road for Route 96 near Windy Point between Orleans and Somes Bar.

Bridge 02-177 over the Salmon River (Somes Bar) in Siskiyou county is named the "Carl Langford Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1974, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 143 in 1974. Carl Langford was the owner of the Somes Bar Store and served as the local Postmaster from 1926 until his death in 1949.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 96:

  • Total Length (1995): 147 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 500 to 3,800
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 147; Sm. Urban 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 147 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 147 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Humboldt, Siskiyou.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

LRN 96 was defined in 1933 as the route from "[LRN 23] near Bridgeport to the Nevada line via Walker River." This definition was codified as LRN 96 in 1935, and remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. This was unsigned before 1964, and is present-day Route 182.



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